October 2010

Date Friday, October 1, 2010

Erica Edwards
Erica Edwards

Time 12:00-1:30pm
Location FedEx Global Education Center
Room 4003
UNC Chapel Hill
Type of Event Public Lecture
Title Taking Europe to Its Extremes: Party and Public Euroskepticism
Contact Info europe@unc.edu
Notes Public lecture by Erica Edwards, Executive Director of the UNC Center for European Studies

Part of the fall 2010 CES Friday Speaker Series. Light refreshments provided.

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Date Tuesday, October 5, 2010

Miquèl Decòr
Miquèl Decòr

Time 7:00pm
Location FedEx Global Education Center
Room 4003
UNC Chapel Hill
Type of Event Public Poetry Reading
Title Miquèl Decòr, Modern Day Troubadour
Contact Info europe@unc.edu
Notes In October, the Triangle will be entertained by a true modern-day troubadour. Miquèl Decòr, a prolific and original poet who carries on the ancient literary tradition of writing and performing in the Occitan (Oc) language, will be sharing his works this poetry reading. This is Decòr's first visit to the United States; he is the author of ten books, including poetry, drama, and history.

Eldest of three brothers, Miquèl Decòr was born March 3, 1949, on Water Street in Bize-Minervois, in the Aude department of France. His father was a road worker; his mother stayed home. His childhood was spent roaming mountains and rivers during torrid, dry summers and seasons of green, wild asparagus. There were loving harvests that tasted of sweet wine and of peppery watercress pulled from the tepid waters of the Doutze. He was bathed in the culture of Occitan from his birth under the spell of his godfather, Uncle Jean, an actor. When he left home to study in Béziers, distance and longing caused him to write poetry in Occitan, his mother tongue. Miquèl Decòr lives on Windmill Street in Félines-Minervois, where he feeds his imagination on vineyards and chestnut trees, on rocky plains and pure waters, on fragile beasts and rugged landscapes.

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Date Thursday, October 7, 2010

Lise Morjé Howard
Lise Morjé Howard

Time 2:00-3:30pm
Location FedEx Global Education Center
Room 1009
UNC Chapel Hill
Type of Event Public Lecture
Title U.S. Foreign Policy, Ideational Path Dependence, and Ethno-Religious Civil Conflict
Contact Info europe@unc.edu
Notes In Bosnia, Northern Ireland and Iraq, U.S. decision makers chose to support ideas of rigid ethnic institutions based on group rights (termed here "ethnocracy") as a solution to ethno-religious conflict. This choice was both impractical, because such regimes are non-democratic and non-self-governing, and ethically questionable because ethnocracy runs in fundamental contradiction to American ideals of individual political rights and civic national identity. The puzzle is why would American decision-makers support the establishment of ethnocratic institutions instead of liberal democracy? There is little evidence that the most common explanations of U.S. foreign policy decision-making - rational choice, bureaucratic politics, cognitive maps, émigré pressure, or epistemic communities - played a significant role in the decisions. This article forwards the argument that decision-making in these cases was "ideationally path dependent." Early foundational ideas of rigid ethnic solutions did not generally originate with Americans, but they did lay the basis for future agreements. With each subsequent agreement, Americans chose to adhere to those ideas in the absence of expert advice and under the pressure looming deadlines. Three years into Iraq, however, American decision-makers changed their ideas, thus providing an important example of the conditions under which ideational path dependence may be overturned.

Lise Morjé Howard is associate professor of government at Georgetown University.

Part of the fall 2010 CES Friday Speaker Series.

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Date Friday, October 8, 2010

Marc Morjé Howard
Marc Morjé Howard

Time 12:00-1:30pm
Location FedEx Global Education Center
Room 4003
UNC Chapel Hill
Type of Event Public Lecture
Title The Politics of Citizenship in Europe
Contact Info europe@unc.edu
Notes Marc Morjé Howard addresses immigrant integration, one of the most critical challenges facing European countries today, the resolution of which will in large part depend on how foreigners can become citizens. Howard's research shows that despite remarkable convergence in their economic, judicial, and social policies, the countries of the European Union still maintain very different definitions of citizenship.

Marc Morjé Howard is Professor of Government at Georgetown University. His research and teaching interests address a variety of topics related to democracy and democratization, including civil society, immigration and citizenship, hybrid regimes, right-wing extremism, and public opinion. He is a native speaker of English and French, fluent in German and Russian, and he has conducted primary research in all four languages.

Part of the fall 2010 CES Friday Speaker Series. Light refreshments provided.

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Date Thursday, October 14, 2010

Monika Wienfort
Monika Wienfort

Time 5:00-7:00pm
Location Hamilton Hall
Room 569
UNC Chapel Hill
Type of Event Seminar
Title North Carolina German Studies Seminar: Constitutions and the Interpretation of Property in the Kaiserreich
Contact Info Sandra Summers
Notes Constitutional history has not been a favorite field of historians in recent years. One of the most interesting ways of renewing the discipline so far has been its reinterpretation as a new history of constitutional or political culture. This presentation will suggest an alternative to this trend by discussing the link between a wider social-political order represented by constitutions, and the economic-legal sphere. This approach, therefore integrates economic and legal phenomena into the socio-political interpretation of late 19th century German history.

Monika Wienfort is a professor of Modern History at the Technical University of Berlin. Her work focuses on the 18th and 19th centuries, constitutional, legal and social history. She is the author of four books: Monarchie in der bürgerlichen Gesellschaft (1993); Patrimonialgerichte in Preußen (2001); Der Adel in der Moderne (2006); and Geschichte Preußens (2008).

Please register with Sarah Summers (ses278@email.unc.edu) in a timely fashion. Refreshments and drinks will be served after all seminars.

More information can be found at the NCGS seminars page. Cosponsored by the Center for European Studies, Carolina Seminars, UNC-Chapel Hill Institute for the Arts and Humanities, UNC-Chapel Hill Program in the Humanities and Human Values, and the Departments of Germanic Languages and Literatures and History at Duke University and UNC-Chapel Hill.

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Date Friday, October 15, 2010

Rachel Epstein
Rachel Epstein

Time 12:00-1:30pm
Location FedEx Global Education Center
Room 4003
UNC Chapel Hill
Type of Event Public Lecture
Title Uneven Integration: Economic and Monetary Union in Central and Eastern Europe
Contact Info europe@unc.edu
Notes Foreign financial institutions bought overwhelming stakes in central and east European (CEE) banks during the postcommunist transition. Recent estimates suggest that foreign banks, mostly western, own over sixty percent of all CEE banking assets, and in seven CEE states, the figure is over eighty percent. This outcome is surprising because at the outset of transition, no CEE government wanted to hold internationally competitive tenders for their state-owned banks. Rather, CEE politicians preferred to protect domestic ownership. Stemming from their interwar experience, CEE transition states feared that foreign domination in finance could lead to economic instability, dependence on external borrowing and foreign interference in political decisions. In the event, significant international pressure and a series of bank crises in the 1990s resulted in the privileging of foreign capital in CEE bank privatization for most of the region. The central question this study will answer is whether transition states that sold their banks to foreigners benefited as the international institutions promised they would.

Rachel Epstein is Associate Professor of International Political Economy and European Politics, Josef Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver.

Part of the fall 2010 CES Friday Speaker Series. Light refreshments provided.

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Date Monday, October 18, 2010

Philip H. Gordon
Philip H. Gordon

Time 12:00-1:00pm
Location Peabody Hall
Room 008
UNC Chapel Hill
Type of Event Public Videoconference
Title The United States and Europe: An Agenda for Engagement
Contact Info europe@unc.edu
Notes The Obama Administration has made engagement with our European allies a top priority. The United States works closely with Europe on every issue of global importance, from Afghanistan and Iran to European security and the global economy. This fall, NATO, U.S.-EU and OSCE summits will provide further opportunities for transatlantic engagement. Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs Philip H. Gordon will review the Administration's record, discuss the upcoming summits and outline the United States' agenda with Europe for the coming months and years.

The UNC CES will be connecting to this lecture in Washington, DC via videoconference. Full details about the event can be found here (PDF).

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Date Friday, October 29, 2010

Claude Mosseri-Marlio
Claude Mosséri-Marlio

Time 12:00-1:30pm
Location FedEx Global Education Center
Room 4003
UNC Chapel Hill
Type of Event Public Lecture
Title Contrasting Competition Concepts
Contact Info europe@unc.edu
Notes Public lecture by Claude Mosséri-Marlio of the European Court of Justice. The lecture will focus on why the approach by EU and US courts to similar competition cases often results in contrasting conclusions. Mosséri-Marlio is professor of European law and the European Court of Justice at the American Business School in Paris and visiting lecturer at the Tyumen University in Siberia.

Part of the fall 2010 CES Friday Speaker Series. Light refreshments provided.

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