Department of Classics

www.classics.unc.edu

JAMES B. RIVES, Chair

WILLIAM H. RACE, Interim Chair (Fall 2013)

Professors

Robert Babcock, Medieval Latin

Donald Haggis (40) Greek Archaeology, Aegean Prehistory, Bronze Age and Early Iron Age Crete

James J. O'Hara (2) Latin Poetry, Latin and Greek Literature

William H. Race (42) Pindar, Greek Poetry, the Classical Tradition

James B. Rives, Ancient Religion, Roman Literature and Culture (on leave Fall 2013)

G. Kenneth Sams (13) Greek Archaeology, Anatolian and Near Eastern Archaeology

Associate Professors

Sharon L. James (5) Latin Poetry, Women in Antiquity

Assistant Professors

Emily Baragwanath, Greek Historiography (on leave 2013–2014)

Luca Grillo, Latin Historiography and Oratory

Jennifer Gates-Foster, Roman Archaeology, Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt

Owen Goslin, Greek Poetry

Adjunct Professors

Eric Downing, Ancient Literary Theory, Ancient/Modern Relations

Bart Ehrman, Hellenistic Religion, New Testament

J. H. Lesher, Ancient Greek Philosophy

Mariska Leunissen, Ancient Greek Philosophy

Jodi Magness, Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology

Fred Naiden, Greek History

Zlatko Plese, Ancient Mediterranean Religions

C.D.C. Reeve (39) Ancient Philosophy, Moral Psychology, History of Philosophy

Mary C. Sturgeon (31) Greek Art

Richard J. A. Talbert (18) Roman History

Professors Emeriti

Edwin L. Brown

Carolyn L. Connor

George W. Houston

Henry R. Immerwahr

Jerzy Linderski

Sara Mack

Kenneth J. Reckford

Peter M. Smith

Philip A. Stadter

William C. West III

Cecil W. Wooten

Graduate work in the Department of Classics is primarily designed to meet the needs of students who intend by intensive study and research to specialize in the classics. The M.A. prepares especially for teaching at the secondary level; the Ph.D. for research and teaching at the university level.

The University is a contributing member of the American Academy in Rome, the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, the Archaeological Institute of America, the American Research Institute in Turkey, and the Institute of Nautical Archaeology. There are thus numerous opportunities for study and archaeological activity abroad.

Requirements for Advanced Degrees

The degree of master of arts is offered with a concentration in Greek, Latin, or classical archaeology. The degree of doctor of philosophy is offered with a concentration in Greek and Latin, classics with historical emphasis, classical archaeology, or classical and medieval Latin. A minor in related departments may be permitted on application. Students may broaden their program by taking supporting work in related languages or literatures or in art, history, linguistics, philosophy, religious studies, or women's and gender studies.

Requirements for advanced degrees are stated in general in the section "Graduate Degree Requirements". A more detailed description of the requirements for the specific graduate degree programs in the Department of Classics may be found on the department's Web site at classics.unc.edu/academics/graduate-programs-in-classics.

Classical Archaeology

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates

CLAR

411 Archaeological Field Methods (3). Systematic introduction to archaeological field methods, especially survey and excavation techniques.

440 Problems in the History of Classical Ideas (3). Permission of the department.

460 Greek Painting (ARTH 460) (3). See ARTH 460 for description.

461 Archaic Greek Sculpture (ARTH 461) (3). See ARTH 461 for description.

462 Classical Greek Sculpture (ARTH 462) (3). Permission of the instructor. A focused study of Greek sculpture during the classical period.

463 Hellenistic Greek Sculpture (ARTH 463) (3). See ARTH 463 for description.

464 Greek Architecture (ARTH 464) (3). Prerequisite, CLAR 244. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A survey of Greek architectural development from the Dark Ages through the fourth century BCE. Special topics include the beginnings of monumental architecture, the development of the orders, and interpretations of individual architects in terms of style and proportions.

465 Architecture of Etruria and Rome (ARTH 465) (3). Prerequisite, CLAR 245. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. The development of architecture in the Roman world from the ninth century BCE through the fourth century CE. The course focuses on the development of urbanism and the function, significance, and evolution of the main building types and their geographic distribution.

470 History and Archaeology of Bathing (3). Cross-cultural survey of the sociocultural and archaeological history of bathing from antiquity (500 BCE) to today, including bathing customs, baths, bathing images, and toilets of different cultures around the world.

474 Roman Sculpture (ARTH 474) (3). Survey of Roman sculpture (200 BCE–300 CE), including portraiture, state reliefs, funerary monuments, and idealizing sculpture, with emphasis on style, iconography, and historical development of sculpture in its sociocultural, political, and religious contexts.

475 Rome and the Western Provinces (3). Survey of the material remains of the Western provinces of the Roman Empire, with attention to their historical context and significance.

476 Roman Painting (ARTH 476). Surveys Roman painting from 200 BCE to 300 CE, with emphasis on style, iconography, historical development of painting in its sociocultural, political, and religious contexts. Treats current debates in scholarship.

488 The Archaeology of the Near East in the Iron Age (3). Prerequisite, CLAR 241. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A survey of the principal sites, monuments, and art of the Iron Age Near East, ca. 1200 to 500 BCE.

489 The Archaeology of Anatolia in the Bronze and Iron Ages (3). Prerequisite, CLAR 241. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A survey of Anatolian archaeology from the third millennium through the sixth century BCE.

491 The Archaeology of Early Greece (1200–500 BCE) (3). This course surveys the development of Greek material culture from 1200 to 500 BCE, exploring the origins of Greek art, architecture, cities, and sanctuaries in the Aegean and eastern Mediterranean.

512 Ancient Synagogues (JWST 512, RELI 512) (3). See RELI 512 for description.

561 Mosaics: The Art of Mosaic in Greece, Rome, and Byzantium (3). Required preparation, any course in classics, art history, or religious studies. Traces the development of mosaic technique from Greek antiquity through the Byzantine Middle Ages as revealed by archaeological investigations and closely analyzes how this dynamic medium conveyed meaning.

650 Field School in Classical Archaeology (6). This course is an introduction to archaeological field methods and excavation techniques, through participation in archaeological excavation.

683 Etruscan Art (ARTH 683) (3).

Courses for Graduate Students

CLAR

781 Aegean Civilization and Near Eastern Backgrounds (3).

782 The Archaeology of Dark Age Greece (3). Prerequisite, CLAR 243, 244, or 781. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Issues and problems in the analysis of the Greek Dark Age and its material culture from the collapse of the Bronze Age palaces to the earliest Greek city states.

790 Field Practicum in Archaeology (3). Seminar in archaeological excavation techniques to be conducted in the field. Previous excavation experience is expected.

794 Greek Topography (ART 794) (3). Study of chief archaeological sites of Greece and of existing buildings and monuments. Attention to the problems of excavation and the role of the sites in Greek history.

796 The Archaeology of the Roman Province (3). This course explores the interaction between Rome and the provinces between the third century BCE and the third century CE, focusing on issues of globalization, resistance, gender, and multiculturalism.

798 Roman Topography (ART 798) (3).

812 Diaspora Judaism (RELI 812) (3). See RELI 812 for description.

841 Special Reading in Archaeology (3).

910 Seminar in Archaeology (3). Topics vary from year to year.

960 Seminar in Ancient Art (ART 960) (3). See ART 960 for description.

993 Master's Thesis (3–6).

994 Doctoral Dissertation (3–9).

Classics in English/Classical Civilization

Courses Not Requiring a Reading Knowledge of Greek and Latin

The following courses in classical literature and civilization are especially designed to supply the necessary foundation for those who, without a reading knowledge of the ancient languages, wish a broader culture or plan to specialize in modern literature, history, art, etc. When approved these courses may count as part of the major requirements in other departments. The courses may also be taken to satisfy the requirements of a minor in literature. See also English and Comparative Literature.

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students

CLAS

409 Historical Literature Greek and Roman (3). The study in English translation of selections from Herodotus, Thucydides, Livy, Tacitus, and others, with consideration of their literary qualities and their readability as historians.

415 Roman Law (3). Introduction to Roman law, public and private. On the basis of Roman texts in translation (or the original if desired), consideration of the principles of Roman constitutional law and the legal logic and social importance of Roman civil law.

540 Problems in the History of Classical Ideas (3). Permission of the department.

541 Problems in the History of Classical Ideas (3). Permission of the department.

547 Approaches to Women in Antiquity (3). Permission of the instructor. Graduate students and senior classics majors. Intensive interdisciplinary introduction to women in antiquity, using literary, historical, and visual materials.

691H Honors Course (3). Honors course for departmental majors in classical archaeology, classical civilization, Greek, and Latin.

692H Honors Course (3). Honors course for departmental majors in classical archaeology, classical civilization, Greek, and Latin.

Greek

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students

GREK

409 Greek New Testament (RELI 409) (3). See RELI 409 for description.

506 Greek Dialects (LING 506) (3). Permission of the instructor. Survey of the major dialects of Classical Greek and study of their derivation from Common Greek. Texts include both literary and epigraphical sources from the eighth century BCE to the Hellenistic period.

507 Greek Composition (3). Prerequisite, GREK 221.

508 Readings in Early Greek Poetry (3). Prerequisite, GREK 221 or 222.

509 Readings in Greek Literature of the Fifth Century (3). Prerequisite, GREK 221 or 222.

510 Readings in Greek Literature of the Fourth Century (3). Prerequisite, GREK 221 or 222.

540 Problems in the History of Classical Ideas (3). Permission of the department.

541 Problems in the History of Classical Ideas (3). Permission of the department.

Courses for Graduate Students

NOTE: One or two Greek courses numbered in the 700s are offered each semester.

GREK

722 Greek Epigraphy (3).

744 An Introduction to Greek Law (3). This class has three goals: familiarizing students with Greek language, introducing them to concepts of Greek law by reading secondary literature, and directing them to current debates in the field.

750 Homer (3).

753 Greek Lyric Poetry (3).

755 Greek Tragedy (3).

757 Sophocles (3).

759 Greek Comedy (3).

761 Greek Philosophical Literature (3).

763 Greek Historical Literature (3).

765 Thucydides (3).

767 Greek Rhetoric and Oratory (3).

769 Demosthenes (3).

771 Hellenistic Poetry (3).

775 Later Greek Prose (3).

841 Special Reading (3).

891 Special Reading (3).

901 Greek Seminars (3). Topics vary from year to year.

993 Master's Thesis (3–6).

994 Doctoral Dissertation (3–9).

Latin

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students

LATN

510 Introductory Latin Composition (3). Prerequisite, LATN 222. Review of Latin grammar and idiom, exercises in composition, introduction to stylistics.

511 Readings in Latin Literature of the Republic (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221 or 222.

512 Readings in Latin Literature of the Augustan Age (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221 or 222.

513 Readings in Latin Literature of the Empire (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221 or 222.

514 Readings in Latin Literature of Later Antiquity (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221 or 222.

530 An Introduction to Medieval Latin (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221 or 222. Survey of medieval Latin literature from its beginnings through the high Middle Ages.

540 Problems in the History of Classical Ideas (3). Permission of the department.

541 Problems in the History of Classical Ideas (3). Permission of the department.

601 Elementary Latin for Graduate Students (3). Designed as a preparation for the reading knowledge examination for higher degrees. Passing the examination at the end of LATN 602 certifies that the requirement has been satisfied, although the course does not count for graduate credit. One semester.

602 Elementary Latin for Graduate Students (3). Designed as a preparation for the reading knowledge examination for higher degrees. Passing the examination at the end of LATN 602 certifies that the requirement has been satisfied, although the course does not count for graduate credit. One semester.

Courses for Graduate Students

NOTE: One or two Latin courses numbered in the 700s are offered each semester.

LATN

722 Latin Epigraphy (3).

723 Latin Paleography (3).

724 Latin Textual Criticism (3). Introduction to textual criticism of Latin texts. Addresses transmission, principles of editing, constructing and interpreting an apparatus criticus. Practical editorial experience working from original manuscripts, microfilms, and digital reproductions.

725 Latin Composition and Prose Styles (3).

726 History of Latin (3).

741 Special Reading (3).

753 Fragments of Early Latin Poetry (3).

762 Roman Historical Literature (3). Study of Sallust, Caesar, Suetonius, or the minor historians of the empire.

764 Roman Dramatic Literature (3). Study of the comedies of Plautus and Terence or the tragedies of Seneca.

765 Roman Lyric and Elegiac Poetry (3). Study of the forms of lyric and elegiac poetry with special attention to Catullus, Horace, Tibullus, or Propertius.

766 Roman Satire (3). Study of the development of satiric forms with special attention to Horace or Juvenal.

767 Ovid and Literary Theory (3). Introduction to literary theory through a study of Ovid and scholarly approaches to his poetry.

768 Horace and Catallus (3).

770 Topics in Medieval Latin Literature (3). Reading in selected medieval Latin prose and verse authors.

771 Cicero: Political Career (3).

772 Cicero: Literary Career (3).

773 Lucretius (3).

774 Virgil (3).

775 Livy (3).

776 Ovid (3).

780 The Roman Novel (3). Selections from Petronius and/or Apuleius and related texts.

784 Tacitus (3).

841 Special Reading (3).

901 Latin Seminars (3). Topics vary from year to year.

993 Master's Thesis (3-6).

994 Doctoral Dissertation (3–9).