Student Affairs Information

The Graduate School
     Graduate School Handbook
     Policies and Guidelines for a Cooperative Learning Environment
     Grade Appeals
     Orientation
     Professional Development in Graduate Education
     Graduate Student Foreign Language Proficiency Assessment
Student Affairs
     Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs
     Office of the Dean of Students
     Campus Y
     University Career Services
     Counseling and Psychological Services
     Accessibility Resources & Services
     Academic Success Program for Students with LD and ADHD
     Housing and Residential Education
     International Student and Scholar Services
     Campus Health Services
     Carolina Union
     Co-curricular Student Organizations
     Student Government
Other Services
     Public Safety
     Student Dining Services
     Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History
     American Indian Center

 

Students are at the center of the learning community at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. To ensure a successful learning experience, graduate and professional students are encouraged to take advantage of a variety of programs and services offered by the University through Student Affairs, The Graduate School, and individual schools and departments. Student Affairs oversees services intended for the entire University student community, and offers programs designed primarily for undergraduate students. The Graduate School, on its own and in conjunction with various Student Affairs offices, offers programs and services intended to specifically address the needs of graduate and professional students.

The Graduate School

The Graduate School is committed to improving and facilitating the integration of graduate and professional students' academic, professional, and personal development, as well as to assist students to make the most of their Carolina experience. To further these aims, staff in The Graduate School are responsible for assisting students in a number of capacities. The offices of the associate dean for student affairs and the associate dean for academics create and implement programs and services that specifically address the needs of graduate and professional students. Some of these programs are listed below. The director of diversity, recruitment, and retention develops and provides a number of programs and services throughout the year, both academic and social in nature, to assist graduate students of color with a successful transition and experience during their graduate work. The director of graduate student academic and professional development oversees workshops and events in the Graduate Student Center. Graduate School staff are available to all graduate and professional students as a source of counsel, information, and referral for questions involving student services, academic procedures, policies, and grievances.

Telephone: (919) 966-2611

Web: gradschool.unc.edu

Graduate School Handbook

The Graduate School Handbook contains most of the policies and procedures of The Graduate School at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Students should become familiar with the material pertaining to their degree programs, and, together with their faculty advisors, make certain that the chosen program of study complies with all policies. The Handbook may be viewed or downloaded from the Graduate School Web site: handbook.unc.edu.

Policies and Guidelines for a Cooperative Learning Environment

Teaching and learning occur simultaneously through a partnership between instructor and student. Instructors share knowledge, experience and ideas with their students. Students process these thoughts, generate new ones and share them with their teachers. In most cases, students and instructors communicate clearly and effectively. However, misunderstandings do occur. In an attempt to foster a positive academic environment, the Faculty Council, upon recommendation of the Educational Policy Committee, establishes these policies and guidelines.

The Faculty Council resolves:

Part I. Policies

Section 1.

The Faculty Council recognizes and affirms the following policies. This recognition is not to be interpreted as precluding modification of any policy by the appropriate authority.

The Honor Code. The faculty should inform students of the provisions of the honor code and be aware of their own responsibilities specified in the honor code. Faculty responsibilities are stated in the Instrument of Student Judicial Governance.

Student Grievance Procedures. According to UNC–Chapel Hill Student Grievance Committee procedures, students may file a grievance against a UNC–Chapel Hill employee, EPA non-faculty employee, staff employee, or student employee (when acting in the role of employee) when there is a violation of one of the following:

A. The UNC-Chapel Hill Sexual Harassment Policy

B. The UNC-Chapel Hill Racial Harassment Policy

C. The UNC–Chapel Hill Policy on Sexual Orientation

D. The Americans with Disabilities Act

E. Title IX, which prohibits exclusion from participation on the basis of sex

F. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which outlaws discrimination on the basis of a handicap or

G. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, which allows students to challenge the content of their educational records.

Copies of these can be obtained from the Office of the Dean of Students. They contain information about how to file a grievance. A grievance based on incidents that occurred more than six months before the complaint was filed will not be considered.

Student Access to Academic Records—Protection Against Improper Disclosure. As stated in The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, students may have access to their full academic records. Individuals who are, or have been, in attendance at UNC–Chapel Hill may inspect and review their education records. Otherwise, education records are subject to confidentiality requirements as specified by law and may not be disclosed improperly. Requests for recommendations imply that the student has given consent to the disclosure of information related to ability and performance. Judgments of ability and character may be provided under appropriate circumstances, normally with the knowledge or consent of the student. "Education records" are those records directly related to a student that are maintained by an educational institution. Particular University policy provisions are found in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Policies and Procedures under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974.

Appealing a Grade. The University has systems for appealing a grade. The exact procedures vary among the academic units. Students should consult with their dean or department chairperson to obtain information about grade appeal procedures.

Part II. Guidelines

Section 2.

The Faculty Council endorses the following guidelines for the faculty-student relationship. This endorsement shall not be construed as faculty legislation, is not intended to establish a contractual undertaking by the University or any individual, and shall not constitute the basis for civil action in a court or a claim in any administrative or judicial body of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Clear Definition of Potential Honor Code Violations. In an attempt to avoid unintended misunderstanding, instructors should clearly state what is acceptable in their class. When study aids such as computers are allowed, the instructor is responsible for explaining what constitutes proper use of these items. These rules should be established at the beginning of the course and should not be changed without giving students proper notice.

Assignment of Graded Work during the Last Week of the Semester. Instructors may not assign graded work during the last week of classes unless the course syllabus clearly states that such an assignment will be given.

Suggested Classroom Procedures. In general, instructors are strongly encouraged to follow the guidelines for course design and classroom procedures recommended by the Center for Faculty Excellence. When students enter into a learning relationship, they have certain needs and expectations. They are entitled to information about course procedures, content and goals. Instructors should provide a syllabus that describes the course and methods of evaluation. Particular attention should be paid to several areas of special concern to students, including provision of reserve readings and grading policy.

Evaluated assignments should be returned to the students within a reasonable amount of time. Since part of the purpose of such assignments is to provide feedback, students should be given time to assess and to learn from their mistakes. Ideally, such assessment would take place while the relevant topics are still fresh in their minds.

Extra credit, if offered, should be announced publicly and made available to the entire class.

Students Should Have Freedom of Expression. Students should be free to take reasoned exception to the data or views offered in any course of study. They are responsible, however, for learning the content of any course of study for which they are enrolled. Incorrect facts and poorly supported arguments or opinions inevitably have an impact on grades. Nothing herein shall be construed to limit the freedom of the faculty to assign grades according to appropriate academic standards.

Responsibilities of Students and Teachers. Just as students ought to expect instructors who are knowledgeable and well prepared, so should teachers expect their students to be motivated, eager to learn and actively engaged in class. It is the responsibility of teachers to make their courses serious intellectual experiences for themselves and for their students. It is the responsibility of students to take seriously the courses in which they enroll. Good teachers need good learners.

Students should understand that they are members of a community of scholars, and membership in such a community is not a passive activity. To be full participants in the educational community and to maximize the educational value of a class, pre-class preparation is necessary. Proper class preparation involves obtaining course materials as they are needed and completing assignments as they are due. Full participation in a class requires regular attendance, arriving on time and remaining until class conclusion, and active involvement in the work of the class.

Students should also consider the extent of their own involvement in a class in assessing the educational value of a class.

Grade Appeals

The procedure for grade appeals can be found in the Graduate School Handbook. Any questions regarding the grade appeals process should be directed to The Graduate School.

Web: handbook.unc.edu/grading.html

Orientation

The Graduate School sponsors a University-wide orientation program for new graduate and professional students to (1) acclimate them to the University community and (2) provide information sessions on a range of topics relevant to graduate students such as broad campus resources, campus health facilities, Graduate and Professional Student Federation, and getting to know the local area. Important reference materials and guides to the campus and Chapel Hill/Carrboro area community resources are available to students on the Graduate School Web site: gradschool.unc.edu. These resources include the Graduate School Handbook, Academic Integrity and Ethics, A Guide to Theses and Dissertations, copies of University policies, and other helpful campus and community publications that are intended to be used throughout the students' graduate careers. As orientation is a continuous process throughout a student's first year, The Graduate School schedules a number of orientation workshops throughout the academic year on a variety of issues related to graduate students such as residency for tuition purposes, funding, and networking.

In addition to the Graduate School orientation, individual graduate and professional programs conduct department-based orientations for new students. Information regarding departmental orientations is available in the respective academic departmental offices.

Orientation and relocation information can be found on the Web site of The Graduate School at gradschool.unc.edu. The Graduate School Office, open year-round, is located on the second floor of Bynum Hall. Graduate School staff and are available to answer questions and help students find the resources they need to make the most of their Carolina experience.

Professional Development in Graduate Education

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is committed to providing students with the highest quality graduate education. While this clearly entails academic training, it also includes a commitment to providing students with resources and services to enhance their graduate experience and to prepare them for their post-student careers.

The cornerstone of professional development at Carolina is a series of workshops and selected one-credit-hour courses. These workshops cover topics designed to promote graduate student academic, professional, and personal growth. Sessions are designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop five areas of professional competency: communication, leadership, teaching and instruction, professional adaptability, and self-awareness.

For more information, visit the Web site of The Graduate School at: gradprofdev.web.unc.edu/.

Graduate Student Foreign Language Proficiency Assessment

The departments of Romance Languages and Literatures, Germanic Languages and Classics offer foreign language proficiency assessments in French, German, Spanish and Latin (classical or medieval) for graduate students needing to satisfy a departmental foreign language requirement. This service is offered once each semester. The Graduate School administers registration for these assessments.

Student Affairs

Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs

The Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs coordinates the division's programs and provides guidance and leadership for its departments. The office also acts in a consulting role for faculty, administrators and students who wish to raise issues that concern the University community, with a particular focus on student needs. Members of the Office of the Vice Chancellor also serve on various University committees to represent the division's several constituencies.

Students are encouraged to explore the opportunities offered by Student Affairs throughout their University career, either directly through the respective departments, or through the Office of the Vice Chancellor.

Telephone: (919) 966-4045

Web: studentaffairs.unc.edu

Office of the Dean of Students

The Office of the Dean of Students, located on the first floor of the Student and Academic Services Building North, provides a variety of direct student services and works closely with a wide range of student programs. The Office of the Dean of Students is the contact and information point for students regarding the University's policies on racial and sexual harassment and discrimination based on sexual orientation. In addition, staff members provide counseling and general advisement to students and assist students, parents, and members of the University staff in dealing with crisis situations or other problems affecting student life. Staff members of the Office of the Dean of Students also work with programs that have a specific focus, such as the Student Activity Fund Office (SAFO). In addition to providing the administrative coordination of the student judicial system, staff members also work with leaders of a variety of extracurricular organizations.

Telephone: (919) 966-4042

Web: deanofstudents.unc.edu

Campus Y

Since its founding in 1860, the Campus Y has been a starting point for the development of many programs responding to students' concerns. The mission of the Campus Y is the pursuit of social justice through the cultivation of pluralism. In particular, the Y serves as a bridge between the University and the local community by addressing the needs of both groups. Y-sponsored committees include community outreach (such as the Big Buddy, Elderly Exchange and Tutoring programs), social issues (such as Women's Issues and Human Rights Week), global action (such as Hunger Action and the South African Scholarship Fund) and fund-raising programs (such as the Footfalls Road Race). Students can also serve on the Y Student Executive Committee, for which elections are held in the spring. All students are welcome to visit the Campus Y offices in the fully renovated historical YMCA Building to learn about volunteer service and University, local and global issues.

Telephone: (919) 962-2333

Web: campus-y.unc.edu

University Career Services

Services for graduate students provided by University Career Services (UCS) include workshops on writing résumés and curriculum vitae, interviewing and job-seeking; résumé referral to employers; individual career advising and career interest assessment; on-campus interviewing; job listings via the Web; and a reference file for students in selected curricula. Some services are limited to students who are in a UNC–Chapel Hill degree or certificate program.

Additional resources and programs include occupational and employer information, career panels, career and professional school fairs, an automated alumni network service, various employer databases, and a UCS home page on the Web.

Students in law, dentistry, and medicine and students enrolled in the M.B.A. and M.A.C. programs are served by career services in their departments, rather than by UCS.

University Career Services is located in 219 Hanes Hall. Office hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. Resource Room hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

Telephone: (919) 962-6507

Web: careers.unc.edu

Counseling and Psychological Services

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) provides free, confidential psychological counseling to help students solve personal, academic, and career problems. CWS specializes in individual evaluations, counseling, psychotherapy, and career counseling. A variety of counseling, testing, developmental, and informational services are offered to all students. Counseling services for individuals or groups focus on academic success, including test anxiety and time management; career decisions, including selecting or changing a major and choosing a career; relationships, including loneliness, shyness, roommate conflicts, dating relationships, and family problems; and cultural issues, including cultural identity, gay and lesbian issues, racism, and women's issues. Also available are dissertation and thesis support groups; training and development programs; stress management and biofeedback; and communication skills training, including assertiveness training and guidance in how to overcome speech anxiety. CAPS is located on the third floor of the James A. Taylor Building.

Telephone: (919) 966-3658

Web: campushealth.unc.edu/caps

Accessibility Resources & Services

Accessibility Resources & Services is responsible for ensuring that programs and facilities are accessible to all members of the University community. Students with disabilities and/or medical conditions may receive accommodations and services that are designed to remove barriers, so that they may independently meet the demands of University life. Accommodations and services—which may include but are not limited to note-takers, alternative testing, accessible class materials and interpreters—are provided on an individual-needs basis. There is no charge for any accommodation or service. Students will be asked to provide documentation of the disability and/or medical condition from an appropriate primary care provider.

Telephone: (919) 962-8300 (Voice/TDD)

Web: accessibility.unc.edu

Academic Success Program for Students with LD and ADHD

The Academic Success Program for Students with LD and ADHD, formerly called Learning Disabilities Services, is the University's designated service provider to students with documented learning disabilities (LD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders (ADHD). The Academic Success Program also meets the needs of students with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) in conjunction with Accessibility Resources and Services, , the campus office that works with students with disabilities other than LD and ADHD.

Telephone: (919) 962-7227

Web: learningcenter.unc.edu

Housing and Residential Education

The Department of University Housing and Residential Education, consistent with the academic mission of the University, endeavors to provide eligible students a supportive environment within which to live. The department maintains the physical quality and the integrity of its buildings at a level conducive to security and comfort, and does so in the belief that providing a safe and healthy living environment supports and contributes to the learning process.

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill follows the principle that all persons shall have equal opportunity and access to facilities in any phase of University activity without regard to handicap, sex, race, creed, color, age, sexual orientation, or national origin. Under this principle, educational, cultural, social, housing, extracurricular and employment opportunities are available on an equal basis. However, receipt of the application by and advance payment to the Department of University Housing does not guarantee admission to the University or to a residence hall. The Department of University Housing reserves the right to refuse for just cause any application for space and to return any advance payment within two weeks of receipt of the completed application. Early application is encouraged.

Telephone: (800) UNC-5502

E-mail: housing@unc.edu

Web: housing.unc.edu

Graduate Student Housing

The Department of Housing recognizes that the living needs of graduate and professional students are usually different from those of undergraduates. At Carolina, graduate and professional students can enjoy the benefits of being affordably close to classes, facilities, and events, and living in a community of fellow graduate students where the atmosphere is characterized by early quiet hours and respect for personal time and space.

Odum Village and Baity Hill Apartments are Carolina's on-campus communities for graduate students providing apartment-style housing. Odum Village is located on south campus off of Manning Drive near the medical facilities, the Dean Smith Center, and the Kenan–Flagler Business School. Its quiet yet friendly atmosphere lends itself to graduate student interests and study. The Baity Hill and Mason Farm communities serve as the Student Family Housing apartment complex for students with families. These one- and two-bedroom apartment communities are situated on rolling hills adjacent to the campus. The apartments are within walking distance of the campus and are served by campus and city bus routes. Rental costs compare favorably with similar area housing. These communities comprise nine buildings with 398 apartments.

Parking is available for graduate students on a limited basis, and a fare-free campus bus service offers several routes that connect the north, middle, and south regions of campus. Find specifications for apartments by visiting the Housing Web site at housing.unc.edu and clicking on "Apartments."

Generally, demand for on-campus housing for graduate students exceeds the supply. On-campus housing is not guaranteed for graduate students, although every effort is made to offer a space to all applicants. Returning residents have priority to re-sign up for the following academic year before spaces are offered to new graduate students. Please visit the department's Web site at housing.unc.edu for additional information.

Off-Campus Housing

Off-campus housing refers to any housing not owned and operated by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This category includes small group housing, such as fraternities and sororities, as well as apartments, houses, and rooms. Two-thirds of the University's students live in the off-campus market. Some units are furnished and within walking distance to campus. Other off-campus housing consists of large, unfurnished apartment complexes located throughout Chapel Hill and Carrboro.

Office of International Student and Scholar Services (OISSS)

The Office of International Student and Scholar Services promotes international educational exchange through its services and programs. OISSS serves as the principal administrative, programming, and advising office for approximately 2,500 international students, faculty, and administrative staff at UNC–Chapel Hill, including research scholars and visiting professors. Located in the FedEx Global Education Center, OISSS issues and helps maintain visa documentation, provides advising related to immigration matters and adjustment to life in the United States, and serves as a liaison between international students and scholars and their departments and governmental and private agencies involved in international education exchange. In addition to administrative and advising services, OISSS provides programming that helps international students and scholars maximize their experience at UNC–Chapel Hill. Programs include orientation, tax seminars, and various cultural programs. The center is a focal point for community service organizations, including the Host Family Program, Conversation Partners Program, Speakers' Bureau, and International Women's English Conversation Group. It also administers the UNC Class of ‘38 Summer Study Abroad Fellowships.

Campus Health Services

Campus Health Services (CHS), located next to Kenan Stadium in the James A. Taylor Building, provides a broad range of ambulatory, primary care, and prevention services. Specialty care services are also available, including orthopedics, obstetrics and gynecology, dermatology, travel information and immunization, and allergy management. For convenience, in-house laboratory, radiology, pharmacy, and physical therapy services are also available.

Any student who has paid the campus health fee for the current semester (or summer session) is eligible for health care at Campus Health Services. The fee covers the cost of most services provided by CHS professionals, including physicians, physician extenders, nurses, physical therapists, and health educators. Additional charges are made for after-hours care, drugs, and miscellaneous supplies. Laboratory and X-ray studies at CHS require a co-payment by the user. There also may be additional charges for specialty services. Spouses not enrolled in the University as students become eligible to receive the same services as students by demonstrating appropriate insurance coverage and by paying the student health fee at CHS.

Hours of operation vary according to the academic calendar. Please call to verify hours of operation Monday through Friday and on the weekends. Preferred CHS office hours are 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, when students are seen on an appointment basis. For convenience, students are encouraged to call (919) 966-2281 for an appointment. After-hours care is available from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on weekends. Physician extenders are available with medical and psychiatric back up. Services are considered a premium service with a visit charge during these times. If other ancillary services are required an additional fee will apply. Major problems may be referred to the UNC Hospitals Emergency Department by the CHS staff when open, or by the HealthLink nurse (966-2281) when CHS is closed. Students should be aware that the campus health fee does not cover medical care at UNC Hospitals or other facilities. Students will be responsible for charges incurred at the UNC Hospital Emergency Department anytime that they use those services.

All students enrolled in UNC system colleges and universities, including UNC–Chapel Hill, who meet three specific criteria (enrolled in six credit hours if an undergraduate or one credit hour if a graduate student, degree-seeking, and eligible to pay the campus health fee) will be required to have health insurance coverage. Distance learning students are exempted from this requirement. For information, please review the Mandatory Health Insurance information at the UNC Campus Health Services Web site (campushealth.unc.edu).

North Carolina law mandates that all new students at the University document the completion of immunization requirements. Failure to comply results in cancellation of registration 30 days after classes begin. Vaccines are offered at Campus Health Services at reduced rates for students who need to complete their immunization requirement. For additional information on Campus Health Services, visit the CHS Web site at campushealth.unc.edu.

Carolina Union

The Carolina Union is an organization of students, professional staff, and part-time student staff who provide programs, services, and facilities for all members of the campus community. The Carolina Union contributes to the educational mission of the institution through the provision of cultural, social, educational, and entertainment programs sponsored by the Carolina Union Activities Board and the Carolina Union Performing Arts Series. The many co-curricular programs offered impact the intellectual environment of the campus and create opportunities for campus members to engage in debate, conversation, and interaction around the issues of the time.

Students play an important role in determining needs, setting programming and financing goals, and evaluating all aspects of the Union. Student employees also provide and maintain the many services offered in the Frank Porter Graham Student Union and other campus locations.

The Carolina Union Board of Directors reviews and approves Union finances, provides long-range planning for the Union, and selects the Union president from student volunteers each year. The Carolina Union Activities Board is a student organization that plans and carries out social, cultural, recreational, and educational programs for the entire student body. Programs range from informal stage performances and workshops on current issues to major speakers and popular and cultural concerts.

In addition to providing office and meeting space and services for student organizations, the Carolina Union also offers lounge space, food services, , and games for all UNC–Chapel Hill students.

Employment opportunities are available in many of the Union's service areas, such as the information desk, ticket office, and technical services. (For more information, contact the administrative office in Room 201 of the Frank Porter Graham Student Union.)

More information about the Carolina Union is available on the Web at carolinaunion.unc.edu.

Co-curricular Student Organizations

The University requires that co-curricular student organizations be officially recognized each academic year. This recognition process is designed to ensure that student organizations affiliated with the University do not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, national origin, disability, age, veteran status, sex (as defined by law), or sexual orientation. In addition, official recognition provides student groups with the following benefits: applying for use (through reservation) of specified University facilities, property, services, or equipment pursuant to the Facilities Use Policy; use of the University's name in the organization's title, so long as University sponsorship or endorsement is not implied or stated; the privilege of applying for funding from monies generated by the Student Activity Fee, which is legislatively apportioned by the Student Congress; and the assistance of University staff. Applications for official University recognition must be completed annually, in order to ensure that active students are aware of University policies and to provide staff with information concerning University-recognized student organizations.

Applications are available in Room 201 of the Frank Porter Graham Student Union Building. (Note: all information in and attached to the application is considered public information upon the granting of recognition.)

A full list of active student organizations (there are currently more than 600) is available on the Union Web site.

Student Government

The Graduate and Professional Student Federation (GPSF), the official representative of graduate and professional students at the University, is organized on the basis of school, departmental, and curricula organizations. The GPSF provides communication between graduate and professional students, represents graduate and professional students both within and outside the University community, and provides structures capable of dealing with ongoing issues and concerns. It also allocates and administers the funds appropriated to it from student fees. Every duly enrolled graduate and professional student is automatically a member of the GPSF. Web: studentorgs.unc.edu/gpsf. Graduate students, whether as a result of individual interest or because of teaching assistantships, may want to learn more about student government at Carolina. Information is available on the Web at studentorgs.unc.edu/studgov.

I. Executive Branch of Student Government

A. Officers: President; Vice President; Treasurer; Secretary; Executive Assistants; Elections Board Chair

B. Current committees that address various areas of student concern: Academic Affairs; External Relations; Human Relations; Info-Tech; Public Service; Student Services

II. Judicial Branch of Student Government

Student Courts (both Undergraduate and Graduate). These bodies maintain original jurisdiction with respect to all violations of the Code of Student Conduct.

Student Attorney General's Staff. The staff of the Student Attorney General investigates alleged violations of the Code of Student Conduct and brings to trial those charges sufficiently supported by evidence. The staff also advises and assists students accused of violations.

University Hearing Board. This court has original jurisdiction in cases deemed inappropriate for hearing within another court, and appellate jurisdiction with respect to cases appealed from student courts.

III. Legislative Branch of Student Government

Student Congress. The legislative branch of the student government is unicameral (one house), consisting of 37 representatives elected by the student body, with the presidents of the student body and of the Graduate and Professional Student Federation (GPSF) serving as non-voting ex officio members. The Speaker of the Student Congress (SC) is elected from among the representatives. Graduate and professional students and on- and off-campus undergraduates are proportionally represented in the congress. Graduate and professional students represent districts composed of several schools grouped together, while undergraduates represent geographical areas.

The Student Congress handles a vast amount of legislation; one of its primary responsibilities is to appropriate student fees for recognized student organizations. Congress also approves appointments, serves as a student advocate and legislates changes to the Student Code.

The representatives are elected in the spring for one-year terms, and each member serves on one of three standing committees: Finance, Rules and Judiciary, and Student Affairs.

Other Services

Public Safety

The Office of Public Safety is located on Manning Drive on the UNC–Chapel Hill campus. Public safety administers the parking and transportation system at the University (including the issuing of parking permits) and provides for the overall safety and security of the campus. Parking permits are available for purchase on a limited basis for students. More information about parking availability can be found on the Web at www.dps.unc.edu.

UNC–Chapel Hill is committed to assisting all members of the University community in providing for their own safety and security. The University's combined Annual Security and Fire Safety Report, which is required by law, contains information regarding campus security and personal safety, including topics such as crime prevention, fire safety, University police law enforcement authority, crime reporting policies, disciplinary procedures and other matters of importance related to security and safety on campus. It also contains information about crime statistics for the three previous calendar years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus; in certain off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by UNC–Chapel Hill; and on public property within or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.

To receive the combined Annual Security and Fire Safety Report, stop by the Department of Public Safety at the Public Safety Building, 285 Manning Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 or request a mailed copy by calling (919) 962-3951. The report is also available on the Department of Public Safety Web site at www.dps.unc.edu/securityreport.

Student Dining Services

Carolina Dining Services operates 10 separate dining facilities at UNC–Chapel Hill. Meal purchases can be made with the UNC One Card using a meal plan, Dining Flex, à la carte, expense, or cash. All meal purchases made with the UNC One Card are not subject to the six percent North Carolina state sales tax on these items. Cash purchases are taxable. To find out more information about acquiring a UNC One Card, visit the One Card Office Web site at www.onecard.unc.edu.

Students can use their meal plans at several of the campus all-you-care-to-eat dining facilities. Top of Lenoir is an award-winning facility with an array of menu choices. The Rams Head Dining Hall is a 30,000 square foot state-of-the-art facility that includes several restaurants and all-you-care-to-eat venues.

Carolina Dining Services offers several meal plans that offer the convenience and value of purchasing meals on campus ahead of time. To find out more about the different meal plan options, visit the Carolina Dining Services Web site at www.dining.unc.edu.

Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History

The Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History (SHSCBCH) was founded in July 1988 and is named for Dr. Sonja Haynes Stone, a member of the UNC–Chapel Hill family for more than 17 years. The SHSCBCH opened in a new building on South Road in fall 2004 in the heart of campus, across from the Student Union and near the Bell Tower. As a center within the University's Academic Affairs Division, SHSCBCH has a central role in supporting the University's academic mission by a strong commitment to broaden the range of intellectual discourse about African Americans and to encourage better understanding of peoples of the African diaspora and their perspectives on important social and cultural issues. The center focuses its efforts on the interdisciplinary examination of Africana lives, cultures, and histories. The Stone Center works with numerous departments and units of the University to help promote interdisciplinary inquiry, as well as focused examinations from various interdisciplinary and disciplinary perspectives.

The Stone Center is a major resource of cultural, historical, and social programming for the UNC–Chapel Hill community. As a focal point for Black cultural expression, the Stone Center sponsors concerts, poetry readings, lectures, group discussions, and presentations in drama and dance. Its permanent programs include the Sonja Haynes Stone Memorial Fellowship and Lecture, the African Diaspora Lecture Series, the Cross-Cultural Communications Institute (CCCI), the Sonja Haynes Stone Collegiums, and the Visiting Scholar Program. More information about the Stone Center can be found on the Web at sonjahaynesstonectr.unc.edu.

American Indian Center

The mission of the American Indian Center is to bridge the richness of North Carolina's American Indian cultures with the strengths of Carolina s research, education and teaching. This will establish the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as a leading public university for American Indian scholarship and scholars and make native issues a permanent part of the intellectual life of the university. The AIC provides focused support for the recruitment and retention of American Indian graduate students, including support for the graduate student organization ‘First Nations Graduate Circle;' support for intellectual activities such as Native Authors' Book Club, mentoring by the AIC Director, support for cultural seminars and events such as Elder-in-Residence, Native American Heritage Month, and related services. More information about the American Indian Center and the director can be found on the Web at americanindiancenter.unc.edu.