Department of Art

art.unc.edu

JAMES HIRSCHFIELD, Chair

Professors

Christoph Brachmann, European Art, 1400–1700

S. Elizabeth Grabowski, Printmaking, Painting, Drawing

James Hirschfield, Sculpture

Yun-Dong Nam, Ceramic Sculpture

Mary D. Sheriff, 18th- and 19th-Century Art, Gender Studies

Daniel J. Sherman, European Art, 1850–1960, Cultural History, Museums

elin o'Hara slavick, Interdisciplinary Practices

Mary C. Sturgeon, Ancient Art, Archaeology

Jeff Whetstone, Photography

Dennis Zaborowski, Painting, Drawing

Associate Professors

Glaire Anderson, Islamic Art

John P. Bowles, African American Art

Eduardo Douglas, Latin American Art

Pika Ghosh, South Asian Art

Cary Levine, Contemporary Art

Wei-Cheng Lin, East Asian Art

Carol Magee, African Visual Culture

Mario Marzan, Painting, Drawing, Latin American Art

Mary Pardo, Italian Renaissance

Roxana Perez-Mendez, Sculpture

Tania String, European Art, 1400–1700

Dorothy Verkerk, Late Antique, Celtic, Early Medieval

Lyneise Williams, Latin American and African Diaspora Art

Assistant Professors

Ross Barrett, American Art

Sabine Gruffat, Digital Art

Cary Levine, Contemporary Art

Wei-Cheng Lin, East Asian Art

Mario Marzan, Painting, Drawing, Latin American Art

Hong-An Truong, Digital Art

Jina Valentine, Mixed-Media

Lecturers

Jennifer J. Bauer, Modern Art

Joy Cox, Digital Art

Michael Sonnichsen, Photography and Printmaking

Ackland Art Museum:

Adjunct Professor

Timothy Riggs, Curator of Collections

Adjunct Associate Professor

Peter Nisbet

Adjunct Assistant Professors

Carolyn Allmendinger, Director of Academic Programs

North Carolina Museum of Art:

Adjunct Associate Professors

John Coffey, Deputy Director for Art

Adjunct Professor – American Studies Department

Bernard Herman

Professors Emeriti

Jaroslav T. Folda

James Gadson

Frances Huemer

Juan Logan

Arthur Marks

Jerry Noe

Marvin Saltzman

For those considering professional careers as art historians (teaching and research), critics, or museum or gallery professionals, the Department of Art offers graduate work leading to the degrees of master of arts and doctor of philosophy. Those who aim to become professional artists should take the degree of master of fine arts. The Hanes Art Center provides exhibition galleries, a departmental library, a visual resources library, offices, study areas, classrooms, and studios. Additional studios and shops are located in the Art Laboratory building on Airport Drive, one mile from campus. The Joseph C. Sloane Art Library has a collection of over 100,000 print volumes and is supplemented by the University Libraries, with holdings of more than 6,000,000 volumes. The Sloane Art Library provides quite study spaces, access to specialized art resources, and houses the reserve holdings for Art Department courses. Graduate students have access to the departmental visual resources library and can use different types of scanning equipment (flatbed scanners, slide and film scanners) to digitize images for research. The VRL has current holdings of 250,000 slides, 60,000 digital images, and 20,000 photographs.

Admission

Deadline for applications will be in December for art history and in January for studio art. The Graduate School application is submitted via the online application for admission. See gradschool.unc.edu/admissions/instructions.html for detailed information and deadlines. This user-friendly, online application is faster and easier than completing a paper application and provides for the prompt receipt and distribution of application information. Individuals who are unable to utilize the online application may request a paper application from gradinfo@unc.edu or by phoning (919) 966-2612.

Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.)

Overview

The master of fine arts program in studio art is a community of dedicated and diverse fine arts professionals. We recognize and respond to the universal human need for visual expression, and the indispensable role of the visual arts and visual communication in contemporary society. We recognize the necessity of intellectual curiosity and creative discipline as components of a dynamic learning environment and respect the conversation between intuition and intellect that contributes to transformative art-making. We encourage exploration and experimentation that crosses intellectual and methodological boundaries while simultaneously respecting and engaging the history and traditions of art.

In the context of a research I institution, the UNC M.F.A. program stands as a site of synthesis, where extensive intellectual and creative resources are available to students in their pursuit of expression. We seek students who are technically adept, critically aware, and dedicated to their passion for art-making. With these qualities as a point of departure, faculty work closely with students to encourage aesthetic and intellectual inquiry, impart versatile skills, and motivate self-exploration. Our resolve is to help students create outstanding works of art.

M.F.A. Curriculum

The master of fine arts degree at UNC–Chapel Hill is a two-year, 60-hour program. Credits are earned through studio practice, formal critique, professional development, and academic electives. Additionally, a teaching foundation class is available for students who wish to prepare for an academic career. While this class is optional, it is required for students who wish to apply for teaching fellowships in the M.F.A. program. Most students take advantage of this opportunity and receive teaching fellowships that provide the opportunity to teach their own class.

Credits for studio practice constitute the majority of credits. These are earned through independent study and critique. All M.F.A. students have individual studio space to support their creative research. With the department's interdisciplinary approach, students need not choose a particular medium for specialization. They may use different media to express a variety of aesthetic and conceptual goals. This however, does not preclude a media focus, but does mean that media choices are integral to students' intellectual and aesthetic explorations.

The structure for feedback in the program is through weekly critiques, where students interact with the studio faculty over the course of the semester. A series of formal reviews bring the entire faculty together to evaluate each student's progress at the end of the first, second, and fourth semester.

The academic component of the M.F.A. program is designed to complement the art making process. The program strongly believes that the decision to pursue the making of fine art in an academic context carries an attendant responsibility to develop the verbal and written articulation of the visual. To help achieve this goal, students participate each semester in a graduate seminar (three credit hours). Contemporary critical issues surrounding the making of art are explored and debated in this group forum. Practical aspects of an art career (grant writing, professional presentation, networking with galleries and museums, etc.) make up the professional development component of the seminar. The balance of these components will vary from semester to semester, reflecting the focus of the various faculty teaching the course.

Other academic credits are satisfied by a requisite six hours of additional course work in art history and/or related fields. Students select these courses depending on the focus of their studio explorations, thus stretching the capacity of their creative work. Usually students are urged to take one of these courses in the area of contemporary art history.

The remaining academic credits are earned through the master's thesis. This includes the preparation of the thesis exhibition and the writing of the thesis document. At the end of the students' final semester, they mount a group exhibition of the thesis work produced under the direction of a thesis committee, as well as a solo show in the Art Department's Allcott Gallery. Students write a thesis statement to accompany the thesis work. A final oral defense takes place during the time of the exhibition. Once the oral defense has been passed, students submit a copy of the thesis statement (along with documentation of the thesis work) for permanent retention in the Sloane Art Library.

In addition to the core curriculum, the UNC–Chapel Hill master of fine arts program supports students by bringing artists and critics to UNC throughout the year. For our Hanes Visiting Artist Lecture Series, artists are typically invited to campus for a two-day visit during which they give a public lecture and provide private critiques for the department's graduate students. In addition, each semester one artist is invited for a longer two-week residency. Graduate students have the opportunity to interact with these artists in a variety of settings. This program has proved to be a vital conduit for graduate students to see the work of, and interact with, a large and diverse number of professional artists. Additionally, once a semester the department brings to campus a critic, gallerist or other art professional to further introduce students to the professional art world, furthering knowledge and fostering mutually beneficial practical and professional connections and relationships.

Financial Aid for Studio Art Students

All applicants for admission to the M.F.A. program are automatically considered for nomination for merit awards offered by The Graduate School. Additional support in the form of assistantships and/or specially designated awards is administered directly by the department. Students may apply for teaching fellowships after they have completed the teaching practicum course.* Students desiring financial aid should consult as early as possible the Office of Scholarships and Student Aid (studentaid.unc.edu/) for information about work-study jobs and loans.

*Students with demonstrable teaching experience at the college level are exempt from this course.

Admission Requirements – M.F.A.

We seek applications from individuals committed to their development as professional artists. While the majority of applicants hold a bachelor's degree in art, we also welcome applications from students who hold undergraduate degrees in other fields and can present a strong art portfolio. Students who do not have a bachelor's degree in art should have at least one basic-level and one intermediate-level course in art history in preparation for the graduate-level course work in art history required of M.F.A. students. Applicants to the M.F.A. program are not required to take the Graduate Record Exam (GRE).

Application for admission to the M.F.A. program in studio art must be made online through The Graduate School. Their instructions for applicants may be found at gradschool.unc.edu/admissions/instructions.html.

Applicants are admitted for the fall semester only.

All applications must be submitted by posted deadlines, and must include the following:

The electronic application via the UNC Graduate School (see gradschool.unc.edu/admissions/instructions.html)

Supplemental materials specific to the M.F.A. admission include (See the Department of Art Web site at art.unc.edu/studio-art/graduate-programs/how-to-applydeadlines/ for specific instructions.)

For more information, contact

Director of Graduate Studies for Studio Art
Department of Art
CB# 3405, Hanes Art Center
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, N.C. 27599-3405
Web: art.unc.edu

Master of Arts (M.A.) and the Doctorate (Ph.D.) in Art History

In addition to completing an application to The Graduate School (which must include up-to-date GRE scores), the candidate for admission to the programs in art history must submit an example of his/her written work. The writing sample should be no more than 15 pages. All applicants for graduate study in art history are admitted to the program as candidates for the master of arts degree unless they have already received or expect to receive the M.A. degree in art history from another institution. An undergraduate major in art history is not required for M.A. candidacy; however, entering candidates must have taken a minimum of twenty-four semester hours in art history, archaeology, cultural anthropology, or aesthetics.

There are no spring semester admissions in art history.

Degree Requirements for Art History

Master of Arts Degree

The master of arts degree generally follows the requirements of The Graduate School as described in the section on graduate degree requirements in the Graduate School Handbook.

Purpose of the M.A. degree: Both a broad knowledge of world art and a basic sampling of the diverse theory and methods employed by our faculty in the discipline of art history.

The master's program in art history is designed to be completed in four semesters.

Course Work

Total of 12 courses, 36 credits.

Three required courses: Methods in Art Historical Research (ARTH 850) in the first semester; Master's Thesis Writing Seminar (ARTH 991) and Master's Thesis (ARTH 993) in the fourth semester.

Nine courses, of which five should be graduate research seminars (700-900-level).

In order to develop breadth of knowledge, both in terms of content and method, students must take at least two courses whose topics cover the time period before 1700 C.E. and two covering the period after 1700 C.E. Additionally, students must take courses with five different members of the graduate faculty.

Language Requirement

M.A. Degree: By the end of the third semester, all M.A. students are required to have met the language requirement of one language, other than English, appropriate to the area of study. The language will be determined in consultation with the student's advisor, the director of graduate studies, and the graduate committee. The student can demonstrate competency by obtaining a passing grade on the UNC–Chapel Hill reading competency exam, or earning a "B" (or a graduate "P") or better in a fourth semester or higher language course, or earning a "B" (or a graduate "P") in a literature course in that language at UNC–Chapel Hill. Note: No credit toward the M.A. course work requirement is given for language courses.

Master's Exam

M.A. students take this exam at the beginning of their third semester. Students who do not pass the exam at that time may re-take the exam at the end of the third semester. Only students who have successfully passed the exam may register for ARTH 991 (Master's Thesis Writing Seminar) or ARTH 993 (Master's Thesis). The exam is offered only during the fall semester.

Master's Thesis

The M.A. thesis is completed by the end of the fourth semester of enrollment. The completed thesis must be signed by the members of the thesis committee and submitted to The Graduate School in time for May graduation.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree

The degree of doctor of philosophy generally follows the requirements of The Graduate School as described in the section on graduate degree requirements in the Graduate School Handbook.

Course Work

Ph.D. students take a total of nine courses, at least four of which are research seminars (900-level), plus a final course, ARTH 994 (Doctoral Dissertation). Two of the nine courses may be taken in other departments as electives for supplementary and complimentary studies.

Electing to pursue an external minor: Ph.D. students may choose to complete a formal external minor, which consists of at least three additional courses in a field related to his or her area of specialized study (such as communication studies, women's studies, history, or medieval studies). The student must secure prior approval of the minor department, and a copy of the proposed courses to be taken must be signed by both departments and entered in the student's permanent record in the Department of Art and the UNC–Chapel Hill Graduate School.

Language Requirement

Ph.D. students are required to demonstrate proficiency in two languages (other than English). The first language will be the language that fulfilled the M.A. language requirement. The second language should be appropriate to the area of study, and will be determined in consultation with the student's advisor, the director of graduate studies for art history, and the graduate committee. Some fields require additional languages and students should study these languages as necessary. Competency in the second language will be determined following the same guidelines as those of the M.A. language requirement.

Preliminary Doctoral Exams

Ph.D. students take both the written and the oral preliminary exams during the semester after the Ph.D. course work is completed. Most Ph.D. students will take the preliminary exams during the spring semester of their second year in the Ph.D. program. Those students pursuing an external minor will take the preliminary exams during the fall semester of their third year.

Dissertation and Final Oral Exam

After passing the preliminary doctoral exams, the student begins work on the dissertation. Once the dissertation is completed and approved by the advisor and dissertation committee, the student defends the finished dissertation. Doctoral students have eight calendar years from the date of first registration in the doctoral program to complete the Ph.D. For doctoral students, there is a minimum residence credit requirement of four semesters, and at least two semesters must be earned through continuous full-time registration on the UNC–Chapel Hill campus.

For further information the applicant should write to the director of graduate studies for art history.

Financial Aid for Art History Students

All applicants for admission who have completed their applications by December 1 are automatically considered by the department for nomination for Graduate School awards. Applicants and students in residence are also eligible for teaching and research assistantships, which are awarded by the department. There are also annual service and non-service awards. Students desiring financial aid should consult as early as possible the Office of Scholarships and Student Aid (studentaid.unc.edu) for information about work-study jobs and loans.

ARTH (Art History)

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students

The content of these courses varies slightly from year to year in accordance with the needs of the students and the special competence of the instructor.

445 The Mexican Mural Renaissance, 1921–1945 (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 157 or 267. Permission of the instructor. This course investigates mural painting and state patronage in post-Revolutionary Mexico, from 1921 to 1945, when artists engaged politics in monumental public works. Focuses on the murals of Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros, as well as on the relationship between art and politics.

450 [ART 450] The City as Monument (3). A city or cities will be considered as cultural artifact(s), with emphasis given to plans and planning, architecture, public monuments and to various institutions, such as religion, government, the arts, and commerce that initiate or affect these urban developments and forms.

451 [ART 451] Women in the Visual Arts II (WMST 451) (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 151 or 254. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Discussion of topics related to the representation of women in Western art and/or women as producers of art.

452 [ART 452] Brazilian Modernism (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 157 or 267. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This course covers the development of modernism in the visual arts in Brazil from 1917, the year in which a Brazilian artist first exhibited "modernist" artworks in Brazil, to 1960.

453 [ART 453] Africa in the American Imagination (AAAD 486) (3). Restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Examines the ways African art appears in United States popular culture (advertisements, magazines, toys, films, art) to generate meanings about Africa. Addresses intersecting issues of nationalism, multiculturalism, imperialism, nostalgia, race.

454 [ART 454] Cathedrals, Abbeys, Castles: Gothic Art and Architecture, ca.1130–1500 (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 157 or 267. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Covers the development of Gothic church and secular architecture in Europe between 1130 and 1500. Explores formal and constructive progress in architecture (including sculpture and stained glass windows) and social, political, and economic aspects of medieval society that affected these developments.

455 [ART 455] City, Architecture, Art: Nuremberg as a European Artistic Center, 1300–1600 (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 151. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. The course covers the development of art and architecture from ca. 1300 to ca. 1600 in one of the most important medieval and early modern art centers in Europe: Nuremberg, the hometown of the famous German painter Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528).

456 [ART 456] Art and Visual Culture of South Asia (ASIA 456) (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. This thematic course explores how objects and monuments are viewed, experienced, and used in a ritual context in South Asia.

457 [ART 457] Studies in the History of Graphic Art (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. Study of prints and printmaking in Western art from ca. 1400 to the present focusing on selected topics.

458 [ART 458] Islamic Palaces, Gardens, and Court Culture (Eighth–16th Centuries CE) (ASIA 458) (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 154. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This course focuses on palaces, gardens, and court cultures beginning with the eighth-century Umayyad period and ending with the 16th-century reigns of the Mughal, Safavid, and Ottoman dynasties.

460 [ART 460] Greek Painting (CLAR 460) (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. A survey of the development of Greek art from geometric to Hellenistic painting through a study of Greek vases, mosaics, and mural paintings.

461 [ART 461] Archaic Greek Sculpture (CLAR 461) (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. A focused study of sculpture during the Archaic period in Greece.

462 [ART 462] Classical Greek Sculpture (CLAR 462) (3). See CLAR 462 for description.

463 [ART 463] Hellenistic Greek Sculpture (CLAR 463) (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. A focused study of Greek sculpture in the Hellenistic period.

464 [ART 464] Greek Architecture (CLAR 464) (3). See CLAR 464 for description.

465 [ART 465] Architecture of Etruria and Rome (CLAR 465) (3). See CLAR 465 for description.

466 [ART 466] History of the Illuminated Book (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. Chronological survey of major developments in book painting during the European Middle Ages from 300 to 1450 CE.

467 [ART 467] Celtic Art and Cultures (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. This course explores the art and culture from the Hallstat and La Tène periods (seventh century BCE) to the Celtic "renaissance" (ca. 400–1200 CE).

468 [ART 468] Visual Arts and Culture in Modern and Contemporary China (ASIA 468) (3). This course examines visual materials, including those from fine arts, commerce, popular culture, political propaganda, avant-garde movements, etc., produced in modern and contemporary China as an important means of defining China's self-identity in the modern and global world.

469 [ART 469] Art of the Aztec Empire (3). This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the art of the Aztec Empire, including architecture, monumental sculpture, small-scale sculpture, ceramics, painting, lapidary work, gold work, and feather work.

470 [ART 470] The Moving Image in the Middle Ages (3). The course explores the range of contexts in which images in the medieval period were made to move; for instance, in rituals, processions, and miracles.

471 [ART 471] Northern European Art of the 14th and 15th Centuries (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. Advanced study of painting and sculpture in France, England, and the Netherlands, 1300 to 1400.

472 [ART 472] Early Modern Art, 1400–1750 (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. This course explores specialized themes and/or broad topics in Western European art of the early modern period.

473 [ART 473] Early Modern and Modern Decorative Arts (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. This course traces major historical developments in the decorative and applied arts, landscape design, and material culture of Western society from the Renaissance to the present.

474 [ART 474] Roman Sculpture (CLAR 474) (3). See CLAR 474 for description.

475 [ART 475] Icons and Idols: Debates in Medieval Art (3). This course will examine theories and instances of image making and breaking from the classical world to the early modern world, covering late antiquity, iconoclasm in Byzantium, and the medieval West.

476 [ART 476] Roman Painting (CLAR 476) (3). See CLAR 476 for description.

481 [ART 481] American Art and the Civil War (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 53, 54, 61, 64, 77, 79, 84, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, or 161. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. An exploration of the ways that American artists negotiated the Civil War, examining artworks and popular images that addressed slavery and sectionalism, the wartime experience, and the project of Reconstruction.

483 [ART 483] Art, Politics, and Society in France, 1850–1914 (HIST 468) (3). An examination of the interaction of artists, criticism, and the market with larger political and social developments in France, with an emphasis on primary sources.

485 [ART 485] Art of the Harlem Renaissance (3). Examines the Harlem Renaissance (1918–1942) as an instance of both transnational modernism and cultural nationalism through study of how artworks articulate interrelated conceptions of race, gender, sexuality, and social class.

487 [ART 487] African Impulse in African American Art (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. This class will examine the presence and influences of African culture in the art and material culture of Africans in the Americas from the colonial period to the present.

488 [ART 488] Contemporary African Art (AAAD 405) (3). Prerequisite, AAAD 101 or ARTH 152 or 155. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Examines modern and contemporary African art (1940s to the present) for Africans on the continent and abroad. Examines tradition, cultural heritage, colonialism, postcolonialism, local versus global, nationalism, gender, identity, diaspora.

490 Special Topics in Art History (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. Selected topics in art history.

514 [ART 514] Monuments and Memory (GLBL 514) (3). See GLBL 514 for description.

551 [ART 551] Introduction to Museum Studies (3). Introduces careers in museums and other cultural institutions. Readings and interactions with museum professionals expose participants to curation, collection management, conservation, exhibition design, administration, publication, educational programming, and fundraising.

552 [ART 552] The Literature of Art (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. A study of the principal critics and historians who have contributed to the development of modern art history. Also application of the principles to specific works of art.

553 [ART 553] The Body in Social Theory and Visual Representation (3). A study of how the human body has been represented in contemporary art and the relation of those representations to theories of the individual and society.

554 [ART 554] Imagining Otherness in Visual Culture in the Americas (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. This course examines representational othering of black, Asian, Latina/o, and Native American people in images in the Americas through postcolonial topics like racial stereotyping, Orientalism, primitivism, essentialism, and universalism.

555 Urban Africa and Global Mobility (3). The contemporary arts of Africa are framed by urbanization and global mobility. This course examines how artists examine, reflect on, and express visually experiences of these conditions.

556 [ART 556] Visual Cultures of the American City, 1750–1950 (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 53, 54, 61, 64, 77, 79, 84, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, or 161. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. An exploration of the wide field of American art and visual culture inspired by the spaces and social life of the modern city.

561 [ART 561] Art and Society in Medieval Islamic Spain and North Africa (ASIA 561) (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 154. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This course introduces the art and architecture of medieval Islamic Spain and North Africa between the eighth and 16th centuries.

562 [ART 562] Islamic Urbanism (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 154. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This course explores the development, urban forms, and social structures of some of the major cities of the medieval Islamic lands.

583 [ART 583] Theories of Modern Art (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. A study of theoretical issues central to the understanding of trends in modern art (e.g., modernism, the avant-garde, formalism originality).

586 [ART 586] Cultural Politics in Contemporary Art (3). Permission of the instructor. This course will examine the strategies of critique in contemporary art. Organized thematically, it focuses on the tactics employed by artists who address political, social, or cultural issues through their work.

588 [ART 588] Current Issues in Art (3). Addresses select issues that have gained or regained prominence in today's art world, for example globalization, training, the market, and the nature of the "contemporary."

590 [ART 550] Topics in Connoisseurship (3). Permission of the instructor. Works in the Ackland Museum's collection will be studied directly as a means of training the eye and exploring the technical and aesthetic issues raised by art objects.

592 [ART 595] History and Theory of Museums (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. Provides an historical overview of museums. Serves as an introduction to many of the theoretical issues museums face including: ethics, audiences, the role of museums in society, exhibiting dilemmas.

595 [ART 596] Experience in Research (1–3). Required preparation, one 100-level art history course and one 200- to 399-level art history course. An experiential-learning opportunity in independent and original research on a topic or in a field of the student's choosing under the close direction of a faculty supervisor.

597 [ART 597] Studiolo to Wunderkammer (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. This course explores the history of early modern collecting, encompassing scholars' and merchants' "study rooms," aristocrats' menageries, humanists' "sculpture gardens," and princely cabinets of wonders.

683 [ART 683] Etruscan Art (CLAR 683) (3). See CLAR 683 for description.

691H Honors in Art History (3). Permission of the instructor. Independent research directed by a faculty member leading to an honors thesis.

692H Honors in Art History (3). Permission of the instructor. Independent research directed by a faculty member leading to an honors thesis.

Courses for Graduate Students

In the seminars listed, the topics for study change from year to year depending upon the professor conducting the course. Architecture, sculpture, painting, or a combination of these may be the subject. Consult the department schedule for details on specific courses in any given semester.

750 [ART 750] Advanced Readings Topics in the History of Art (3).

751 [ART 751] Gender and Visual Culture (WMST 751) (3).

755 [ART 755] Museum Studies Apprenticeship (3).Prerequisite, ARTH 551 or ARTH 592. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Provides experience in some aspect of museum work: curatorial, educational, collections management, exhibition design, administration. Requires a minimum of 90 hours and will have an academic component.

763[ART 763] Medieval Studies (3).

768 ]ART 768] Tudor and Jacobean Portraits: A Theoretical and Practical Investigation (3). This course involves close and critical examination of a select body of extant portraits from the Tudor and Jacobean periods in English history (1485-1625) in the collection of the North Carolina Museum of Art. Students taking this unit will play an active role in researching these relatively unstudied works of art.

777 [ART 777] Colonialism and European Visual Culture, 1800–1990 (3).Considers the role of visual representation in the construction of European empire and its associated knowledges from the Napoleonic expedition to Egypt to debates over primitivism in the 1980s.

794 [ART 794] Greek Topography (CLAR 794) (3). See CLAR 794 for description.

798 [ART 798] Roman Topography (CLAR 798) (3).

850 [ART 850] Methods in Art Historical Research (3). This course introduces students to a variety of historical and contemporary methods for the interpretation of visual culture.

910 [ART 910] Seminar in Architecture (3).

950 [ART 950] Problems in the History of Art (3).

952 [ART 952] Seminar in Museum Studies (3).

954 [ART 954] Seminar in Chinese Art and Architecture (3). Study selected topics in the history of Chinese art and architecture.

955 [ART 955] South Asian Art (3).

956 [ART 956] Seminar in Islamic Art (3). Required preparation, 400-level or higher art history course or permission of the instructor. Graduate seminar for critical issues in Islamic art (for example, Orientalism, historiography of Islamic art, critiquing the Islamic city).

957 [ART 957] Seminar in African Art (3).

958 [ART 958] Seminar in Contemporary Global Arts (3). This seminar examines contemporary artistic production that engages, questions, and challenges the narratives of culture and art that privilege Europe and America as the models for understanding cultural production.

959 [ART 959] Seminar in Latin American Art (3).This seminar investigates topics in the history of colonial and modern Latin American art.

960 [ART 960] Seminar in Ancient Art (CLAR 960) (3).

961 [ART 961] Seminar in Medieval Art (3).

971 [ART 971] Seminar in Renaissance Art (3).

972 [ART 972] Seminar in Baroque Art (3).

980 [ART 980] Seminar in Modern Art (3).

981 [ART 981] Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Art (3).

982 [ART 982] Seminar in American Art (3).

983 [ART 995] Mexico City: 1890–1950 (3).Permission of the instructor. This course examines the visual culture of Mexico City between 1890 and 1950. It also considers works by artists outside of Mexico who were associated and inspired by cultural production here.

984 [ART 984] Seminar in Contemporary Art (3).Addresses select topics and theoretical issues relevant to contemporary art.

985 Fashioning Power (3).This graduate seminar focuses on fashion (clothing, accessories, style, performance) as the central cultural component for examining power in society.

987 [ART 987] Seminar in African American Art (3).Advanced standing in art history or permission of the instructor. Explores current debates crucial to the study of African American art. Emphasis on the variety of theories and methods central to the field.

991 [ART 992] Master's Thesis Writing Seminar (3).

993 [ART 993] Master's Research and Thesis (3).

994 [ART 994] Doctoral Research and Dissertation (3).

ARTS (Studio Art Courses)

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students

402 [ART 402] Advanced Painting (1–6). Prerequisite, ARTS 302. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Continuation of ARTS 302. May be repeated for credit.

403 [ART 403] Advanced Sculpture (1–6). Prerequisite, ARTS 303. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Continuation of ARTS 303. May be repeated for credit.

405 [ART 405] Color Photography (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 105. The class will focus on lectures, readings, technical demonstrations, and visual assignments investigating color photography. Students will be responsible for completing a series of photographic assignments. Emphasis will be placed on intensive final projects.

407 [ART 407] Body Imaging (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 102. Required preparation, one intermediate ARTS class or permission of the instructor. Work is made through close examination and analysis of the human "body." Work may be made using any technical or theoretical approach. Required readings provide a conceptual grounding.

410 [ART 410] Public Art (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 302, 303, or 305. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This studio class explores public art from historical and critical perspective. Students will propose and create works of public art. Opportunities to implement projects will be explored through the Department of Art and other resources.

413 [ART 413] Advanced Ceramic Sculpture (1–6). Prerequisite, ARTS 313. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Continuation of ARTS 313. May be repeated for credit.

415 [ART 415] Conceptual-Experimental Photography (3). An advanced photography course for students interested in contemporary photographic practices, critical theory, art history, and experimental processes: theory and practice, formal and conceptual investigations, and historical and contemporary strategies will all be given equal attention.

416 [ART 416] Video Art (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 106. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. An introduction to the creative and technical processes in producing video art. Students will shoot and edit their own independent video projects. Some class time will be devoted to viewing video art and other media-based work.

417 [ART 417] Advanced Mixed Media Projects (3). Cultural production and practice, theory, and criticism. Pursuit of individual visual projects, formally and conceptually, through theoretical, poetic, art historical, and autobiographical texts, critiques, collaboration, and discussion using all media.

418 [ART 418] Advanced Printmaking (1–6). Prerequisites, ARTS 208 and any two of 328, 338, or 348. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. This course is appropriate for students who have had a minimum of three semesters of prior printmaking experience. Students submit a proposal outlining technical and artistic goals for the semester.

423 [ART 423] Installation (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 303. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This class explores art that encompasses its audience. Conceptual motivations as well as practical realities of dealing with a specific three-dimensional space will be considered.

426 Two-Dimensional Computer Animation (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 106. Familiarity with basic computer skills and drawing required. Explores concepts and techniques of two-dimensional animation, including conceptualization with storyboards, pencil testing and timing animation, animating sequences with Photoshop, experimenting with color and compositing using After Effects. Emphasis placed on developing ideas though experimental practices, combining traditional and digital animation processes.

428 [ART 428] Book Art (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 102. Required preparation, one additional two-dimensional studio course (drawing, photography, or printmaking). Defining the book as a "multiple and sequential picture plane," this course considers a range of traditional approaches and conceptual departures of the book as a format for creative expression.

490 [ART 490] Special Topics in Studio Art (3). Required preparation, any intermediate studio art course or permission of the instructor. Advanced consideration of selected topics in studio art.

493 Studio Art Practicum or Internship (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 300. Recommended for juniors or seniors. Allows studio art majors to pursue unpaid practicums or internships for credit. Examples include working as a studio assistant or working in art-related fields, such as galleries, design firms, architectural firms, and nonprofit arts organizations. Work undertaken must comply with Federal criteria governing unpaid internships.

500 [ART 500] Senior Seminar (3). Restricted to senior studio art majors. This course is the capstone course for the studio art major. Topics covered include issues of professional development, curatorial practice, and presentation of works of art in exhibition. The culminating project is mounting the Senior Exhibition.

515 [ART 515] Advanced Photography (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 305. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. May be repeated for credit.

526 Three-Dimensional Animation (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 106. The primary goals of this class are to introduce three-dimensional computer modeling and animation in Maya. The course covers a broad range of creative applications including special effects, compositing with video, and motion graphics. Students will produce a short three-dimensional animation as their final project.

596 [ART 590] Independent Study in Studio Art (1–9). Permission of the instructor. For students wishing to pursue additional media or thematic study beyond the advanced level. Students register with section numbers designated for faculty. May be repeated for credit.

636 [ART 406] Interactive Media (COMM 636) (3). See COMM 636 for description.

691H [ART 691H] Honors in Studio Art (3). Permission of the instructor. Independent research directed by a faculty member leading to an honors thesis.

692H [ART 692H] Honors in Studio Art (3). Permission of the instructor. Independent research directed by a faculty member leading to an honors thesis.

Courses for Graduate Students

700 [ART 700] Graduate Studio Art Seminar (3).

701 [ART 701] TA Practicum (3).

710 [ART 710] Graduate Studio (1–21).

713 [ART 713] Graduate Sculpture (1–21).

718 [ART 718] Graduate Printmaking (1–21).

720 [ART 720] Qualifying Review (2).

798 [ART 799] M.F.A. Graduate Group Critique (3). M.F.A. candidates meet weekly for organized group analysis and critique of their art work. Each candidate presents work on rotating basis before a panel of faculty and peers

992 Master's Project in Studio Art (3).