School of Education

soe.unc.edu

G. WILLIAMSON McDIARMID, Dean

Professors

Patrick Akos, School Counseling, School Transitions

Kathleen Brown, Educational Leadership

Marta Civil, Mathematics Education

Gregory J. Cizek (176) Educational Assessment and Evaluation

Sharon Derry Experiental Learning, Learning and Cognitive Science

Fenwick English (998) Educational Administration, Curriculum Inquiry and Leadership

Susan Friel (115) Mathematics Education

John P. Galassi Jr. (028) Strengths Based School Counseling

Madeleine R. Grumet (170) Culture, Curriculum, and Change

Catherine Marshall (105) Politics, Qualitative Inquiry, Gender, Race, and Class Issues

Linda Mason Adolescent and Adult Literacy, Special Education

Judith L. Meece (055) Educational Psychology, Measurement and Evaluation, Elementary Education

George W. Noblit (057) Sociology of Education, Qualitative Research Methods, Critical Race Studies

Sam Odom, Early Childhood, Disability

Xue Lan Rong (146) Social Studies Education, Social Foundations of Education, Large Data Set Research

Keith Sawyer Creativity and Innovation, Entrepreneurship

Rune J. Simeonsson (073) Child Development and Disability, Psychological Assessment, Primary Prevention

Lynda Stone (147) Philosophy of Education, Social Theory, Feminism

Lynne Vernon-Feagans, Early Childhood Intervention, Literacy

William B. Ware (085) Educational Psychology, Measurement and Evaluation, Research Design Analysis

Barbara H. Wasik (086) Child Psychology, Social/Emotional and Cognitive Development, Literacy

Associate Professors

Harriet Able (149) Early Intervention, Family Support, Ethics

Cheryl Mason Bolick (029) Education Technology and Social Studies Education

Lora Cohen-Vogel, Educational Leadership and Policy

Jocelyn Glazier, Diversity and Multiculturalism, Literacy, Equity

Jeffrey Greene, Cognition and Learning

Dana Griffin, Diversity and Multiculturalism, Professional Development of School Counselors

Leigh Hall, Literacy Studies, Early Childhood, Families

Jill Hamm, Adolescent Development

Eric Houck, Educational Leadership, School Finance, Policy

Sherick Hughes Critical Race Studies, Qualitative Methodology

Steve Knotek (2001) School Psychology

Rebecca New, Early Childhood Intervention

Rita O'Sullivan (180) Educational Assessment and Evaluation

Eileen Parsons, African American Science Achievement, Racial Equity

James Trier, English Education–Secondary

Assistant Professors

Janice Anderson, Science Education, Gender and Science Education, Technology

Claire Baker School Readiness, Home Based Interventions with Young Children

Juan Carillo Latino/a Chicano/a Education Social and Cultural Foundations of Education

Claudia Cervantes-Soon, Bilingual and ESL Pedagogy, Gender and Minority Issues

Gemma Mojica Math Education, Teacher Education

Kelly Ryoo Technology in Teaching and Learning, Science Education

Dana Thompson Dorsey, Educational Leadership, School Law

Clinical Professors

Suzanne A. Gulledge (033) Social Studies Education

Clinical Associate Professors

Jennifer Diliberto, Special Education

Daniel M. Huff, Choral Music Education, Teacher Preparation, Teacher Socialization

Sharon Palsha, Child Development and Family Studies

Stanley Schainker, Educational Leadership: Systems Functions, School Management, Group Dynamics

James Veitch, Educational Leadership,Budget, Staff Development, Technology, Instructional Supervision

Clinical Assistant Professors

Nick Cabot, Science Education, Professional Development in Science Teaching, Distance Learning

Deborah Eaker-Rich, Social Foundations

Sandra Evarrs, School Psychology, Psychoeducational Assessment

Martinette Horner, Elementary Education

Cheryl Horton, Science Education

Molly Lloyd, Literacy Education

Cathy Scott, Secondary Mathematics, Teacher Prep, STEM Program Evaluation

Meghan Walter, School Counseling

Jennifer Wooten, Foreign Language Education, Spanish Education

Professors Emeriti

Richard A. Brice

Linda Brooks

William I. Burke

Richard H. Coop

James W. Cunningham

Barbara Day

Jill Fitzgerald

James J. Gallagher

R. Sterling Hennis Jr.

Paul B. Hounshell

Richard C. Hunter

David L. Lillie

Bobbie B. Lubker

Carol Malloy

William Malloy

William S. Palmer

Richard C. Phillips

Walter Pryzwansky

William C. Self

Dixie Lee Spiegel

Donald J. Stedman

Gary B. Stuck

Linda Tillman

Alan Tom

Neal H. Tracy

Gerald Unks

Eugene R. Watson

Kinnard P. White

Ronald Wiegerink

Ralph E. Wileman Jr.

The School of Education, in keeping with the general goals of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, embraces a threefold mission of teaching, research, and service. With these purposes in mind, the school's graduate programs are designed to meet the needs of professional educators who seek to further their knowledge, understanding, and skills relating to educational processes. These professionals vary in their career orientations. Some are employed in (or wish to become employed in) educational institutions and others in agencies and organizations performing non-instructional educational functions.

The research mission involves continuing inquiry into the development of knowledge of the teaching-learning process, human development, the organization of schools and educational agencies, the historical, social, and philosophical bases for educational institutions, and the processes of program development and implementation.

The service mission provides public and private institutions and agencies with the benefits of research and consultation, thereby enhancing these institutions and agencies' ability to satisfy their educational objectives.

The teaching mission involves the faculty and graduate students in applying the knowledge base in field settings and translating it into coursework.

The School of Education has attempted to present correct information as of the printing date of this Record. However, this information does not establish a contractual relationship and the school reserves the right to alter any statement when review is complete. Therefore, applicants should contact the School of Education to obtain updated information on programs prior to final application procedures.

Degree Programs

Note: Additional information may be found on the School of Education's Web site at soe.unc.edu.

The School of Education offers two doctoral degrees: 1) the doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) in education with five research areas (applied developmental sciences and special education, cultural studies and literacies, learning sciences and psychological studies, policy, leadership and school improvement and teacher education and curriculum) and in school psychology; and 2) the doctor of education (Ed.D.) with two research areas, one in educational leadership and one in curriculum and instruction.

The master's programs include the following degrees: 1) the master of arts in teaching (M.A.T.) with a concentration in secondary education for English, social studies and foreign language, 2) the master of education (M.Ed.) in school counseling and the master's for experienced teachers, 3) the master of school administration (M.S.A.), and 4) the master of arts in international education The Graduate School administers all but the master of school administration program and the master's for experienced teachers, which the School of Education administers.

Two off-campus, part-time programs are offered: the master of education (M.Ed.) for experienced teachers and the flexible master of school administration (M.S.A. Flex). The content specialty areas for the M.Ed. program are early childhood intervention and family support (birth through kindergarten); literacy, social studies, mathematics, science, technology, special education and English as a Second Language. Content specialty areas generally offer admission every other year although some areas are offered more or less often.

The part-time, off-campus M.S.A. Flex program is designed for working professionals and stretches the normal two-year program offered on campus over an extended period of two and a half academic years, beginning each January with a new cohort. While the program emphasizes preparation for the school principalship, individuals with other educational career aspirations (such as district-level leadership positions) will find it appropriate.

Education Degree Requirements

M.A. Degree Requirements

  1. A bachelor's degree from an accredited four year university.

  2. Completion of 30 hours of graduate coursework and two consecutive semesters in residence.

  3. Completion of all required and elective courses within five years of admission.

  4. A grade of Pass on a written comprehensive exam or approved equivalent.

  5. The degree application to be filed no later than the date specified in the academic calendar.

  6. A grade of P or better is required in all EDUC courses. One grade of F in an EDUC course makes a student academically ineligible to contine In the program.

M.Ed. Degree Requirements

  1. A bachelor's degree from an accredited four-year college or university.

  2. Completion of the minimum required number of semester hours of graduate course work. (Check with individual programs to ascertain the minimum requirements.)

  3. Completion of at least two consecutive semesters in residence.

  4. Completion of all required and elective courses within five years of admission.

  5. A grade of Pass on a written comprehensive examination or approved equivalent.

  6. The degree application to be filed no later than the date specified in the academic calendar.

  7. A grade of P or better is required in all EDUC courses. One grade of F in an EDUC course makes a student academically ineligible to continue in the program.

M.A.T. Degree Requirements

  1. A bachelor's degree from an accredited four-year college or university.

  2. The equivalent of an undergraduate major in the chosen subject area.

  3. Completion of a minimum of 33 semester hours of advanced course work.

  4. Completion of at least two consecutive semesters in residence.

  5. Completion of all required and elective courses within five years of admission.

  6. Satisfactory completion of a comprehensive teaching portfolio that synthesizes course work and experiences as related to state and national standards.

  7. Successful completion of the full time student teaching internship

  8. The degree application to be filed no later than the date specified in the academic calendar.

  9. A grade of P or better is required in all EDUC courses. One grade of F in an EDUC course makes a student academically ineligible to continue in the program.

Ed.D. (Doctor of Education) Degree Requirements

  1. A bachelor's degree from an accredited four-year college or university and a master's degree in the field of educational leadership or administration, or another approved field. Students without such a degree can still be admitted into the program as judged by faculty review.

  2. Completion of six hours of graduate work for two consecutive semesters in residence. Part time enrollment is allowed after this requirement has been satisfied.

  3. Completion of all required course work on an approved Individual program of study within six years.

  4. Completion of written and oral exams within six years, and completion of all degree requirements in eight years.

  5. A grade of P or better is required in all EDUC courses. One grade of F in an EDUC course makes a student academically ineligible to continue in the program.

  6. Completion of twelve semester hours of research courses. or research experiences as specified In the program of study.

  7. Completion of a research seminar and a supervised field experience in the student's area of specialization.

  8. A grade of Pass on a written comprehensive examination.

  9. A grade of Pass on an oral examination.

  10. Successful completion of a final oral examination, which is the defense of the dissertation.

  11. Satisfactory completion of a research- or practice-based dissertation.

  12. A degree application to be filed no later than the date specified in the academic calendar.

  13. A grade of P or better is required in all EDUC courses. One grade of F in an EDUC course makes a student academically ineligible to continue in the program.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements

In addition to the requirements of The Graduate School for the Ph.D., the School of Education also requires:

  1. full-time enrollment until all formal course work is completed; and

  2. completion of all required coursework on an approved individual program of study comprised of required and elective courses.

  3. A grade of P or better is required in all EDUC courses. One grade of F in an EDUC course makes a student academically ineligible to continue in the program.

Programs of Study

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Education

The M.A. in education is designed for individuals from a variety of backgrounds who are interested in research or practice in the field of education. The M.A. is not designed for those students interested in receiving licensure. In general, the M.A. as currently designed is a terminal degree not necessarily designed to lead to a future doctorate although continuation to a doctorate is neither precluded nor discouraged.

Master of Education (M.Ed.) for Experienced Teachers

The M.Ed. for experienced teachers is a part-time, field-based program for teachers currently employed in local schools, public and private. The program is designed to assist licensed teachers with at least three years of experience in reflecting upon their experiences and developing further skill and art as professional educators. It is a 31- to 36-hour program (depending on the content area) that begins in the summer, and extends through the next two years. Courses are offered in general at the Caroline Center for Educational Excellence at Smith Middle School in Chapel Hill, a facility supported by the university but housed away from main campus, for the convenience of practicing teachers. Courses during the traditional calendar school year are offered generally from 4–7 p.m. Specifics about content areas can be found at the School of Education website.

The School of Education offers and administers the M.Ed. for experienced teachers program. For program information or an application, please visit the school's Web site at soe.unc.edu or call 919-966-1346.

Master of Education (M.Ed.) in School Counseling

The M.Ed. program in School Counseling at the University of North Carolina is predicated on the Strengths-Based School Counseling (SBSC) model that asserts that the school counselor's primary role is to promote and advocate for positive youth development for all students and for the environments that enhance and sustain that development.

The SBSC approach characterizes positive youth development as nurturing and enhancing empirically identified student strengths or competencies rather than focusing on student weaknesses and problem areas.

SBSC provides a framework to guide the practice of school counseling in the 21st century that is both compatible with and operationalizes many of the features of the ASCA National Model for School Counseling Programs.

Strengths-based school counselors employ a variety of direct (e.g., counseling, classroom guidance) and systemic (e.g., consultation, advocacy) level interventions to promote culturally relevant student development in the academic, personal/social, and career domains. The strengths-based perspective identifies the counselor as a school leader who works with students, teachers, administrators, parents, and other members of the community and promotes strengths-enhancing environments for all students.

Requirements

The M.Ed. program in school counseling consists of four semesters of full-time study, 60 semester hours of course work, over a 14-month period. Students normally begin classes during the last week in May. Students finish the program by August of the year following their entrance into the program.

Because the 60 semester hours of course work are completed in a 14-month period rather than the more traditional two-year period for programs of this type, this is a very concentrated and intense program. As a result, only full-time students are admitted and students may not enter the program at times other than the one specified above.

  1. Thirty (30) hours of content courses.

  2. Twenty-four (24) hours of skill/clinical courses

  3. Six (6) hours of graduate level electives, approved by the advisor

  4. Fall Practicum runs August through October. Fall Internship runs October through December. Students must spend a minimum of 100 (40 direct service) clock hours in practicum and 600 (240 direct service) in internship in their field experiences during the August to June K–12 public school year. The schedule for accumulating the required 700 hours is typically completed in three full-time days per week at the school site and/or arranged with both the field supervisor and the EDUC 705 instructors.

Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.)

The Master of Arts in teaching (M.A.T.) program is designed for individuals wishing to teach in secondary school (grades 9–12) or in kindergarten–grade 12 special subjects. Secondary school subjects include English, Latin, and social studies. Special subjects include, French, German, Japanese, and Spanish. This school-based, student-centered program relies on partnerships between public schools and the University and uses the realities of the classroom as the motivation for students to connect theory and practice. It provides opportunities for students to accomplish three general objectives:

  1. Expand their understanding of methodology in their content specialization

  2. Gain an understanding of curriculum and instruction primarily at the secondary level (but in K–12 in foreign languages,) and

  3. Provide knowledge of the social and psychological foundations of education

This program is designed to prepare candidates for initial and advanced teaching licensure in North Carolina.

Several interrelated strands of knowledge run throughout the program:

The Teaching and Methods Strand focuses upon the structure of disciplines, tools of inquiry, and methodologies concerned with instructional strategies, planning and assessment in varied learning experiences and communities.

The Learner and Learning Strand helps teachers design and implement learning experiences for students based on subject matter knowledge, the nature of the learning process, and the nature of learners.

The Context Strand focuses on teacher-student-community relationships in schools and classrooms. Students will prepare case studies of each type of relationship; analyze them from cultural, historical, and pedagogical perspectives; and develop strategies to address these issues in practice.

The M.A.T. is a 12-month, full-time program that requires a minimum of 33 hours of course work.

The program of study can be found on the School of Education Web site at soe.unc.edu. Some clinical placements will include multiple settings and levels of instruction.

Seminars, methods, contexts, learner and learning courses are ongoing over the entire 12-month period and are both interdisciplinary and subject area oriented.

Master of School Administration (M.S.A.)

The M.S.A. on-campus and M.S.A. FLEX programs prepare individuals to lead schools and other educational organizations for the schools of North Carolina and the nation. These programs include three dimensions: 1) Awareness (i.e., acquiring concepts, information, definitions, and procedures), 2) Understanding (i.e., interpreting knowledge to school environments, integrating concepts with practice, and using knowledge and skills in context), and 3) Capability (i.e., applying knowledge and skills to specific problems of practice). While most of those who complete this program move into administrative positions at the school-site level, some assume roles within state, regional, or national organizations that focus on educational professional development, research, or policymaking. The completion of this program leads to eligibility for licensure from the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction and qualifies one for administrative certification in most states. The M.S.A. programs are administered by the School of Education. Visit the Web site at soe.unc.edu.

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Curriculum and Instruction

The Ed.D. program in curriculum and instruction is designed specifically for people who seek to become curriculum leaders for the 21st century. While the main target population for this program will be those who will work in central office and policy-level positions at district and state levels, the program will also enroll experienced teachers and other school personnel who have or seek leadership roles within school or other educational settings. Potential professional leadership roles for C&I doctoral program graduates include district or state level directors of curriculum and instruction or a specialty area, specialty area supervisors, or school-based leaders working with mentor teachers. A variety of specialty areas may be selected in which program graduates might play a leadership role, including such 21st-century demands as technology, cultural and linguistic diversity, special education, universal pre-kindergarten, and international education. Additionally, this program will accommodate individuals–both full- and part-time–who seek positions in Curriculum and Instruction within higher education, governmental or policy institutions.

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Educational Leadership

The educational leadership doctoral program develops senior administrative leaders for K–12 school districts throughout the nation. The program prepares central level leaders to excel in an ever-changing national, state, and local educational environment. A director of student support services option prepares leaders as central office level directors/assistant superintendents for student support services.

Courses are offered in the evenings during the fall and spring terms, and sometimes on weekends. Most students are enrolled part-time and typically take two courses per semester. Classes are scheduled so that many students take two classes in one evening (e.g., on Thursday night, a class from 4 to 6:50 p.m. and another class from 7 to 9:50 p.m.).

Students may transfer up to nine credit hours, subject to program faculty approval. Credits must have been taken at the graduate level, for a grade, and within the past five years.

Educational Specialist, Ed.S.

The educational specialist licensure program in educational leadership is advanced study beyond the master's degree, which is designed to prepare students for leadership and administration at the district office level of a K–12 school system. Completion of the program typically leads to either North Carolina Level I (Entry-level Principal) or North Carolina Level II (Advanced Principal) licensure and includes a Superintendent concentration.

The Ed.S. licensure program is essentially a subset of the Ed.D. degree program. Obtaining the Ed.S. and North Carolina administrative licensure (AP/AS) can lead to salary increases for some administrative professionals in North Carolina.

Below is a suggested sequence in which to take courses for the Ed.S./Ed.D. There is no set sequence of courses. Students have five years to complete program course work and, if continuing with the Ed.D., an additional three years to complete and successfully defend their dissertation.

Students may transfer up to nine credit hours, subject to program faculty approval. Credits must have been taken at the graduate level, for a grade, and within the past five years.

If students do not have a master's degree in educational leadership/school administration, they will be required to take a minimum of nine additional M.S.A. credits (listed below).

Educational Specialist, Ed.S.

The program of study for the Specialist license can be found on the School of Education Web site at soe.unc.edu.

Educational Leadership, Ed.D.

The program of study for the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership can be found on the School of Education Web site at soe.unc.edu.

Students without a master's degree in educational leadership or administration:

If an Ed.D. student has a master's degree in an education-related field, but not in educational leadership/school administration, he or she is required to take a minimum of nine additional M.S.A. credits for a total of 63 credits for the doctorate. He or she may take up to three of the following seven M.S.A. courses listed below, which are offered at UNC–Chapel Hill, and/or, with the chair's permission, transfer up to nine M.S.A./educational leadership credits from another accredited institution.

EDUC 724 (old# 631) Program Development for Special Pops 3 hrs

EDUC 725 (old# 632) Problems of Supervisory Practice (highly recommended–TPAI) 3 hrs

EDUC 730 (old# 634) Curriculum Leadership 3 hrs

EDUC 759 (old# 645) Problems in Educational Leadership I 3 hrs

EDUC 741 (old# 636) School-Based Inquiry and Reform 3 hrs

EDUC 750 (old# 638 ) Managing Schools within a District Context 3 hrs

EDUC 731 Problems in Educational Leadership II 3 hrs

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Education

The schools in North Carolina and in the nation face myriad complex issues and challenges. These challenges range from meeting the educational and social-emotional needs of diverse student populations to designing, implementing, and evaluating educational programs within cultural contexts. The Ph.D. in education prepares leaders in educational research who understand these issues and who can improve educational practice using state-of-the-art knowledge and research skills. The design of the program fosters collaboration among faculty and students from diverse disciplines. Such cooperation across levels and areas of interest provides the opportunity to develop relevant research agendas. Graduates of this program are prepared for leadership positions in research and teaching at major universities and institutes in the state and nation.

The Ph.D. in education is a single program with five research emphases: applied developmental sciences and special education, cultural studies and literacies, learning sciences and psychological studies, policy, leadership and school improvement and teacher education and curriculum. These five fields blend areas of inquiry that were formerly discrete.

The mission of Applied Developmental Science, and Special Education (ADSSE) program area is to train doctoral students in the interdisciplinary, theoretical foundations of Developmental Science. These foundations will provide young scholars with the tools to advance knowledge about human development from birth through adolescence, with a particular focus on studying children/students at risk for learning and behavioral challenges. This mission is accomplished by offering research perspectives in (a) the developmental trajectories of families and children/students from diverse socio-culturally backgrounds in the multiple contexts in which they live, including school, home, neighborhoods, and communities as well as a grounding in (b) evidence-based models of prevention that seek to provide equitable opportunities for learning and successful adjustment for all children by emphasizing education and instruction directed towards individual differences among learners.

We have a strong program dedicated to developing a new generation of interdisciplinary scholars that have acquired a rigorous research knowledge base with expertise in a quantitative, mixed method, and single case methodology. Graduates will work closely with their advisor and committee members to develop the skills and experiences necessary to work as leaders in a variety of research settings, including institutions of higher education as well as governmental entities at the state or federal level as well as private research firms. Throughout the doctoral experience, students will engage in research activities, grant writing, and the dissemination of their research and prevention efforts, such as presenting their research at local, state, and national conferences, and teaching college level classes.

The Cultural Studies and Literacies strand is designed for future scholars and researchers who will study the linguistic, social and cultural contexts of education and how culture, language and education are produced locally, nationally and globally. This strand prepares future scholars, researchers and faculty who work in the areas of multiple and critical literacies, social and cultural foundations of education, the intersectionality of race , gender, language, sexual orientation and class, qualitative research methods broadly conceived, and how all to these contribute to creating social and educational inequities. Our focus is both critical and constructive. Our efforts first describe, interpret and critique current practice and belief and then move to strategizing about how to create a more equitable society and world. We prepare scholars to be first rate educators, theorists, and qualitative research methodologists-- and advocates for change.

The Learning Sciences and Psychological Studies (LSPS) Ph.D. program draws upon the relatively new field of learning sciences that has emerged to address the increasingly inter- and multidisciplinary nature of work within and beyond the academy. Program faculty represent a diverse set of academic backgrounds and fields (e.g., critical theory, educational psychology, psychometrics, school psychology, socio-cultural studies, mathematics and science education, technology studies, statistics). LSPS focuses on learning, a cognitive, social, and cultural activity that is distributed among the participating actors as individuals and groups within a specific context. The strand examines formal and informal learning within and across multiple contexts (e.g., teaching and learning in classrooms, centers, communities, homes, museums, schools, virtual environments) from multiple perspectives (e.g., critical, disciplinary, design-based, post-positivist, post-structuralist, and structuralist). The rigorous study of formal and informal learning utilizes multiple paradigms and employs quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods approaches most appropriate for the questions investigated. The examination of formal and informal learning seeks to understand how people learn and how this learning is influenced by knowledge, networks, social and societal structures, tools (e.g., technology), and an array of socio-cultural factors. The goals of this examination of learning is to produce theory, generate research, inform policy, and develop practice that lead to the construction and design of environments that facilitate optimal opportunity, and access for and development of all participants, within the contexts in which formal and informal learning occurs. LSPS is committed to the preparation of doctoral students who develop an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary-based expertise within a concentration (e.g., mathematics and science education, education and technology, cognition and learning, quantitative methods and evaluation). LSPS intends to develop doctoral candidates who thoroughly understand theory, research, the paradigmatic underpinnings of each, and the plausible implications of each for policy and practice; who are able to generate scholarship and design and conduct rigorous theory-driven research appropriate for the issues identified; and who are able to foster mutually informative, translational relationships among the diverse stakeholders in academic, policy, and practice communities.

Students interested in LSPS can elect to concentrate in a number of areas including Mathematics Education, Science Education, Educational Technology, Cognition, and Quantitative Methods and Evaluation. The design of the LSPS program requires committed engagement on the part of students, and faculty, in order to benefit from the dynamic interaction that occurs when multiple, interdisciplinary perspectives are used to inform learning and achievement.

The aim of the PhD program in Policy, Leadership and School Improvement (PLS) is to prepare leaders who will influence the direction of educational organizations at home and around the world. The program produces scholars, administrators, and analysts for leadership roles in K-12 systems, universities, research organizations and policy-making bodies. It does so by developing students' understanding of the societal, political and economic conditions affecting schools; the capacity to analyze educational problems and their proposed solutions; and the ability to design innovations and implementation processes that work.

The PhD program in PLS is among the few programs at elite public universities in the nation to offer opportunities to study with a faculty whose work in K-12 administration, education policy, and school improvement is internationally known. As leaders in these areas, our faculty work collaboratively with students to develop research questions and hypotheses, study them in state and national settings, and link findings to practice. Faculty and students in PLS are engaged in the examination and critique of today's important and contested issues in education, including:

In addition to disciplinary core and research courses, students pursue programs of study that include courses in policymaking, education program evaluation and policy analysis, school law, leadership, educational innovation, implementation, and taking reforms to scale. In combination with courses in quantitative, qualitative and mixed research methods, students develop their research skills through a professional seminar and assistantships with faculty. Committed to professional service, our faculty are also members of editorial boards and advisory forums at the national, state and local levels. They also work directly with school systems, consulting on issues of staffing, instructional delivery, and governance. PLS faculty are currently working with the federal Race to the Top initiative in North Carolina and a national education research center funded by the U.S. Department of Education.

The Teacher Education and Curriculum(TEC) strand provides advanced study for students who wish to situate their research and scholarship in these fields which are sites for considerable national debate. There is a growing need for scholarship that incorporates school-based inquiry along with research that considers policy and socio-cultural contexts of teaching and learning so as to inform educational practice. The strand provides a venue for advanced study and research in interdisciplinary curriculum areas and in teacher education. Students who select this strand will take additional courses in other doctoral strands in the School of Education and in other programs and colleges across UNC's campus. Graduates will be ready to assume teacher education positions and/or curriculum studies positions.

Teacher Education Core:

Curriculum Core:

Students in the Ph.D. program are required to maintain full-time enrollment through the completion of course work, with the expectation that they will graduate in three to four years. Programs of study are available on the School of Education Web site.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in School Psychology

The doctoral program in school psychology, fully accredited by the American Psychological Association and approved by the National Association of School Psychologists, prepares school psychologists as scientist-practitioners to assume leadership positions in academic, research, and applied settings.

Program graduates are eligible for psychological and educational licensing in North Carolina and national certification by the National Association of School Psychologists.

The doctoral program of studies is comprised of seven areas: assessment, intervention, consultation, research and evaluation, professional development, externship/internship, and foundations. Students are required to take courses from each of the psychological foundations.

Doctoral students in school psychology should enter the program with course work in personality theory, abnormal psychology, learning theories, and developmental psychology. Students must enter with at least three prerequisites. A missing prerequisite must be made up the first semester of enrollment.

The program of study for the Ph.D. in school psychology can be found on the School of Education Web site at soe.unc.edu.

Licensure

The School of Education recommends eligible graduates of its approved education programs to the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction for licensure as teachers, administrators, school counselors, school psychologists, and curriculum and instruction specialists. In addition, the school recommends licensure candidates from the following University degree programs: the School of Information and Library Science (for school media coordinators), the School of Social Work (for school social workers), and graduates of the speech-language pathology program in the Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences.

The master of arts in teaching and master of education in school counseling prepare students for their initial professional license at the master's and advanced specialist level. The master's for experienced teachers provides the opportunity for practicing teachers to achieve the advanced competencies of master's level licensure in a variety of specialty areas. School administrators are eligible for licensure at the master's and doctoral levels. School psychologists are eligible for licensure at the advanced (educational) specialist (for master's students) or doctoral level. Curriculum and instruction specialists may earn the add-on license at the master's level or complete an Ed.D. for doctoral-level licensure.

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students

EDUC

401 Childhood Development: Understanding Birth to 12 (3). This course examines the field of child development as it contributes to the teaching and learning of children in early childhood and elementary educational settings, ages birth to 12.

402 Models of Early Childhood Service Delivery (3). This seminar serves as an introduction to the field of child development and early childhood education and special education. Students learn about the primary professional disciplines and agencies serving young children and their families. Current policy, recommended practices, and research innovations are reviewed.

403 Families, Schools, and Communities (1–3). This course examines issues of diversity among and across families within 21st-century schools and communities. The course stresses strategies for effective communication and collaboration with families, professional team members, and school and community resources.

404 Infant/Toddler Assessment and Intervention (3). Prerequisite, EDUC 401. Restricted to majors. Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. This course provides students with knowledge of program models and curricula/intervention strategies for working with infants and toddlers with and without disabilities. Additionally, information is provided regarding identification and assessment strategies for infants, toddlers, and two-year-olds. Program models for working with families are emphasized.

412 Introduction to Children and Schools and Field Experience (3). Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. This course helps prospective teachers gain the necessary knowledge to work sensitively and effectively with all elementary children and design appropriate learning experiences for elementary-aged students.

413 Language and Literacy Learning (3). Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. This course covers the theoretical and developmental aspects of language and literacy processes and practices. The course will cover reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing practices, birth to age 12.

416 Curriculum Integration: Science, Math, and Technology (3). Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. The focus of this course is children's development in mathematical and scientific ways of knowing and the use of technology to support this development.

421 Community Organizations and Children I (1). Provides an understanding of the community contexts of schools and an experience working in community groups. This is the first semester of a two-semester course.

422 Community Organizations and Children II (1). Prerequisite, EDUC 421. Provides prospective teachers with an understanding of the community contexts of the schools. Second semester of a two-semester course.

441 Education in American Society (3). A reflective examination of beliefs and attitudes associated with 1) the historical, philosophical, sociological, political, and economic forces affecting education and schooling in the United States; 2) the structure and function of the school system; and 3) current issues and trends in American schooling and education.

465 Introduction to Teaching (2). Offered concurrently with EDUC 466. Restricted to students admitted to the middle grades teacher education program. Initiates students into the teaching profession. The course stresses what it is like to be a teacher, with concurrent emphasis on the life of the student and the study of schools.

466 Planning for Teaching in the Middle Grades (3). Offered concurrently with EDUC 465. Restricted to students admitted to the middle grades teacher education program. Helps students learn how to plan and develop skills to meet the unique and diverse needs of young adolescents as they prepare to teach.

469 Developing Skills for Teaching (3). Prerequisites, EDUC 465 and 466. Helps students develop a variety of basic teaching skills used by classroom teachers. This course will be conducted primarily as a laboratory course.

493 Practicum (1–6). Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. Students gain familiarity with the operations and complexity of teaching. Students observe instruction, assist in teaching, learn about the curriculum and specific resources, interact with school personnel, work with students, and apply skills learned in previous courses. Prepares students for internship or student teaching.

496 Independent Study (1–3). Permission of the instructor. Provides readings and research under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours.

503 Leadership Seminar (1–3). Course asks students to consider what it means to participate in schools as educational leaders. Students consider how to collaborate effectively with school colleagues, advocate for children and families, participate in the politics of schools and education, and examine what it means to be change agents in classrooms and schools.

504 Learning in the Modern World (3). Students learn about current educational emphases and controversies as well as what the research and scholarship in the fields of education and cognition can contribute to our understanding of these phenomena.

505 Leadership in Educational/Nonprofit Settings (3). Introduces students to a research-based, highly practical understanding of leadership frames/styles prominent in educational/nonprofit organizations. Emphasizes continued student engagement with various leadership models and principles.

506 Politics, Policymaking, and America's Schools (3). Through extensive case study and conversations with policy actors, students will learn the stages model of policy making and understand conflicting values that play out in policy decisions.

508 Cultural Competence, Leadership, and You (3). This course was developed to confront and address questions of global cultural competence and self-critique. Culturally competent leaders work to understand their own biases and patterns of discrimination.

509 Helping Youth Thrive in K–12 Schools (3). Learn strengths-oriented approaches in education practice, research, and policy. The course takes up contemporary literature on positive psychology, developmental assets, resiliency, cultural competence, school readiness, school engagement/connectedness, and positive youth development.

510 Mexican American and Chicana/o Experience in Education (3). This course examines the political, cultural, and historical dimensions of the Mexican American and Chicana/o experience in education. A critical exploration of K–12 schools, higher education, and various social initiatives intended to address inequities in education for Mexican Americans and Chicanas/os will also be a focus of this class.

513 Methods for Teaching in the Elementary School (9). Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. This methods block is a field based, integrated collection of science, literacy, and math courses designed to prepare preservice teachers for planning and implementing instruction in elementary schools.

515 The Arts as Integrative Teaching (2). Restricted to students admitted to the elementary education program or the child development and family studies program. Explores integration of the arts in the curriculum.

516 Introduction to the Education of Exceptional Learners (3). Offers an overview of the special education field and its relevance to the classroom teacher. The course is based on an interdisciplinary perspective toward serving exceptional learners and collaboratively coordinating services. Course content emphasizes inclusive programming and the teacher's role in facilitating students' unique learning needs.

519 Senior Seminar (3). Corequisite, EDUC 593. Course is restricted to majors. Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. The senior seminar is inquiry based and directly connects student teachers with classroom practices. Throughout the semester student teachers develop and implement inquiry projects.

520 Early Language and Literacy Learning–Birth to Third Grade (3). Course is restricted to majors. Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. Course focuses on the language, reading, and writing development of children birth through third grade. Promotes early literacy learning for all children with and without disabilities, including those at risk.

521 Schools, Cultures, and Communities I (3). Permission of the instructor. Explores current issues dealing with schools and the cultures and communities they encompass.

522 Schools, Cultures, and Communities II (3). Prerequisite, EDUC 521. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Continues to explore current issues dealing with schools and the cultures and communities they encompass.

523 Teaching Early Mathematics–Birth to Third Grade (3). Course is restricted to majors. Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. Students study the teaching and learning of mathematics for young children, birth to third grade. Emphasis is placed on content for math, as well as materials, techniques, and teaching aids.

526 Ethics and Education: From Global Problems to Classroom Dilemmas (3). Among the topics examined are ethical implications of democratic schooling for a democratic society, educators as moral agents, and education as an institution with incumbent responsibilities. Students explore the explicit and implied ethics of education and schooling as they relate to policy makers, educators, and citizens concerned about social justice.

531 Effective Teaching: First Steps (2). Characteristics of effective teachers, classroom management, instructional methods, instructional planning and presentation, monitoring and assessing student behavior and learning, differentiating instruction, yearly plans and pacing guides.

532 Child and Adolescent Development (2–3). This course examines the field of human development as it contributes to the teaching and learning of all children. The emphasis is on understanding the nature of development in educational contexts and the implications of research and theory on human development for teacher practice and the creation of supportive learning environments for all children.

533 Social Justice in Education (3). Course examines how education can help create more fair and just societies, ultimately contributing to high performing educational systems internationally. Students explore multiple perspectives on social justice; examine efforts at local, state, national, and global levels; and learn to articulate efforts in classrooms and schools with wider community initiatives.

534 Effective Teaching: Assessment (2). Methods of assessment, multiple measures, monitoring student performance to inform and improve instruction, understanding students with special needs with individual education plans, test scores, and other information in student files.

535 Teachers and Schools (3). Leadership in classroom and school with families, standards of practice, advocating equity, supporting teaching profession, school organization, school finance, legal issue/education strategies for environments that promote learning, issues and trends.

540 Mathematics Teaching (2). NCTM Standards, Standard Course of Study, developing student understanding of mathematics, problem-solving skills, and professional commitment.

541 Mathematics Problems for Instruction (2). Mathematical tasks for learners in grades six through 12 and instructional methods necessary to maintain a task at a high cognitive level.

542 Planning for Mathematics Instruction (2). Examining patterns of practice and assessment, modifying and improving planned units, pacing instruction, reconsidering individual differences and differentiation.

550 Science Teaching (2). Nature of science, national science standards, teaching science as inquiry, safety in the science classroom, materials management.

551 Designing Science Tasks (2). Prerequisite, EDUC 550. Developing and redesigning science instruction to engage students actively, with emphasis on classroom management for energetic curricula, modifying tasks and projects, assessment strategies, and utilization of resources.

552 Improving Science Instruction (2). Prerequisite, EDUC 551. A practitioner's look at instruction in middle and high school science classrooms using many current pedagogical approaches of instruction: constructivism, models of inquiry, reflective practice, and conceptual change theory.

555 Constructive Coaching I: Starting Out Right (2). Designed to support lateral-entry candidates, solving the most urgent problems in the classroom. Includes frequent online communication, individualized attention to immediate problems and combines supervision, coaching, and mentoring.

556 Constructive Coaching II: Effective Management of Student Behavior (2). Prerequisite, EDUC 555. Course designed to help lateral-entry candidates by improving their classroom management skills, specifically those related to student behavior.

557 Constructive Coaching III: Helping Students Learn (2). Prerequisite, EDUC 556. Course designed to support the lateral-entry candidates through individualized feedback about concerns, focusing on strategies for increasing student learning using content area literacy strategies.

560 Second Language Teaching (2). Methods of teaching a second language, how people learn foreign languages, planning instruction, getting students to communicate, using and adapting foreign language textbooks, and developing lessons.

561 Designing Second Language Tasks (2). Students examine instruction as effective mechanism for classroom management, choosing and redesigning tasks and projects to engage students in active learning. Assessment of student understanding investigated as necessary for development of effective instruction.

562 Improving Second Language Instruction (2). Students will consider national standards frameworks as organizing principles for instructional strategies. They will develop skills by use of culturally authentic materials, performance based assessment, and units and lessons promoting successful language learning.

563 Teaching Language Arts in the Middle Grades (3). Restricted to students admitted to the middle grades education program. Focuses on the goals and methods of teaching language arts in the middle grades, including planning for student diversity and unit planning.

564 Teaching Social Studies in the Middle Grades (3). Restricted to students admitted to the middle grades education program. Focuses on the goals and methods of teaching social studies in the middle grades.

565 Teaching Science in the Middle Grades (3). Restricted to students admitted to the middle grades education program. Focuses on methods for teaching science in the middle grades and includes emphasis on the individual needs of students, reading and writing in the content area, and unit planning.

566 Teaching Math in the Middle Grades (3). Restricted to students admitted to the middle grades education program. Focuses on methods for teaching mathematics in the middle grades and includes emphasis on the individual needs of students, reading and writing in the content area, and unit planning.

567 Children's Literature in Elementary and Middle Schools (3). Explores literature in the contexts of interdisciplinary elementary and middle school curricula and the interests and needs of children and young adolescents. Topics include reader-response theory, censorship, Internet resources, school resources, and methods.

568 Seminar on Teaching (3). Prerequisites, EDUC 465, 466, and 469; corequisite, EDUC 593.

593 Internship/Student Teaching (1–12). Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. Student teaching internships are full-time, authentic, field-based experiences in an educational setting. Preservice teachers are responsible for planning lessons, delivering instruction, assessing students, managing the classroom, and demonstrating their teaching effectiveness. This internship is devoted exclusively to the student's functioning in a professional capacity.

595 Introduction to Exceptional Children (3). Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. Surveys giftedness and mental disabilities; emotional and behavioral disorders learning disabilities; speech, hearing, vision, and physical impairments. Emphasizes the role of professionals, families, and the community in supporting the whole child.

601 Education Workshops (1–3). Permission of the program director. Workshops designed around education topics primarily for licensed K–12 teachers.

626 Pedagogical English Grammar for ESL Teachers (3). Enhances foreign and second language educators' understanding of English grammar, expands their skills in linguistic analysis, and helps them develop a more pedagogically sound approach to the teaching of English grammar.

627 Pedagogical Linguistics for ESL Teachers (3). Provides future English as a second language teachers with advanced concepts in linguistics and comparative linguistics. Topics such as phonology and morphology will be covered.

628 Methods of Teaching English as a Second Language (3). Covers teaching methods, assessment, and resource issues related to helping the ESL learner. Additional topics include theories of language learning and the relationships between culture and language.

629 Language Minority Students: Issues for Practitioners (ANTH 629) (3). Permission of the instructor. Explores issues of culture and language associated with teaching English as a second language.

689 Foundations of Special Education (3). This course provides an advanced introduction to key concepts, issues, and service delivery approaches pertaining to the educational needs of students with high incidence disabilities.

691H Honors Seminar in Education (3). Restricted to honors candidates in the School of Education. Required for graduation with honors in education. Integration of critical analysis of selected educational themes, introduction to methods of educational research, and intensive work in skills of reading critically and writing.

694H Honors Thesis in Education (3). Prerequisite, EDUC 691H. A grade of B or better in EDUC 691H is required to take this course. Required of all candidates for graduation with honors in education. Preparation of an honors thesis under the direction of a member of the School of Education faculty and an oral examination on the thesis.

697 Education Minor Capstone Course (3). Student completes a major project in education. Course involves discussion about the changing and contested goals of education, how student projects are implicated in these complexities, and how the projects may be articulated in terms of policy change.

Courses for Graduate Students

EDUC

702 Introduction to Strengths-Based School Counseling (3). Introduction to the counseling profession and ethical codes. Primary focus on the history and ethical practice of school counseling, specifically the Strengths-Based School Counseling framework.

703 Theories of Counseling (3). Permission of the instructor. Explores current theories of counseling, with emphasis on theory as a means of conceptualizing behavior change in the counseling process.

704 College and Career Readiness (3). Course examines theories and models of career development, school transitions, college access/college admissions counseling, and educational policy. Students will utilize action plans that include assessment tools, information sources, and technology for diverse K-12 school communities. Restricted to student in M.Ed. in School Counseling.

705 Internship in School Counseling and Consultation (3–9). Prerequisites, EDUC 606 and 608. Permission of the instructor. Places students in counseling and consultation under supervision in a school setting in order to develop competencies in individual counseling, group counseling, and consultation. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

706 Collaboration and Leadership in School Counseling (3). Students are required to have taken 18 hours in counseling courses. Emphasizes the collaboration and leadership skills needed to effectively organize and implement a comprehensive school counseling program.

707 Promoting Cultural Competence and Social Justice in School Counseling (3–6). Permission of the instructor. Explores the cognitive and affective considerations of counseling in culturally different social systems. This includes ways to incorporate specific sociocultural dimensions into the counseling process.

708 School Consultation Methods (3–12). Examines various models of consultation and the role of the consultative model in the schools and related agencies; uses role playing and experience in the school. May be repeated for credit.

709 Seminar in Applied Investigations (3). Permission of the instructor. Provides opportunities to expand understanding of research in education, psychology, counseling, and school psychology.

710 Statistical Analysis of Educational Data I (4). Studies descriptive and inferential statistics for educational research, including an introduction to fundamentals of research design and computer data analysis.

711 Promoting Academic Development (3). The course addresses the school counselor's role in promoting student academic development. Interventions for impacting academic achievement at both the individual and systems level are explored.

712 Prepracticum in School Counseling (3). Prerequisites, EDUC 702 and 703. School counseling graduate students only. Permission of the instructor. Develops basic strengths-based counseling and interviewing techniques at specified levels of mastery through role playing, feedback sessions, and other experiential counseling activities to enhance counselor competence.

713 Tests and Measurements (3). Prerequisite, EDUC 702. Studies basic concepts in measurement and their application in the use and interpretation of tests. The student may be required to purchase tests.

714 Group Counseling and Guidance (3). Permission of the instructor. Applies counseling theory and research to the organization and implementation of group work (e.g., guidance, task, psychoeducational, counseling groups) in schools.

715 Introduction to School Psychology (3). Introduces the student to concepts and methods involved in school psychology.

716 Technology across the Curriculum (3). Explores the field of educational technologies, situating the field within the context of historical and theoretical foundations, current practices, and future directions.

717 Theory and Research in Education Technology (3). This course is based on the review and critique of research and theoretical literature in the field of education technology. Students will conduct critical analyses of theory, research, and methodology in the field of education technology and design a proposed education technology research study.

718 Psychological Assessment and Intervention I (1–3). Permission of the instructor. Addresses knowledge and skills in techniques of observation, interviewing, assessment of environment, intelligence, achievement, perceptual motor skills, and interpersonal perceptions. May be repeated for credit.

719 Psychological Advanced Assessment and Intervention II (3). Permission of the instructor. Addresses knowledge and skills in techniques of observation, interviewing, assessment of environment, intelligence, achievement, perceptual motor skills, and interpersonal perceptions.

720 Seminar in Professional School Psychology (2–3). Deals with the goals and roles of school psychology, ethical concerns, privileged information, certification and licensing, and other relevant areas. May be repeated for credit.

721 Externship in School Psychology (1–6). Permission of the instructor. Provides supervised observation and participation in school psychological services in schools and school-related field facilities. May be repeated for credit.

722 Master's Internship in School Psychology (1–6). Prerequisite, EDUC 721. Permission of the instructor. Provides supervised full-time field experience for master's students in school psychology in a school setting.

723 Advanced Assessment and Intervention Approaches for Students with Traumatic Brain Injury (3). Assessment and treatment of students who have sustained traumatic brain injury; for school and clinical psychologists.

724 Parent and Community Engagement for the School Executive (3). Focus on the environmental context of family and community engagement. Research-based best practices applied to an identified local school site, where analyses of school/district initiatives, policies, and practices are examined through a social justice lens. Review federal/state legislation and compliance to ensure the rights of parents and guardians.

725 Supervisory Practice for the School Executive (3). Admission to the master of school administration program required. Focuses on the role of school administrators in facilitating the continuous improvement of the clinical supervision process and on a variety of observation and conferencing skills that school leaders may employ with teachers and other support staff.

726 Practica in Second Languages (1). Permission of the instructor. Provides students an opportunity to observe and become involved with all school aspects of teaching and learning second/foreign languages.

727 The Social Context of Educational Leadership (3). Provides retrospective, contemporary, and prospective examinations of the social, cultural, political, and philosophical contexts from which the current issues that affect schools and schooling have evolved.

728 Practicum in ESL II/Foreign Languages (3). Provides an internship to teach ESL/FL under the supervision of an experienced ESL teacher.

729 Culture and Politics in Second Language Education (3). This course provides an overview of current issues in second language teaching (ESL, foreign languages, and bilingual education) with a focus on culture, politics, and diversity.

730 Curriculum Leadership for the School Executive (3). Applies curriculum skills required of school executives today, including the development of an alternative school schedule with a different curricular focus; analysis of test data to discern achievement trends; test item deconstruction; instructional mapping; and the creation of a group-based curriculum management plan for a specific elementary or secondary school.

731 Organizational Management for the School Executive (3). This course provides pre-service school executives with a skill set and practical experiences that address effective organizational management behaviors. Topics include time management, budget and resource allocation, use of data to assess decisions and initiatives, implementation of appropriate rules and procedures, and open communication with all stakeholders.

732 Group Dynamics for the School Executive (3). Experiential course that focuses on the development of an understanding and skills for working with various organizational groups. Focus is on teams, leadership of teams, team problem solving, and team decision making.

734 Planning in Educational Organizations (3). Examines a conceptual and practical approach to planning in educational organizations. Includes a focus on environmental scanning, futures research, and strategic planning.

735 Seminar on Internship I (3). Students examine a variety of issues that arise during their internship. Heavy emphasis on the creation of required artifacts needed for both program completion and State licensure.

736 Seminar and Supervised Internship in Educational Administration I (3–6). Provides supervised internship in school administration to facilitate the student's progress toward certification in the principalship. May be repeated for credit.

737 Seminar on Internship II (3). In addition to dealing with a variety of issues that candidates are dealing with in their internships, there is a heavy emphasis on creation of required artifacts needed for both program completion and State Licensure.

738 Seminar and Supervised Internship in Educational Administration II (3–6). Prerequisite, EDUC 834. Required preparation, six semester hours in educational administration, including EDUC 834. Permission of the instructor. Provides supervised internship in school administration to facilitate the student's progress toward certification in the principalship. May be repeated for credit.

739 Educational Policy Studies (3). Reflectively examines issues and trends associated with models and theories of educational policy development. The tension between practice and theory is analyzed and models of educational change are considered.

740 Cultural Leadership for the School Executive (3). Course focuses on the importance of school executives' understanding the organizational culture of their schools and then exerting symbolic leadership strategies to reshape that culture so it is more conducive to promoting the academic achievement of students.

741 School Inquiry and Reform for the School Executive (3). Course focuses on the use of various types of data that can be used to impact decisions regarding school improvement and increased student achievement. It also introduces a number of proven strategies and tactics for improving schools.

742 Law for the School Executive (3). Course focuses on the basic legal principles that school executives need to know and follow in their day-to-day leadership activities.

743 Teaching Secondary Students with Disabilities (1). Following a case format and utilizing online instruction, M.A.T. students learn to teach secondary learners in inclusion settings.

744 Advanced Assessment Techniques (3). Prerequisites, EDUC 755. Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. Covers the knowledge and abilities necessary to create and interpret assessments of academic progress, engagement, and motivation. Emphasis on (a) technology and (b) assessments for ESL and special needs students.

745 Contexts of Education II (2). Prerequisite, EDUC 759. Provides a weekly seminar (part two of a two-semester sequence) for interns with full-time teaching responsibilities. Interns will connect their teaching experience to social, cultural, and philosophical issues in education.

746 Practica Student Internship (9). Permission of the instructor. Provides full-time internship in teaching in the content area under the supervision of experienced teachers and a university supervisor for the semester.

747 Methods and Materials for Teaching Secondary/K–12 Subjects II (3). Teaches student teachers to be aware of trends and issues in their content area in North Carolina and the nation, therefore improving their understanding and skills in curriculum development and instruction.

748 Advanced Leadership (3). Course restricted to graduate students in the M.A.T. program. The course will provide a foundation for advanced students to consider what it means to participate in schools as educational leaders. This course builds on experience gained from the student teaching internship and is one-half of the capstone module of the MAT program of study.

749 Advanced Exploration of Families, Schools and Communities (3). Admission into the M.A.T. program required. This advanced course examines strategies for effective communication and collaboration with families, professional team members, and school resources. Topics will include a return to contextual issues and reflection on initial preparation experiences. This course is one-half of the capstone module of the MAT program of study.

750 Empowerment Strategies for the School Executive (3). Course focuses on the factors that hinder both school executives and their teachers from feeling empowered to fulfill their leadership potential and examines a variety of strategies for overcoming those challenges.

751 Introduction to Teaching Diverse Learners (3). Admission to the M.A.T. program required. Introduces the principles of effective teaching with emphasis on the first year of teaching.

753 Introduction to Curriculum (3). Open to graduate students in education or permission of the instructor. Surveys the nature of curriculum development and contemporary changes as they relate to social aims, learner characteristics, and social problems.

754 Teacher Education in the United States (3). Studies the research relating to teacher effectiveness and programs for the preparation of teachers. Designed for students planning to work in teacher education.

755 Development, Learning, and Assessment (3). Course restricted to graduate students in the M.A.T. program. Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. This course provides prospective secondary teachers with a conceptual understanding of development, learning, and assessment to promote all students' school achievement and adjustment in the 21st century.

756 Principles and Methods in Parent Education and Involvement (3). Examines principles, theory, models, and methods for work with parents and families in educational settings, with relevant research and practical applications.

757 College Teaching (3). Introduces students to the planning of courses and educational programs for college students. Emphasis is on a systematic approach to developing, implementing, and evaluating instruction. This course is intended for graduate students in any academic department who plan teaching careers.

758 Immigration and Education (3). Investigates social (including political, economic, legal, and demographic) and cultural impacts on immigration and education.

759 Teacher Leadership for a Diverse Society (3). Course restricted to graduate students in the M.A.T. program. Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. For educational institutions to be effective in a diverse society, teachers must take on key leadership roles. This course helps prepare future teachers for such leadership.

760 Methods and Materials for Teaching Secondary/K-12 Subjects I (4). Prepares students to teach discipline-area material at the secondary level. The immediate purpose of this course is to prepare participants for full-time student teaching during the spring semester.

762 Child Development and Disability (3). Emphasizes typical development and developmental deviation exhibited by children in cognitive, language, social, and affective areas.

763 Biological Bases of Children's Development (3). Focuses on the theory and research related to the biomedical and psychological aspects of exceptionality.

764 Current Issues in Literacy (3). The main purpose of this seminar is to engage students in the synthesis and critical examination of current research and policy issues in literacy education.

766 Practicum in School Counseling (1-9). Prerequisites, EDUC 703 and 712. Permission of the instructor. Develops individual counseling skills and an understanding of the school as a setting for counseling through an apprenticeship experience.

767 Seminar in Educational Studies (3). Focuses on educational issues involving culture, curriculum, and change. Issues addressed will vary.

768 Education in Latin America (LTAM 768) (3). See LTAM 768 for description.

769 Schooling of Latinos (LTAM 767) (3). See LTAM 767 for description.

770 Multicultural Ways of Knowing (3). Dialectically explores narratives about race, class, and gender through critical, multicultural, aesthetic, and post-modern lenses.

771 Seminar in Social Foundations of Education (1). Explores topics in the social and philosophical context of American public education.

772 Educational Sociology (3). Applies sociological theory and research to problems of concern to educators.

773 Social Change and Education (3). Analyzes social change within a theoretical framework and describes its probable impact on education. Considers the role of the school in the development of human capital.

774 Social and Educational History of the United States (3). Provides a survey of the social forces influencing the development of American education from the period of colonization to the early years of the 20h century.

775 Introduction to Ethics and Education (3). Identifies issues arising in the professional activities of education personnel in the context of systematic consideration of the nature of ethical choice.

776 Gender, Race, and Class Issues in Education (WMST 776) (3). Provides an understanding of (and remedies for) the racism, sexism, and class divisions that schools can perpetuate. Examines curriculum, counseling, and interaction in classrooms; structure and leadership; and fundamental assumptions.

777 Gender, Policy, and Leadership in Education (WMST 777) (3). Covers feminist critiques of organizational and political power structures in readings and discussions leading to group and individual research projects.

779 Contemporary Philosophies of Democratic Schooling (3). Provides a comparative study of current philosophies of education, with particular attention to their impact on solutions offered to problems currently recognized in American education.

781 Theories and Research in Human Development (3). Permission of the instructor. Covers the basic theories and the research bases for instructional decisions. This is an advanced-level course in human development.

782 Psychology of Learning in the School (3). Studies learning in the school setting, with emphasis on fundamental concepts, issues, and evaluation of materials and experiences.

783 Applied Measurement Theory for Education (3). An examination of the logic and theory of educational measurement. Practical applications of measurement theory to the construction and use of a variety of educational measurement devices.

784 Statistical Analysis of Educational Data II (4). Prerequisite, EDUC 710. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A linear model approach to the analysis of data collected in educational settings. Topics include multiple regression, analysis of variance, and analysis of covariance, using computer packages.

785 Program Evaluation in Education (3). Prerequisites, EDUC 710 and 871. An examination of major approaches to program evaluation with emphasis on differences between evaluation and research.

786 Problems in Educational Psychology (3-6). Permission of the instructor. Study and development of original investigations in the area of educational psychology.

787 Problems in Educational Measurement (3). Prerequisites, EDUC 710 and 783. Permission of the instructor. Provides an opportunity for advanced doctoral students to study a particular problem area in educational measurement under the supervision of a faculty mentor. May be repeated for credit.

788 Instructional Theories (3). Prerequisite, EDUC 744. Examines the nature and application of various theories of instruction to instructional goals, individual differences, teaching strategies, sequencing, motivation, and assessment.

790 Special Topics in Education – Graduate (3). This course provides graduate students the opportunity for intensive exploration and discussion of selected topics in education.

792 Research on Technology (3). Explores and discusses the application of emerging technologies in education.

795 Seminar in Learning Disabilities Education (3). Prerequisite, EDUC 687. Pre- or co-requisite, EDUC 688. (Students enrolled in the licensure-only program require initial competencies with regard to law and assessment that are not currently available). Instructs students about the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and case law, particularly those pertaining to learning disabilities. Also covers the basics of measurement concepts.

796A Independent Study Master's Level (1-12). Permission of the instructor.

796B Independent Study Doctoral Level (1-12). Independent study at the doctoral level.

797 Collaboration with Families and Other Professionals (3). Instructs students about the resources available to them, their students, and their students' families. Students will develop skills in working with parents and professionals as partners in the instruction and planning of programs for students with learning disabilities.

798 Master's Internship in Learning Disabilities Education (1-12). Provides supervised experience in a phase of special education or literacy studies appropriate to the student's qualifications and future educational goals. May require a minimum of 300 clock hours at the internship site per semester depending on student placement. See your advisor for credit hours needed.

800 Diversity in Education (3). Restricted to graduate students in the M.A.T. program. Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. Along with providing overview of schools, their structure, and their role in American society, the course introduces students to the necessity of differentiated instruction based on race, culture, special education, and English as second language learners.

802 Foundations of Educational Research (3). Applies the philosophies of science, social science, language, and history (including recent theoretical issues) to the understanding of how educational research is conducted and what contribution it makes.

803 Pro-seminar in Education (3). Students develop an in-depth understanding of scholarly traditions within education, histories of curricular area and current issues facing these areas and education as a whole, and application of these histories and issues to classrooms and schools.

804 Seminar in Culture, Curriculum, and Change (3). Open to doctoral students only. Critical examination of topics and policy issues related to curriculum and educational change, considered in cultural context.

805 Seminar in Early Childhood, Special Education, and Literacy (3). Introductory seminar for master's and doctoral students in ECSEL program. Review current issues in early childhood, special education, and literacy and introduces students to the research of current faculty members.806 Seminar in Psychological Measurement and Evaluation (3). Open to doctoral students only. Critical examination of theoretical and research issues related to learning, development, teaching, assessment, and quantitative methods of research, from a psychological perspective.

805A Professional Seminar I (3). Introductory seminar for graduate students. Review current issues in early childhood, special education, and literacy and introduces students to the research of current faculty members.

805B Professional Seminar II: Research and Scholarship in the Educational Sciences (3). Course explores history of psychological studies in education and examines areas of current inquiry such as cognition and learning, teaching and instruction, academic motivation, contextual influences, and theory-based intervention.

807 Social Studies and Arts (1-9). Looks at social studies as a discipline that easily integrates other disciplines, particularly the arts, which includes literature. It emphasizes curriculum and instruction, as well as theoretical underpinnings.

808 Seminar in Learning Disabilities Education (3). Prerequisite, EDUC 687. (Students enrolled in the licensure-only program require initial competencies with regard to law and assessment that are not currently available). Instructs students about the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and case law, particularly those pertaining to learning disabilities. Also covers the basics of measurement concepts.

809 Problems in Special Education (3). Permission of the instructor. Provides an opportunity for post-master's students who wish to engage in supervised field and pilot research. May be repeated for credit.

810 Psychology of Career Development (3). Open to doctoral students only. Reviews theories and research in the psychology of career development and counseling. Emphasis is on theory and implications for practice.

811 Problems in School Counseling (1–21). Provides students the opportunity for directed study in school counseling.

812 Doctoral Practicum in School Counseling (1–21). Provides students experiences that may include working with individual, family, or group counseling and consultation.

813 Doctoral Internship in School Counseling (1). Provides students a supervised professional pre-doctoral internship training experience in counseling.

814 Supervision and Teaching in School Counseling (3). Enables students to gain supervision and teaching skills that will enhance their functions as professors and as leaders in counseling agencies. Strategies of practicum supervision are summarized and research literature is reviewed.

815 Doctoral Seminar in School Counseling (3). Provides an in-depth appraisal of topics of theoretical and/or clinical nature that are of particular relevance to the field.

816 Transformational Education (3). Examines 20th-century schools that have attempted to redefine and deepen United States democracy, embracing pedagogies and values that offer alternatives to mainstream education.

817 Introduction to Educational Research (3). Course provides introduction to purposes of educational research, roles of theories, hypotheses, questions, and ethical issues. While being exposed to a range of research designs, students are to become critical reviewers and develop research proposals or a master's thesis.

820 Doctoral Seminar in Professional School Psychology (3). Required preparation, appropriate courses. Permission of the instructor. Considers advanced topics in the field of school psychology such as professional issues, standards and ethics, and interdisciplinary relations.

821 Doctoral Externship in School Psychology (1–6). Permission of the instructor. Supervised field placement experiences for doctoral-level students in school psychology, integrating training with field responsibilities at a systems level in schools and school-related settings.

822 Doctoral Internship in School Psychology (1–6). Prerequisite, EDUC 821. Supervised doctoral internship in school psychology for advanced training in professional skills and research in schools and school-related settings.

823 Policy Development in Education (3). Graduate course about the political process and policy dynamics. With a focus on the U.S. domestic context, the course addresses the policy process in general and examines the workings of that process in education.

824 Fundamentals of Educational Research (3). Explores and analyzes the range of educational research designs including experimental, correlational, survey, descriptive, case study, ethnography, narrative, policy, and longitudinal research.

827 Human Development (3). School of Education majors only. Emphasizes theories of child and adolescent development as well as research findings that aid in the understanding of human behavior and development.

828 Educational Measurement and Evaluation (3). Identifies the basic concepts in measurement and evaluation, describes the role of evaluation in curriculum construction and revision, and describes the development and use of teacher-constructed tests.

830 Field Techniques in Educational Research (3). Introduces students to field research methods and analysis of qualitative data that focuses on the application of these techniques in evaluation and policy research.

831 School Law: Justice and Equity (3). Required preparation, six semester hours of graduate school work in school administration. Provides an overview of the legal structure of education, liability, constitutional rights, contractual relationships, federal regulations, and collective action. May be repeated for credit.

832 Educational Politics and Policy (3). Examines theory of competing conceptions of policy. Actors and agencies are examined at federal, state, and local levels. Interactions across levels are studied in relation to current policy alternatives.

833 Leading System Functions (3). Prerequisites, EDUC 839 and 842, Permission of the instructor. This course is focused on the issues pertaining to personnel, planning, facilities, administrative applications of technology, superintendent/board relations, district-level curriculum and assessment issues, and creating and sustaining community inter-agency partnerships.

834 Organizational Behavior and Theory in Education (3). Permission of the instructor. Analyze the theoretical assertions and empirical knowledge claims that have led to the dominant structures, power relationships, and performance expectations of American schools.

835 Instructional Leadership for Supervision, Curriculum, and Technology (3). Provides fundamental knowledge of instructional design, techniques of teaching/learning, evaluation of the teaching/learning process, and ways in which school-based leaders can support excellence in classroom instruction.

836 School Finance and Economic Equity (3). Covers the area of financing school corporations in the current economic and political setting, with emphasis on the interrelationships of educational, economic, and political decisions. May be repeated for credit.

837 Cultural Aspects of Leadership and Instruction in School Reform (3). Designed to provide students with perspectives regarding the interplay of cultural issues that challenge the partnership between administration and instruction.

838 School Governance (3). Permission of the instructor. Focuses on governance and policy at the school building level and how district-wide governance, state educational policy, federal involvement in education, and educational special interest groups impact school-sized governance.

839 The Excellent School Seminar I (3). Permission of the instructor. Research and models on high-performing organizations, instructionally effective schools and school systems, and national school reform efforts presented in the context of traditional and emerging organizational theory and research.

840 Advanced Leadership Theories (3). Prerequisites, EDUC 727, 750, 832, and 834. Requires students to integrate previous studies to focus on management applications, dilemmas, and conflicts.

841 The Development of a Research Proposal (3). Prerequisites, EDUC 727, 832, and 834. Requires students to integrate previous studies to focus on theory, inquiry, and organizational practice.

842 The Excellent School Seminar II (3). Permission of the instructor. Research and models on high-performing organizations, instructionally effective schools and school systems, and national school reform efforts presented in the context of traditional and emerging organizational theory and research.

843 Seminar in Educational Studies (3). Focuses on educational issues and theories involving culture, curriculum, and change. Issues and theories addressed will vary.

844 Advanced Seminar and Supervised Internship in Educational Administration (1–6). Prerequisites, EDUC 727, 750, 832, 834. Permission of the instructor. An advanced internship and seminar relevant to the program in administration and to the student's progress toward advanced administrative certification. May be repeated for credit.

851 Curriculum Theory (3). Relates curriculum development to relevant theories and research in humanistic and behavioral studies. This is an advanced course.

852 Instructional Systems Development (3). Delineates strategies for developing instructional systems, including needs assessment, job analysis, goal setting, use of criterion tests, delivery systems, project management, and evaluation of learners and programs.

853 Supervision and Instruction (3). Examines the history, nature, and purposes of educational supervision, with an emphasis on the supervisor's role in improving teaching, curriculum development, and staff development.

854 Seminar in Curriculum and Instruction (3). Review and interpretation of existing research in the area of curriculum and instruction.

855 Problems in Curriculum and Instruction (3–6). Required preparation, two courses in graduate education. Provides an opportunity for advanced students to do independent study under supervision in an area of study. (Sections include early childhood, intermediate, secondary subjects, media, literacy, and general.) May be repeated for credit.

856 Practicum in Curriculum and Instruction (3–6). Experiences may include projects, field studies, or internships with one of a number of agencies concerned with education. (Sections include early childhood, intermediate, secondary subjects, media, literacy, and general.)

861 Seminar in Special Education (3). Emphasis on developmental deviation exhibited by exceptional children in cognitive, language, social, and affective development.

862 Teaching and Personnel Development (SPHS 862) (3). Focuses on teaching and personnel development at the pre-service and in-service levels. Topics include: application of adult learning principles and styles; syllabus development; technology and teaching; supervision; mentorship and research innovations in college teaching.

863 Supervised Post-Master's Internship in Special Education (1–21). Permission of the instructor. A full-time field placement under the joint direction of a University staff member and a selected professional at the internship site.

864 Families, Schools, and Child Development: Successful Intervention Strategies (3). The purpose of this seminar is to provide an introduction to the theory, research, methods, and current issues related to the influence of families and schools on children's development.

865 College Teaching Internship (1–3). Open to graduate students only. Permission of the instructor. This course is designed to give doctoral and masters' students experience at college teaching prior to taking on full responsibility for a class of her/his own. The student will fully participate as a teaching assistant in the class of an experienced tenured, tenure track, or clinical professor.

866 Policy to Practice (3). Examine relationships between broader social, economic, and political currents and the chosen instruments for education reform. Students examine what purposes stakeholders believe schools serve and how policy is/isn't translated into practice.

867 Issues in Educational Policy and Research (3). Course familiarizes students with public policy in education and its influence on schools and schooling. Students learn methodological perspectives of education policy research. Examine major policy initiatives in education.

868 Advanced Qualitative Analysis and Interpretation (3). This advanced seminar focuses on the needs of doctoral students immersed in qualitative research, with an emphasis on data analysis and representation.

871 Seminar in Education (3). Required preparation, two courses in graduate education. Permission of the instructor. Provides for seminar treatment of appropriate topics.

872 Seminar in Educational Studies (3–6). Topics in educational philosophy to be determined by the students with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

873 Problems in the Philosophical Foundations of Education (3–21). Prerequisite, EDUC 779. Provides an opportunity for advanced doctoral students to do independent study under supervision.

874 Problems in the Sociological Foundations of Education (3–21). Prerequisite, EDUC 772. Provides an opportunity for advanced doctoral students to do independent study under supervision.

876 Problems in the History of Education (3–21). Prerequisite, EDUC 774. Provides an opportunity for advanced doctoral students to do independent study under supervision.

877 Critical Multicultural Education (3). Examination of the current issues in multicultural education, cultural study, and the development of curriculum for critical multicultural education.

878 Seminar in Educational Studies (3). Involves an in-depth exploration of theories and issues involving culture, curriculum, and change. Topics will vary.

881 Seminar in Human Development and Individual Differences (3). Required preparation, at least one course in human development at the graduate level or permission of the instructor. Analyzes research data and theoretical positions pertaining to individual differences in human development in the educational setting.

882 Seminar in Human Learning and Cognition (3). Required preparation, one or two courses in educational and developmental psychology. Studies theoretical aspects and practical implications of psychologies of learning.

883 Case Study Methods (3). Provides students with an overview of the methodology of case study research and to enhance students' skills in using research techniques.

884 Statistical Analysis of Educational Data III (3). Prerequisites, EDUC 710 and 784. An extension of the general linear model to analysis of educational data with multiple dependent variables, with computer applications.

885 Secondary Data Analysis (3). Provides students who have an introductory background in statistics with an overview of secondary data analysis and enhances students' skills in using data analysis to test hypotheses.

888 Introduction to Structural Modeling (3). Introduces structural equation modeling with both observed and latent variables. Applications include confirmatory factor analysis, multiple group analyses, longitudinal analyses, and multi-trait-multi-method models.

890 Special Topics in Education (1-3). This course provides students the opportunity for intensive exploration and discussion of selected topics in education.

891 Educational Policy Doctoral Seminar (3). Provides for seminar treatment of appropriate topics related to education policy.

892 Seminar in Educational Studies (3-6). Topics in educational philosophy to be determined by the students with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

904 Exploring Representations of Education in Popular Culture (3). Students in this course explore and analyze how education has been represented in popular culture. Theoretical foundation of the course from seminars and readings.

909 Applied Quantitative Methods in Curriculum and Teacher Education (3). Applied statistics course designed to introduce students to how descriptive and inferential statistics are used in curriculum studies and teacher education. Students explore how statistical procedures are used in school, school district, state, and national settings.

913 Language, Identity, and Power (3). Language is involved in the construction of social identity and power structures. Students examine how individuals construct their identities and language interacts with other social groupings (class, ethnicity, and gender) and examines how language creates and maintains power for certain groups. Special attention to marginalized groups in the United States.

915 Introduction to Learning Sciences (3). Course is designed to provide an overview of the field of learning sciences. Goals of learning sciences are: 1) understand the physical, cognitive, and social aspects of learning environments and 2) use these understandings to design more effective learning environments.

918 Introduction to Cognitive Science and Sociocultural Perspectives on Learning (3). Course provides an overview of learning theories in education with a special emphasis upon a sociocultural perspective. Course examines how learning theories are or can be enacted in research, policy, and practice.

930 Economics of Education (3). Students consider and critically reflect upon the contributions of economic theory to educational policy issues. Course provides an overview of economic theories as they pertain to the provision of public education and an overview of econometrics. Focuses on salient topics in educational policy and their analysis through an economic lens.

945 Intellectual Histories of Educational Thought (3). Course will explore ideas about children, families, knowledge, and the state that resonate through European and U.S. histories, primarily, and, though changed, continue to be debated now.

947 Diversity in Teacher Education (3). Focus on research in teacher education that addresses diversity issues, a particular focus on sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches. Course emphasizes the relationship between theory and practice by focusing on the teacher as an agent of change.

948 Research in Teacher Education and Diversity (3). Course looks at research in teacher education that addresses diversity issues, with a particular focus on sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches. Course will emphasize the relationship between theory and practice by focusing on the teacher as an agent of change in addressing issues of equity and social justice in diverse classrooms.

950 Advanced Curriculum in the Humanities (3). Course brings together those with interests in academic disciplines of literature, history, foreign languages and literatures, English as a second language, and the arts to examine the status of the humanities in our society and in our P-12 schools. Students will consider socio-cultural and political contexts and contributions to the humanities.

970 Applied Theory and Research: Dissertation Proposal Prep (3). Course explores planning and conducting qualitative research. Students will apply knowledge of qualitative research to dissertation proposal/projects. They will also explore different research proposals and data collection strategies.

972 Critical Race Theory: History, Research, and Practice (3). Course will explore the historical development of Critical Race Theory (CRT) from its origins in Critical Legal Studies through the more recent frameworks established in education, including intersections with LatCrit Theory, AsianCrit, QueerCrit, TribalCrit, and Critical Race Feminism.

974 Critical Social Theory Explored Through Media (3). Course explores critical social theories through popular culture texts. Course challenges the perception that popular culture texts have little to offer in the way of educational discourse.

977 Autoethnography Educational Research (3). Course will focus on the theory and practice of autoethnography, or "reading" significant patterns in everyday experience and connecting those patterns to the self and to broader social concerns. Students will read models of autoethnography, methodological works, do writing exercises, and create independent autoethnographic projects.

981 Field Techniques in Educational Research (3). Prerequisite, EDUC 684. Introduces students to field research methods and analysis of qualitative data that focuses on the application of these techniques in evaluation and policy research.

982 Advanced Qualitative Analysis and Interpretation (3). This advanced seminar focuses on the needs of doctoral students immersed in qualitative research, with an emphasis on data analysis and representation.

990 Supervised Research (1). Open to graduate students only. Provides students with the opportunity to work with individual faculty members in collaborative research activities in association with a seminar during the second, third, and fourth semesters of study. May be repeated for credit.

992 Master's (Non-Thesis) (3). Focuses on the development of a master's project or a major paper other than a thesis.

993 Master's Research and Thesis (3).

994 Doctoral Research and Dissertation (3).

Courses for Graduate Students

EDMX

704 Literacy Reflection (3). Focuses on reflective literacy teaching: problematizing, processes of understanding students' thinking about reading and writing.

706 Assessment and Accountability (3). Provides students with the opportunity to review, renew, and expand their understanding of assessment and program evaluation procedures, as well as the role of accountability in educational settings.

707 Reinventing Teaching (3). Admission to the M.Ed. for experienced teachers program required. Addresses contexts of teaching, teaching in the world, and teaching students in schools. This course is designed for experienced educators to "reinvent teachers and teaching."

708 Teacher Researcher I (1-3). Enrollment in the M.Ed. for Experienced Teachers program required. Explores the meanings of research and the potential roles of teachers in conducting research. Teachers formulate possible individual or small group research projects that they can carry out during the year.

709 Teacher Researcher II (1-3). Teachers will plan and conduct advanced inquiry/research projects informed by their knowledge of teacher-research and their experience as teacher-researchers garnered through their successful completion of EDMX 708.

710 Teacher Leadership for a Democratic Society (3). Focuses on the nature of change and teachers' roles as leaders within a changing environment. Several themes are addressed: shaping school cultures, schools as communities, schools as sites for reform, and politics and schools.

715 Assessment and Differentiation (1). Prerequisite, EDMX 707. Enrollment in the M.Ed. for experienced teachers program required. Enhances teachers' understanding of how to differentiate assessment.

716 Teaching and Differentiation (3). Enrollment in the M.Ed. for experienced teachers program required. Enhances teachers' understanding of how to differentiate instruction. Using a case-based approach, teachers examine the areas of human development, special education and inclusion, cultural diversity, linguistic diversity, cognitive styles, and multiple intelligences as frames through which to consider creative environments to promote students' classroom success.

721 Content-Area Reading and Writing (3). Focuses on current theory, research, and issues in the teaching and use of reading and writing in the content areas. This is an introductory course.

722 Advanced Reflective Literacy Teaching (3). Teachers will learn how to problematize assessment of students' thinking about reading and writing in this practicum course.

723 Number Systems and Operations: K-5 Mathematical Tasks (3). Course has major restrictions. Analysis and construction of effective mathematical tasks in teaching number systems and operations at the K-5 level; attention is also given to the expansion of content knowledge.

724 Data Analysis and Measurement: K-5 Classroom Interactions (3). Course has major restrictions. Focuses on statistical literacy of elementary teachers and the teaching of data analysis and measurement to K-5 students; attention is also given to learning methods that facilitate appropriate classroom interactions.

725 Rational Numbers and Operations: K-5 Learning Trajectories (3). Prerequisite, EDMX 723. Course has major restrictions. Focuses on rational number concepts through learning trajectories at the K-5 level. Attention also given to problem solving and content knowledge.

726 Revisiting Real Numbers Concepts (3). Uses a problem-based format and group work to explore the mathematics of the real numbers with an emphasis on rational numbers.

727 Algebraic Reasoning: K-5 Discourse and Questioning (3). Prerequisite, EDMX 723. Course has major restrictions. Focus on the early algebra concepts of functional thinking and generalized arithmetic in relationship to pedagogical practices centered on questioning in the mathematics classroom.

728 Topics in Mathematics Education: Geometry (1-3). Provides students with a mathematical foundation and cognitive support for elementary and middle school geometry. Specific goals address structure of elementary and middle school geometry.

730 Geometry and Spatial Visualization: K-5 Assessment (3). Course has major restrictions. Geometric concept development along with formative and summative assessment strategies of students' geometric thinking. Attention also is given to geometric content knowledge and diagnosis of student errors.

731 Writing in the 21st Century (3). Focuses on the writing process and the theoretical foundations necessary to become practitioners who can develop and implement effective writing instruction using 21st-century skills.

732 Explorations in Literacy (3). Explores what it means to be a reader and writer, the nature of development of literacy.

733 Spanish for Educators (3). This graduate-level course is an introductory immersion-style Spanish course for anyone involved in education. Learners will acquire novice-level proficiency in Spanish and an awareness of Hispanic culture.

734 Revisiting Literacy (3). Explores literacy topics as capstone course for master's or licensure program in literacy.

735 Math and Content Area Methods: Special Education, General Curriculum (3). Students will learn characteristics of students with mild to moderate learning disabilities in math, social studies, and science. They will also learn assessment techniques and instructional methods to address these specific characteristics.

736 Mathematical Modeling: K-5 Leadership (3). Prerequisites, EDMX 723, 724, 725, 727, and 730. Restricted to majors. Generating mathematical representations and making explicit connections between concepts. Pedagogy designed to equip elementary teachers to become mathematics teacher-leaders in school settings. Focuses on topics integrated within mathematical strands.

757 Social Studies Pedagogy A (1-9). Designed to extend students' professional content knowledge by exploring the content and methods of a social science discipline.

758 Social Studies Pedagogy B (3). Designed to extend students' professional content knowledge by exploring the content and methods of a social science discipline.

759 Contemporary Research for Social Studies Teaching (3). Focuses on current research topics and methodologies in the field of social studies education and examines their implications on the field.

760 Integrated Learning (3). Builds on earlier coursework and will include teachers from each of the two concentrations in the M.Ed. for Experienced Teachers. It focuses on exploring what is meant by integrated curriculum and understanding the process of developmental research as it relates to the design and use of curricula.

761 Social Studies/Humanities (1-9). Aims to develop social studies teachers' understanding of social science and humanities through an interdisciplinary inquiry process.

762 Advanced Emergent Literacy (3). Advanced course on emergent literacy, focusing on the research and theory in the development of reading and writing processes from birth through first grade, emphasizing the cognitive and socio-cultural perspectives.

763 Diversity Global Education (1-9). Provides a linked perspective on international studies and multicultural education. Students explore issues relevant to these two topics as they relate to teaching and learning in social studies.

764 Families and Teams in Early Childhood Intervention: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (3). Open to graduate students only. Explores issues and models of family-professional and interprofessional relationships in early childhood settings. Collaborative communication and problem-solving strategies are emphasized in the context of diversity.

765 Early Childhood Assessment Strategies (3). Open to graduate students only. Provides an overview and application of strategies for developmental screenings, normative evaluations, curriculum, and play-based assessments for young children ages birth through five.

766 Preschool/Kindergarten Curriculum and Learning Environments (3). Open to graduate students only. Focuses on individually, developmentally, and culturally appropriate learning environment and curriculum strategies for young children with and without disabilities ages three to five.

767 Infant/Toddler Curriculum and Learning Environment (3). Focuses on infant/toddler development and mental health strategies for facilitating development in the home and in child care.

768 Professional Development and Leadership in Early Childhood Intervention (3). Prerequisites, EDMX 764, 765, and 766. Focuses on leadership skills in mentoring, supervision, staff development, resource gathering, and applied research related to early childhood settings.

775 Seminar in Science Education (3). Teaches students curriculum and instruction strategies in science education. The focus of the course is on teaching and assessing science for conceptual understanding.

776 Perspectives on Science Education: Physical Science (3). Examines physical science domains in depth. Students reflect on their own understandings of science phenomena and research their students' understandings.

777 Perspectives on Science Education: Life Science (3). Studies the history of science education, curriculum design, and national reform ideas as well as projects and programs currently used in United States classrooms.

778 Perspectives of Science Education: Earth, Space, and Environmental Science (3). Explores current reforms in science education through an examination of critical topics in earth-space science.

779 Big Ideas in Science Education (3). Through investigations, research, and guest speakers, this course engages students in discussions about teaching science in conjunction with issues of technology and society.

782 Behavioral Support Techniques (3). Emphasizes effective behavior management and applied behavior analysis techniques for intervening in the environments of exceptional children to increase learning.

789 Designing Problem Tasks for Mathematics (1-3). Focuses on the analysis and construction of mathematics instructional activities.

792 Problem-Based Learning in Mathematics (1-3). Focuses on the analysis and construction of mathematics instructional activities: tasks, problems, and materials with which students and teachers engage.

794 Developing Mathematical Knowledge (3). Designed to help teachers think through the major mathematical ideas of the curriculum and to examine how students develop these ideas.

810 Culturally Responsive Teaching (2). This course initiates thoughtful discussion of race and culture in our schools by exploring history, identity, and issues in academic achievement.