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PWAD Calendar of Events  


Workshop
UN Peacekeeping: Its History and Effectiveness
February 11, 2010
5:30-8:30pm
Fed Ex Global Education
301 Pittsboro Street

United Nations peacekeeping is a unique and dynamic instrument, developed as a way to help countries torn by conflict to create the conditions for lasting peace.  This workshop explores the past and present, of  UN peacekeeping and its effectiveness, because UN peacekeeping will continue to evolve and will meet new challenges and political realities.

Peace Studies Conference (Co-sponsor)
Hosted by Political Science
November 20-22, 2009

Marty Matlock
"Land, Natural Resources, and Sovereignty: Lessons from the Cherokee Nation and the Palestinian West Bank"
November 17, 2009
6:00pm
0001 Blue Cross Blue Shield Auditorium
Michael Hooker Research Center
Gillings School of Global Public Health

Dr. Matlock (Cherokee) is a Professor of Ecological Engineering, Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department, University of Arkansas - Fayetteville.

Brian Barna, CIA Analyst
Sept. 17, 2009
1:00pm
569 Hamilton Hall

For PWAD majors interested in talking about working in the agency.  
Mr. Barna is from the Directorate of Intelligence, in the Office of Asian Pacific, Latin American, and African Analysis.  He has particularly specialized in economic analysis, and has been with the CIA since 1992.
This is a follow up to a presentation he will be making in PWAD 350 "National and International Defense and Security" about the role of intelligence services in national security and policy.  

Joe Jockel
September 15, 2009
11:30am
569 Hamilton Hall

Dr. Joe Jockel of St. Lawrence University will make an informal presentation about emerging hemispheric security problems and U.S. - Canadian cooperations in NORAD.

Steve Kelly, Diplomat in Residence at Duke, will intoduce himself and talk with students who might have an interest in pursuing security issues and careers at the State Department.

Christopher Dandeker
April 8, 2009
3:30-
569 Hamilton Hall

Met with PWAD and other students re King's College study abroad or graduate study.


Jeremi Suri
University of Wisconsin, Department of History
February 27, 2009

Guest speaker for PWAD 369, "War and American Society, Twentieth Century"

James Gelvin
"al-Qaeda"
February 20, 2009
12-2pm
569 Hamilton Hall

Professor of History, UCLA with a focus on Near East.

Emmanuel Jal
"Performancs for Peace: A Diary of Darfur"
February 6, 2009
7pm
Memorial Hall

By the time Emmanuel Jal was seven year old, he was already fighting in the rebel army in Sudan.  For five years he fought in Sudan's bloody civil war.  Today he is a child soldier turned hip hop artrist, channeling his childhood pain into songs.

Michael Geyer
"Genocide, Massacre, and Warfare in World War Two in Comparative Perspective"
January 30, 2009
4:00-6:00pm Public Lecture and Reception
FedEx Global Education Center
GEC 4003

Dr. Geyer is Samuel N. Harper Professor for German and European History at the Univesity of Chicago.

What distinguishes "good war" from "bad war"?  Are there moral choices to be made in war and what might they entail?  Specifically, how would you differentiate between the Nazi war in the Soviel Union, the Red Army's advance into Germany, the bombing campaign of the Western Allies against German cities, and the mass-expulsion of civilian?  Are all wars against civilians genocides, and is the Holocaust another genocide? These questions have gained a new urgency with regard both to the European and the East Asian War.  Research on World War II during the past decade provides some judicious, if tentative, answers to these questions, but has also produced its share of miscues.  The more productive answers all point to the insight that World War II is best understood as a "new war," if not a "revolution in warfare," rather than being the last and most extreme in a series of "old" mass wars.

Mark Grimsley
January 13, 2009

Military Historian at Ohio State University and currently Harold K. Johnson Visiting Professor of Military History at the U.S. Army War College. Dr. Grimsley spoke to the students in PWAD 369, "War and American Society, Twentieth Century" and to the military history community.
Cynthia Enloe
"When Women Think About Security: Some Feminist Lessons from the Iraq War"
December 2, 2008
6:00-8:00pm
FedEx Global Eductation Center

Dr. Enloe is a Research Professor at Clark University and affliated with the Department of International Development Community and Environment and the Women's Studies program..
"Security" is a goal that can spark wars and end wars.  But too often we don't ask "Whose security?"  Feminists from myriad countries pose a deep questions for all of us.  If we take seriously the sorts of insurities that women experience in their daily lives, how would we go about re-making "national security policy" and "global security polidy?"  Looking afresh at the 6-year US-led war in Iraq gives us a chance to explore these urgent questions and craft some useful answers.

Jeremy Black
"Could the Brits have won the US War of Independence?"
November 7, 2008
12-1:30pm
569 Hamilton Hall

Dr. Black, Professor of History and Established Chair in History at the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom, will talk on whether or not the British could have won the American War for Independence.

Please call Jackie Gorman for reservations as space is limited.

James M. McPherson
"Tried by War: Abraham Lincoln as Commander in Chief"
October 23, 2008
7:30pm
Wilson Library
Pleasants Family Meeting Room

Dr. McPherson, Professor of American History Emeritus, Princeton University, and eminent Civil War historian, analyzes Lincoln's steep learning curve as commander in chief, his relationships with his generals, the evolution of the North's national and military strategies, and the ebb and flow of victory and defeat during four years of war. McPherson will trace Lincoln's transition from a policy of conciliation to one of all-out war, the emergence of emancipation and the abolition of slavery as a war aim, and the forging of a war-winning strategy.

CIA Officer-China Military Analyst
September 16, 2008
569 Hamilton Hall

Spoke to PWAD majors interested in working for the CIA

Congressman David Price, Philip Bobbitt, Joseph Caddell, Josephy Kennedy, Scott Silliman, and Stephen Soldz
September 13, 2008
8:30am - 6:00pm
Hyde Hall

An expert line of speakers will discuss the issue from a variety of perspectives, including Psychology, Law, National Security, and History.

Hector Aristizabal
"Torture and Interrogation: Have we gone too far?"
September 12, 2008
7:30-9:30pm
Hyde Hall

Torture survivor, performs a dramatic reenactment of a torture scenario.

Michele Malvesti
April 17, 2008
3:30-5:30
Hamilton Hall 569

Dr. Malvesti is a Political Science graduate of UNC; received her PhD from Tufts.  She now works for SAIC in DC but was for two years at least the day to day war on terrorism chief on the NSC.

Civil War Symposium
in honor of Alan Stephenson,
donor of the Stephenson Chair in Civil War History

Sat., Mar. 29, 2008
111 Carroll Hall
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Free and open to the public
No registration required

Co-sponsored by the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense, the Center for the Study of the American South, and the Department of History

Program of Events

  • 8:15 a.m. Morning Reception

  • 8:30 a.m.  William Barney, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill         
    "Rush to Disaster: Secession and the Slaves' Revenge"
  • 9:40 a.m.  Joan Waugh, University of California at Los Angeles
     "The Troubled Legacy of U.S. Grant"
  • 10:50 a.m.  Brian Holden Reid, King's College
     "Robert E. Lee: The British View"

  • 11:50    Break for Lunch

  • 1:10 p.m.  Joseph T. Glatthaar, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    "The Army of Northern Virginia and the Narrowing Margin of Error"
  • 2:20 p.m.  Gary W. Gallagher, University of Virginia
     "Causes Won, Lost, and Forgotten: Hollywood and the Civil War Since 'Glory'"

Brian Holden Reid
March 27, 2008
3:30-till
569 Hamilton Hall

Info session for PWAD majors interested in study abroad or graduate studies at King's College, London.

Professor Brian Holden Reid, former head of War Studies at King's College, is a distinguished historian of the American Civil War, and the author of many books and articles about American and British military thought and experience.

Simon Harak
"The Global War on Terror: Who Wins? Who Loses?"
March 26, 2008
1:30
3413 Student Union

Dr. Harak is Director of Marquette University's Center for Peacemaking.  Long active in the peace movement, Harak helped found Voices in the Wilderness, which has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.
Robert Angevine
"The Defense Contracting Industry"
November 13, 2007

Speaker for PWAD 350 and PWAD 691H

Dr. Angevine, Strategic Analysis & Assessments, Scitor Corporation
Deborah Dash Moore
"G.I. Jews: How WWII Changed a Generation"
October 29, 2007
7:30pm
Sonja Haynes Stone Center Theatre

Over half a million Jews entered the United States' armed forces during the Second World War.  They joined every branch of the military and saw action on all fronts.  Dr. Moore, Director of the Frankel Center for Jewish Studies and Frederick G.L. Huetwell Professor of History, University of Michigan, gives us an unprecendented view of the multiple struggles these GI Jews faced, having to fight not only the enemy, but also the prejudices of their fellow soldiers.

Panel Discussion on the Iraq War with:
Colonel Rondall Rice, USAF (PhD, UNC-CH)
Dr. Jeffrey Record, USAF War College
Thursday, April 6, 2006
Noon to 1:30 (Lunch)
569 Hamilton Hall

Lt. Col. Rice grew up in eastern North Carolina, graduated from the USAF Academy, served as an intelligence officer in the 1991 Persian Gulf War, the intervention in the Balkans in 1995, and in the Iraq War; he also has taught two tours at the Academy (where he is now Assistant Prof. of History) and published widely on civil military relations, including his book "The Politics of Air Power," recently issued from the University of Nebraska Press.

Dr. Record is one fo the nation's foremost defense analysts, having served on congressional staffs, taught at several of the war colleges, worked at the Institute for Defense Analyses, and published books and articles on a variety of military and national security topics over the last thirty years.  His "Iraq and Vietnam: Differences, Similarites, and Insights" with Andrew Terrill was a controversial analysis and stimulated much comment in the press.

To attend, you must make a reservation with Jackie Gorman as space is limited.

Ambassador Brenda Schoonover (ret.)
"U.S./European Relations, an Evolving Alliance"
Tuesday, February 28, 2006
Noon to 1:30
569 Hamilton Hall

Ambassador Breanda Schoonover recently retired from the Foreign Service.  She was among the first group of Peace Corps volunteers, served as equal opportunity officer for Arlington County, Virginia, and in her diplomatic career served in a variety of posts in Europe, Africa, and the United States, ending as chief of mission in Belgium responsible for much of our NATO and European relations.

To attend, you must make a reservation with Jackie Gorman as space is limited.

UNC Workshop Series: GENDER, POLITICS, AND CULTURE IN EUROPE AND BEYOND
Friday, February 3, 569 Hamilton Hall
Gender, Nation, and War in Twentieth Century Europe
Workshop: 2-6pm
Evening Lecture: 6-7:30pm
Chair: Karen Hagemann, History Department, UNC-CH
Commentator: Christopher Browning, History Department, UNC-CH
Sponsor: History Department, UNC-CH
Co-sponsor: Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense, UNC-CH
Rami Khouri, prominent Middle East jounalist
"Four years after 9/11: A Critical Arab View of the U.S. in the MIddle East"
January 31, 2006
7:30 pm
Hanes Art Center 121

UNC lecture sponsored by UCIS, School of Journalism, Middle East Center, Asian Studies, Department of History, and the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense

FALL  PWAD Field Trip to Washington, DC
November 10, 2005

Our eighth field trip to government and non-government offices and organizations in the DC area to investigate jobs and careers in national and international security will take place on November 13. We will visit the Henry L. Stimson Center , perhaps the most respected non-partisan think tank in the field doing national security research; Ike Skelton's office, the ranking Democrat on the House National Security Committee who has been in Congress since 1977 and is a devoted promoter of military history for applied policy and decision-making; Institute for Defense Analyses, one of the leading federal research centers doing national security analysis; and the National  Geospatial Agency at its offices at the CIA headquarters at Langley.


Yoav Gelber
Lecture and Research Presentation

"Changing Israel's Ethos: Recent Transformations in Israeli Society"
Wednesday, October 26, 7:30 pm
Carroll Hall, Room 111

Since 1967, Israel's traditional pioneering and collectivist ethos has given way to an individualistic ethos, accompanied by new ideals such as peace, democracy, and personal success.  Gelber will explore the viability of these new ideals given the current political climate in the Middle East, and he will investigate the challenges that recent developments have issued to traditinal forms of Zionism.

Gelber is head of the Herzl Institute for Research and Study of Zionism at the Unviersity of Haifa, and he is spending the year in residence at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Co-sponsored by the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, The Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense, the Curriculum in International and Area Studies, and the University Center for International Studies.

Kathryn Roth-Douquet
LECTURE AND DISCUSSION_

"AWOL:  THE UNEXCUSED ABSENCE OF AMERICA'S UPPER CLASSES FROM THE MILITARY AND HOW IT HURTS OUR COUNTY"

Monday, September 26, 4PM
Frank Porter Graham Student Union
Room 1505

Join us for PWAD's first distinguished visitor luncheon to hear Kathryn Roth-Douquet.  She is a writer, lawyer, political activist, and Marine Corps spouse who writes on the issues of civil-military relations.  She served in the White House and Defense Department during the Clinton Administration.  Her talks examines this gap and its implications for American foreign and defense policy, and the health of the American military and American society.  Her book on the subject, co-authored with Frank Schaeffer, will be published next spring.

SYMPOSIUM ON THE MEDIA AND WAR
UNC CAMPUS, 116 Murphy Hall
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
10:30AM to 4PM

Purpose:  The purpose of this event will be to use the film "Occupation: Dreamland" as a springboard for raising the level of public discussion concerning issues related to the war in Iraq.   As the film creates a very human portrayal of the soldiers in this conflict, it can be used to inspire a broad discussion about media, history, and politics in relation to the current conflict and those that have come before it. By bringing together soldiers, veterans, and their families - as well as experts on media, politics, and history - the conference facilitators hope to create an environment in which the Iraq War can be viewed in its historical context. As such, this conference will explore the challenges American citizens and soldiers must address as we consider the influence of media on our understanding of the war and the consequences of that understanding."

Morning Session- 10:30 - 12:30

Soldiers' View:
10 minute clip from "Occupation: Dreamlan"

A panel with soldiers and veterans as well as family members of both groups will discuss soldiers' rights and needs.  How are they affected by media representations of the current conflict.  Would they rather seemore information?  Does what they see on the news ring true with what they hear from others?  Some of the discussion during this panel will make useful parallels between the Vietnam War and the current conflict.  This panel will also delve into the idea of how media representations of the conflict affect soldiers while serving and upon returning.  This issue is especially touchy right now as anger is building up on both sides due to the actions of peace activists like Cindy Sheehan.  Some say that calls of "Bring the Troops Home" damages morale.  How do these soldiers feel?

Panelists:
Captain Brit Erslev  United States Army
James Massey  Former Career Marine/ Recruiter
 arrett Reppenhagen  Cavalry Scout/ Sniper
Others to be announced

12:30- 2:00 lunch break

 afternoon Session: 2:00-4:00

"What we know, how we know it, and what it means.

10 minute clip from Occupation: Dreamland

In this panel, experts in media and politics will examine media coverage of the war and how that influences and is influenced by political and public life. "Occupation:  Dreamland" provides a starting point for the discussion, which is given additional impetus by issues relating to media coverage of events in Iraq and Afghanistan, the impact on the military and their families, the controversy of Cindy Sheehan's protest, and television series such as "Over There."

Panelists:
Cori Dauber (UNC) Communication Studies
David Paletz (Duke) Political Science
Napoleon Bryars (UNC) School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Garret Scott  Filmmaker "Occupation Dreamland"
Ian Olds      Filmmaker "Occupation Dreamland"

This program is sponsored by the Department of Communication Studies and  the Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense

For additional information on the film, please visit www.occupationdreamland.com

Ambassador Brenda Schoonover
"Europe and the United States, an Evolving Alliance?   An American Diplomat's Perspective
Tuesday, Apr. 5, 2005
569 Hamilton Hall

Join us for PWAD's third distinguished visitor luncheon to hear Ambassador Schoonover.  The Ambasador served as a senior American diplomat in Brussels, Belgium, and the capital of Europe and the seat of NATO.  Ambassador Schoonover found it extraordinarily challenging to represet the United States in a climate of strained U.S./European relations, and will discuss those challenges and their implications in a noon time talk.

To attend, you must make a reservation with Jackie Gorman as space is limited.

Brian Holden Reid
"America at War"

Monday, Feb. 28, 2005
569 Hamilton Hall

Join us for PWAD's second distinguished visitor luncheon to hear Professor Brian Holden Reid, is a distinguished historian of the American Civil War, and the author of many books and articles about American and British military thought and experience.

To attend, you must make a reservation with Jackie Gorman as space is limited.

FALL  PWAD Field Trip to Washington, DC
November 16, 2004

Our seventh field trip to government and non-government offices and organizations in the DC area to investigate jobs and careers in national and international security will take place on November 13. We will visit the Henry L. Stimson Center , perhaps the most respected non-partisan think tank in the field doing national security research; Ike Skelton's office, the ranking Democrat on the House National Security Committee who has been in Congress since 1977 and is a devoted promoter of military history for applied policy and decision-making; Institute for Defense Analyses, one of the leading federal research centers doing national security analysis; and the National  Geospatial Agency at its offices at the CIA headquarters at Langley.

Ray McGovern
"Intelligence and the Iraq War"
Monday, Oct. 18, 2004
569 Hamilton Hall

Join us for PWAD's first distinguished visitor luncheon of the semester to hear Mr. Ray McGovern.  Mr. McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years.  He was one of the founders and serves on the Steering Group of Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity and has authored "A Compromised CIA: What Can Be Done," a chapter in Patriotism, Democracy and Common Sense.

To attend, you must make a reservation with Jackie Gorman as space is limited.

Charlie Allen
"Issues of Intelligence Current and Past"
Tuesday, Aprl 13, 2004
569 Hamilton Hall

Join us for PWAD's last distinguished visitor luncheon of the year to hear Mr. Charles E. Allen, Assistant Director of Central Intelligence for Collection.

Please call Jackie Gorman for reservations as space is limited.

Brian Campbell
"Those who seek peace must prepare for war: Rome and the threat from the East"

Thursday, April 1, 2004
569 Hamilton Hall

Brian Campbell is Professor of Roman History at Queens University, Belfast Northern Ireland, where he headed the school of classics and ancient history.  A graduate of Queens and Oxford, he has won many awards and published many works on the Roman army and ancient warfare.  

Please call Jackie Gorman for reservations as space is limited.

Professor Eliot A. Cohen
"The War on Terrorism: It is a War, Isn't It?"
Wednesday, March 31, 2004
569 Hamilton Hall

Eliot Cohen is Professor and director of strategic studies at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of the Johns Hopkins University.  He has taught at Harvard and the Naval War College, and served in the Pentagon and on many advisory and consulting boards.  His many works on the military and society include "Commandos and Politicians: (1978), "Citizens and Soldiers" (1985), and most recently "Supreme Command: Soldiers, Statesmen and Leadership in Wartime"  (2002).  He currently serves on the Department of Defense's Defense Policy Board.

Please call Jackie Gorman for reservations as space is limited.

Admiral Dennis Blair (USN, Retired)
"The Origins of the War on Terrorism"
Friday, March 19, 12 noon
569 Hamilton Hall

Admiral Blair is currently president of the Institute for Defense Analyses that performs analytical studies for the Department of Defense and the Office of the Secretary of Defense.  A U.S. Naval Academy graduate and a Rhodes Scholar, Admiral Blair has commanded surface warships and a carrier task force, was assistant to the Secretary of Defense and Director of the Joint Staff in the 1990s, and retired as commander in Chief of the Pacific command in 2002.

PLEASE LET JACKIE GORMAN KNOW BY MARCH 17 TO RESERVE A PLACE, AS OUR SPACE IS LIMITED AND WE NEED TO HAVE AN ACCURATE COUNT FOR ORDERING OUR FOOD.

 Professor Brian Linn, Texas A&M University
"The Military View of American National Security"

Thursday, March 4
569 Hamilton Hall
12:00-1:30 (MUST HAVE RESERVATIONS TO ATTEND)

Prof. Linn teaches courses on American and European military history, military thought, and military strategy.  His books include, "The Philippine War, 1899-1902" (2000); "Guardians of Empire: The U.S. Army and the Pacific, 1902-1940" (1999); and "The U.S. Army and Counterinsurgency in the Philippine War, 1899-1902" (1989).  His publications include a chapter examining "Peacetime Transformation in the U.S. Army, 1865-1965," in Conrad Crane's edited book, "Transforming Defense" (Carlisle: Strategic Studies Institute, 2002), pp. 3-30 and an article "The American Way of War Revisited" "Journal of Military History" 66 (April 2002), pp. 501-30.  Dr. Linn has won many awards and honors, including numerous distinguished book prizes and a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship (2003-2004).  He is currently engaged in two research projects: a book on the evolution of American military attitudes towards war and a book tentatively titled "Elvis's Army" which examines the U.S. Army between the Korean and Indochina conflicts (1953-65).

PLEASE LET JACKIE GORMAN KNOW BY TUESDAY MARCH 2 TO RESERVE A PLACE, AS OUR SPACE IS LIMITED AND WE NEED TO HAVE AN ACCURATE COUNT FOR ORDERING OUR FOOD.

"Media Coverage of the War and Pentagon Press Relations"
February 2, 2004, 12-1:30pm
569 Hamilton Hall
   
Please join us for a distinguished visitor luncheon talk and discussion with Lt. Col. Dave Lapan, USMC.  During both Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom, he worked in the Pentagon Press Office where he helped to develop and implement the policy of "embedding" journalists with U.S. militiary units.  Col. Lapan is currently Chief Pubilc Affairs Officer at Camp Lejeune.

Please call Jackie Gorman for reservations as space is limited.

FALL PWAD Field Trip to Washington, DC
November 13, 2003

Our sixth field trip to government and non-government offices and organizations in the DC area to investigate jobs and careers in national and international security will take place on November 13. We will visit the Henry L. Stimson Center , perhaps the most respected non-partisan think tank in the field doing national security research; Ike Skelton's office, the ranking Democrat on the House National Security Committee who has been in Congress since 1977 and is a devoted promoter of military history for applied policy and decision-making; Institute for Defense Analyses, one of the leading federal research centers doing national security analysis; and the National  Geospatial Agency at its offices at the CIA headquarters at Langley.

"Homeland Security and the War on Terrorism"
November 20, 2003, 12-1:30pm
569 Hamilton Hall

Please join us for a distinguished visitor luncheon talk and discussion with Brigadier General Stanley Jaworski, Pennsylvania Air National Guard.  He works part time for Secretary of Homeland Defense tom Ridge.  General Jaworski is most knowledgeable about the current war on terrorism and homeland defense.

The United Nations and Human Rights
November 19, 2003, 7:30pm
Room 135 Tate-Turner-Kurralt Building

The United Nations Association, in cooperation with the United Nations Organization of UNC, the Campus Y Advocates for Human Rights Committee, Students for Students International, the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense, and the Political Science Departmetn present Goro Onojima, Human Rights Officer in the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights.  Mr. Onojima will discuss the United Nation's work on protecting human rights and take questions from the audience.

"A Rift in Transatlantic Relations: How serious is the present crisis?"
September 24, 2003, 12-1:30pm
569 Hamilton Hall

Join the Curriculum in Peace, War, & Defense for its first distinguished luncheon of the year.  Dieter Mahncke, head of the Politics Department at the College of Europe in Bruges, Belgium, will be the speaker.  He will talk briefly about how the role of Europe has changed for Americans since the end of the Cold War and about how conditions for Europeans have changed or seem to have changed and how they view the relationship and the Untied States.

Please call Jackie Gorman for reservations as space is limited.

The Iraq War After Ten Days: A Panel Discussion With Carolina Faculty
April 1, 2003, 7-9pm
Union Auditorium

Richard H. Kohn, History, The Military Campaign from the American Perspective
Mark Weisburd, Law, Is it Legal, and Does that Matter?
Douglas Maclean, Philosophy, Is it Ethical and Moral: Ends and Means?
James Stimson, Political Science, Will the American People Continue to Support It?
Michael Hunt, History, Implications for American Foreign Relations

Free and Open to the Public

UNC to Host American Indian Stickball Match
March 22, 9-11am (Rain date Aprill 26)
Hooker Fields

UNC-Chapel Hill will host its most unusual sporting event of the season: American Indian stickball.  The exhibition will involve the Paint Town Stickball Team from Cheokee, NC.  This game is ancient, and traditionally it was accompanied by much of the ritual associated with warfare (fasting, sexual abstinence, ritual bathing, dances, etc.).  In fact, Cherokees called stickball "the little brother to war," they settled internal disputes with ball games, and occasionally they played ball with other tribes rather than going to war.  There are historic accounts of Cherokees and Creeks settling a land dispute through the ballgame.  Today, it is the closest we are likely to come to seeing aboriginal American warfare.  This event is made possible through a grant from the Office of Distinguished Scholarships and Intellectual Life.  UNC sponsors include the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense.


Reverend Robert E. Seymour
"Opposition to War"

Wednesday, March 5, 2002, Noon to 1:30pm
226 Memorial Union

Join us for a conversation with Robert Seymour about opposing the war against Iraq: the ethical and moral issues involved in the United States undertaking to overthrow the government of that country; just and unjust wars; how opposition to the present war compares to other anti war efforts in North Carolina and the country in past times, particularly during the Vietnam War; and other questions related to the present crisis.

Feel free to bring lunch with you.

Free and open to the public.  Sponsored by the Campus Y and the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense

Admiral Dennis Blair
"How National Security Policy is REALLY Made in Washington: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, with some Case Studies"
Friday, February 7, 2003, Noon to 1:30 pm
569 Hamilton Hall

Join the Curriculum in Peace, War, & Defense for its third distinguished visitor lunch/talk and discussion.  Adm. Blair, former head of the Pacific Command in charge of all American forces in the region (1999-2002), is the Frey Foundation Distinguished Visiting Professor at Carolina this spring.  He was directly or indirectly involved in most of the major decisions in U.S. defense policy and interventions overseas.  In his years as the Pacific commander, he participated in decisions relating to U.S. relations with China, Korea, Japan, Indonesia, and other Asian and Pacific countries.

Please call Jackie Gorman for reservations as space is limited
Dr. James Abrahamson
"The Coming War With Iraq"
Wednesday, January 15, 2003, Noon to 1:30pm
569 Hamilton Hall

Join the Curriculum in Peace, War, & Defense for its second distinguished visitor luncheon/talk and discussion.  Dr. Abrahamson was an armored cavalry officer in Europe and Vietnam, and on the history faculty at West Point and the Army War College.  He will proved a notional analysis of what an American/allied campaign to overthrow Saddam Hussein might look like.

Please call Jackie Gorman for reservations as space is limited. 


Dr. Abigail Kohn
"Gun Ownership and Public Health: How Gun Owners Hear Public Health Messages About Guns"
November 19, 2002, 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Ibrahim Seminar Room, 1301 McGavran-Greenberg Hall

Join the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense and the Department of Health Policy and Administration to hear Dr. Abigail Kohn discuss how gun enthusiasts hear public health messages about guns and why gun enthusiasts are distrustful of what health professionals say about guns.

Abigail Kohn has an A.B. in Folklore and Mythology from Harvard University, a Masters in Criminology from Cambridge University, and a Ph.D. in Medical Anthrolpology from the University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco.


Congressman Mike McIntyre
November 7, 2002, 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Student Union, Speaker Room 3503

Congressman Mike McIntyre will meet with PWAD majors only to answer questions about the War on Terror, and his perspctives on it.  Congressman McIntyre is a member of the House Armed Services Committee, and the Special Oversight Panel on Terrorism, and has been to Afghanistan as part of this work for the Committee.  (He is also a Carolina alum).  His Biography is available at www.house.gov/mcintyre and reflects his interest in, and work on, national security affairs during his years in the Hosue.


Matrilineal Islam and Political Motherhood in West Sumatra, Indonesia
November 4, 2002, 12pm noon
569 Hamilton 

Join the Curriculum in Peace, War, & Defense for its first distinguished visitor luncheon of the year.  The speaker will be Professor Jeffrey Hadler of the University of California, Berkeley.  He will describe a civil war in the early 19th century in the Minangkabau highlands of West Sumatra that sought to replace the local matrilineal culture with one that mirrored the Wahabi society in Mecca.  The reformists were defeated, but the peace brought an ongoing questioning of gender and religion, as well as the intensive colonial presence of the Dutch.  Today, the Minangkabau remain the world's largest matrilineal Muslim culture, and have had tremendous influence on the development of the modern nation of Indonesia.  This talk explores those cultural debates surrounding Islam and gender, and seeks to explain the unique cultural and political position that Minangkabau people have had in 20th century Indonesia.

You must have a reservation to attend.  Please get in touch with Jackie Gorman.


Should the United States Attack Iraq?
September 25, 2002, 6pm
George Watts Hill Alumni Center

Join the Curriculum in Peace, War, & Defense and the UNC General Alumni Association for an Iraq Symposium featuring A. Mark Weisburd, Professor of Law, Mark Crexcenzi, Asst. Professor of Political Science, Richard H. Kohn, Professor of History; Chair, Curriculum in Peace, War, & Defense, James A. Stimson, Raymond Dawson Professor of Political Science, Sarah D. Shields, Associate Professor History, Carl Ernst, Professor of Religious Studies, Douglas MacLean, Professor of Philosophy, and Michael H. Hunt, Everett H. Emerson Professor of History.

Free and Open to the Public


Spring PWAD Field Trip to Washington, DC
March, 19, 2002

Our fifth field trip to government and non-government offices and organizations in the DC area to investigate jobs and careers in national and international security will take place on November 9. We will visit the Henry L. Stimson Center , perhaps the most respected non-partisan think tank in the field doing national security research; Ike Skelton's office, the ranking Democrat on the House National Security Committee who has been in Congress since 1977 and is a devoted promoter of military history for applied policy and decision-making; Institute for Defense Analyses, one of the leading federal research centers doing national security analysis; and the National Imagery and Mapping Agency.


Mr. Colin Soloway
February 18, 2002

"A Reporter from Carolina in Afghanistan" who discovered the "American Taliban" John Walker Lindh in the prison in Mazar-i-Sharif and broke the story in Newsweek, will present a talk.  The event will be held on from 12:00-1:30 in Hamilton 569.

You must have a reservation to attend.  Please get in touch with Jackie Gorman.


Dr. David J. Weber, Associate Professor of Medicine, Associate Professor School of Public Heath
November 20, 2001

Dr. Weber will present The Third in a Series of Presentations on The War on Terrorism, "BIOTERRORISM: WHAT IS THE THREAT, HOW GREAT IS IT?"  The event will be held from 7-9pm in Hamilton 100 and is open to the public.


Captain Craig Marks, US Army (Ret)
November 9, 2001

Capt. Marks, an Associate Professor of Military Science at UNC Chapel Hill, and a former Green Beret, will present The Second in a Series of Presentations on The War on Terrorism, "IS AMERICA UNDER ATTACK?  HOW CAN YOU PROTECT YOUR FAMILY?"  The event will be held at Gerrard Auditorium, 7-9pm and will be open to members of the community.  Capt. Marks has an extensive background in counterterrorism, having served in Special Forces units throughout his career in the Army.  He will discuss the current situation, ways the public can be vigilant and protective without paralyzing themselves, and answer questions from the audience.


Professor Jeremy Black, University of Exeter, England
October 26, 2001

Join us for PWAD's second Distinguished Visitor luncheon of the year on Friday, October 26, 12 noon in Hamilton Hall 569.  Professor Black is an internationally famous military historian, author of numerous books on war and society since medieval times, and a delightful and engaging speaker.

Please call Jackie Gorman for reservations as space is limited.



Gene R. Nichol, Jr., Dean, and Burton Craige Professor of Law
October 16, 2001

The Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense presents The First in a Series of Presentations on The War on Terrorism "American Civil Liberties and The War on Terrorism".  7PM, Tate-Tuirner-Kuralt Building, Tuesday, October 16, 2001.  Co-Sponsored by the School of Law, UNC-Chapel Hill.


Rye Barcott ('01)

August 30, 2001

Join us for PWAD's first Distinguished Visitor luncheon of the year on Thursday August 30, noon-1:30 to hear PWAD alum Rye Barcott report on "The Challenges of Development in East Africa's Largest Slum."  After graduating in May and commissioning in the US Marine Corps, Rye took the Non-Governmental Organization he founded and leads, Carolina For Kibera, Inc. (CFK), back to Kenya for the summer to work on a number of grassroots projects in the Kiberal slum of Nairobi, including a youth sports association, medical clinic, and nursery school.  Rye's particular interest has been preventing youth violence, in one of the world's real tinderboxes: a slum of over a million people in the space of UNC's Chapel Hill campus.

We gather for lunch at noon in Hamilton Hall 569.  Please call Jackie Gorman for reservations as space is limited.


2001 MCAS Cherry Point Air Show
March 31, 2001

From wing walkers to sailplanes, ribbon cutters to jet trucks, now is the time to "gear up" for the largest spectator event in eastern NC as the world's largest Marine Corps air station prepares to host the 2001 MCAS Cherry Point Air Show.

This year's show, themed "Wings Over Carolina", will highlight a display of military might and will take place March 31.  The air show will feature the world famous US Navy Blue Angels jet performance team.  Military acts will include a Marine Air Ground Task Force demonstration highlighting the US Marine Corps finest capabilities, the US Army precision parachute team The Golden Knights and an additional highlight to the show will be a spectacular display of pyrotechnics and explosives aptly named the Wall of Flame.

We will travel by bus and have reserved seating for the show.  The trip is limited to 57.  Contact Jackie Gorman to make reservations.


Dith Pran
March 26-30, 2001

The famous Cambodian photojournalist for the NY Times, Dith Pran, will be visitng campus the week of March 26-30 for Human Rights Week.  He is the person whose life was the basis for "The Killing Fields" film.  The Curriculum in Peace, War, & Defense is helping to sponsor and support the visit.


Prof. Robert Rupen
March 6, 2001

Join us for a luncheon on March 6 in Hamilton Hall 569, 12-1:30, for Professor Robert Rupen, "Mongolia in Russian-Chinese Relations, 1960-2000." 

Prof. Rupen taught for thirty years in our political science department in soviet studies, national and international security, and central and inner Asia.  He is one of this country's foremost experts on Mongolia, having written two books on the country, and visited last August.  Come hear about this far corner of the world which is unkown to most of us!!

Please call Jackie Gorman for reservations as space is limited.


Bo Hla-Tint
March 1, 2001

Mr. Bo Hla-Tint, a minister representing the National Coalition Government of the Union of Burma (NCGUB), will speak in the Common Room of the James M. Johnston Center at 8:15pm on Thursday, March 1 on the subject of forced labor and military rule in Burma today.  This talk is in part sponsored by the Curriculum in Peace, War, & Defesne.  It should be very interesting, as Burma is one of the more repressive military governments in the world today.


John Isaacs
February 6, 2001

Join us for our first distinguished visitor luncheon of the new year on Tuesday, February 6, 12-2 in Hamilton 569 for a talk and discussion with John Isaacs on : "Weapons of Mass Destruction: Opportunities, Dangers Ahead."

John Isaacs has served as executive director and president of Council for a Livable World since 1991, headed the Washingotn office since 1981 and lobbied for the Council since 1978.  He is one of the most respected and senior leaders of the nation's arms control community, and one of Washington, D.C.'s foremost experts on Congress and national security issues.  Profiled in both Congressional Quarterly and National Journal, he has authored numberous studies, fact sheets and breifing books on arms control, weapons of mass destruction and military budget issues.  He is frequently interviewed for television and radio shows and for newspaper stories.

Please call Jackie Gorman for reservations as space is limited.


Congressman Ike Skelton
December 1, 2000

Join us for our fourth distinguished visitor luncheon of the semester on Friday, December 1, 2000 in Hamilton 569 with Congressman Ike skelton, the ranking democrat on the House Armed Services Committee. Congressman Skelton represents the 4th district of Missouri (Fort Leonard Wood and Whiteman AFB, home of the B-2s) and has been in the House since 1976. He is a great friend of scholars, loves military history, thoroughly enjoys students and intellectual interchange, and is about as charming, stimulating, fun, warm, and informal a senior political leader as you could imagine.

Please join us for lunch and a discussion, "The 2000 Election, the Military, and National Defense in the Next Administration?" Call for reservations.


Professor Speaks on Break-Up of U.S.S.R.
November 29, 2000

Join us for our third distinguished visitor luncheon of the semester on Wednesday, November 29, 12-1:30 in Hamilton 569 with Professor Robin Watson, visiting in our Economics Department, on "The Collapse of the Soviet Union: Where was the Agency?" Prof. Watson is a senior economist with the CIA, where he has spent most of his career since graduating from Carolina in '70, conning BGBs, and taking his PhD at the University of Tennessee. He has been in the Directorate of Intelligence working on international economics issues, particularly Soviet and East European issues. He has headed their Econometrics and Economic Data shop for the past several years.


Fall PWAD Field Trip to Washington, DC
November 9, 2000 

Our fourth annual fall field trip to government and non-government offices and organizations in the DC area to investigate jobs and careers in national and international security will take place on November 9. We will visit the Henry L. Stimson Center , perhaps the most respected non-partisan think tank in the field doing national security research; Ike Skelton's office, the ranking Democrat on the House National Security Committee who has been in Congress since 1977 and is a devoted promoter of military history for applied policy and decision-making; Institute for Defense Analyses, one of the leading federal research centers doing national security analysis; and the CIA Headquarters.


Luncheon Seminar
October 26, 2000, 12:00-1:30 
569 Hamilton Hall

The Curriculum in Peace, War, & Defense will hold its second Luncheon Seminar of the year. UNC's Diplomat in Residence, Ambassador Brenda Schoonover, will discuss her experiences: "The Practice of Diplomacy on the Ground: Life in an Embassy," including the day-to-day activities of an American mission, relationships with the military attaches and CIA, how American diplomats interact with various government officials and the public, and how American foreign policy plays out around the world on the ground in countries around the world. Ambassador Schoonover headed our mission in Togo and has served in a number of countries in Africa and elsewhere in the world. 


Luncheon Seminar
September 6, 2000, 12:00-1:30 
569 Hamilton Hall 

The Curriculum in Peace, War, & Defense will hold its first Luncheon Seminar of the year. The featured speaker will be Lisa Cilento who is a PWAD major. Lisa, along with Marrisa Downs, Allison Pickett, and Grant Miller who attended the Burch Seminar in Vienna, and visited the Balkans, will give their impressions of seeing a war zone up close and ugly. 


Distinguished Visitor Luncheon Seminar 
March 30, 2000, 12-2 
569 Hamilton Hall

The Curriculum in Peace, War, & Defense will hold its second Distinguished Visitor Luncheon of the spring semester, featuring Colonel Thomas Greenwood, Senior Aide to the Commandant of the Marine Corps. His talk is titled "Age of Violent Peace." He will consider the Commandant's perspective on peacekeeping and his own experiences in peacekeeping missions to Haiti and Africa, concluding with an analysis of common characteristics of successful peacekeeping operations. A period of discussion will follow, and Colonel Greenwood will entertain questions and comments on peacekeeping and other issues of interest related to defense and to the Marine Corps.


Distinguished Visitor Luncheon Seminar
February 1, 2000, 12-2 
569 Hamilton Hall

On February 1, from 12-2pm, Peace, War, and Defense will hold its first Distinguished Visitor Luncheon of the spring semester, featuring Major Per Iko, Swedish Army speaking on PREVENTING UNREST: EXPERIENCES OF THE U.N. MISSION IN MACEDONIA. Major Iko joined the Swedish Army after compulsory service in 1984, serving as a reconnaissance/intelligence officer and in various assignments as commander, in the Artic region, and on peace-keeping missions in Cyprus (1986-87), Lebanon (1990), and Macdonia (1999). Presently he is a member of the military history department of the Royal Swedish Staff and War College, Stockholm. 

He will give a brief description of the Swedish Defense system with its conscription and how it is used in peace-keeping operations, blending with his own experiences.


The Bombing of Yougoslavia, 1999: A Vindication for Air Power?
Thursday 4th November from 7-9PM
Toy Lounge-Dey Hall

Featured speakers: 
Professor Tami Biddle, History, Duke University, Formerly of the National Air and Space Museum, author of a forthcoming history of strategic bombing doctrine in Britain and the United States, who will speak on STRATEGIC BOMBING IN THE 20TH CENTURY. 

Professor Stephen Biddle, Political Science, UNC, formerly of the Institute for Defense Analyses, and author of several recent articles on the future of warfare, who will speak on THE KOSOVO AIR CAMPAIGN. 

Major Edward Westermann, USAF, DOCTORAL CANDIDATE IN History, UNC, author of a forthcoming work on German anti-aircraft defenses, 1910-1945, who was in German during the campaign, and will speak on THE EUROPEAN VIEW OF THE BOMBING CAMPAIGN. 

Professor Richard Kohn, History, UNC, Chair of Peace, War, and Defense and formerly Chief of Air Force History and Chief Historian, USAF, who will moderate the program and speak on THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN VICTORY AND SUCCESS.


Fall PWAD Field Trip to Washington, DC
November 9, 1999

Our third annual fall field trip to government and non-government offices and organizations in the DC area to investigate jobs and careers in national and international security will take place on November 9. We will take people on a first-come, first-served basis under the strict rule of seniority: seniors, juniors, sophomores, and freshman.


Captain Howard Petrea Speaks
November 1, 1999, 12-2pm

Captain Petrea, USN, Ret., was the Executive Assistant to Admiral Leighton Smith, commander of the air campaign in Bosnia in 1995, and to Admiral Joseph Prueher, Commander-in-Chief Pacific, 1997-1999 during crises with China. Capt. Petrea, who has a distinguished career as a carrier pilot, will speak on these two experiences: COALITION OPERATIONS VS UNILATERAL ENCOUNTERS IN FUTURE MILITARY OPERATIONS BY THE UNITED STATES and on THE ASIA-PACIFIC AS SEEN THROUGH THE US CINCPAC PERSPECTIVE. He will then lead a discussion on American military interventions and the possibilities of conflict with China. 


Spring PWAD Field Trip
April 10, 1999

On April 10, 1999, we will be taking a field trip to the Naval Base in Norfolk, Virginia, to visit the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington for about two hours. After our tour on the George Washington we will eat lunch in the Wardroom of the carrier and then visit the USS Normandy, a cruiser in the Atlantic Fleet. We will leave at 5:45am sharp from Hamilton Hall and return mid-evening. This trip is available for PWAD majors, PWAD faculty, History faculty, Military History graduate students, and the students in the History of Sea Power. 


Bombing Yugoslavia
Thursday 8th April at 5:30pm
Greenlaw Room 431

Program features Gerhard Weinberg (History) speaking on the historic background of the Balkans; Robert D. Greenberg (Slavic Languages and Literature) speaking on the culture and condition of the former Yugoslavia; Richard H. Kohn (History) speaking on bombing--its political-military utility and limitations; and Stephen Biddle (Political Science) speaking on the politico-military alternatives in the current crisis.


General George Lee Butler, USAF (Ret.) speaking on "The Future of Nuclear Weapons."
March 2-3, 1999

General Lee Butler served from 1991 to 1994 as Commander-in-Chief of the United States strategic nuclear forces. In this position he was responsible for the employment of the nation's nuclear bombers and ballistic missiles, both land and sea-based; developing nuclear weapon target plans; and advising the President on response to nuclear attack on the United States. A 1961 graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy, with a Master's Degree in International Affairs at the University of Paris, France, in 1967. General Butler's military career spanned five decades and encompassed a wide variety of command and staff assignments. He is a rated pilot, navigator and parachutist, with over 5000 hours of flying time in 15 types of aircraft. He flew in aerial combat in Vietnam in the F-4C, and later served as aide-de-camp to the commander of U.S. Air Forces in Southeast Asia. He served three tours in the Pentagon, commanded two B-52 wings and was the Inspector General for Strategic Air Command. His Washington tours included responsibilities for strategic arms control negotiations, Congressional liaison, weapons system acquisition, and direction of operation forces. He served as the chief strategist and planner for U.S. armed forces from 1987 to 1991, when he was promoted to his fourth star and named commander of the nation's strategic nuclear forces. General Butler retired from active military service in 1994. Since 1996, when he spoke on this issue to the National Press Club in Washington, General Butler has campaigned for the abolition of nuclear weapons.


Dr. William T. Generous Luncheon Seminar
March 18, 1999

Dr. Generous is the author of "Sword and Scales: The Development of the Uniform Code of Military Justice," a history of American military justice since World War II, and "Choate Rosemary Hall: The History of the School, 1890-1990." The Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense will be hosting Dr. Generous on March 18, 12-2pm in Hamilton 569 where he will be giving his slant on issues of Peace, War, and Defense. Dr. Generous is retiring to Chapel Hill after 30 years at Choate/Rosemary Hall School in Connecticut, where he taught history, coached various sports and the debate team, and chaired the history department. He served in the Navy as an enlisted man and officer (including in Vietnam).


Fall PWAD Field Trip to Washington, DC 
November 20, 1998

Once again our fall field trip will be to Washington, DC, where we will investigate jobs in national security in the federal government and in non-governmental organizations. We will visit NIMA (National Imagery and Mapping Agency), the Henry L. Stimson Center, and the office of The Honorable Ike Skelton, U.S. House of Representatives. 


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7 January 2010