UNC-CH Office For Undergraduate Research

2017 Celebration of Undergraduate Research Panel Program

The panel sessions for the eighteenth annual Celebration of Undergraduate Research will be held in rooms located on the third floor of the Frank Porter Graham Student Union. Panel sessions have been organized according to thematic tracks. Each presentation will last a maximum of 10 minutes, and there will be time for Q&A at the end of each session. There is a 15-minute break from 2:15-2:30.

Please also view the Poster Program or use the Searchable Program of All 2017 Presenters.

ROOM 3203

Computing & Programming
Moderator: TBA
Room: 3203

1:15-1:25 — Evan Gertis (Physics & Astronomy), Programming Stepping Motors with NI LabView
Track: Education
Advisor: Hugon Karwowski (Physics and Astronomy)
Abstract: In this investigation we explore the limitless possibilities of automatizing the motion of programmable stepper motors. A stepper motor is capable of rotating a shaft either clockwise or counter clockwise at a set angular speed. In addition, the motor is capable of keeping track of the angular position of the shaft by tracking the number of degrees of rotation. These features are useful for designing equipment that requires precision mechanical movement, such as rotating a valve a certain number of degrees or moving a linear actuator up and down. However, it is often very difficult to create custom programs that allow users to take full advantage of a motor's features. We wrote several programs that will allow users to communicate more easily with the DMX-ETH-23 stepping motor, a commonly used, generic motor. These programs allow a user to turn on the motor from a remote computer and control its speed and direction of rotation. In future applications, we hope to use these libraries as a basis to develop programs for other motors, which could be used for applications in low temperature nuclear physics.

1:25-1:35 — Lucas deHart (Physics & Astronomy), TUNL: Revealing 50 Years of Excellence in Nuclear Physics
Track: Education
Advisor: Christian Iliadis (Physics and Astronomy)
Abstract: The Triangle Universities Nuclear Labs are a collection of nuclear physics research laboratories located in Durham North Carolina on the campus of Duke University. TUNL is a unique institution, representing a collaborative research effort with major contributions from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University, Duke University, and recently, increasing involvement from North Carolina Central University. Despite recognition from the Department of Energy as one of only four centers of excellence in nuclear physics in the nation, TUNL remains relatively unknown. General knowledge of the existence of TUNL is low, even on the constituent University campuses. The goal of this project is to investigate the history of this unique organization of researchers and to share that history with the public. The primary product of this project is a series of videos based on interviews with researchers who work at TUNL. The videos cover a range of topics, including the history and founding of TUNL, a basic description of nuclear physics, the kinds of research performed at each currently operating facility, and some information on TUNL's recent collaborations with other departments and institutions. TUNL remains an important center for nuclear physics research and education, and could serve as an inspiration for the next generation of American scientists.

1:35-1:45 — Liz Reeder (Psychology & Neuroscience), Effects of presentation style on the Author Recognition Task
Track: Education
Advisor: Jennifer Arnold (Psychology & Neuroscience)
Faculty/Postdoc Contributors: Jennifer Arnold
Abstract: Spoken and written language differ in both production and comprehension; to study natural spoken language determining the influence of written language is essential. The Author Recognition Task (ART) is a measure of an individual's exposure to printed language and fulfills this role quickly and objectively. Developed in 1989 by Stanovich and West, the task asks participants to distinguish between authors and non-authors and penalizes the final score for false-identifications; this method evades social desireability. In research this measure has been presented in serialized and list views, but the reasoning behind this differentiation is unclear and unstudied. This study seeks to determine which presentation style best reflects the individual's true reading exposure. Additionally, this study will investigate item selection and use in the measure. Results of the first experiment demonstrate no difference in final score of the ART. Participants select fewer correct and incorrect items in list view, however the higher correct selections in serial view is offset by the more numerous incorrect selections, bringing the final score of both presentations to be equal. A second experiment in this study is currently underway to parse the interactions of the first study. Additionally, the first study demonstrates that reading exposure is not correlated with socioeconomic status, as previously suggested in the literature.

1:45-1:55 — Dayton Ellwanger (Physics & Astronomy), Pedagogy of Quantum Computing: An Investigation Into the Feasibility of Teaching Quantum Computing to Undergraduates
Track: Education
Advisor: Jonathan Engel (Physics)
Abstract: Quantum computers make use of the quantum phenomena of superposition and entanglement to perform certain tasks much quicker than classical computers. The most famous example is Shor's algorithm - a quantum algorithm for integer factorization that runs in polynomial time. The implications of this for public-key cryptography are hugely significant. The ubiquitous RSA scheme is built on the assumption that integer factorization is a hard problem, an assumption which is voided by a sufficiently powerful quantum computer. Quantum computing has received little attention since its conception in the 1980s due to its questionable practicality. However, several groups have already demonstrated functional quantum computers, and many governments are heavily funding quantum computing research due to its communications security implications. Although an understanding of quantum computing will soon be essential for computer scientists and physicists, the field remains esoteric. Through examination of the literature and an independent studies course on quantum computing, this research investigates the pedagogy of quantum computing and the feasibility of teaching the subject to undergraduates. Much of the difficulties of quantum mechanics arise from considering continuous systems, but because quantum computing deals only with qubits (two-dimensional quantum systems), all that is required to have a working understanding of it is a minimal background in linear algebra.

1:55-2:15 — Questions

2:15-2:30 — BREAK

Adaptations to Change
Moderator: TBA
Room: 3203

2:30-2:40 — Bhairavi Rajasekar (Biology), Analysis of the Effects of Variations in Chemosensory Genes in Drosophila
Track: Environment
Advisor: Corbin Jones (Biology)
Abstract: Our research examines the adaptation and evolution of preference for one food environment. The toxic effects of octanoic acid, a compound produced by the fruit of Morinda citrifolia, is lethal to most fruit flies. However, some fruit flies such as Drosophila sechellia have developed a resistance to the compound and are able to thrive on this host plant. Drosophila that prefer fruits with more fatty acids are considered the specialist species while those that display no particular preference are generalists. While this trait involves several genes, a key evolutionary shift was potentially made possible by a mutation occurring in a chemosensory receptor that changed how the flies respond to the food. We hypothesize that a chemosensory gene, Gr22c, has evolved and allows these flies to be attracted environments with high concentrations of octanoic acid. The research used transgenesis to create chimeric versions of the generalist species that contain alleles of a specialist species. Virgins of these species were set up in a controlled bio assay, containing an acidic food medium and a control food medium. After 24 hours, the flies in the acidic environment were quantitatively compared against the flies that preferred the control environment, evaluating the sex and status of the fly as alive or dead. The overall goal is to investigate the relationship between the adaptations and food preferences.

2:40-2:50 — Emily Watson-Cook (Environmental Science), Characteristics and Classification of Southern Appalachian Spruce-Fir Forests
Track: Environment
Advisor: Robert Peet (Biology)
Faculty/Postdoc Contributors: Robet K. Peet
Abstract: Southern Appalachian spruce-fir forests, one of the most threatened ecosystems in the southeastern U.S, are relatively uncommon communities that occur at high elevations in the mountains of North Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee, and West Virginia. Previous examinations of the southern Appalachian spruce-fir ecotone have revealed past variation in its distribution with elevation, with apparent high points being reached during temperature maximums. These communities have been sampled as part of the Carolina Vegetation Survey (CVS), a large-scale research program aimed at the inventory and monitoring of the natural vegetation of the Carolinas. We obtained spruce-fir forest data through the CVS database and utilized agglomerative hierarchical clustering methods to group plots based on species cover class values, as defined by CVS protocol. We then examined community composition and environmental characteristics of these groupings, which we used to describe an appropriate community type for each. This was done with the goal of evaluating and improving upon current spruce-fir community type classifications under the U.S. National Vegetation Classification. Given that future changes in climate are anticipated to affect the distribution of spruce-fir forests, further knowledge of their dynamics and distribution is imperative to conservation efforts.

2:50-3:00 — Jasmine Shah (Psychology & Neuroscience), Hedonic Capacity Influences Motivated Behavior in Autism Spectrum Disorder
Track: Health & Well-Being
Advisor: Gabriel Dichter (Psychiatry, School of Medicine)
Undergraduate Co-Authors: N/a
Undergraduate Contributors: N/a
Graduate Student Contributors: Maya Mosner, Rachel Greene
Faculty/Postdoc Contributors: Dr. Jessica Kinard, Sean McWeeny, Dr. Cara Damiano-Goodwin, Dr. Margaret Burchinal, Dr. Helena Rutherford, Dr. Michael Treadway, Dr. Gabriel Dichter
Abstract: The Effort-Expenditure for Rewards Task (EEfRT) has shown altered reward processing in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Since MDD is highly comorbid in ASD, we aimed to explore the relation of depressive symptoms and hedonic capacity with motivated behavior in high-functioning adolescents with ASD. For each EEfRT trial, participants chose either an "easy task" which would yield small, constant monetary reward, or a "hard task" for a variable, yet consistently larger reward. Each choice was presented with a low, medium, or high probability of winning the reward if the task was successfully completed. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Child Depression Inventory (CDI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Hedonic capacity was measured using the Temporal Experience of Pleasure Scale (TEPS). For a sample of 49 adolescents, correlations between the CDI/BDI composite score and the anticipatory subscale of the TEPS and all EEfRT metrics were insignificant. There were significant correlations between the consummatory subscale of the TEPS and EEfRT choices in the high reward probability, medium reward magnitude, and low reward magnitude conditions. They remained significant when controlling for severity of ASD symptoms. This suggests hedonic capacity is related to motivated behaviors in adolescents with ASD. Future studies addressing reward processing in ASD should consider hedonic capacity as an important explanatory variable.

3:00-3:10 — Emily Reckard (Anthropology), Cultivating Belonging: The role of community farming in the lives of refugees from Burma
Track: Health & Well-Being
Advisor: Jocelyn Chua (Anthropology)
Abstract: Significant research exists supporting the public health benefits of urban green space. Yet little qualitative research has been done regarding how green space impacts refugee populations who have a history of farming. The aim of this thesis is to conduct original research on the transition of refugees from Burma to life in the United States, specifically in relation to green space. This paper explores how Roots Community Farm (RCF) cultivates a transnational identity and sense of belonging for refugees from Burma in Rock Springs. Drawing on three ethnographic methods -- participant observation at the farm, analysis of end-of-the-year evaluation interviews with the farmers, and semi-structured interviews with community members and staff -- this thesis utilizes RCF as a case study to research the role the community farm plays in forming and encouraging social relationships within the community of refugees from Burma and with the larger community of Rock Springs. Through this daily practice of farming, the refugees create a tangible and sensory connection to an imagined and remembered place of Burma. RCF fosters a deeply affective sense of belonging to the other farmers and to the land. This is significant given the increasing recognition of the importance of social connectedness for wellbeing.

3:10-3:30 — Questions

ROOM 3205

Narratives of Health
Moderator: TBA
Room: 3205

1:15-1:25 — Hallie French (English & Comparative Literature), Haunted Houses, Haunted Memories: Embodiment, Reproduction, and Storytelling
Track: Diversity & Equity
Advisor: GerShun Avilez (English)
Undergraduate Co-Authors: n/a
Undergraduate Contributors: n/a
Graduate Student Contributors: n/a
Faculty/Postdoc Contributors: n/a
Abstract: Bettina Judd, an African American poet, writes in her book Patient of her harrowing experience of being ignored by her doctors and finally losing one of her ovaries as a result. In her poem "In 2006 I had an Ordeal with Medicine" Judd writes,"I had an ordeal with medicine and was found innocent or guilty. It feels the same because I live in a haunted house. A house can be a dynasty, a bloodline, a body." Her poetry, however, is not just about her own experience, but is rather also an exploration of the ways in which African American women's bodies have been exploited, ignored, and abused by the medical profession throughout American history. Using Judd's framework of body, bloodline, and dynasty I have launched a yearlong thesis project on the relationship between African American women, stories, the past, and medicine in the works of late twentieth century African American women writers.Many of those works endeavor to reclaim the past and remember the bodily experiences of the women that came before them. By consistently thinking through that painful past each author works to unravel the threads of history and explore the present. I am interested in answering why these writers have chosen to brutally and consistently write history on the backs of their female characters.

1:35-1:45 — Kaylyn Pogson (Biology), The Cancerous Breast
Track: Diversity & Equity
Advisor: GerShun Avilez (English and Comparative Literature)
Abstract: Breast cancer is an ancient disease about which attitudes, thought, and knowledge have evolved with time due to research and activism, though there are some qualities that remain surprisingly constant. The dynamic and static aspects of the breast cancer experience can be traced through illness narratives created by women with the disease, narratives which span centuries. This thesis argues that women with breast cancer use their illness as an opportunity to help loved ones as well as other women with the disease through their actions while living with breast cancer and their illness narratives. The examination begins with Frances Burney's letter about her mastectomy in 1811, complimented by Spare Hours by Dr. John Brown who performed a mastectomy during the same era. The focus then moves to the 1980s with Audre Lorde's The Cancer Journals and Susan Sontag's theory-based Illness as a Metaphor. It shifts to the 2004 graphic novel Cancer Vixen by Marisa Acocella Marchetto, then Dr. Jennifer Ho's 2010 blog No F****** Pink Ribbons!, and Tig Notaro's 2012 comedy routine about her breast cancer diagnosis. Finally, it includes the fictional narrative from Marvel Comics' Thor comic books beginning in 2014, wherein a woman with breast cancer becomes Thor. As illness as an opportunity to help others was explored, the importance of agency, community, and identity to women with breast cancer emerged, as well as the tendency to create an illness narrative to aid in the healing process.

1:45-1:55 — Mary Glenn Krause (Anthropology), Patrick Livingston Murphy: A Glimpse into An Innovative, Yet Largely Forgotten North Carolinian Mental Healthcare Pioneer
Track: Health & Well-Being
Advisor: Dale Hutchinson (Anthropology)
Abstract: Mental health was and continues to be a greatly misunderstood area of healthcare, especially here in the North Carolina. Yet, for a brief period around the turn of the twentieth century, psychiatrists and other mental healthcare workers advocated for innovative and surprisingly contemporary treatments that would not reemerge until arguably the mid-1990s. Patrick Livingston Murphy (1848-1907), the superintendent during this period at the Western North Carolina Asylum for the Insane in Morganton, was an especially complimentary advocate and practitioner of this largely unstudied historical trend in our state's history. By studying his publications, speeches, diaries and private letters, I will explore just what kind of changes made Dr. Murphy's rehabilitation programs so successful, and perhaps what knowledge today's clinicians may glean from his hard work.

1:55-2:15 — Questions

2:15-2:30 — BREAK

Social Identity and Social Change
Moderator: TBA
Room3205

2:30-2:40 — Kyley Underhill (Communication Studies), #BuryTropesNotUs: How queer women create online communities to resist unfair representation
Track: Diversity & Equity
Advisor: Alex McVey (Communication Studies)
Abstract: In recent years, more attention has been brought to the issues of queer representation in media and the proliferation of online fan communities. For my part of the panel, I will present information from a research paper that I have written. My research explores the intersection of online queer communities, online fan communities, and the horizontal structure of social media that enables users to create social movements. I will begin my presentation by reviewing literature on the topics of social media, online fan communities, queer representation in media, cultural competencies in fandoms, and queer online communities. I will then present the case of "The 100", a television show that used the common media trope of killing off queer female characters. I will use this case to demonstrate the power of online communities to connect people and create social change.

2:40-2:50 — Jamie Ramos (Information Science), Looking @ the Trolls behind the Screen
Track: Diversity & Equity
Advisor: Leslie Frost (English)
Abstract: Cyber trolling is a known manifestation of everyday sadism. A study of over 500 internet users was conducted to determine why the internet allows for easier expression of sadistic behaviors. Through a 9 question survey, it was suggested that deindividuation and immediacy may be factors in the process. This study contributes to existing theories for trolling and sadism enablers online.

2:50-3:00 — Timber Beeninga (Global Studies), The Anti-Apartheid Shanty Protest from 1985 to 1987
Track: The US & Foreign Relations
Advisor: Lauren Jarvis (History)
Abstract: From 1985 to 1987, American university students built tin, cardboard, and wood shanties on prominent campus spaces to protest university endowment holdings in apartheid South Africa. My research asks the following questions: Why did the shanty protest emerge in this historical moment? What did the shanties offer that other forms of anti-apartheid protest had not? I argue that the events in South Africa in the early 1980s -- the township uprisings, the state of emergency in 1985, and the overall gross violations of human rights that were well-circulated in the American media -- were moral shocks to American students. Beyond the emotional response to the reality of apartheid, actions by the Free South Africa Movement in the United States provided students the political opportunity, or leverage, to pressure their own universities by building the shanties. Furthermore, I argue that the shanties' aesthetics, use of public space, and performative elements elevated anti-apartheid protests in ways that previous efforts did not.

3:00-3:10 — Erin Lewis (Public Policy), BlackCrime BlueShield: How Race Affects Support of Police Body Cameras
Track: Diversity & Equity
Advisor: Courtney Rivard (English and Comparative Literature)
Abstract: This paper examines the support students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill show towards the mandatory implementation of police body cameras nation-wide. With the topic of police brutality and accountability being a hot button issue among Americans, especially young adult Americans, a survey was given to UNC students to measure support of mandated body cameras. While I hypothesized that African-Americans would be more likely than non-African-American students to support a federal mandate for body cameras, the results showed that UNC students as a whole, regardless of race, were more likely to be in favor of the cameras. The overwhelming support was best contributed to the technological advancement of the age group surveyed. From the study, policymakers can begin to see that the overwhelming consensus the UNC students showed could be a miniature version of America's mindset. Thus, giving political figures the support to strive toward establishing a mandate that would require officers nation-wide to be equipped with body cameras. Such a mandate would allow for better monitoring of police-civilian interaction in order to increase police accountability and possibly decrease the amount of police brutality victims.

3:10-3:30 — Questions

ROOM 3206

Contemporary Policy Issues
Moderator: TBA
Room: 3206

1:15-1:25 — Sarah Arney (Philosophy), Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors: Understanding the Debate over the role of LGBT+ Christians in the United Methodist Church
Track: Diversity & Equity
Advisor: Todd Ochoa (Religious Studies)
Abstract: Since 1972, when the United Methodist Church (UMC) stated that "homosexuality is incompatible with Christian teaching," the denomination has been divided on a global and personal level. The denomination is facing schism due to the debate over same-sex marriage, LGB ordination, and the overall role of LGBT+ Christians in the church. Based on participant observation at the 2016 UMC General Conference and interviews with twelve North Carolina pastors, I developed a theory of the underlying causes of the conflict. At the global level, demographic shifts and a stagnation of ideological camps has made the debate unresolvable unless the UMC changes its organization to decide the issue by cultural region. However, in the context of the American South, the debate is far more nuanced. Within the church, personal relationships with LGBT+ Christians are the most obvious and powerful influences in the debate, but fostering relationships cannot resolve underlying theological disagreements. The debate stems from a combination of discomfort with discussions of sexuality, differing beliefs about the purpose of marriage, different ideologies about secular culture's influence on religion, and the tension between pastors upholding their covenant vows or following their conscience to defy church policy. At present, the UMC is focusing on these areas of disagreement and is debating whether to create definitive doctrine or allow a diversity of opinion and practice within the denomination.

1:25-1:35 — Emily Venturi (Political Science), Economic Integration of Refugees and Migrants in Armenia
Track: Diversity & Equity
Advisor: Niklaus Steiner (Political Science)
Undergraduate Co-Authors: Ana Dougherty
Abstract: Our presentation will explore the critical role played by the private sector in promoting economic opportunities for refugees and migrants. Our research explores the following questions: What are the barriers to economic integration of refugees and migrants, and what role can impact investing play in overcoming these barriers and creating economic opportunities for refugees and migrants? In recent years many Syrian-Armenians have been seeking asylum in Armenia and have been granted citizenship almost immediately due to their ethnic ties to Armenia. This presentation will explore the particularities of the Syrian-Armenian experience with regard to economic opportunities and economic integration. We will be conducting field research from March 11-19 in Yerevan, Armenia, in cooperation with the Small Enterprise Assistance Funds (SEAF). This fieldwork is being funded by a grant from the Morehead-Cain Foundation. SEAF, as a mission-driven corporation, is dedicated to bringing investments and entrepreneurial training into emerging markets and marginalized communities that are traditionally underserved in terms of international capital opportunities and partnerships. We are researching the entrepreneurial, business, and NGO environment, as well as migration management conditions in Yerevan. This presentation will highlight our research on mission-driven private investment ("impact investing") and its role in the effort to integrate refugees and migrants into local economies.

1:25-1:35 — Ana Dougherty (Economics), Economic Integration of Refugees and Migrants in Armenia
Track: Diversity & Equity
Advisor: Niklaus Steiner (Center for Global Initiatives)
Undergraduate Co-Authors: Emily Venturi
Abstract: Our presentation will explore the critical role played by the private sector in promoting economic opportunities for refugees and migrants. Our research explores the following questions: What are the barriers to economic integration of refugees and migrants, and what role can impact investing play in overcoming these barriers and creating economic opportunities for refugees and migrants? In recent years many Syrian-Armenians have been seeking asylum in Armenia and have been granted citizenship almost immediately due to their ethnic ties to Armenia. This presentation will explore the particularities of the Syrian-Armenian experience with regard to economic opportunities and economic integration. We will be conducting field research from March 11-19 in Yerevan, Armenia, in cooperation with the Small Enterprise Assistance Funds (SEAF). This fieldwork is being funded by a grant from the Morehead-Cain Foundation. SEAF, as a mission-driven corporation, is dedicated to bringing investments and entrepreneurial training into emerging markets and marginalized communities that are traditionally underserved in terms of international capital opportunities and partnerships. We are researching the entrepreneurial, business, and NGO environment, as well as migration management conditions in Yerevan. This presentation will highlight our research on mission-driven private investment ("impact investing") and its role in the effort to integrate refugees and migrants into local economies.

1:35-1:45 — Vishnu Ramachandran (Computer Science), False Hope: Body-Worn Cameras as Community Policing in Durham, North Carolina
Track: Diversity & Equity
Advisor: Torin Monahan (Communications)
Abstract: Police body cameras are often presented as a tool for reducing police violence while also enhancing trust and accountability. However, the policies governing the technology can call these goals into question. To explore the assumptions behind police body cameras and the ways their uses are shaped by local context, this paper follows the city council debates leading to the adoption of-and policy guidelines for-police body cameras in Durham, North Carolina. In this example, we see that the city council aimed to promote community policing through body camera usage, to allow the citizens to "police" the police and increase trust. The policy guidelines, on the other hand, create nebulous expectations for police behavior and fail to acknowledge power asymmetries. Furthermore, the video access statutes grant significant discretion to the police department and its officers but limit public oversight. Finally, the asset forfeiture funds used to finance the program arouse concerns about exploitation. Ultimately, Durham's implementation of police body cameras strays far from its community policing goals.

1:45-1:55 — Sarah Adams (Journalism & Mass Communication), When Whistleblowers Become Traitors: Approaching Internal Relations in the Intelligence Community from a Psychological Perspective
Track: The US & Foreign Relations
Advisor: Joseph Cabosky (School of Media and Journalism)
Abstract: The tension between secrecy and transparency is not a new dichotomy in either US politics or popular conversation. However, when Edward Snowden leaked classified documents to the media in 2013 about an extensive surveillance program known as PRISM, the views held by many Americans regarding security and accountability reached new extremes. This study takes an interdisciplinary approach to examining one of the most central elements of this issue, "the Whistleblower's Dilemma." Referring to a situation of internal ethical conflict in which an individual must compromise one core value to uphold another, the Whistleblower's Dilemma has no higher stakes scenario than the United States' Intelligence Community (IC). This quantitative and qualitative content analysis examines interviews with IC whistleblowers who reported on classified information in order to identify motivations and deterrents to their behavior. Four psychological variables will be examined (valuation of fairness, loyalty, public service motivation and perceived personal cost) in order to identify potential similarities and differences between internal and external IC whistleblowers. The results of these findings will be used to develop internal relations strategies that ultimately increase internal reporting, decrease external reporting and contribute depth to current insider threat programs.

1:55-2:15 — Questions

2:15-2:30 — BREAK

Identity and Community Integration
Moderator: TBA
Room: 3206

2:30-2:40 — Amanda Lalezarian (Journalism & Mass Communication), What is the future of Judaism in Denmark? (A Documentary examining history from the Holocaust in 1943 to modern life in 2016)
Track: Diversity & Equity
Advisor: Charlie Tuggle (Media & Journalism)
Abstract: Who is a Danish Jew? What does it mean to be a Jew living in a traditionally Lutheran, yet secular, country? How do viewpoints and opinions vary between generations? While Copenhagen Jews are one of the most active and engaged religious groups in Scandinavia, living a fully Jewish life in Denmark has its fair share of challenges. The memory of the Holocaust has always been in the background as a warning sign of what could happen if things are not dealt with at the right time, and a recent terror attack in 2015 has left the city on high alert. "What is the future of Judaism in Denmark? is a short documentary film that sheds light on the Danish Jews of Copenhagen, a small community that has remained intact despite facing obstacles in recent years. This project examines the future of Judaism in Denmark through personal testimony from various members of the Jewish community from a 14-year-old Bat Mitzvah girl to a 78-year-old Holocaust survivor. By analyzing the social, political and religious dimensions of this community, "What is the future of Judaism in Denmark?" is an open dialogue that allows Jewish Danes to speculate about the potential future of their beloved community in a time of increased uncertainty and strife.

2:40-2:50 — Sarah Shannon-Mohamed (History), Beyond the Veil: Exploring Issues of Social Adversity Female Muslim Students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are Faced With While Integrating Into the Fabric of University Life
Track: Diversity & Equity
Advisor: Tommy Ender (Education)
Abstract: The purpose of this qualitative auto-ethnographic research study is to identify social barriers and issues of prejudice that may negatively impact the outcome of female Muslim student's experiences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH). Focusing primarily on identifying the main forces driving these issues in order to find solutions that will help these students to succeed on an educational and social level, and provide an overall experience that positively combines social acceptance and tolerance in conjunction with a quality education. Findings within this paper are defined as indicative rather than definitive due to the sample size -- five faculty members and five female Muslim students -- used to obtain data. Findings indicate that while UNC-CH is a welcoming and diverse institution Muslim students -- particularly veiled female Muslims students -- still experience feelings of marginalization, social segregation, and prejudice. The study also reveals that female Muslim students tend to gravitate socially toward other groups also experiencing social adversity. In order to assist students dealing with social obstacles, the findings show that the university would benefit in the accumulation of knowledge surrounding these issues. Doing so opens the door for the development of programs focused on providing support for future students with the purpose of aiding them in overcoming barriers in an effort to ensure they receive an all-encompassing education.

2:50-3:00 — Makaela Jones (Exercise & Sport Science), Psychosocial Antecedents of Athlete Burnout in Black Student-athletes
Track: Diversity & Equity
Advisor: J.D. DeFreese (Exercise and Sport Science)
Abstract: Previous literature on Black student athletes points to their experiences being , at times, shaped by racism, discrimination, and racial inequities. Moreover, Black student-athletes graduate at lower rates than White student-athletes; however, Black student-athletes also make up over half of athletes participating in high-revenue sports. In addition to negative psychological factors facing this population, they also may be vulnerable to stress and stereotypes pertaining to their student-athlete status. Aims of the study are to determine if the negative impacts of racism and discrimination have an effect on their susceptibility to negative psychological sport outcomes, like athlete burnout. The study will include 50 active varsity or club Black student-athletes. Participants will take a survey battery measuring levels of athlete burnout, psychosocial factors (stress and social support), and identity (racial and athletic). It is hypothesized that race-related stress and sport-related stress will be positively associated with each other, as well as dimensions of athlete burnout. Secondly, social support will act as a buffer against the psychosocial stress-burnout relationship. Also, racial and athletic identity will be examined as exploratory variables such that each hypothesis may be moderated by identity. If bi-variate correlations support a relationship between athlete burnout and markers of psychological health, it is possible that Black student-athletes may not be receiving

3:00-3:10 — Leah Bishop (Music), Futebol, Feminismo e Funk
Track: Diversity & Equity
Advisor: David Garcia (Music)
Abstract: This presentation examines the roles of gender and sexuality in the development and reception of women and of female identity in soccer and funk music in Brazil. Using footballer Marta and funk artist Valesca Popozuda as case studies, I make connections between how female musicians and athletes express their identities and argue that these women both conform to and resist patriarchal norms in order to be successful in their male-dominated domains.

3:10-3:30 — Questions

ROOM 3209

The Arts in England, 1450-1650
Moderator: Tania String
Room: 3209

1:15-1:25 — Jeremy Howell (History), Masculine Aspirations: Young Men Asserting Masculinity Through Arms & Armor in Tudor Portraiture
Track: Fine Arts
Advisor: Tatiana String (Art History )
Abstract: In the Fall of 2016, I had the opportunity to conduct original research on the North Carolina Museum of Art's recently reexamined work, "Portrait of a Gentleman Wearing a Breastplate" (circa 1585-1590). My research culminated in the first scholarly paper written on this portrait. It is my intention to convey my findings at the 2017 Celebration of Undergraduate Research. "Portrait of a Gentleman Wearing a Breastplate" offers viewers a look into the psychology of young aristocratic Tudor men. My presentation will address the following questions: What did masculinity mean to Tudor men; How did young Tudor men visually assert their masculinity; and Why did these young men desire to be seen as masculine???Through analysis and comparison to contemporaneous portraits with similar subjects, it was shown that young aristocratic Tudor men asserted their masculinity in their portraits by carrying specific kinds of weapons and wearing armor that displayed heroic iconography. To a lesser extent, this presentation will reveal how powerful body language enhanced this assertion of masculinity.??As "Portrait of a Gentleman Wearing a Breastplate" has only been recently reintroduced to the art historical community, this presentation will identify what specific arms and armor are found in the portrait.

1:25-1:35 — William Yoder (English & Comparative Literature), A Narrative of the Life of the Mind: The Engravings of Bacon's Sylva Sylvarum
Track: Fine Arts
Advisor: Tatiana String (Art History)
Abstract: Francis Bacon's Sylva Sylvarum consists of a collection of one thousand philosophical arguments and small scientific experimentations that cover, as the Latinate title so eloquently describes, "a miscellany of topics." The first edition of Sylva Sylvarum was published with two engravings after Bacon's death in 1627. The frontispiece of the book shows an engraved portrait of Francis Bacon, and the title page displays an inscribed globe that sits atop a cartouche and is framed by a pair of columns, the sun's rays, and the Tetragrammaton. The author portrait and title page of Francis Bacon's Sylva Sylvarum are reflective of both the author and the work to which they are attached. Furthermore, the engravings seek to establish Bacon, even after his death, as a giant of both the intellectual world and the Jacobean court. The pair of engravings ultimately work in congress to establish a visual image of the complexity of Francis Bacon's political and intellectual persona, as the frontispiece portrait wraps a cerebral portrait of the author in his political status and heraldry, and the title page encapsulates his ideas regarding knowledge and the life of the mind through its emblems and inscriptions.

1:35-1:45 — Grace Ketron (Journalism & Mass Communication), Francis Delaram's Print of Queen Elizabeth: Charles I's Message of Elizabethan Pax
Track: Fine Arts
Advisor: Tania String (Art History Department)
Abstract: My research concerns Delaram's Print of Queen Elizabeth I, which I studied and wrote about from the Ackland Art Museum's collection. My research discusses why a print of Queen Elizabeth I would have circulated during the later reign of Charles I. Because prints were utilized to spread mass messages, Francis Delaram's Print of Queen Elizabeth, which probably circulated around England in 1630, sought to communicate a message of stability and to reinforce the concept of the Elizabethan pax, or peace, as the economically, politically, religiously, and militaristically tumultuous reign of Charles I attempted to stabilize itself in England. The monarch never dies, at least figuratively. Henceforth, Charles I attempted to use the 1630 print and an earlier 1625 version of the same print to create nostalgia for Elizabeth's "golden age of pax," thereby demonstrating his ability to rule well as a monarch in the footsteps of the successful and beloved Queen.

1:45-1:55 — Dana Rodriguez (Art), The Notorious Case of Lady Frances Howard
Track: Fine Arts
Advisor: Tatiana String (Art History)
Abstract: The Ackland Museum of Art possesses an undated print of Lady Frances Howard and her second husband, Robert Carr. There is little information known about this work of art, and this research questions which artist(s) created the print, during what time, and what function the print held. I argue that the print was made in 1615 and can be attributed to Renold Estrack. I exam how her two trials led to her rise in fame and subsequent public analysis, the print's production and other artistic renderings, and the relationship with the court of James I. The artist created a uniquely constructed printed image that illustrated the popular and provocative story of Lady Frances Howard. Howard, a seventeenth century celebrity, was surrounded by stories of sexual disloyalty and empowerment, murder by poison, political ploys, witchcraft and imprisonment. Her story was an affair driven by society's desire to unearth the reason for such amoral behavior. In this print, the artist combined references of femininity and power to show the product of controversial personal and political circumstances; a message that satiated the public's desires to fathom the nature behind a woman's amorality.

1:55-2:15 — Questions

2:15-2:30 — BREAK

Prevention & Treatment of Injury & Disease
Moderator: TBA
Room: 3209

2:30-2:40 — Shelby Waldron (Exercise & Sport Science), Training's Effect on Burnout Over Time
Track: Health & Well-Being
Advisor: J.D. DeFreese (Department of Exercise & Sport Science)
Abstract: Burnout, the multidimensional psychological syndrome of reduced sense of athletic accomplishment, sport devaluation, and physical and emotional exhaustion, has important implications for athletes' performance and well-being. Burnout may be a maladaptive psychophysiological response to high training demands that result in overtraining syndrome. However, recent research has found mixed results in regards to training's relationship with burnout. Therefore, this study examined associations between training (combination of hours and perceived intensity) and burnout, using a longitudinal design. UNC women's club cheer athletes (N = 11) completed online self-report assessments of demographic information and study variables, four times (biweekly) over a six week period. Repeated measures ANOVAs showed that individuals' burnout scores remained relatively stable over the six weeks, as there was not a significant main effect of time, F(3, 21) = .65, p > .05. However, there was a significant interaction effect on burnout between time at four weeks and training at two weeks, F(1, 7) = 5.42, p =.05, as well as six weeks, F(1, 7) = 6.30, p < .05. Athletes who reported more training, tended to report higher burnout scores at four weeks. This pilot study serves to fill the gap in knowledge about changes in individuals' burnout over time; subsequently, affirming the utility of future, large-scale longitudinal studies.

2:40-2:50 — Hannah Price (Exercise & Sport Science), Gender Discrepancies in Persistent Symptom Presentation One-Month Post-Concussion in Youth Athletes
Track: Health & Well-Being
Advisor: Johna Register-Mihalik (Exercise and Sport Science)
Graduate Student Contributors: Christina Vander Vegt
Abstract: Concussion in youth athletes may produce severe long-term developmental and cognitive problems. We examined the association between gender and individual persistent symptom presentation in young student-athletes in the primary care setting. A cross-sectional analysis of pediatric and adolescent athletes ages 8-18 years one-month after presenting to the primary care setting following sport-related concussion (SRC) consented to participate in the study (n=278; age=14.37??2.08 years). Parents of the participant completed the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptom Questionnaire (RPQ) at one-month follow-up (follow-up= 75.0%). Participant gender (male vs. female) served as the independent variable. Primary outcomes were presence of individual symptoms reported as worse at 1-month post-concussion than prior to the injury. Fisher's exact tests were utilized to examine the association between gender and individual 1-month symptom presentation. Two hundred and ten participants completed the RPQ, 118 were male (57%), and 89 were female, one individual did not report gender, and two individuals had incomplete demographic data. There was not a significant association between total number of symptoms endorsed as worse or the type of symptoms reported in males compared to females one-month following SRC (p<0.05). Gender does not appear to be associated with type of symptoms reported 1-month following SRC. Clinicians should be mindful of this information to ensure proper concussion management.

2:50-3:00 — Kathryn Citrin (Biology), The inhibitory protein PMEPA1, but not SMAD7, inhibits BMP signaling in endothelial cells
Track: Health & Well-Being
Advisor: Victoria Bautch (Biology)
Graduate Student Contributors: Lyndsay Wylie
Faculty/Postdoc Contributors: Kevin Mouillesseaux, Ph.D. (post-doc); Victoria Bautch, Ph.D. (Principle Investigator)
Abstract: Angiogenesis is the development of blood vessels from existing vasculature via sprouting of endothelial cells. It is regulated by growth factor signals including Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP), a member of the TGFb superfamily of signaling pathways. The BMP ligand leads to intracellular signaling and response via engagement with the heterotetrameric BMP receptor on the surface of an endothelial cell. The receptor complex phosphorylates intracellular SMAD1/5/8 proteins. These proteins then bind to SMAD4 protein to facilitate nuclear translocation and transcriptional regulation.1 Another signal, Notch, downregulates endothelial cell responsiveness to BMP signaling by mechanisms that are not fully understood.2 A screen to investigate Notch-regulated BMP/TGFb pathway members identified two proteins, PMEPA1 and SMAD7, that are upregulated by Notch and negatively regulate BMP signaling.1,3 Knockdown of PMEPA1 expression significantly increased signaling in response to BMP ligand, indicating that PMEPA1 inhibits BMP signaling in endothelial cells. However, SMAD7 knockdown did not affect BMP responsiveness. We hypothesize that PMEPA1 modulates the responsiveness of endothelial cells to BMP by virtue of their Notch status. Understanding the function of these Notch-regulated BMP/TGFb pathway inhibitors is critical, as they hold therapeutic potential for diseases of aberrant BMP signaling.4

3:00-3:10 — Grant Cabell (Exercise & Sport Science), The Test-Retest Reliability and Exercise-Driven Changes of UCH-L1 in Healthy, Recreationally Active College Students
Track: Health & Well-Being
Advisor: Kevin Guskiewicz (Exercise and Sports Science)
Graduate Student Contributors: Liz Teel
Faculty/Postdoc Contributors: Erik Hanson, Jason Mihalik
Abstract: Concussive injuries are a common injury in contact sports and remain difficult to diagnose. The current concussion assessment battery is not foolproof and more sensitive concussion diagnostic tools are needed. Blood biomarkers have long been proposed as a potential solution, however their utility is still not well established. As most concussion evaluations require serial evaluation and occur after exercise, these properties must be evaluated before UCH-L1 can be used clinically. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate the test-retest reliability of UCH-L1 in healthy subjects. A secondary purpose was to examine the effect of exercise on UCH-L1 levels in healthy participants. Participants completed a maximal exercise test during two clinical assessments sessions 10-14 days apart, with blood draws occurring before and after each exercise test. Results, conclusions have not yet been determined.

3:10-3:30 — Questions

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