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Developing Diplomats for 2010:
If Not Now, When?

by Stephanie Smith Kinney*

APPENDICES

APPENDIX I — CORE VALUES

A.   Positive “core values” mentioned by senior, mid-level and junior FSOs

GROUP I
 TOTALSeniorMid-levelJunior
Service to nation/
patriotism
292234
Personal Integrity/
honesty
1513 2
Professional Competence/
make it happen/Effectiveness
141121
Loyalty13931
Intellectual Integrity/
objective advice
1212  

GROUP II
 TOTALSeniorMid-levelJunior
Hard Work10415
Sacrifice963 
Excellence/quality87 1
Promote America’s Interests Abroad/Liberty, Equality, Free Market7331
EEO/Inclusiveness72 5
Intelligence761 
Respectful/respect7322
Commitment/dedication6213
Sense of nobility about work/heroic service/pride66  
Good Interpersonal skills/
communication skills/persuasiveness
5221
Foreign Service Ethos/esprit de corps53 2
Foreign Service family/help each other5212
Teamwork5  5
Worldwide availability44  
Leadership44  
Oath of Allegiance44  
Curiosity44  
Gentlemanly culture/patience, eloquence formal politeness431 
Precepts/BEX 12 dimensions31 2
Perspective33  
Cooperation312 
Courage211 
Discipline211 
Duty211 
Honor211 
Trust21 1
 

GROUP III
(one mention each)
SeniorMid-levelJuniorSeniorMid-levelJunior
Altruism1  Adaptability    1
Decency1  Dissent1   
Learning  1Value added to Amcits  1
Adventure1  Bipartisanism 1 
Discretion1  Humor  1
Merit  1Unflappability1  

B.   Negative “core values” mentioned

TSMJ
Look out for yourself, no one else will/self-interest/individual careerism5 23
Reluctance to coordinate with non-State/Look down on other agencies3 21
Maintain status quo/don’t rock the boat3 21
Should be merit but isn’t2 2 
Self-promotion/empire building2 2 
Conflict avoidance2 11
Castes2  2
Thinking rather than doing1  1
Political result over problem solving1 1 
CYA1 1 
Either flexibility or high tolerance for excuse making1  1
Gossip/corridor rep1  1
Kiss up, kick down1 1 
Deference1 1 
Consensus over individual initiative1 1 
Process over result1 1 
Do nothing rather than risk1 1 
Take credit for subordinates good work and blame them for bad1 1 
Rank has privilege but not accountability1 1 
More with less1 1 
Territoriality1 1 
Bilateral relations1 1 
Get used to it; it won’t get any better1  1



APPENDIX II — OFFICIAL CORE VALUES

Text of the Department of State Strategic Plan's Values Statement

The men and women of the Department of State, at home and overseas, have a distinct responsibility to represent and advocate the interests and people of the United States in the rest of the world. The International Affairs Mission Statement is the map of what we aim to accomplish; this Values Statement articulates the guiding principles for us as individuals and as an institution.

    Impact: Our work significantly advances the interests of the American people at home and abroad.

    Expertise: Language and cultural skills, area expertise, management ability, and international experience are critical to our role as the lead U.S.G. agency overseas; our skills help others representing the United States do their jobs more effectively.

    Discipline: We faithfully execute policy regardless of personal views; members of the Foreign Service are ready to serve worldwide as needed.

    Dissent: The constructive, thoughtful expression of divergent views strengthens the formulation and execution of foreign policy.

    Diversity: We strive for a merit-based workforce that is excellent, reflective of the American people, and confident that solid, mission-related performance is rewarded.

    Partnership: Our effectiveness as an institution is heightened by the unique mix of skills and experiences that our Civil Service, Foreign Service, and foreign national colleagues bring to the workplace.

    Commitment: We are dedicated to America's leadership in the world and to the effective conduct of international relations; we take the long-term view that comes with a career, not merely a job.
     


APPENDIX III
Junior Officer Reasons for Entering the Foreign Service

Adventure/travel/exotic vacations18
Service/useful work11
Work on foreign policy/international relations11
Prestigious/excellent caché/mystique6
Learn/personal growth4
Lifestyle4
Bored with previous job4
Learn a foreign language3
Expose children to world2
Constant change1

 


APPENDIX IV
Department of State Strategic Plan
MISSION STATEMENT

U.S. diplomacy is an instrument of power, essential for maintaining effective international relationships and a principal means through which the United States defends its interests, responds to crises, and achieves its international goals. The Department of State is the lead institution for the conduct of American diplomacy, a mission based on the role of the Secretary of State as the President’s principal foreign policy advisor.

In order to carry out United States foreign policy at home and abroad, the Department of State:

  • Exercises policy leadership, broad interagency coordination, and management of resource allocation for the conduct of foreign relations;
  • leads representation of the United States overseas, advocates U.S. policies before foreign governments and international organizations, supports official visits and other diplomatic missions;
  • conducts negotiations, concludes agreements, and supports U.S. participation in international negotiations of all types;
  • coordinates and manages the U.S. G. response to international crises of all types;
  • carries out public affairs and public diplomacy;
  • reports on and analyzes international issues of importance to the U.S. Government;
  • assists U.S. business;
  • protects and assists American citizens living or traveling abroad;
  • adjudicates immigrant and non-immigrant visas to enhance U.S. border security;
  • manages those international affairs programs and operations for which State has statutory responsibility; and
  • guarantees the diplomatic readiness of the U.S. Government.

Most of the time, State personnel in the United States and abroad carry out these core diplomatic activities in pursuit of specific goals. Some ongoing responsibilities are essential to the conduct of effective international relations and contribute to all international affairs goals, for example maintaining contacts and access overseas, or supporting official visits. Similarly, State’s management functions provide the foundation of support essential for maintaining U.S. diplomatic readiness around the world.

At posts overseas, the Ambassador reports to the President through the Secretary of State, and as Chief of Mission has authority over all U.S. executive branch personnel, except for those under the command of a U.S. area military commander. The Country Team, under the leadership of the Chief of Mission, is the principal coordinating body for all U.S.G. agencies represented at overseas missions. As the lead agency abroad, State manages U.S. Embassies, Consulates, and other diplomatic posts, and supports the international activities of the rest of the U.S. Government.



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American Diplomacy                Vol. V, No. 3                Summer 2000
Copyright © 2000 American Diplomacy Publishers, Durham NC
http://www.unc.edu/depts/diplomat/amdipl_16


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