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Image: Chancellor Moeser visits the Children's Dental  Clinic

Chancellor Moeser visits the Children’s Dental Clinic, a part of the Alamance County Health Department. Carolina dental and dental hygiene students work with the clinic’s dentists to provide care for underserved children from birth through age 21.


For more information about Carolina Connects, please email info@unc.edu.

 

 

April 29, 30
May 10, 11, 14
May 17
June 16
June 17
June 23
June 24-26
July 12-13
July 23
August 10
August 16
August 26
September 1-2

September 7
September 16
September 21
September 30
October 1
October 6
October 13
October 20
October 28
November 3
November 4
December 8 – 9


January 5
February 23, 2005
April 25, 2005
May 4, 2005

2006
February 13
February 21
February 24
March 29
May 3
May 4
May 5


Image: Destiny, UNC's Traveling Science Laboratory

The Carolina Connects tour of North Carolina included some stops with Destiny, UNC’s Traveling Science Laboratory, which brings the latest science to North Carolina public school students who would not otherwise see what a science career offers.

New Hanover and Brunswick counties, April 29, 30. Chancellor Moeser helps celebrate a new partnership involving Destiny, UNC’s Traveling Science Laboratory. The DESTINY program brings the latest science to North Carolina’s public school students who would not otherwise see what a science career offers. Partners include the local school system and community college as well as the business community. Goals include improving career options for high school graduates and attracting a biotechnology company to the area.

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Franklin, Johnston, Craven and Wake counties, May 10, 11, 14. As part of the annual Tar Heel Bus Tour, Chancellor Moeser joins a busload of new faculty who are learning about the state, its history, and the issues it faces today.

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Image: Chancellor Moeser addresses an audience

Reaching out on behalf of UNC-Chapel Hill, Chancellor James Moeser has devoted much of 2004 traveling around the state on a “Carolina Connects” tour to highlight the many ways in which the university serves the communities and people of North Carolina.

Chatham County, May 17. Chancellor Moeser and School of Education Dean Tom James discuss with Chatham County education leaders issues such as educational needs of immigrants who do not speak English as a first language. Dr. Jill Fitzgerald, a UNC education professor who left her classroom in Chapel Hill for a year to teach at Siler City Elementary School, joins them. Her experience changed how she trains North Carolina’s future teachers.

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Image: Chancellor Moeser addresses an audience

Inspire Pharmaceuticals is Carolina's most successful spin-off. Christy Shaffer, Inspire's chief executive officer, teams with UNC-Chapel Hill's Dr. Richard Boucher, whose research at UNC's Cystic Fibrosis Research Center merged with Inspire's efforts. Boucher's team discovered that the molecule Uridine triphosphate could potentially add moisture to airway surfaces and help clear the lungs and sinuses of dust, viruses and bacteria.

Durham and Wake counties, June 16. Meets with legislators. Visits Inspire Pharmaceuticals, Carolina’s most successful spin-off of research conducted on campus, to learn more about the university’s role with the company and how the university can do more to enhance this and other partnerships with the biotechnology community.

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Alamance County, June 17. Visits the Children’s Dental Clinic and the Open Door Dental Clinic and discusses their relationship with Carolina’s School of Dentistry. As part of the Alamance County Health Department, dental and dental hygiene students work with the clinic’s dentists to provide care for underserved children from birth through age 21 and to low-income and underserved adults. Observes a joint project of the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and the School of Public Health – BEAUTY (Bringing Education and Understanding to You). The study assesses how beauty salons can share information about cancer prevention. Sixty-two salons in central North Carolina participate; Moeser visits two – Unique Hair and Designs Unlimited.

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Image: Returning soldier hugs family member

Whether upon return from tours of duty or during deployment, North Carolina’s military families can look to Carolina and other organizations for support through the Citizen-Soldier Initiative. Chancellor Moeser has been telling military families across the state about this UNC-led program, which serves the families of National Guard and Reserve personnel.

Fort Bragg, June 23. Observes training at the N.C. National Guard Academy. Meets with family representatives working with the NC Guard and U.S. Army Reserve Family Readiness Program and with the NC Guard’s Family Assistance Center in Fayetteville. Describes how faculty members are helping military families through the Citizen-Soldier Initiative, a program funded by the work of the North Carolina congressional delegation. Describes some of Carolina’s approximately 58 public service projects serving Cumberland County residents.

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Carteret and Craven counties, June 24-26. Tours the Institute of Marine Sciences and meets with faculty, staff and students. Makes keynote speech at Carteret County Economic Development Council’s annual luncheon. Experiences the Bogue Sound from aboard Capricorn, a research ship. Highlights role of marine research in Carteret County by UNC and other partners, and discusses the institute’s contributions to the county’s economy in areas such as tourism, recreation, and fisheries.

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Buncombe County, July 12-13. Meets with National Guardsmen and their families, and with representatives of family support units. Hears about hardships associated with deployment and describes the Citizen-Soldier Initiative. Over dinner, talks with some Carolina Covenant students. Meets with some members of the UNC Board of Governors.

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Raleigh, July 23. Spends time with first-year students who are participating in the Carolina Covenant program and with other incoming students.

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Mecklenburg County, August 10. At National Air Guard headquarters, talks with Air Guard and Army Reserve families about the hardships caused by deployment, and describes Carolina’s involvement in the Citizen-Soldier Initiative and the partnership in that effort with entities such as UNC Charlotte. Tours a C130 aircraft. Meets with incoming students and their parents from the area, including a few Carolina Covenant participants.

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New Hanover County, August 16. Meets with Chancellor Rosemary DePaolo from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. Joins Dr. William Roper, dean of the UNC School of Medicine and UNC Health Care chief executive officer, to visit the North Carolina Area Health Education Centers clinic at the New Hanover Regional Medical Center. Meets with physicians and patients at the Zimmer Cancer Center to discuss how Carolina and UNC Health Care provide top-quality health care in New Hanover County and counties throughout the state.

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Image: Students conduct experiments inside  Destiny

High Point Central students on Destiny prepare to conduct a lab session called The Case of the Crown Jewels.

Guilford County, August 26. Visits High Point Central High School and the classroom of Steven Ross, who teaches seniors taking Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate courses. On Destiny, UNC’s Traveling Science Laboratory, Moeser and Destiny staff interact with students who are assuming the roles of forensic scientists in a lab session called The Case of the Crown Jewels. Also meets with area Carolina alumni to talk about the University’s more than seventy public service projects in Guilford County.

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Image: Moeser talks with Pocosin Arts executive director along Tyrell County's Scuppernong River

Walking by Tyrell County's Scuppernong River, Chancellor Moeser listens to Feather Phillips, Pocosin Arts executive director, describe her organization's mission to connect culture and the environment through the arts. Phillips points out the importance of the University's presence in Tyrell County. Moeser had just visited the Pocosin Arts center, and joined the group on a walk to the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge in Columbia, NC William Stott, a Carolina faculty member and director of the Albemarle Ecological Field Site, and Carolina Environmental Program student intern Martha Hodge, who is detailing the history of Pocosin Arts, also helped familiarize Moeser with Carolina's work in that region of North Carolina.

Tyrell, Washington, Dare counties, September 1-2. Visits Plymouth and Columbia high schools to talk with staff, teachers, and students about aspiring to attend college and how the Carolina Covenant. Learns from area leaders about initiatives such as Washington County’s Windows on the World E-Community Development Corporation and the Coastal Studies Institute. Meets with the students interning with the University’s Carolina Environmental Program at various locations in the CEP’s Albemarle Ecological Field Site. These locations include the Pocosin Arts Center, Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, and NC Aquarium on Roanoke Island.

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Catawba County, September 7. At Hickory High School, Moeser meets with school officials and speaks with an English class about the opportunities that a college education can bring and tells the students about the Carolina Covenant. Tours the Hickory Metropolitan Higher Education Center (HMHEC), an educational consortium among several North Carolina universities and colleges, and talks with representatives about possible partnerships. This facility at Catawba Valley Community College assists students who have completed their initial two years of college courses in earning degrees by enrolling them in part-time classes. Graduate degree programs are also available.

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Image: Moeser talks with Pocosin Arts executive director along Tyrell County's Scuppernong River

Luis Sanchez, a patient at Elm City's Harvest Family Medical Center, tells Chancellor Moeser about his heart surgery.

Wilson, Nash, Edgecombe counties, September 16. Joins UNC Health Care CEO Bill Roper at the Harvest Family Medical Center in Elm City. Visits the Area L AHEC clinic to see work by the staff, including Carolina pharmacy and medical students interning there. This healthcare education center, affiliated with Carolina’s School of Medicine, promotes education and training for healthcare providers in a five-county area – Northampton, Halifax, Edgecombe, Nash, and Wilson. Students in medicine, pharmacy, nursing, allied health and public health train here and benefit from practice in a rural area. Local residents use the Area L AHEC facility to access distance degree programs through Carolina’s schools of public health and nursing.
Also speaks with the Rocky Mount Kiwanis Club, and visits the Roanoke Center in Rich Square. The center, created by a partnership between the Roanoke Electric Cooperative, the Roanoke Economic Development, Inc. and Roanoke Energy Resources, Inc., was developed to enhance community and economic development. Faculty from Carolina’s School of Government and the Kenan-Flagler Business School consulted with the Electric Cooperative and helped develop a strategic plan for the Roanoke Chowan Partners for Progress.

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Guilford County, September 21. At the Beverly Healthcare Summit, Moeser visits with Jin Yi Kwon, a UNC dental student, and two Greensboro-area social workers, Dawn Cutts and Jan Mckinnon. Through a Bryan Fellowship from Carolina’s Center for Public Service, Kwon instructed the nursing home staff and residents about correct and consistent oral hygiene. Moeser later talks with a group Triad residents who are critical in how the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies helps the University fulfill its mission.

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Forsyth and Guilford counties, September 30, 2004. Visited with the Greensboro News and Record editorial board, then spoke at the Economic Development Council Forum at the Triad Park in Kernersville. Sponsored by the Friends of the Institute of Government in Kernersville, the forum included approximately 150 people from across the Piedmont Triad – elected officials, economic developers, educators, and others interested in economic development.

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Triad – October 1.

Orange County, October 6. At the NC Women’s Hospital in Chapel Hill, Moeser launches “¡A su salud! Spanish for Health Professionals,” a UNC-produced distance-learning program for the North Carolina health-care professional and academic communities. “¡A su salud!” combines multi-media interactive exercises, text and Web-based resources in a television-style drama to teach Spanish language and culture at an intermediate level. More than 65 of the state’s health, education and university leaders attend.

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Fayetteville area – October 13.


Orange County, October 20. This visit to Smith Middle School illustrates UNC-Chapel Hill’s collaboration with local teachers and school administrators to create the new Carolina Center for Educational Excellence. The center offers professional training for teachers, School of Education students at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and counselors. It is also wired and outfitted to provide distance learning.

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Durham County, October 28. At Hillside High School, Moeser speaks to students about the opportunities a college education can make possible and about access to college through scholarships and programs such as the Carolina Covenant. He also talks about how the University’s varied programs contribute to what students call the “Carolina experience.”

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Image: Students conduct experiments inside  Destiny

Chancellor Moeser and Asheville City Schools Superintendent Robert Logan talk with Asheville High School students.

Buncombe County, November 3. At Asheville High School, the Chancellor boards DESTINY, the traveling science laboratory, to watch biology students and teachers perform scientific experiments. The DESTINY program brings the latest science to North Carolina’s public school students who would not otherwise see what a science career offers. Moeser also visits with UNC-Asheville Chancellor James Mullen.

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Western N.C – November 4.

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Rutherford and Mecklenburg counties, December 8-9. In Rutherfordton, Chancellor Moeser visits with Carolina student Kris Jordan, a Bryan Fellowship winner and creator of NCKidScience.com, at the KidSenses Children’s InterACTIVE Museum. The site is as an online resource for area elementary school teachers, so officers of the Rutherford County Schools System and supporters of the museum join the discussion. The next day, Moeser joins business school dean Steve Jones and UNC Hospitals CEO Bill Roper in Charlotte. They talk with Charlotte Observer staff about how Carolina is addressing the state’s key issues such as economic development, education, and health care. Moeser also joins Jones for a conversation with UNC Charlotte Chancellor James Woodward, then meets with Roper for a visit to the Carolinas Medical Center.

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Jackson County, January 5, 2005. In Cullowhee, Moeser and several Carolina officials meet with administrators from Western Carolina University to discuss ways the two universities can continue to collaborate. Moeser and WCU Chancellor John W. Bardo pause to celebrate 20 years of cooperation in providing educational opportunities for public officials in Western North Carolina. The two chancellors sign a memorandum of understanding, and discuss future partnership opportunities. The meeting takes place during an “Essentials of County Government” course attended by about 35 county officials from across western North Carolina.

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Orange County February 23, 2005. Rashkis Elementary School third-graders listen to Moeser read from two books as part of their annual read-a-thon. He stresses the importance and joys of reading. Then, he and the Rashkis literacy coach talk about ongoing work between Carolina and the school. Later in the day, Moeser speaks with members of the Cedars of Chapel Hill community about opportunities for them to become involved with Carolina.

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Pitt County April 25, 2005. Chancellor Moeser and key staff members meet with East Carolina University Chancellor Steve Ballard and his staff to discuss collaboration between the two universities, research strengths and partnerships, and economic development.

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Randolph County May 4, 2005. The Chancellor and officials representing Carolina's offices for undergraduate admissions and financial aid talk with students and Asheboro High School. Moeser encourages them to take advantage of all academic opportunities and to aspire to continue their education, whether one of North Carolina’s private or public universities, Randolph Community College, or another community college or technical school.

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Wake County, February 13, 2006. Chancellor Moeser and undergraduate admissions personnel visit Ligon Middle School in downtown Raleigh. Ligon is a magnet school known for its accelerated instruction and performing arts programs. Students select courses from more than 150 electives as well as their core subjects. The visit includes sessions in the program Carolina Helping to Advance Middle-school Parents and Students (CHAMPS), in which UNC students advise eighth-graders about preparing for college. Moeser encourages Ligon students to choose challenging courses, study hard, and select engaging extracurricular activities. He also urges them to pursue careers in math, science and technology.

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New Hanover County, February 21-2. Moeser meets with UNC-Wilmington Chancellor Rosemary DePaolo, then visits freshmen, sophomores, and juniors at New Hanover High School. He gives some serious advice to students from the AVID program, a group of peers and adults that promotes academic achievement, and from the school's multidisciplinary Lyceum Academy. Moeser encourages them to begin preparing for college now. He then steps into Carolina's DESTINY Bus to observe students exploring science. Twelve former and current leaders in North Carolina's K-12 education later join Moeser for an exchange of idea and discussion about how UNC can help support and improve education in North Carolina.

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Pasquotank County, February 24. Chancellor Moeser and School of Pharmacy Dean Robert Blouin observe an Elizabeth City State University biochemistry class taught via video-teleconference by a UNC pharmacy professor back in Chapel Hill. ECSU Chancellor Mickey Burnim joins them. Dr. Ken Bastow, associate professor of medicinal chemistry and natural products, leads the class from the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. Launched in fall 2005, the UNC-Chapel Hill and Elizabeth City State University Doctor of Pharmacy Partnership Program enrolls between 10 and 15 students per year at ECSU. The program plans to increase the number of pharmacists working in underserved northeastern North Carolina.

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Guilford County, March 29. Moeser, School of Education faculty, and a UNC Scholarships and Financial Aid officer begin the day at Peck Elementary School. They join Peck's leadership team - 12 representatives from grade levels K-5 - in a roundtable discussion. In the afternoon, the group talks with Kiser Middle School and Grimsley High School teachers about how the University can better prepare future teachers and better serve the state's schools.

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Alamance County, May 3. At the invitation of Robin Hadley, executive director of the What's After High School Initiative, Moeser visits the Burlington-Alamance County school system. Hadley, former Morehead Scholar and Rhodes scholar, arranged trips to Woodlawn Middle School Cummings High School. The chancellor encourages students at each school to aspire to and prepare for college. Steve Farmer, director of undergraduate admissions, and Moeser stop at Alamance Community College. With President Martin Nadelman, Executive Vice President Janyth Fredrickson, counselors, and newly-admitted Carolina transfer students and other students, they talk about the C-STEP partnership.

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Buncombe County, May 4. Visiting Asheville Middle School, the chancellor tells students in the AVID program about their opportunities for college. AVID, a national program, helps students develop the skills necessary to attend college. Moeser encourages them to think about careers that will enhance America's position in the global economy. Later, he meets with some local members of the University of North Carolina Board of Governors.

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Mecklenburg County, May 5. With Tom James, dean of the School of Education, Moeser meets with members of the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce and Mary Lynn Calhoun, dean of UNC Charlotte's College of Education. They discuss the "What's Working in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Education" conference presented by the Chamber and corporate partners. Business representatives, civic leaders, parents, elected officials and educators attended the conference. The meeting confirms the UNC system's commitment and initiatives to prepare math and science teachers.

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"Participating in BEAUTY has been a privilege. I get a lot of satisfaction from seeing our customers’ response to the information. We have some customers who are sick, and it’s nice to see how they respond.
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Teresa Elmore
Owner, Designs Unlimited
Burlington, NC