The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Carolina Connects
Key Information LinksUNC Home pageDirectoriesDepartmentsCarolina Connects Home
Carolina Connects With People Spacer Spacer
 
   
   
 
Spacer


BY DATE

WITH COMMUNITIES

 

 

For more information about Carolina Connects, please email info@unc.edu.

 

 

Carolina Connects with People

Dave Inscoe

Christy Shaffer

Teresa Elmore

Jill Fitsgerald

"

Image: David Inscoe

Dave Inscoe
Executive Director
Carteret County Economic Development Council

 

Dave Insco

We've been involved extensively for the past year with UNC’s Office of Economic Development. We worked with them on a study conducted by the university. The study’s purpose was to define the role of the marine sciences industry in Carteret County and to help us look at the industry’s economic impact. When Chancellor Moeser came here, we had just seen preliminary results, and he was able to talk about those. We have just published the results of the study and they include information about UNC’s Institute of Marine Sciences. The hard facts are that 62 employees work and conduct research there, and in this community that makes the institute a significant sized business.

About a year ago, one of the institute’s employees came to me and the president of our community college with an idea for taking what he had learned and creating a new business in the county. He did and it’s called Geodynamics, run by Chris Freeman, a coastal geologist. He saw market potential for commercialization and he started his own business. It’s a spin off of the institute, you might say, and that’s exactly what we’re looking for. Geodynamics maps and studies beach erosion and sedimentation transport in addition to providing other services. He bought a boat locally and has been working all up and down the coast. If the institute hadn’t been here and Chris hadn’t been there, then we wouldn’t have this world headquarters for Geodynamics.

"

> back to top

 

 

Image: Christy Shaffer

Christy Shaffer
Chief Executive Officer, Inspire Pharmaceuticals

Christy Shaffer

The success we have enjoyed shows why it’s important for UNC to be open for business. We have been pleased with our relationship with the university and its scientists, who had the vision to develop novel treatments for diseases such as cystic fibrosis. Our partnership illustrates the powerful role a major research university like Carolina plays in our state’s business community through tech transfer.

> back to top

 

 

Image: Teresa Elmore

Teresa Elmore
Owner, Designs Unlimited
Burlington, NC

Teresa Elmore

Participating in BEAUTY has been a privilege. I get a lot of satisfaction from seeing our customers’ response to the information. We have some customers who are sick, and it’s nice to see how they respond. For example, we just put up our third poster and it’s about adult immunizations. Just this morning, a lady looked at it and told me that she was going to ask her doctor about getting the right shots.

It’s nice to see that there are people in this world who still care and who want to help others. I didn’t know that UNC does things like this, and I didn’t know that they go out to deal with people one on one. I plan to be with the BEAUTY project as long as they need us. Being a cosmetologist and an entrepreneur, I want to help women achieve healthy hair, skin, and bodies. There’s a definite connection to what we do, and we’ll be with them as long as they need us."

> back to top

 

 

Image: Jill Fitzgerald

Jill Fitzgerald
Professor and Assistant Dean, UNC-Chapel Hill
School of Education

 

Jill Fitzgerald

Our School of Education has been responsive to the changing demographics in schools, and my reassignment to Siler City Elementary was a kind of early recognition of the need not only to address how we teach in our schools, but how the university educates practicing and future teachers. I went specifically because I was interested in trying to apply ideas about working with English language learners. At that time, I think that Chatham County was one of the districts with a relatively high percentage of Latino students – around 25 percent – and it’s moving toward 75 percent today. That huge increase is a reflection of the constancy of families coming to North Carolina to find work and to make good homes.

When the Connects tour went to Siler City Elementary, the Chancellor and the rest of us enjoyed talking with the students. Their responses gave us a small taste of the challenges and, we hope, eventual joy that these children have when moving into a foreign location and culture. It helped us look at the world through their eyes for a bit.

Now, a Latina has joined our faculty here, we’ve added a new strand within our master’s program for teachers who work with English language learners, and we offer licensure for teaching students who speak English as a Second Language. So, Carolina’s School of Education is providing more and more resources and expertise for our students and the schools in North Carolina.

> back to top