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With humanitarian concerns and respect for human rights breaching traditional constraints of national sovereignty in recent conflicts, the international community faces a pressing need to update its notion of collective security. During a day-long conference at Simmons College February 29, ten veteran diplomats and scholars discussed the difficult policy decisions facing the United States as the sole remaining superpower: whether to act alone, to tackle crises in collaboration with allies, or to work through the UN Security Council. Organizers of the conference, held to commemorate Simmons' centennial anniversary and to honor Mrs. Joan M. Warburg, have kindly made the results of the discussions available to American Diplomacy readers. We invite you to join in the discussion by sending us your comments and questions by email.
 
COLLECTIVE SECURITY,
POSSE OR GLOBAL COP

The US and Global Security at the Turn of the Century
SESSION ONE:

“As the sole remaining superpower, the U.S. is faced with difficult decisions when crises arise: whether to act alone; or to tackle them in collaboration with like-minded allies, for example, through NATO; or to work for collective security principally in the United Nations Security Council. Hence the conference title: Collective Security, Posse or Global Cop.” [FULL TEXT]

“In an era of increasing globalization and proliferating transnational problems, the relevance and utility of the United Nations can only grow.This is not a boast, but an acknowledgment that often there is no alternative.” [FULL TEXT]

“The cold war was not a freezer, but an incubator of European cooperation. . . [Europe] is not and never will be a homogenized federation, but it is already far more than a confederation.” [FULL TEXT]

“The U.S. has a fundamental role to play in helping to put together the capabilities to meet these types of emergency [wars of nationalism and separatism]. But so too have other countries.” [FULL TEXT]

“We cannot disengage from Africa because America’s own roots run too deep there and because we as a people are too deeply touched by the fate of Africans.” [FULL TEXT]


SESSION TWO:

(to be presented in the Summer 2000 issue
of American Diplomacy)

    Latin America:
    The U.S. and Its Near-abroad
    By AMB. ROBERTt E. WHITE

    Greece and Turkey:
    The Clash of Civilizations
    By AMB. MONTEAGLE STEARNS

    India and Pakistan:
    The Spread of Nuclear Weapons
    By AMB. HARRY F. BARNES, JR.

    Concluding Discussion:
    Global Security and Humanitarian Intervention

    By E
    RIK JENSEN



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