TAM Course Pages

This is the course page archive. For recent courses, visit the TAM Course Pages.

The following pages contain representative examples of the syllabi and/or course descriptions followed in various TAM modules. Not all of the syllabi from all TAM courses are contained in this site. Syllabi vary across years, faculty, and sites.

2010-11 Courses

Below are available syllabi from the 2010-11 academic year. Not all courses offered are represented here, and these listings are subject to change.

UNC at Chapel Hill — Required Courses

TAM I Required Courses

All TAM Track I students will take the following courses at UNC-CH during the 2010 fall semester. These courses were specifically designed to introduce students to the TransAtlantic world and focus on comparative approaches to the institutions, politics, policies, and societies of nations on both sides of the Atlantic. 

Varieties of Welfare Capitalism (3 credits)
Professor Peter Starke from the University of Bremen will teach this class while Professor John Stephens is on leave for the semester.
The course will examine the development of different types of welfare states in Europe and North America. The course will be structured around the concept of “welfare states regimes”, as defined by Gøsta Esping-Andersen in his path breaking book, Three Worlds of Welfare Capitalism. The course moves back and forth from broad conceptual issues to examination of developments in several countries which represent the different welfare state types, including the United States and Britain as liberal welfare states, Sweden as a social democratic welfare state, Germany as a Christian democratic welfare state, and Italy as a southern or Mediterranean variant of the Christian democratic regime
Download Course Syllabus (PDF)

US-EU Lecture Series (1 credit – pass/fail class)
Professor: Milada Vachudova
This weekly lecture series will draw primarily on the expertise of Europeanist faculty from UNC-CH and beyond.  Topics will focus on EU and/or US foreign and domestic politics as well as on contemporary transatlantic relations. Each week, two TAM students will be required to research the up-coming topic and speaker; these students will introduce the lecturer and will lead the discussion following the talk.  TAM students will also be required to participate in an on-line discussion forum focused on the lectures. 

European Integration: Theories, Institutions and Decision-Making Processes (3 credits)
Professor Christiane Lemke – (visiting from the University of Hannover in Germany) 
The seminar will begin with a brief introduction to the European integration process, then cover major theories of integration, the institutions of the EU, including the most recent EU-reform process and some major policies of the EU.  For more information about Prof. Lemke, please see her website at the University of Hannover.
2010 Syllabus (PDF)

The EU as a Global Actor (3 credits)
Professor: DAAD Professor Holger Moroff - www.moroff.eu
The seminar focuses on the EU’s external relations and foreign policies. The EU is not a classical actor in international relations as it enjoys more decision making powers than an international organization and less than a unitary state. However, these powers vary according to the degree of integration in different policy fields. We shall look at a diverse set of EU external policies ranging from trade and soft security issues to diplomatic and military developments as well as US-EU relations.
Download Course Syllabus (PDF)

TAM I Elective Courses

Below please find a list of the TAM I elective course offerings for fall 2010.  Each TAM I student will enroll in ONE class on this list.   Typically only 5 TAM students may enroll in each elective course. 

1. POLI 438 - Democracy and International Institutions in an Undivided Europe
Professor Milada Vachudova
This class explores the collapse of communist rule in 1989, and the reaction of international institutions to the challenges of democratization, economic transition, ethnic conflict and European integration in an Undivided Europe.
Professor Vachudova’s website | Course Syllabus

2. PUBH 600 – Health Care in the US
Professor Sue Tolleson-Rinehart
The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the fundamental organization, behavior, financing, and challenges of the health system of the United States. The course treats the entire edifice of American health care as "the American health system," and intends to examine it in toto, including by comparing it to other national health systems, and in part, by examining critical components of the system.
2008 Syllabus (PDF)

3. PUBH 510 – Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Global Health
Professors Peggy Bentley and Gretchen Van Vliet
This course will explore contemporary issues, problems and controversies in global health through an interdisciplinary perspective; examine the complex tapestry of social, economic, political and environmental factors that affect global health; analyze global health disparities through a social justice and human rights lens; and expose students to opportunities in global health work and research.
Prof. Bentley's website | Prof. Vliet's Website | Course Syllabus (PDF)

4. ENST 585  - American Environmental Policy
Professor Richard Andrews
This course has two principal objectives. The first is to provide an intensive introduction to the historical development and current issues of environmental policy in the United States, including basic perspectives, processes and institutions, major developments in the history of American environmental policy, environmental regulation and recent innovations, and implications of emerging global issues and institutions. The second objective is to develop each student’s skills in critical thinking and reasoning about environmental policy issues, both historical and current, and about the arguments of advocates on all sides of environmental issues; and in writing a concise assessment of a policy issue and options for dealing with it.
Prof. Andrew's website | 2009 Syllabus (PDF)

5. PLCY 570 – Health and Human Rights
Benjamin Mason Meier, JD, LLM, PhD
Human rights are inextricably linked to the achievement of public health policy goals. This course provides an introduction to the relationship between health policy and human rights. As a survey course, it ranges broadly over theoretical approaches and concrete issues relating to the realization of human rights in the context of domestic and international public health policies. For public policy, public health, and law students seeking to gain an understanding of human rights, this course will complement other rights-based courses at UNC, giving students a foundation for future studies at the intersection of human rights and public health. The focus of this course will be on rights-based approaches to health, applying a human rights perspective to selected public health policies, programs, and interventions. Specifically, this course will teach students how to apply a formalistic human rights framework to a wide range of critical issues in public health, exploring the role of human rights as both a safeguard against harm and a catalyst for health promotion. Upon completion, students will have acquired an understanding of the social, economic, cultural, legal, and political processes by which human rights inform public health objectives.
Prof. Meier's website | Course Syllabus

6. POLI 891 – Statistics and Data Analysis
Professor Justin Gross
This course focuses on the application of statistical analysis to quantitative data in order to study theoretically and substantively interesting questions about politics. We will consider attributes of single variables, including their distributions and measures of central tendency and dispersion. We will then consider measures of association between two variables and introduce the concept and mechanics of hypothesis testing. We will conclude with the basic linear model as a way to introduce additional covariates. For each topic, we will examine methods for both categorical and continuous variables.
Download Course Syllabus (PDF)

7. ITAL 830:  Italian Biopolitical Thought
Professor Federico Luisetti
Taking as a point of departure Gilles Deleuze’s notion of “immanent life”, the course will explore the radical politics of life emerged in contemporary Italian philosophy, literature, and cultural theory. In particular, we will discuss the legacy of Friedrich Nietzsche, Michel Foucault, and Gilles Deleuze, as seen through the lenses of Italian biopolitics.
Readings will include:
G. Agamben, "What Is an Apparatus?" and Other Essays, Stanford University Press; and State of Exception, University of Chicago Press, 2005
M. Cacciari, The Unpolitical: On the Radical Critique of Political Reason, Fordham University Press, 2009
G. Deleuze, Nietzsche and Philosophy, Columbia University Press, 2006
R. Esposito, Bios: Biopolitics and Philosophy, University of Minnesota Press, 2008
M. Foucault, Security, Territory, Population: Lectures at the College de France 1977—1978, Picador, 2009
T. Negri, Insurgencies: Constituent Power and the Modern State, University of Minnesota Press, 1999
G. Vattimo, Dialogue with Nietzsche, Columbia University Press, 2008
Professor Luisetti’s website

8.      POLI  721 - Public Policy and Administration
Professor Virginia Gray
Alternative explanation of public policies and policy-making processes; introduction to policy analysis as a way to inform choices among policy options; policy implementation through administrative practices and procedures.
Professor Gray’s website

Specialist Modules

Specialist Module I, February/March to May/June (selected by student)

After a winter break, TAM I students resume the program in February / March with Specialist Module I. This module will be offered at four EAUC sites: Bath, Berlin, Paris, and Prague. The content information below may be subject to change. Please check back for updated information. We cannot guarantee placement at any particular site due to yearly fluctuations in the number of seats available.

*Disclaimer: Module content is controlled by member sites and is subject to change due to faculty involvement.

BATH: The Specialist Module I at Bath University will be called "Global Europe: Roles and Comparisons." This module will have a strong IR focus. Courses may include: Europe in Global Politics, European Political Economy, Organized Crime in Europe, The Politics of Migration, The Politics of Sustainability, Britain and Europe, and Norms in International Relations, The European Union's Common Foreign and Security and Defense Policy, International Security: The Contemporary Agenda, and The Theory and Practice of Arms Control.

BERLIN: In Berlin TAM I students will begin in February with a pre-semester mini-module. They will have the option to take German-language classes as well as a workshop on research design and methods in political science and a thematic Colloquium. Humboldt and Free Universities will offer a Specialist I module called "Democratic Government in Europe." Courses may include: Comparative European Government, Facets of Europeanization, and Europe's Borders and Neighbours. This module is offered in German; however, some of the coursework during this module may be offered in English. However, the universities in Berlin have now set a standard of B2 / intermediate German-language ability (in the CEFR: Common European Framework of Reference for Languages).  This level serves as a guideline intended to help applicants determine whether to pursue study in Berlin.

PARIS: The Specialist Module I at S-P will take as its title "The Politics and Policies of the EU." Courses include: The Political System of France, The Transformation of European Governance, The European Union and the Question of Democracy, Minorities in Europe, and The Dynamic of European Society in the 20th Century. A methodological workshop will also be offered. Students who opt to study at S-P must be prepared to meet the French-language proficiency and admissions standards set by that institution. Please see the Application Forms section for more information.

PRAGUE: Specialist Module I will be taught in English at Charles University and will be called "Central Europe in the European Union – Transformation and Transition." The module will be comprised of several units with titles such as: The EU Enlarged and Transformed, The Politics and Society of CEE Countries, and The Political System of the Czech Republic. Students may also have the option to take Czech language classes.

Specialist Module II, September/October to January/February (selected by student)

Specialist II modules are typically taught in the language of the host site. TAM I students will frequently use the coursework of this module to begin specializing for the masters thesis and will usually stay at the same site to write the thesis in the spring. The following topics are subject to change. Please check the website for updates.

BATH: Specialist Module II's main emphasis at the University of Bath will be on the issue of security and will be called "European Perspectives on Security". Since the end of the Cold War, the concept of security has been increasingly broadly defined. The Bath Specialist II Module will include such courses as European Security, International Terrorism, From International to Global Political Economy, Power, Order and Institutions in World Politics, and IR Theories.

BERLIN: The Berlin site will begin with a mini-module in September. This mini-module will offer students the chance to study German and to take a workshop on research design and methods in political science as well as a thematic Colloquium. Berlin's Specialist Module II is called "Democratisation and Political Change". Course titles include: Facets of Europeanisation, Foreign and Security Policy in Europe, and Democracy and Democratisation in Europe. Please note that some of the coursework during this module may be offered in English; some courses, however, will be taught in German. However, the universities in Berlin have now set a standard of B2 / intermediate German-language ability (in the CEFR: Common European Framework of Reference for Languages).  This level serves as a guideline intended to help applicants determine whether to pursue study in Berlin.

MADRID: The Specialist Module II in Madrid focuses on social and cultural change in the South of Europe. It is divided into two main units. The first one looks at the general frame of change in Europe, with particular attention to the South; the second one's topic is based on changes led by women and the path towards gender equality. This piece is divided into four sub-units, all of them looking at specific sides of women's new roles in Europe. University of Carlos III is the module's base camp although some of the sub-units' theoretical sessions may be given outside of the university.

PARIS: This module in Paris offers courses with such titles as: The History of European Integration, France and European Security (NATO, ESDP), Politics of the European Union, Theories of European Lobbying, The Political and Legal System of the European Union, and Foreign Policy of the European Union. A methodology workshop will also be offered. Students who opt to study at S-P must be prepared to meet the French-language proficiency and admissions standards set by that institution. Please see the Application Forms section for more information.

SIENA: Siena's Specialist Module II, "From National to Global: Changing Perspectives on a Changing World", examines issues which derive from the particular pressures to which Italy is subject. Course titles may include: National Perspectives: Italy, Europe and the EU, European Perspectives: Migration, Culture, Markets, and Europe in Global Perspective. This module is primarily taught in English. Italian language instruction will be offered.

TAM Track II - Required Fall 2010 courses:

All Track II TAM students will take four required core courses at UNC-CH during the 2010 Fall semester. In addition to these four required courses, those in Track II will take one elective course.

Varieties of Welfare Capitalism (3 credits)
Professor Peter Starke from the University of Bremen will teach this class while Professor John Stephens is on leave for the semester.
The course will examine the development of different types of welfare states in Europe and North America. The course will be structured around the concept of "welfare states regimes", as defined by Gøsta Esping-Andersen in his path breaking book, /Three Worlds of Welfare Capitalism/. The course moves back and forth from broad conceptual issues to examination of developments in several countries which represent the different welfare state types, including the United States and Britain as liberal welfare states, Sweden as a social democratic welfare state, Germany as a Christian democratic welfare state, and Italy as a southern or Mediterranean variant of the Christian democratic regime.
Download Course Syllabus (PDF)

US-EU Lecture Series (1 credit – pass/fail class)
Professor: Milada Vachudova
This weekly lecture series will draw primarily on the expertise of Europeanist faculty from UNC-CH and beyond. Topics will focus on EU and/or US foreign and domestic politics as well as on contemporary transatlantic relations. Each week, two TAM students will be required to research the up-coming topic and speaker; these students will introduce the lecturer and will lead the discussion following the talk. TAM students will also be required to participate in an on-line discussion forum focused on the lectures.

European Integration: Theories, Institutions and Decision-Making Processes (3 credits)
Professor Christiane Lemke – a visiting professor from the University of Hannover in Germany will teach this class.
The seminar will begin with a brief introduction to the European integration process, then cover major theories of integration, the institutions of the EU, including the most recent EU-reform process and some major policies of the EU. For more information about Prof. Lemke, please see her University of Hannover website.
2010 Syllabus (PDF)

Statistics and Data Analysis (3 credits)
Professor Justin Gross
This course focuses on the application of statistical analysis to quantitative data in order to study theoretically and substantively interesting questions about politics. We will consider attributes of single variables, including their distributions and measures of central tendency and dispersion. We will then consider measures of association between two variables and introduce the concept and mechanics of hypothesis testing. We will conclude with the basic linear model as a way to introduce additional covariates. For each topic, we will examine methods for both categorical and continuous variables.
Download Course Syllabus (PDF)

TAM Track II - Elective courses:

1. The EU as a Global Actor
Professor: DAAD Professor Holger Moroff - www.moroff.eu
The seminar focuses on the EU’s external relations and foreign policies. The EU is not a classical actor in international relations as it enjoys more decision making powers than an international organization and less than a unitary state. However, these powers vary according to the degree of integration in different policy fields. We shall look at a diverse set of EU external policies ranging from trade and soft security issues to diplomatic and military developments as well as US-EU relations.
Download Course Syllabus (PDF)

2. RUES/PWAD 469 - Ethnic Conflict and International Intervention in the Former Yugoslavia
Professor: Robert Jenkins
This course focuses on factors leading to the breakup of socialist Yugoslavia, the nature of conflicts in this territory throughout the 1990s, and the various efforts of the international community to end conflict and promote post-conflict reconstruction and development. We will explore how ethno-nationalist identity and mobilization have developed and transformed up to the most recent events. We will also examine the evolution of international intervention from the beginnings of conflict through current efforts. We will end by discussing implications of intervention, ethnic conflict, and nation building in Iraq.

3. POLI 438 - Democracy and International Institutions in an Undivided Europe
Professor Milada Vachudova
This class explores the collapse of communist rule in 1989, and the reaction of international institutions to the challenges of democratization, economic transition, ethnic conflict and European integration in an Undivided Europe.
Professor Vachudova’s website | Course Syllabus

4. PUBH 600 – Health Care in the US
Professor Sue Tolleson-Rinehart
The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the fundamental organization, behavior, financing, and challenges of the health system of the United States. The course treats the entire edifice of American health care as "the American health system," and intends to examine it in toto, including by comparing it to other national health systems, and in part, by examining critical components of the system.
2008 Syllabus (PDF)

5. PUBH 510 – Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Global Health
Professors Peggy Bentley and Gretchen Van Vliet
This course will explore contemporary issues, problems and controversies in global health through an interdisciplinary perspective; examine the complex tapestry of social, economic, political and environmental factors that affect global health; analyze global health disparities through a social justice and human rights lens; and expose students to opportunities in global health work and research.
Prof. Bentley's website | Prof. Vliet's Website | Course Syllabus (PDF)

6. PLCY 570 – Health and Human Rights
Professor Benjamin Mason Meier, JD, LLM, PhD
Human rights are inextricably linked to the achievement of public health policy goals. This course provides an introduction to the relationship between health policy and human rights. As a survey course, it ranges broadly over theoretical approaches and concrete issues relating to the realization of human rights in the context of domestic and international public health policies. For public policy, public health, and law students seeking to gain an understanding of human rights, this course will complement other rights-based courses at UNC, giving students a foundation for future studies at the intersection of human rights and public health. The focus of this course will be on rights-based approaches to health, applying a human rights perspective to selected public health policies, programs, and interventions. Specifically, this course will teach students how to apply a formalistic human rights framework to a wide range of critical issues in public health, exploring the role of human rights as both a safeguard against harm and a catalyst for health promotion. Upon completion, students will have acquired an understanding of the social, economic, cultural, legal, and political processes by which human rights inform public health objectives.
Prof. Meier's website | Course Syllabus

7. ITAL 830:  Italian Biopolitical Thought
Professor Federico Luisetti
Taking as a point of departure Gilles Deleuze’s notion of “immanent life”, the course will explore the radical politics of life emerged in contemporary Italian philosophy, literature, and cultural theory. In particular, we will discuss the legacy of Friedrich Nietzsche, Michel Foucault, and Gilles Deleuze, as seen through the lenses of Italian biopolitics.
Readings will include:
G. Agamben, "What Is an Apparatus?" and Other Essays, Stanford University Press; and State of Exception, University of Chicago Press, 2005
M. Cacciari, The Unpolitical: On the Radical Critique of Political Reason, Fordham University Press, 2009
G. Deleuze, Nietzsche and Philosophy, Columbia University Press, 2006
R. Esposito, Bios: Biopolitics and Philosophy, University of Minnesota Press, 2008
M. Foucault, Security, Territory, Population: Lectures at the College de France 1977—1978, Picador, 2009
T. Negri, Insurgencies: Constituent Power and the Modern State, University of Minnesota Press, 1999
G. Vattimo, Dialogue with Nietzsche, Columbia University Press, 2008
Professor Luisetti’s website

8.      POLI  721 - Public Policy and Administration
Professor Virginia Gray
Alternative explanation of public policies and policy-making processes; introduction to policy analysis as a way to inform choices among policy options; policy implementation through administrative practices and procedures.
Professor Gray’s website

TAM II's Spring Semester at UNC-CH

During the Spring semester, TAM II students will take three required courses. In 2011, the required courses will focus on European Security (PDF) as well as on Political Contestation in Europe (PDF). In addition, TAM II students will take one elective course.

TAM II's Second Academic Year

TAM II students will spend their second year of study in Amsterdam, Barcelona, or Bremen. The TAM II overseas coursework is offered in English. VU University Amsterdam, UPF, and the University of Bremen all have strong offerings in social policy. In Amsterdam, courses focus on comparative welfare states, international political economy, international security, and global environmental governance. Some research internships may be available to TAM students who study at the VU. At UPF, course titles for the fall 2010 semester include Technical of Statistical Analysis I, Electoral Systems, Multiculturality and Immigration Policies, The Welfare State, Globalization and European Integration, Democracy and Political Liberalism, Social Policy and the Welfare State, Electoral Competition and Voting Behaviour, and Migration and Society. In Bremen, research internships are readily available to TAM II students and serve as an integral part of the program. Some of these positions are paid. In addition, social policy coursework focuses on the economy and on health policy. TAM students may also have the option to take classes through other MA programs offered in English at Bremen. During the second semester overseas, TAM II students will focus on their thesis research and preparation.

 

« Back to the top