Department of Dramatic Art

www.unc.edu/depts/drama

ADAM VERSENYI, Chair, Dramaturg/PRC

JEFFREY CORNELL, Associate Chair

Professors

McKay Coble, Design, Head of Graduate Studies

Raymond L. Dooley, Head of M.F.A. Acting, Actor

Roberta A. Owen, Costume History and Design

Associate Professors

Janet A. Chambers, Design

Michael J. Rolleri, Head of Technical Production

Professors of Practice

Judith L. Adamson, Head of Costume Production

Joe Haj, Producing Artistic Director/PRC

Assistant Professors

Julia Gibson, Acting

John Patrick, Voice and Speech

Lecturer

Adam Maxfield, Technical Director

The Department of Dramatic Art offers professional training programs in acting, costume production, and technical production leading to the master of fine arts degree. The production facilities in the Center for Dramatic Art include the Paul Green Theatre and the Elizabeth Price Kenan Theatre along with studios, rehearsal hall, costume complex, and scene shops.

Each student is responsible for becoming familiar with the general regulations of The Graduate School and particularly with the dates indicated on the calendar for the academic year. This information is contained elsewhere in the Graduate Record. Please note that, due to the nature of the professional training programs, the calendar for graduate students in the Department of Dramatic Art will not always coincide with that of the University. Graduate students in the department are frequently required to work on productions during University-scheduled holidays.

A limited number of graduate appointments are available in the department. Appointments are presently awarded in the areas of acting, technical production, costume production, and in support of introductory courses (DRAM 115, 116, and 135). All appointments involve instructional or laboratory supervisory responsibility.

Master of Fine Arts

Purpose. Through disciplined classroom training and a progressive involvement in performance or production opportunities, students in the master of fine arts (M.F.A.) programs are challenged to develop the skills and attitudes that enable them to compete in the professional theatre. Emphasizing accomplishment in a wide range of performance and production styles, the programs complement the variety of theatrical experiences available in the PlayMakers Repertory Company (PRC), a professional full-season equity company and a member of The League of Resident Theatres. Within his or her area of specialization, upon graduation students will be ready to perform a variety of roles or assume a range of responsibilities onstage or backstage in stage, film, or television. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a member of URTA (University/Resident Theatre Association, Inc.).

Prerequisites. All applicants must meet admission requirements established by The Graduate School of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Each area of specialization within the department requires additional application materials. In the costuming and technical areas, applicants are required to submit portfolios. Candidates should check with the department for further information as to what is entailed for each area. All acting candidates must audition. In addition to on-campus auditions, the department holds auditions two out of every three years in February in New York and Chicago. Applications must be received by January 31 to be considered.

Curriculum. Each candidate pursues a course of study in a conservatory environment. Classroom training offers a variety of approaches, each designed to develop and refine the candidate's artistic and professional potential. Classroom work is augmented by participation in the professional season of PlayMakers Repertory Company. In addition to the PRC, students find performance opportunities in studio projects and productions.

Evaluation. At least once each semester, the faculty formally evaluates the candidate's progress and makes recommendations concerning his or her continuation in the program. Evaluations are made of each individual on the basis of classroom and performance or production work. Letter grades (H, P, L, F) are assigned for work in all courses.

Admission. Generally, only first-year applicants are considered for admission. Candidates should check with the department for admission information pertaining to their specific area of specialization (i.e., acting, technical production, or costume production).

Residency and Requirements. All candidates are required to be in residence for three years, six consecutive semesters. The departmental system of evaluation requires that the student be invited to continue in the second and then in the final year of the program. While all programs require their students to complete 60 credit hours, those hours are apportioned differently from program to program. In addition to 60 credit hours, each area of specialization carries its own graduation requirements. Candidates are encouraged to ascertain individual requirements for graduation as soon as possible.

Detailed information can be obtained by addressing inquiries to the Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Dramatic Art, CB# 3230, Center for Dramatic Art, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, N.C. 27599-3230. Additional information is available on the Web at www.unc.edu/depts/graduate/home_graduate.htm.

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students

DRAM

450 Shakespeare in the Theatre (3). Prerequisite, DRAM 120. A study of the literary, stage history, and production problems of representative plays.

460 Stage Management (3). Permission of the department. A study of the basic principles and practices of modern stage management.

465 Sound Design (3). The study of general principles of sound design for the theatre. Theory and application of sound design techniques for the stage, including script analysis, staging concepts, special effects, sound plots, and technology.

466 Scene Design (3). Permission of the instructor. General principles of visual design as applied to scenery for the theatre. Instruction in standard techniques of planning and rendering scene design.

467 Costume Design I (3). Permission of the instructor. Studies and practicum in play analysis and costume design for the theatre. Instruction in techniques of planning and rendering costume design.

468 Lighting Design I (3). Permission of the instructor. General principles of lighting design as applied to the performing arts. Theory and instruction in standard techniques of lighting for the stage.

470 Survey of Costume History (3). A survey of historic costume forms from ancient Egypt to the present time.

473 Costume Construction I (1–3). Permission of the instructor. Beginning instruction in pattern making through flat pattern for theatrical costume.

474 Costume Construction II (1–3). Prerequisite, DRAM 473. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Beginning instruction in pattern making through draping on a dress form for theatrical costume.

475 Costume History: Africa, Asia, and Arabia (3). A survey of the traditional costume forms on the African Continent, in Asia (China, Japan, India), and on the Arabian Peninsula.

477 Theatrical Design (3). General principles of scenic, costume, and lighting design for the theatre.

480 Period Styles for Production (3). Students may not receive credit for both DRAM 280 and 480. A study of the historical development of Western minor arts and the ramifications of reproducing them for the theatre.

484 Studies in Dramaturgy and Criticism (3). This seminar seeks to introduce students to the principles of arts criticism through study of the work of a variety of different critics, by distinguishing between the nature of criticism and reviewing the arts, and through the students' own practice of critical writing.

486 Latin American Theatre (3). This course explores the historical and aesthetic development of Latin American theatre, focusing on particular factors that distinguish this theatre from the Western European tradition.

487 Chicana/o Drama (3). This course surveys Chicana/o history and culture from 1965 to the present through the examination of plays by and about Chicana/os. It also interrogates Chicana/o performance practices as political acts.

488 United States Latino/a Theatre (3). Investigation of United States Latino/a theatre texts and performance practices as a discreet genre. United States Latino/a theatre will be distinguished from the dominant culture, and diversity of forms and styles discussed.

489 Carnivals and Festivals of the African Diaspora (3). This course will examine the role of Carnival in the African Diaspora, exploring its history, its many theatrical forms and its fusion with European and indigenous American cultures. Through examining published and unpublished texts the development of the Carnival will be understood as an expression of freedom and cultural survival.

491 Issues in Arts Management (3). Arts management issues taught through analysis of case studies. Course includes management theories, organizational structures, and current issues.

493 Theatre Management (3). Practicum in theatre management procedures and business of the theatre involving box office, audience development, research, publicity, operational, and contract procedures in regard to artists, technicians, managers, and producers. Students actively engage in management areas of the PlayMakers Repertory Company and productions of the Department of Dramatic Art.

566 Advanced Scene Design (3). Prerequisite, DRAM 466. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Advanced study of the principles and practice of designing scenery for the theatre.

567 Costume Design II (3). Prerequisite, DRAM 467. Permission of the instructor. Practicum in costume design for the theatre, focusing on the requirements of professional theatre production and alternative costume design solutions.

586 Costume Seminars I: Dyeing and Painting (1–3). Prerequisite, DRAM 192. Permission of the instructor. Taught in a four-semester rotation. May be repeated for credit for a total of six hours for undergraduates and 12 hours for graduate students. Series of topics in costume for use in design and production for the stage.

587 Costume Seminars II: Millinery and Hair (1–3). Permission of the instructor. Advanced costume production techniques with an emphasis on millinery and hair design.

588 Costume Seminars III: Masks and Armor (1–3). Permission of the instructor. Advanced costume production techniques with an emphasis on creating masks and armor.

589 Costume Seminars IV: Decorative Arts (1–3). Permission of the instructor. Advanced costume production techniques with an emphasis on decorative arts.

590 Advanced Special Topics in Dramatic Art (0.5–3). The study of a topic in dramaturgy, theatrical design, or theatrical production for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Content and instructor will vary. May be repeated for credit.

650 Costume Production I: Couture Methods (0.5–3). Prerequisite, DRAM 192. Advanced construction techniques in theatrical costuming with an emphasis on couture methods.

667 Advanced Costume Design I (1–3). Permission of the instructor. Study of costume design for students concentrating in costume production.

691H Honors Project in Dramatic Art (3). Required preparation, 3.3 cumulative grade point average and permission of the department. The commencement of a special project (essay or creative endeavor), approved by the department, by a student who has been designated a candidate for undergraduate honors.

692H Honors Project in Dramatic Art (3). Prerequisite, DRAM 691H. Permission of the department. The completion of a special project by a student who has been designated a candidate for undergraduate honors.

697 Senior Seminar (3). Close study of the interrelationships between theory and practice in contemporary world theatre, placing developments in their cultural contexts, and exploring current theatrical trends in an international framework.

Courses for Graduate Students

DRAM

720 Acting I (3). Admission to the M.F.A. Acting program required. Intensive professional training for the actor. Must be taken fall and spring.

721 Acting II (3). Admission to the second year of the M.F.A. Acting program required. Advanced professional training for the actor. Must be taken fall and spring.

722 Voice I (3). Admission to the M.F.A. Acting program required. Development of the individual actor's voice and speech. Must be taken fall and spring.

723 Voice II (3). Admission to the second year of the M.F.A. Acting program required. Expansion of the individual's vocal versatility in performance. Must be taken fall and spring.

724 Movement I (3). Admission to the M.F.A. Acting program required. Development of the actor's body as an expressive instrument. Must be taken fall and spring.

725 Movement II (3). Admission to the second year of the M.F.A. Acting program required. Advanced projects in movement. Special sessions in tumbling and stage combat. Must be taken fall and spring.

726 Rehearsal and Performance I (1-6). Admission to the M.F.A. Acting program required. Rehearsal and performance of special ensemble projects. Must be taken fall and spring. May be repeated for credit.

727 Rehearsal and Performance II (1–6). Admission to the second year of the M.F.A. Acting program required. Practical application of techniques in rehearsal and performance in studio and main stage production. Must be taken fall and spring. May be repeated for credit.

728 Acting Practicum I (3–12). Admission to the third year of the M.F.A. Acting program required. Intense practicum as a member of the PlayMakers Repertory acting company. Preparation and presentation of assigned projects and work in departmental productions. Work in voice and movement as scheduled.

750 Advanced Special Studies: Costume Production II: Advanced Couture Methods (.5–3). Advanced construction techniques with an emphasis on advanced couture methods.

752 Special Studies: Costume Production III: Tailoring (.5–3). Costume graduates only. Advanced construction techniques with an emphasis on bodice development.

760 Costume Construction III: Advanced Flat Pattern (1–3). Prerequisite, DRAM 473. Continued study of pattern making with flat pattern in advanced shapes for the stage.

762 Costume Construction IV: Advanced Draping (1–3). Prerequisite, DRAM 474. Continued study of draping theatrical costumes with advanced shapes.

764 Costume Construction V (1–3). Prerequisites, DRAM 473, 474, 760, and 762. Using combination of patternmaking and dressmaking techniques to achieve unusual shapes in theatrical costume.

766 Costume Construction VI: Computer Pattern (1–3). Prerequisite, DRAM 473. Continuation of the study of flat pattern using computer software with AutoCAD.

770 Period Pattern I: Pre-Victorian (1–3). Permission of the instructor. Advanced study of historical pattern, costume crafts, or costume shop management through directed study. May be repeated for credit.

772 Period Pattern II: Victorian (1–3). Costume graduates only. Study of historical pattern with an emphasis in Victorian era.

774 Period Pattern III: 20th Century (1–3). Costume graduates only. Study of historical pattern with an emphasis in 20th century.

776 Period Pattern IV: 19th and 20th Century Men's Wear (1–3). Costume graduates only. Study of sartorial arts with an emphasis in 19th to 20th centuries.

780 Costume Management I: Supplies and Suppliers (1–3). Costume graduates only. Study of supplies and suppliers needed to produce theatrical costumes.

782 Costume Management II: Budget Methods (1–3). Costume graduates only. Study of cost analysis for costume production.

784 Costume Management III: Personal (1–3). Costume graduates only. Study of organization and personnel management for costume production.

790 Costume Laboratory I (3). Admission to the M.F.A. Costume program required. Practical work in the costume shop. Must be taken fall and spring.

791 Costume Laboratory II (3). Admission to the second year of the M.F.A. Costume program required. Advanced practical work in the costume shop. Must be taken fall and spring.

792 Costume Laboratory III (3). Costume graduates only. Continuation of practical work through production assignments.

793 Costume Laboratory IV (3). Costume graduates only. Continuation of practical work through production assignments.

796 Costume Laboratory V (1–3). Admission to the third year of the M.F.A. Costume program required. Advanced practical work in the costume shop. Must be taken fall and spring.

797 Costume Laboratory VI (1–3). Costume graduates only. Continuation of practical work through production assignments.

799 Costume Program Internship (3–6). Intensive practicum in Costume Arts, with tutorial and class assignments on an individual basis as required. May be repeated for credit.

800 Technical Direction (3–6). Prerequisite, DRAM 491. Permission of the instructor. Study of the technical and engineering problems in production and standard theatrical drafting and construction conventions. Must be taken fall and spring.

801 Technical Direction II (3–6). Technical graduates only. Additional study of technical and engineering problems in production.

802 Advanced Technical Direction (3–6). Admission to the second year of the M.F.A. Technical Production program required. An advanced study of the management, technical, and engineering problems involved in theatrical production. Must be taken fall and spring.

803 Advanced Technical Direction II (1–6). Admission to the third year of the M.F.A. Technical Production program required. An advanced study of the management, technical, and engineering problems involved in theatrical production. Must be taken fall and spring.

805 Special Studies: Technical Production (.5–12). Prerequisite, DRAM 192. Permission of the instructor. Advanced scenic construction techniques leading to specific project or production responsibility in the area of scenic construction in Department of Dramatic Art productions and PlayMakers Repertory Company. A minimum of 15 hours per week is required during the rehearsal period. Faculty evaluation at the close of the production. May be repeated for credit.

806 Technical Planning and Production (3–6). Admission into the third year of the M.F.A. Technical Production program required. Intensive practicum in production projects for departmental and PlayMakers Repertory Company productions. Must be taken fall and spring.

813 Special Studies: Technical Production (1–6). Technical graduates only. Continuation of advanced scenic construction techniques with specific project or production responsibility in the area of scenic construction.

814 Professional Theater Laboratory: Technical Production (.5–12). Technical graduates only. Individual programs in scenic construction techniques.

821 Advanced Lighting Design (3). Permission of the instructor. This course acquaints the student with professional practice in lighting design through lecture by faculty and visiting professionals and through evaluation of lighting designs executed by students and critiqued by professionals.

830 Seminar in Professional Practice: Technical Production (1–21). Admission to the M.F.A. program in Technical Production required. An examination of professional theatre practice through contact with students, staff, faculty, and visiting artists in technical theatre. Generally taken fall and spring. May be repeated for credit.

841 Design Technical Theatre Practicum I (3–6). Admission into the M.F.A. Technical program required. Practical work in scene shop. Must be taken fall and spring.

842 M.F.A /Technical Theatre Practicum II (1–6). Technical graduates only. Continuation of practical work in scene shop.

843 Design Technical Theatre Practicum II (3–6). Prerequisite, DRAM 841. Admission to the second year of the M.F.A. Technical program required. Advanced practical work in scene shop. Must be taken fall and spring.

844 M.F.A./Technical Practicum IV (3–6). Continuation of advanced practical work in scene shop.

845 Design Technical Internship (6–12). Intensive practicum in production projects for departmental and PlayMakers Repertory Company productions, with independent studies as assigned on an individual basis. May be repeated for credit.

875 Seminar in Dramatic Literature (1–3). Admission to the M.F.A. program in any area required. An examination of the literature of the theatre in terms of dramatic construction, theory, and interpretation. May be repeated for credit.

992 Master's Final Practicum (3).