Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages
and Literatures

www.unc.edu/depts/gsll

CLAYTON KOELB, Chair

Carolina-Duke Graduate Program in German Studies

www.german.trinity.duke.edu/carolina-duke-grad

ERIC DOWNING (UNC) and ANN MARIE RASMUSSEN (Duke), Directors of Graduate Study

Professors

William Donahue (20) (Duke) 19th- and 20th-Century German Literature and Culture, Holocaust Studies, Politics and Literature, Contemporary German Literature and Culture

Eric Downing (2) (UNC) 18th-to-20th-Century Narrative Fiction, Literary Theory, Realism and Aestheticism

Jonathan Hess (3) (UNC) 18th-Century Studies, German-Jewish Cultural History, Aesthetics and Literary Theory, Philosophy and Literature

Clayton Koelb (4) (UNC) Modern Literature (Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka), Literary Theory, Philosophy and Aesthetics, Comparative Literature

Thomas Pfau (24) (Duke) Romanticism, 19th-Century Literature, Critical Theory, Literary History and Criticism, English Literature

David Pike (8) (UNC) 20th-Century Literature, East German and Soviet Culture and Politics

Ann Marie Rasmussen (25) (Duke) Medieval Literature and Culture, Gender Studies, Manuscript Studies, Poetics

Paul T. Roberge (9) (UNC) Historical Linguistics, Older Germanic Dialects, Comparative Germanic Grammar, Pidgins and Creoles, Afrikaans, Language, Ethnicity, and Politics

Associate Professors

Ruth von Bernuth (12) (UNC) Early Modern German Literature and Culture, Yiddish Studies, Disability Studies

Richard Langston (6) (UNC) Postwar and Contemporary Literature, Avant-Garde Studies, Popular Culture and Literature, Literary and Cultural Theory

Associate Professor of the Practice

Ingeborg Walther (26) (Duke) Applied Linguistics, Second Language Acquisition, Pedagogy, 20th-Century Literature

Assistant Professors

Kata Gellen (30) (Duke) German Modernism; Film; Fin-de-Siècle and Postwar Austrian Literature, German-Jewish Studies

Priscilla Layne-Kopf (UNC) 20th- and 21st-Century Literature, Film and Music, (Post)Subculture Studies, Multiculturalism, Afro-German History and Culture, and Gender Studies

Jakob Norberg (23) (Duke) Postwar Literature and Society, 20th-Century Austrian Literature, Political Theory, the Public Sphere

Inga Pollmann (UNC) Film and Media Theory and History, Early Cinema, German Cinema, Film and Science, Aesthetic and Critical Theory

Gabriel Trop (11) (UNC) 18th-Century Studies, Poetry and Poetics, Romanticism, Philosophy and Aesthetics

Assistant Professor of the Practice

Corinna Kahnke (21) (Duke) Pedagogy; 20th-/21st-Century Literature, Popular Culture, Literature and Film, Women, Gender and Queer Studies

Senior Lecturer

Christina Wegel (13) (UNC) Pedagogy, Theater Productions and Music in the Foreign Language Classroom, Drama and Theater, Performance Studies

Lecturer (Part Time)

Sandra Summers (18) (UNC) Business German

Adjunct Professor

Jochen Vogt (33) (Duke) Early Modern German Literature, "Goethezeit," 20th-Century Culture and Literature; Hermeneutics and Narratology, Literature, Journalism, and the Media, International Crime Literature, Pedagogy

Adjunct Associate Professors

Helga Bister (15) (UNC) Germanic Linguistics, Dialectology, Contact and Sociolinguistics, Applied Linguistics

Norman Keul (31) (Duke) Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Linguistics, Literary History and Criticism

Adjunct Assistant Professors

Tanya Kinsella (16) (UNC) Languages Across the Curriculum, Language Pedagogy, Early German Cinema, 19th- and 20th-Century Narrative, Aesthetics

Heidi Madden (32) (Duke) 19th Century, Comparative Literature and Theory

Dan Thornton (19) (UNC) Postwar German and Austrian Literature, Expressionism, Neue Sachlichkeit, Golden Age and 20th-Century Dutch Literature, Holocaust Studies, Jewish Literature in the Diaspora

Professors Emeriti

Siegfried Mews (UNC)

James Rolleston (Duke)

Christoph E. Schweitzer (UNC)

Sidney R. Smith (UNC)

Petrus W. Tax (UNC)

Associate Professor Emeritus

Walter K. Francke (UNC)

Assistant Professor Emeritus

Helga Bessent (Duke)

Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures

CHRISTOPHER R. PUTNEY, Director

Associate Professors

Radislav Lapushin (14) Russian Literature

Hana Pichova (18) Czech Literature

Christopher R. Putney (12) Russian Literature, Medieval Slavic Culture

Assistant Professors

Stanislav Shvabrin Russian Literature (22)

Ewa Wampuszyc (21) Polish Literature

Senior Lecturer

Eleonora Magomedova (20) Russian Language

Professors Emeriti

Madeline G. Levine

Vasa D. Mihailovich

Peter Sherwood

Associate Professors Emeriti

Lawrence Feinberg

Ivana Vuletic

The Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures offers a Ph.D. in German studies in conjunction with Duke University The Carolina-Duke graduate program in German studies is a fully merged graduate program that draws on one of the largest German studies faculties in the country, as well as on the considerable library holdings of each institution. Students apply to a single program and graduate with a diploma bearing the names of both Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The program features a combination of disciplinary rigor and interdisciplinary flexibility that recognizes the fundamental interrelation of all the cultural expressions of societies where the German language is spoken. Taking full advantage of the intellectual, educational, and cultural resources of two great universities, the program offers an attractive combination of individual attention in small classes and a close connection to the broader communities of literature, cultural studies, and German studies at Duke University and at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The core German studies faculty represents all branches of research in the field, including medieval studies, gender and sexuality studies, literary theory and poetics, European intellectual history, modernism, realism, German-Jewish studies, Holocaust studies, politics and culture in the 20th century, film and media studies, and contemporary society. Faculty engage in innovative, interdisciplinary teaching and research projects involving other departments and programs and support close intellectual ties with major German universities.

Students take courses full time in their first year of study; in subsequent years they acquire pedagogical training and teaching experience at both a private (Duke University) and a public (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) university. Multiple program options are available to students, from the study of historical periods and genres (medieval to contemporary) to literary criticism and theory. Interdisciplinary work is strongly encouraged.

Admission is competitive and limited to no more than seven students a year. Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are committed to offering five years of full funding, including tuition, to students in good standing in the program.

Note: The previous Ph.D. programs in German studies at Duke University and in Germanic languages at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill no longer admit new students.

Admissions Requirements

We seek applicants who demonstrate academic excellence, and we welcome applicants from diverse academic and cultural backgrounds. A bachelor's degree or the equivalent is required, generally in German studies or a related field. All applications are routed through the UNC Graduate School. Please read UNC's admissions instructions at gradschool.unc.edu/admissions for detailed information about the application process and requirements. Questions regarding translation issues and foreign degrees and transcripts should be directed to gsll@unc.edu.

Application Deadline

Applicants are strongly encouraged to complete their applications by December 8 and must meet all posted deadlines at gradschool.unc.edu/admissions.

Course of Study

  1. Five core courses: Foreign Language Pedagogy, Theories, and Practices; Cultural Foundations in German Studies, to 1800; Cultural Foundations in German Studies, 1800 to the Present; Middle High German; and German Linguistics or History of the German language. Incoming students who have satisfactorily completed equivalent graduate courses may be exempted by the directors of graduate studies and graduate advising (DGS) from one or more of the required courses.

  2. Students are required to take two courses outside the German studies program that complement the students' areas of interest in an interdisciplinary fashion. In their first semester students take all their course work in the program. In subsequent semesters, students may take one course per semester outside the program. All courses taken outside the program must be approved by the directors of graduate study.

  3. A total of 16 courses (including those enumerated above), two of which may be credit for work on the dissertation.

  4. A Ph.D. preliminary exam, normally by the end of the third year.

  5. An oral dissertation defense, normally by the end of the fifth year.

In addition, students are strongly encouraged to attend the program's monthly "works-in-progress" seminar, at which faculty, advanced graduate students, and guests present their current research.

Qualifying Requirements

  1. Satisfactory performance in all course work.

  2. Satisfactory performance in the teaching program.

  3. Demonstration via the Goethe C-1 Certificate of proficiency in German, including all four competencies (reading, writing, speaking, and listening), usually by the time the student enters the program or by the end of the first year of study.

  4. Demonstration of reading knowledge in a second foreign language relevant to the student's research, as approved by the DGS.

  5. All students will submit an annual plan of study form each year prior to completion of their preliminary exam. Doing so encourages students to reflect in broad terms on their current intellectual interests and possible future trajectories for these interests. Students can access this form on the program's Web site (www.german.trinity.duke.edu/carolina-duke-grad/) under the "Program of Study" tab just below the heading "Qualifying Requirements." The document is titled "Annual Plan of Study Report."

  6. Successful completion of the writing proficiency review, normally by the end of the second year of study. Normally, students will submit a revised paper originally written for one of their courses.

  7. Completion of the preliminary examination with a grade of "pass." The exam is normally taken in the third year of study.

  8. Successful completion of a dissertation chapter review, usually by the end of the fourth year of study.

Course Work

Checklist of 16 Courses

1. Foreign Language Pedagogy

2. Foundations, to 1800

3. Foundations, 1800 to present

4. Middle High German

5. German Linguistics or History of the German Language

6–7. Electives: Course from outside the program

8–14. Electives

15–16. Dissertation research

Courses outside German Studies: Students will normally take at least two courses outside of the German studies program. They are encouraged to take more as relevant to their interests and research.

Transfer Credit: Students coming in with an M.A. in German may, at the discretion of the directors of graduate studies, receive credit for coursework completed at their previous institution. A maximum of four courses can be remitted, and decisions about credit for prior course work will be made at the end of the students' first year in the Carolina–Duke graduate program.

Teaching

Teacher training is a central component of the Carolina–Duke graduate program in German studies. Both departments provide rigorous training in foreign language teaching, which includes an introduction to the interdisciplinary fields of applied linguistics and second language acquisition.

Teaching assistantships are normally available to students in their second through fifth years of study who continue to make satisfactory progress towards the completion of their degree.

It is crucial that teaching assistants (TAs) have highly advanced German language skills. During their first year, students' language proficiency in German will be evaluated. Only students who obtain a Goethe C-1 certificate will be asked to teach in the German language program. Students who do not possess the required proficiency in German will be expected to obtain this proficiency as soon as possible.

Beginning TAs generally teach first-year German and take the foreign language pedagogy course concurrently with their first semester of teaching. In later semesters, graduate students often teach second-year German, and occasionally more advanced undergraduate courses as well (German culture and society, advanced composition, introduction to German literature). In addition, students may serve as discussion leaders in larger lecture courses or serve as research assistants.

Reviews, Examinations, Dissertation

The Annual Plan of Study Report. All students will have to prepare and submit to the DGS an updated plan of study form by January 31 of years 1–3. Once the preliminary exam has been taken, this form is no longer required.

The Writing Proficiency Review. For the writing proficiency review–an hour-long oral review that takes place in the second year of study–students submit a scholarly paper, normally written in English and about 30 pages in length, which expands and reworks a paper written for one of their courses. The DGS sets up a committee of three faculty members, including the student's primary advisor, in consultation with the student.

Ph.D. Committee. For the purpose of the preliminary examination and the dissertation chapter review, the Ph.D. committee consists of four faculty members, including the faculty advisor, selected by the student in consultation with the faculty advisor and the DGS. A fifth faculty member will be added to the committee for the dissertation defense. Typically, faculty from the preliminary exam will also serve on the dissertation review and dissertation defense committees.

The Preliminary Examination. The purpose of the preliminary exam is to ensure competency in a teaching field and to establish a comprehensive intellectual framework for the dissertation project. The exam should be designed so that students approach their teaching interests and dissertation research in such a way as to engage a set of broad questions that will speak to scholars both within and outside the field of German studies. The exam centers on two equally weighted lists, one of which generally concerns itself with a broadly defined literary field, such as a recognized period, movement, or genre across several periods. The other list focuses on a more specific topic such as represents the student's projected area of doctoral research, it being understood that by "area" of doctoral research something broader is envisioned than a list of texts immediately pertinent to the "topic" of the dissertation. In keeping with the prevalent conception of German studies, at least one of the exam lists ought to have a substantive interdisciplinary component; this might include integrating a particular historical span of literary production with an adjacent and related area, such as visual culture, music, religion, cultural anthropology, literary or critical theory, media studies, philosophy, linguistics, or political theory.

The preliminary examination has both a written and an oral component. In consultation with their advisor and the DGS, students may choose either of the following formats for the written portion of the exam.

  1. An in-house, closed book exam. Students are given eight hours to respond to three out of a set of six exam questions assembled by the student's faculty advisor in consultation with committee members. The program will provide a computer for the exam and a quiet room; legible handwritten exams are also acceptable.

  2. A take-home, open-book exam, consisting of two substantial questions, one on each field, given every other day. Students are given 24 hours per question and are expected to submit an essay of roughly 15 pages on the assigned topic. Students are encouraged to make use of all available technology and of any materials, resources, databases, etc., they would normally consult while doing research.

The oral portion of the exam, with questions from all examiners, lasts about 90 minutes and generally takes place within two weeks of the written exam.

Dissertation Overview. A successful German studies Ph.D. dissertation must constitute a significant contribution to the field of German studies.

Following the preliminary exam in their third year of study, students are generally expected to complete their dissertation chapter review during their fourth year of study, and to defend their dissertation by the end of the fifth year.

Dissertation Chapter Review. In consultation with their advisor, students develop a dissertation project. Students submit to the dissertation review committee a chapter of 30–45 pages, a two-to-three-page overview of the dissertation, and a comprehensive bibliography. The oral review lasts approximately 1–2 hours.

Dissertation Defense. When the student and the primary advisor are satisfied that a defensible draft is complete, they will offer it to the members of the committee for final approval and set a date for the final examination (also known as the dissertation defense). The defense will usually be held as soon after submission of the final draft as is practical and in keeping with University and Graduate School requirements.

Study and Research Abroad

Students are strongly encouraged to study and conduct research abroad as an integral part of their graduate work. Both Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have strong, long-standing partnerships with German universities.

Duke offers student exchanges with the Free University of Berlin and the University of Potsdam, programs in which graduate students in German studies regularly participate. Additionally, Duke University's Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures has initiated a graduate student exchange with the University of Duisburg-Essen, which typically takes the American graduate students to Essen for four weeks of intensive study in May or June, with a corresponding visit of German students to Durham in September. Finally, select graduate students will be invited to serve as mentors, instructors, and/or program assistants in the undergraduate Duke study abroad summer program in Berlin.

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has partnerships with German universities, including exchanges with Göttingen, Tübingen, and the state of Baden-Württemberg. Its German department has a TA exchange with the University of Tübingen, annually sending one graduate student to Tübingen to teach English and pursue further graduate studies.

Further, graduate students in German at Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have a strong track record for successful DAAD and Fulbright fellowships for study abroad.

German

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates

GERM

400 Advanced German Grammar (3). Prerequisites, GERM 302 and 303. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. A study of current German structure and usage. Course strengthens the writing of graduate students and helps them confront the problems most frequently faced in speaking and teaching.

493 Internship in German (3). Prerequisite, GERM 303. This course enables a student to earn a maximum of three credit hours for a faculty-supervised internship directly related to the study of German literature or culture, or that uses the German language in day-to-day conduct of business in a German-speaking environment.

500 History of the German Language (3). Prerequisites, GERM 302 and 303. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. Development of phonology and morphosyntax from ancient times to present. Political, social, and literary forces influencing the language.

501 German Linguistics (3). Prerequisites, GERM 302 and 303. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. LING 101 recommended for undergraduates. Introduction to formal analysis of German grammar (phonology, morphophonemics, prosodics, morphology, syntax) within the framework of generative grammar.

502 Middle High German (3). Prerequisites, GERM 302 and 303. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. Introduction to medieval German language and literature. Readings in medieval German; lectures in English.

505 Early New High German (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Reading and linguistic analysis of Early New High German texts, with study of phonology, morphology, and syntax. On demand.

508 Old High German (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Reading and linguistic analysis of Old High German texts, with study of phonology, morphology, and syntax; comparison of the various dialects with other older dialects of Germanic. On demand.

511 Old Saxon (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Reading and linguistic study of biblical texts (Heliand, Genesis) in Old Saxon, with study of phonology, morphology, and syntax; comparison with Old English, Old High German, and other Germanic dialects. On demand.

514 Old Norse I (Old Icelandic) (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Reading and linguistic analysis of Old Norse (Old Icelandic) texts, with study of phonology, morphology, and syntax; comparison with other older dialects of Germanic. On demand.

515 Old Norse II (Old Icelandic) (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Continuation of GERM 514. On demand.

517 Gothic (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Reading and linguistic analysis of Gothic biblical texts, with study of phonology, morphology, and syntax; comparison with other older dialects of Germanic. On demand.

520 Stylistics: Theory and Practice (3). Prerequisites, GERM 302 and 303. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. LING 101 recommended for undergraduates. Study of stylistic theories and practices in literature and linguistics, analysis of a large variety of texts, written exercises, training in the use of stylistic devices.

521 Variation in German (3). Prerequisites, GERM 302 and 303. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. LING 101 recommended for undergraduates. Major topics in sociolinguistics: development of the German language, traditional dialects, variation in contemporary speech, German as a minority language (Alsace, Belgium), German outside of Germany (Austria, Switzerland, Luxemburg, Liechtenstein).

545 Problems in Germanic Linguistics (3). Prerequisites, GERM 302 and 303. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. LING 101 recommended for undergraduates. Special problems will be selected for intensive investigation. Subject matter of the course will be adapted to the particular interests of the students and instructor.

590 Topics in Germanic Linguistics (3). Prerequisites, GERM 302 and 303. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. LING 101 recommended for undergraduates.

601 Elementary German for Graduate Students (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. With GERM 602, a two-semester sequence designed as preparation for the reading knowledge examination for higher degrees in the humanities, social sciences, physical sciences, etc.

602 Elementary German for Graduate Students, Continued (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Continuation of GERM 601.

605 Comparative Germanic Grammar (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. LING 101 recommended for undergraduates. Analysis of phonological, morphological, and syntactic development from Indo-European to the older stages of Germanic dialects.

615 Cultural Foundations in German Studies, to 1800 (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. First part of a two-semester sequence offering students a comprehensive, text-based survey of German literary history from the High Middle Ages to the present.

616 Cultural Foundations in German Studies, 1800 to Present (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Second part of a two-semester sequence offering students a comprehensive, text-based survey of German literary history from the High Middle Ages to the present.

625 Early Modern Literature (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. German literature of the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries. Close readings, lectures, and discussions of representative texts.

630 18th-Century Literature (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Literature in the Age of Enlightenment. Close readings, lectures, and discussions of representative texts.

640 Early 19th-Century Literature (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Literature of the Romantic period. Close readings, lectures, and discussions of representative texts.

645 Later 19th-Century Literature (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Literature of Realism, Naturalism, and related movements. Close readings, lectures, and discussions of representative texts.

650 Early 20th-Century Literature (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Major figures of the period from the turn of the century to World War II. Close readings, lectures, and discussions of representative texts.

655 Later 20th-Century Literature (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Literature since World War II in both the Federal Republic and the former GDR. Close readings, lectures, and discussions of representative texts.

683 Moving-Image Avante-Gardes and Experimentalism (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 159, COMM 140, or ENGL 142. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. History and theory of international avant-garde and experimentalist movements in film, video, intermedia, multimedia, and digital formats. Content and focus may vary from semester to semester.

685 Early 21st-Century German Literature (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Literature since German unification in 1989. Close readings, lectures, and discussions of representative texts.

691H Honors Course (3). Permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Majors only. Reading and special studies under the direction of a faculty member.

692H Honors Course (3). Permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Majors only. Reading and preparation of an essay under the direction of a faculty member, designed to lead to the completion of the honors thesis.

693H Honors Seminar (3). Permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Majors only. Introduction to research techniques and preparation of an essay, designed to lead to the completion of the honors thesis.

Courses for Graduate Students

GERM

700 Foreign Language Pedagogy: Theories and Practice (3). For prospective teachers of German. Required of all teaching assistants.

703 Advanced Topics in Foreign Language Pedagogy (3). Prerequisite, GERM 700. This seminar provides experienced teaching assistants the opportunity to revisit the fundamentals in foreign language pedagogy while exploring in greater depth advanced issues like content-based instruction, technology, and supervising.

705 Essay Course (1). Must be taken with a German Department course numbered 620–689. Courses numbered 620–689 may be taken in conjunction with GERM 705 for one additional credit hour. German Department graduate students only. Requires a term paper.

706 Topics in Literary Theory (3). Literary and cultural theory with a German accent. Topics may include hermeneutics, Frankfurt School, reception theory, psychoanalysis, new historicism, and other strains of contemporary theory relevant to German studies.

820 Topics in Medieval Literature (3). Selected topics in medieval literature. Topics will vary by offering.

825 Topics in Early Modern Literature (3). Selected topics in early modern literature. Topics will vary by offering.

830 Topics in 18th-Century Literature (3). Selected topics in 18th-century literature. Topics will vary by offering.

840 Topics in Early 19th-Century Literature (3). Selected topics in early 19th-century literature. Topics will vary by offering.

845 Topics in Later 19th-Century Literature (3). Selected topics in later 19th-century literature. Topics will vary by offering.

850 Topics in Early 20th-Century Literature (3). Selected topics in early 20th-century literature. Topics will vary by offering.

855 Topics in Later 20th-Century Literature (3). Selected topics in later 20th-century literature. Topics will vary by offering.

860 Topics in Aesthetics and Criticism (3). Selected topics in aesthetics and criticism. Topics will vary by offering.

861 Topics in Literary Genres (3). Explores issues associated with various literary genres across various literary periods.

865 Topics in German Cultural Studies (3). Selected topics in German cultural studies. Topics will vary by offering.

870 Topics in Gender Studies (3). Selected topics in gender studies. Topics will vary by offering.

875 Topics in German Jewish Studies (3). Selected topics in German Jewish studies. Topics will vary by offering.

880 Topics in German Cinema (3). Selected topics in German cinema. Topics will vary by offering.

889 Special Topics in German Literature, Culture, Film: Compact Seminar (3). An intensive seven-week seminar to be offered exclusively during fall semesters, this graduate-level course is taught by a distinguished short-term scholar with expertise in German literature, film or culture who is visiting from a German-speaking country.

896 Independent Readings (1–12). Permission of the instructor and the director of graduate studies. Special readings and research in a selected field or topic outside the scope of current course offerings.

980 Seminar in German Literature (3).

985 Seminar in German Linguistics (3).

992 Master's (Non-Thesis) (3). Students enrolled in the Carolina-Duke Graduate Program in German Studies will enroll in this course during the semester in which they undergo the Writing Proficiency Review.

994 Doctoral Research and Dissertation (3).

Duke German Studies Courses

(Please also check the Duke University course catalog at registrar.duke.edu/courses-classroom/course-catalog)

499S Seminar in German Studies (3). Review of current debates and historical perspectives in the German cultural field, structured through contributing disciplines: social and economic history, political theory and history, literature, fine arts, music, philosophy, and religion. Team-taught, involving a wide range of faculty in the German Studies Program. Taught in English.

532S Fin-De-Siècle and Interwar Vienna: Politics, Society, and Culture (HISTORY 532S) (3). Advanced undergraduate and graduate colloquium and research seminar focusing on the cultural milieu of fin-de-siècle and interwar Vienna. Readings in the Austro-Marxists, the Austrian School of Economics, Freud, Kraus, the Logical Positivists, Musil, Popper, and Wittgenstein. Monographs on the Habsburg Empire, fin-de-siècle culture and technology, Viennese feminism, Austrian socialism, philosophy of science, literature and ethics, and the culture of the Central European émigrés.

560 History of the German Language (LINGUIST 560, MEDREN 607) (3). Phonology, morphology, and syntax of German from the beginnings to the present.

561S Second Language Acquisition Theory and Practice (LINGUIST 561S) (3). Overview of current research in the fields of second language acquisition and foreign language pedagogy, and its implications for the teaching of the German language, literature, and culture at all levels. Readings and discussions on competing theories of language acquisition and learning, issues of cultural identity and difference, learner styles, and the teaching of language as culture; training in contemporary teaching techniques and approaches.

575S Hegel's Political Philosophy (PHIL 536S, POLSCI 676S) (3). Within context of Hegel's total philosophy, an examination of his understanding of phenomenology and the phenomenological basis of political institutions and his understanding of Greek and Christian political life. Selections from Phenomenology, Philosophy of History, and Philosophy of Right. Research paper required.

576S Nietzsche's Political Philosophy (PHIL 537S, POLSCI 577S) (3). Study of the thinker who has, in different incarnations, been characterized as the prophet of nihilism, the destroyer of values, the father of fascism, and the spiritual source of postmodernism. An examination of his philosophy as a whole in order to come to terms with its significance for his thinking about politics.

580S Music in Literature and Philosophy (English 580S) (3).

586S Literary Guide to Italy (AMI 640S, ITALIAN 586S, LIT 542S) (3). A journey of Italy through literary, cinematic, and musical texts through Italy's sights and customs, as well as the place of Italy, both the real and imagined, in the aesthetics of the Grand Tour. Taught in English.

590S Special Topics (3). Special topics in German literature and cultural studies. Taught in English.

610S Introduction to Medieval German: The Language of the German Middle Ages and Its Literature (MEDREN 610S) (3). Basic reading skills in the medieval German language (Middle High German) developed by working with literary texts in their original idiom. Canonical texts such as courtly love poetry (Walther von der Vogelweide), Arthurian romance (Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram), and heroic epic (Nibelungenlied). Understanding manuscript culture, philological inquiry, medieval intellectual practices, relationship between learned Latin culture and educated vernacular cultures. Research paper required. Readings and discussion in German.

690 Special Topics in German Literature and Culture (3). Topics vary by semester.

690S Special Topics in German Literature and Cultural Studies (3).

700S German Pedagogy (3). Overview of current research in the fields of second language acquisition and foreign language pedagogy, and its implications for the teaching of the German language, literature, and culture at all levels. Readings and discussions on competing theories of language acquisition and learning, issues of cultural identity and difference, learner styles, and the teaching of language as culture; training in contemporary teaching techniques and approaches.

701 German Studies: Theory and Practice (3). German studies at the intersection of various discourses (such as feminism, psychoanalysis, new historicism), questioning traditional concepts such as national identity, history, and language. Interdisciplinary issues may include: the relationship of literature, the unconscious and technology; the cinematic representation of Nazi history; architecture, monuments, and ‘‘German'' space. Texts might include works by Kafka, Freud, Marx, Spengler, and Schinkel as well as texts by individuals whose work has been excluded from more traditional ‘‘Germanistik'' courses.

721S Sex, Gender, and Love in Medieval German Literature (3). Historical contexts for emergence of courtly love and the role of desire and interpretation in Gottfried von Strassburg's Tristan und Isolde, courtly love lyric, ‘maere.'

740S Introduction to Goethe (3). Major works of lyric, narrative, drama, and theory, throughout Goethe's career. Readings and discussions in German.

745S Goethe's Faust (3). Goethe's masterpiece and life's work, conceived as a summation of Western literature and mythology for the modern age. Readings and discussions in German.

790-1 Topics in Literary Theory (3). Literary theories and methods in their history and philosophical contexts. Issues include canonicity, German identity debates, and the claims of aesthetic language.

790-2 Topics in Literary History (3). Relations between an established German literature and its competing cultural centers; classical and popular cultures, literary conventions, and nonliterary discourses (religious, national, scientific), the construction of Austrian and Swiss traditions.

790-3 Topics in Genre Theory (3). The construction of German literature through generic frameworks: Minnesang, epic, baroque lyric and drama, classical ballad, folksong, Bildungsroman, expressionist film, others.

801S The Discipline of Germanistik: A Historical Survey (3). A study of trends in scholarly criticism within the context of German culture and politics beginning in the 1810s with the origins of Germanistik as a university discipline. Topics may include: the invention of philology and the romantic enterprise; positivism and Geistesgeschichte; the politics of Germanistik, 1933–45; Germanistik in Europe and the United States after 1945.

810S Germanic Seminar (3).

995S Graduate Dissertation Colloquium (3). The course will probe the complexities of advanced research from several perspectives: the opening up or extension of a specific scholarly field; the articulation of results in a broad professional context, including publication; the translation of personal explorations into pedagogical assets. German studies students will present dissertation chapters; German studies faculty will give guest talks surveying their own work, its interdisciplinary implications and the goal of synthesizing research and teaching.

Dutch

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates

DTCH

402 Elementary Dutch (3). Rapid introduction to modern Dutch with emphasis on all fundamental components of communication.

403 Intermediate Dutch (3). Focuses on increased skills in speaking, listening, reading, global comprehension, and communication. Emphasis on reading and discussion of longer texts.

404 Advanced Intermediate Dutch (3). Aims to increase proficiency in language skills (reading, speaking, writing) and is constructed around a series of themes meant to introduce students to Dutch society, culture, and history.

405 Topics in Dutch Culture: A Literary Survey (3). Prerequisite, DTCH 404. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Ability to read and speak Dutch at intermediate to advanced level recommended. Introduction to Dutch literature from Middle Ages to the present. Survey of topics in Dutch culture.

Slavic

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates

SLAV

405 Introduction to Slavic Linguistics (3). The phonological and morphological history of Slavic languages from the late Indo-European to the split of the common Slavic linguistic unity.

463 Medieval Slavic Culture (RELI 463) (3). Survey of medieval Slavic culture, beginning with Christianization in the ninth and 10th centuries. Themes include Byzantine missions, the replacement of paganism with Christianity, the oral traditions, and Slavic literary relations. Readings in English for non-Slavic concentrators.

464 Imagined Jews: Jewish Themes in Polish and Russian Literature (JWST 464) (3). Explores the fictional representation of Jewish life in Russia and Poland by Russian, Polish, and Jewish authors from the 19th century to the present. Readings in English for non-Slavic concentrators.

465 Literature of Atrocity: The Gulag and the Holocaust in Russia and Eastern Europe (JWST 465, PWAD 465) (3). Literary representation in fiction, poetry, memoirs, and other genres of the mass annihilation and terror in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union under the Nazi and Communist regimes. Readings in English for non-Slavic concentrators.

467 Language and Political Identity (PWAD 467) (3). This course examines the roles of language policy and linguistic controversies in determining national identity and fueling political polarization. It focuses primarily on western and eastern Europe and Central Asia.

469 Coming to America: The Slavic Immigrant Experience in Literature (JWST 469) (3). Fictional and autobiographical expressions of the Slavic and East European immigrant experience in the 20th century. Readings include Russian, Polish, Jewish, and Czech authors from early 1900s to present. Readings in English for non-Slavic concentrators.

470 20th-Century Russian and Polish Theater (3). A comparative survey of the major trends in 20th-century Russian and Polish dramaturgy and theatrical production, with attention to aesthetic, professional, and political connections between the two. Readings in English for non-Slavic concentrators.

490 Topics in Slavic Culture (3). Comparative study of topics in non-Russian Slavic literatures and culture not covered in any other course. Specific topics will vary and will be announced in advance. Taught in English. Some readings in the target language(s) for qualified students.

500 Old Church Slavonic (3). An introduction to the language of the oldest Slavic texts. Translation, grammatical analysis, comparison of texts.

560 Reading Other Cultures: Issues in Literary Translation (CMPL 560) (3). Permission of the instructor. Reading knowledge of a language other than English recommended. Starting from the proposition that cultural literacy would be impossible without reliance on translations, this course addresses fundamental issues in the practice, art, and politics of literary translation.

580 East European Literary Criticism (3). Survey of 20th-century Slavic literary criticism. Russian formalists, Bakhtin and his circle, Czech structuralists, Soviet semiotics. Emphasis on influence of Slavic criticism on development of Western literary criticism.

691H Honors Reading Course (3). Slavic and East European languages and cultures majors only. Research and writing of an honors thesis on an agreed-upon topic not covered by scheduled courses, under the direction of departmental advisors.

692H Honors Reading Course (3). Slavic and East European languages and cultures majors only. Research and writing of an honors thesis on an agreed-upon topic not covered by scheduled courses, under the direction of departmental advisors.

Courses for Graduate Students

SLAV

700 Proseminar in Slavic Literature (1). Graduate students only. A seminar that acquaints graduate students with the basic resources for conducting research in their field and trains them in various critical approaches to the analysis of Slavic literatures.

740 Reading Course (1–21). Permission of the instructor. Special readings and research in a selected field or topic under the direction of a faculty member.

751 East Slavic Linguistics (3). Prerequisite, SLAV 405. Required preparation, four years of study of any East Slavic language. An examination of the linguistic history and contemporary dialectology of the East Slavic languages (Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian) with emphasis on Russian.

752 West Slavic Linguistics (3). Prerequisites, SLAV 405 and/or 500. Required preparation, one year of any West Slavic language. An examination of the linguistic history and contemporary dialectology of the West Slavic languages (Polish, Czech, Slovak, Upper and Lower Sorbian, Kashubian, Slovincian, Pomeranian).

753 South Slavic Linguistics (3). Prerequisite, SLAV 405. Required preparation, one year of study of any South Slavic language. An examination of the linguistic history and contemporary dialectology of the living South Slavic languages (Slovenian, Serbo-Croatian, Macedonian, Bulgarian).

760 Topics in Slavic Sociolinguistics (3). A seminar that acquaints graduate students with the variety of approaches to sociolinguistics research, with particular emphasis on the extant literature in Slavic sociolinguistics, language and identity, language and the nation.

905 Seminar in Slavic Linguistics (3). Selected issues in Slavic synchronic and diachronic linguistics.

960 Pre-Dissertation Research (3).

993 Master's Research and Thesis (3).

994 Doctoral Research and Dissertation (3).

Russian

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates

RUSS

400 The Evolution of Russian (3). This course traces the development of Russian from late common Slavic to contemporary Russian. Consideration is given to linguistic developments as well as cultural, social, and historical circumstances shaping contemporary Russian.

405 The Structure of Modern Russian (3). Prerequisite, RUSS 400. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. For students who want a systematic understanding of the language. Synchronic analysis of contemporary standard Russian phonology, morphology, morphophonemics, semantics, and syntax.

406 Advanced Russian Grammar (3). Prerequisite, RUSS 204. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A comprehensive review of Russian grammar on an advanced level, emphasizing reading and writing skills.

407 Advanced Russian Grammar (3). Prerequisite, RUSS 406. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A comprehensive review of Russian grammar on an advanced level, emphasizing reading and writing skills.

411 Advanced Russian Conversation and Composition (3). Prerequisite, RUSS 322 or 407. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Designed to develop conversational and writing skills in a variety of situations and subjects.

412 Advanced Russian Conversation and Composition (3). Prerequisite, RUSS 411. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Designed to develop conversational and writing skills in a variety of situations and subjects.

413 Russian Stylistics (3). Prerequisite, RUSS 412. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Advanced Russian conversation and composition, with appropriate grammatical and stylistic explanations. Can be taken repeatedly for credit, but only counts once toward degree requirements.

414 Russian Stylistics (3). Prerequisite, RUSS 413. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Continuation of Russian Stylistics at a more advanced level.

431 Dandies and Dead Souls: Russian Literature and Culture, 1800–1850 (3). A survey of major works of Russian literature and culture in the first half of the 19th century. Readings in English translation. Some readings in Russian for qualified students.

432 Great Novels and Cursed Questions: Russian Literature and Culture, 1850–1881 (3). A survey of major works of Russian literature and culture in the Golden Age, an era of sociopolitical reform. Readings in English translation. Some readings in Russian for qualified students.

441 From Decadence to Revolution: Russian Literature and Culture, 1881–1945 (3). A survey of major works of fin-de-siècle Russian and early Soviet literature and culture. Readings in English translation. Some readings in Russian for qualified students.

442 From Cold War to Capitalism: Russian Literature and Culture, 1945–Present (3). A survey of major works of Russian literature and culture from 1945 to the present. Readings in English translation. Some readings in Russian for qualified students.

450 The Russian Absurd: Text, Stage, Screen (3). Examines "The Absurd" in Russian literature and culture as it developed from the 19th century to the present. Through works by important Russian writers and representative films students encounter facets of "The Russian Absurd" viewed as literary, cultural, and social phenomena. Readings in Russian for majors, in English for nonmajors.

460 Russian Short Story (3). An introduction to the Russian short story. The readings, in English for nonmajors and in Russian for majors, include works from the 17th century to the present. Readings in Russian for majors, in English for nonmajors.

462 Russian Poetry of the 19th Century (3). Readings and lecture on 19th-century Russian poetry. Readings in Russian.

463 Russian Drama: From Classicism to Modernism (3). Survey of Russian drama as a literary and theatrical phenomenon from the end of the 18th to the beginning of the 20th century. Readings in English translation. Some readings in Russian for qualified students.

464 Dostoevsky (3). Study of major works of Dostoevsky and a survey of contemporary authors and literary trends relevant to his creative career. Readings in Russian for majors, in English for nonmajors.

465 Chekhov (3). Study of major works of Chekhov and survey of contemporary authors and literary trends relevant to his creative career. Readings in Russian for majors, in English for nonmajors.

469 Bulgakov (3). Study of major works of Mikhail Bulgakov, including The Master and Margarita, and a survey of contemporary Russian history and culture relevant to his creative career. Readings in English, in Russian for majors.

471 Gogol (3). Study of major works of N. V. Gogol and a survey of contemporary authors and literary trends relevant to his creative career. Lectures and seminar discussions. Readings in Russian for majors, in English for nonmajors.

473 Vladimir Nabokov (3). Exploration of Vladimir Nabokov's prose fiction written in Germany and America. Emphasis placed on the primary texts, but some secondary readings included. Movies based on Nabokov's novels will be viewed as well. Readings in Russian for majors, in English for nonmajors.

475 Literature of Russian Terrorism: Arson, Bombs, Mayhem (PWAD 475) (3). Literary representations of Russian revolutionaries and terrorists in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Readings by Dostoevsky, Chernyshevsky, Bely, Joseph Conrad, and by some of the terrorists themselves. Readings in English translation. Some readings in Russian for qualified students.

479 Tolstoy (3). Study of the major works of Tolstoy and a survey of contemporary authors and literary trends relevant to his creative career. Readings in Russian for majors, in English for nonmajors.

486 Contemporary Russian Women's Writing (WMST 486) (3). A study of Russian women's writing after World War II, including both fictional and propagandistic works analyzed in their sociopolitical context. Serves as an introduction to Russian women's studies. Readings in Russian for majors, in English for nonmajors.

490 Topics in Russian Culture (3). Study of topics in Russian literature and culture not currently covered in any other course. The specific topic will be announced in advance. Taught in English. Some readings in Russian for qualified students.

511 Russian Mass Media I (3). Prerequisites, RUSS 411 and 412. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. Module 1. Fifth-year Russian, intended to expand and master the knowledge of the language necessary for understanding deep ongoing changes in different spheres of Russian society.

512 Russian Mass Media II (3). Prerequisites, RUSS 411 and 412. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. Module 2. Fifth-year Russian, intended to expand and master the knowledge of the language necessary for understanding deep ongoing changes in different spheres of Russian society.

513 Russian Culture in Transition I (3). Prerequisite, RUSS 411. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Fifth-year Russian, to expand knowledge of the language necessary for understanding social changes that are taking place in Russian society, in literature, art, culture, and everyday human mentality.

514 Russian Culture in Transition II (3). Prerequisite, RUSS 412. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. RUSS 513 is not a prerequisite. Fifth-year Russian, continuing with the theme of RUSS 513 offered in the fall semester.

560 Russian Sentimentalism and Romanticism (3). Prerequisite, RUSS 407. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Survey of Russian sentimentalism and romanticism, with special attention to the intellectual currents of the period (ca. 1770 to 1850). Consideration of Western precursors (Rousseau, Sterne, Byron, et al.). Readings in Russian.

691H Honors Reading Course (3). Russian language and culture majors only. Researching and writing of an honors thesis on an agreed-upon topic not covered by scheduled courses, under the direction of departmental advisors.

692H Honors Reading Course (3). Russian language and culture majors only. Researching and writing of an honors thesis on an agreed-upon topic not covered by scheduled courses, under the direction of departmental advisors.

Courses for Graduate Students

RUSS

790 Teaching Methods and Materials (1). For prospective teachers of Russian. Required of all teaching assistants.

851 Pushkin (3). Study of major works of Pushkin.

859 Medieval and Baroque Russian Literature (3). Literature from the advent of literacy to the late 17th century. Lectures on and interpretations of literature of Kievan Rus' down to Grand Muscovy. Readings in English for non-Slavic concentrators.

860 Russian Literature of the 18th Century (3). A survey of major movements and genres from Prokopovich to Karamzin. Emphasis on Russian formulations of European models of neoclassicism, sentimentalism, and pre-Romanticism.

866 Russian Symbolism (3). Required preparation, reading knowledge of Russian or permission of the instructor. Introduction to the leading writers and works of the Symbolist movement in Russia.

867 Post-Symbolist Poetry (3). Required preparation, reading knowledge of Russian or permission of the instructor. A study of the major poetic works of Gumilev, Akhmatova, Mandelstam, Mayakovsky, Khlebnikov, Pasternak, Tsvetaeva.

892 Russian Versification (3). A study of technical problems and thematic aspects in the development of Russian poetry.

950 Seminar in Russian Literature (3). Permission of the instructor. Seminar on selected topics in Russian literature.

Czech

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates

CZCH

401 Elementary Czech (3). Pronunciation, structure of language, and reading in modern Czech.

402 Elementary Czech (3). Pronunciation, structure of language, and reading in modern Czech, continued.

403 Intermediate Czech (3). Continuation of proficiency-based instruction begun in Elementary Czech.

404 Intermediate Czech (3). Continuation of proficiency-based instruction begun in Elementary Czech, continued.

405 Advanced Czech (3). Advanced readings and discussion in Czech in humanities and social science topics.

406 Advanced Czech (3). Advanced readings and discussion in Czech in humanities and social science topics, continued.

411 Introduction to Czech Literature (3). Introduction to Czech literature with an emphasis on 19th- and 20th-century prose. Taught in English. Some readings in Czech for qualified students.

469 Milan Kundera and World Literature (CMPL 469) (3). This course traces Milan Kundera's literary path from his communist poetic youth to his present postmodern Francophilia. His work will be compared with those authors he considers his predecessors and influences in European literature. Taught in English. Some readings in Czech for qualified students.

490 Topics in Czech Culture (3). Study of topics in Czech and/or Slovak literature and culture not currently covered in any other course. The specific topic will be announced in advance. Taught in English. Some readings in Czech for qualified students.

Hungarian

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates

HUNG

401 Elementary Hungarian (3). Pronunciation, structure of language, and reading in modern Hungarian.

402 Elementary Hungarian (3). Pronunciation, structure of language, and reading in modern Hungarian, continued.

403 Intermediate Hungarian Language (3). Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction begun in Elementary Hungarian.

404 Intermediate Hungarian Language (3). Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction begun in Elementary Hungarian, continued.

405 Advanced Hungarian (3). Prerequisite, HUNG 404. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Advanced readings and discussion in Hungarian in humanities and social science topics.

406 Advanced Hungarian (3). Advanced readings and discussion in Hungarian in humanities and social science topics, continued.

407 The Structure of Modern Hungarian (3). Prerequisite, HUNG 401 or LING 101. Introduction to the phonology, morphology, and syntax of modern standard Hungarian, with emphasis on some of its distinctive typological features.

411 Introduction to Hungarian Literature (3). An introduction to Hungarian literature of the last five centuries through a selection of works in English translation, with supporting background materials including films (with English subtitles). Taught in English; some readings in Hungarian for qualified students.

490 Topics in Hungarian Culture (3). Study of topics in Hungarian literature and culture not currently covered in any other course. The specific topic will be announced in advance. Taught in English; some readings in Hungarian for qualified students.

Macedonian

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates

MACD

401 Elementary Macedonian (3). Pronunciation, structure of language, and reading in modern Macedonian.

402 Elementary Macedonian (3). Pronunciation, structure of language, and reading in modern Macedonian, continued.

403 Intermediate Macedonian (3). Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction begun in Elementary Macedonian.

404 Intermediate Macedonian (3). Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction begun in Elementary Macedonian, continued.

405 Advanced Macedonian (3). Advanced reading and discussion in Macedonian in humanities and social science topics.

406 Advanced Macedonian (3). Advanced reading and discussion in Macedonian in humanities and social science topics, continued.

Polish

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates

PLSH

401 Elementary Polish (3). Pronunciation, structure of language, and reading in modern Polish.

402 Elementary Polish (3). Pronunciation, structure of language, and reading in modern Polish, continued.

403 Intermediate Polish (3). Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction begun in Elementary Polish.

404 Intermediate Polish (3). Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction begun in Elementary Polish, continued.

405 Advanced Polish (3). Advanced readings and discussion in Polish on humanities and social science topics.

406 Advanced Polish (3). Advanced readings and discussion in Polish on humanities and social science topics, continued.

411 19th-Century Polish Literature and Culture (3). A survey of the major works of 19th-century Polish literature and culture in English translation. Some readings in Polish for qualified students.

412 20th-Century Polish Literature and Culture (JWST 412) (3). A survey of the major works of 20th-century Polish literature and culture in English translation. Some readings in Polish for qualified students.

490 Topics in Polish Culture (3). Study of topics in Polish literature and culture not currently covered in any other course. The specific topic will be announced in advance. Taught in English. Some readings in Polish for qualified students.

Serbian and Croatian

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates

SECR

401 Elementary Serbian and Croatian Language (3). Pronunciation, structure of the language, and readings in modern Serbian and Croatian language.

402 Elementary Serbian and Croatian Language (3). Pronunciation, structure of the language, and readings in modern Serbian and Croatian language, continued.

403 Intermediate Serbian and Croatian Language (3). Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction begun in Elementary Serbian and Croatian language.

404 Intermediate Serbian and Croatian Language (3). Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction begun in Elementary Serbian and Croatian language, continued.

405 Advanced Serbian and Croatian Language (3). Advanced readings and discussion in Serbian and Croatian language on humanities and social science topics.

406 Advanced Serbian and Croatian Language (3). Advanced readings and discussion in Serbian and Croatian language on humanities and social science topics, continued.

411 Introduction to Serbian and Croatian Literature (3). Introduction to Serbian and Croatian literature with an emphasis on 19th- and 20th-century prose. Taught in English. Some readings in Serbian and Croatian for qualified students.

490 Topics in South Slavic Culture (3). Study of topics in Serbian, Croatian, and other South Slavic literatures and cultures not currently covered in any other course. The specific topic will be announced in advance. Taught in English. Some readings in the target language for qualified students.