Economics
 

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

919-966-5332
919-966-4986 fax
919-966-2383 messages

Gardner 101

e-mail:
afield@email.unc.edu

web site:
www.unc.edu/~afield

Alfred Field, Jr.

Professor
Iowa State
Economic Development,
International Economics

 

Al Field is Professor of Economics at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill.  He received his undergraduate and graduate training at Iowa State University, and joined the faculty at Carolina in 1967.  Field teaches courses in international economics and economic development at both the graduate and undergraduate level, and is the co-author of International Economics, an upper level undergraduate text now in its 5th edition. He has directed numerous Senior Honors theses and Masters theses, and has served as principal member or director of nearly 100 Ph.D. dissertations. In 1996 he received the Department's Jae Yeong Song and Chunuk Park Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching.  Within the Department of Economics he has served as Director of Graduate Studies, Associate Chair/Director of the Undergraduate Program, and interim Department Chair.  He is currently serving on the Chancellor's Committee on Scholarships, Awards, and Student Aid  and is on the Faculty Advisory Board of several university organizations, including the Institute for Latin American Studies.  In Spring of 2006 he received the University John L. Sanders Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and Service.

Professor Field's  research lies in the areas of international trade and economic development.  He has worked in Latin America and China as well as with a number of international agencies in the United States and Europe, primarily on trade and development policy issues. His research interests  are focused on international trade, structural adjustment, and development policy, particularly as they relate to trade, agriculture, and household decision-making in developing countries.  Another of Field's ongoing lines of research addresses trade and structural adjustment issues in the United States, focusing on the textile and apparel industries and the experience of unemployed textile and apparel workers in North Carolina starting in the 1980s.  He maintains an active interest in theoretical trade and economic integration issues as well as the use of econometric and computable general equilibrium models in analyzing the effects of trade policy, particularly in developing countries. He recently presented a joint paper with his daughter, Professor Erica Field (Harvard University), on rural household response to globalization in Peru.