School of Journalism and
Mass Communication

www.jomc.unc.edu

SUSAN KING, Dean

Professors

Penelope Muse Abernathy (92), Knight Chair in Journalism and Digital Media Economics. Digital Media, Economics

Richard R. Cole (18) John Thomas Kerr Jr. Distinguished Professor. International Communication, Professional Journalism, Mass Communication and Society

James Hefner, Professor of the Practice of Journalism. Broadcast and Electronic Journalism

Ferrel Guillory, Professor of the Practice of Journalism; Director, Program on Southern Politics and Media and Public Life. Politics and the Media

Anne M. Johnston (50) James H. Shumaker Term Professor. Media Effects, Women and Media, Political Communication

Thomas R. Linden (58) Glaxo Wellcome Distinguished Professor of Medical Journalism. Medical Journalism

Cathy Packer (37) W. Horace Carter Distinguished Professor. Media Law and Ethics

Daniel Riffe (91) Richard Cole Eminent Professor. Media Processes and Production

Laura Ruel (73) Hugh Morton Distinguished Professor Visual Communication

JoAnn Sciarrino, Knight Chair, Digital Advertising and Marketing

Dulcie Straughan (36) James Howard and Hallie McClean Parker Distinguished Professor. Public Relations

John Sweeney (46) Distinguished Professor in Sports Communication. Advertising, Sports Marketing

Charles A. Tuggle (59) MA Program Director. Reese Felts Distinguished Professor. Broadcast and Electronic Journalism

Lucila Vargas (53) Julian W. Scheer Term Professor. International/Development Communication, Women and Media, Qualitative Methods

Jan Yopp (42) Dean, Summer School; Walter Spearman Professor. News-Editorial Journalism, Public Relations

Research Professor

Brian Southwell (47) Health Communication

Associate Professors

Debashis Aikat (55) Media Technology

Andy Bechtel (77) News-Editorial Journalism, Media Ethics

Lois Boynton (61) Public Relations, Ethics

Francesca Carpentier (80) Ph.D. Program Director. Electronic Journalism, Media Effects

George W. Cloud (41) News-Editorial Journalism

Paul Cuadros (86) News Reporting

Patrick Davison (62) Visual Communication

Barbara Friedman (71) News-Editorial Journalism, Media History

Rhonda Gibson (63) Print Journalism, Minorities and Media, Mass Communication Theory

Joe Bob Hester (64) Advertising

R. Michael Hoefges (70) Mass Communication Law, Advertising Law, Freedom of Information and Access Law, Privacy Issues

Heidi Hennink-Kaminski (82) Senior Associate Dean for Graduate Studies.. Advertising, Social Marketing

Seth Noar (25) Interdisciplinary Health Communication

Sriram Kalyanaraman (66) New Media and Media Effects

Chris Roush (67), Senior Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies and Walter E. Hussman Sr. Distinguished Scholar in Business Journalism; Business Journalism Director, Carolina Business News Initiative; News-Editorial Journalism; Business Reporting

Ryan Thornburg (87) News-Editorial Journalism

Clinical Associate Professor

Paul Jones, Director of ibiblio.org. Internet Issues and Applications (Digital Libraries, Electronic Publishing, Online News, Virtual Communities, Legal and Social Issues Relating to Networked Information and Access)

Assistant Professors

Spencer Barnes, Visual Communication

Nori Comello (98) Strategic Communication, Identity, and Health

David Cupp (81) Broadcast Journalism

Victoria Ekstrand, Media Law and Ethics

Daniel Kim, Advertising

Daniel Kreiss (99) Political Communication, New Media

Trevy McDonald (88) Diversity

Dana McMahan (90), Advertising

Terence Oliver (96) Visual Communication

Adam Saffer, Public Relations

Chad Stevens (94), Visual Communication

Lisa Villamil, Visual Communication

Lecturers

Jock Lauterer, Senior Lecturer. Director, Carolina Community Media Project. Community Journalism, News-Editorial Journalism

Paul O'Connor, News-Editorial Journalism

Professors Emeriti

John B. Adams

Harry Amana

Richard J. Beckman

Thomas A. Bowers

Jane D. Brown

Napoleon Byars

Queenie Byars

A. Richard Elam

Frank Fee

Robert F. Lauterborn

Raleigh Mann

Philip Meyer

James J. Mullen

Carol Reuss

Stuart Sechriest

Donald Shaw

Richard Simpson

Chuck Stone

Ruth Walden

The School of Journalism and Mass Communication offers programs leading to the Master of Arts in mass communication, the Master of Arts in technology and communication, and the doctor of philosophy in mass communication.

Admission

Applications are available via the Web through gradschool.unc.edu. Completed forms are submitted to The Graduate School. Its admissions decisions are based largely on recommendations from the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. The minimum criteria for admission to a graduate program in journalism and mass communication are:

In addition, international applicants must submit Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores or International English Language Testing System (IELTS), as well as the financial certificate required by The Graduate School.

International applicants must complete the International Student Data Form and Financial Certification Instructions/Worksheet (available in admission application) and must show proof of financial ability to pay for two years for the master's program and three years for the Ph.D. program. Applications will not be reviewed without these documents.

Applicants should be aware that the number of applications far exceeds the number of spaces available, and that many qualified applicants must be denied admission because of limited space in the program.

New students are admitted in fall semester only. The application deadline is generally the second Tuesday in January for the following fall, but the definitive deadline is not determined until early summer, before the application system opens for the year.

Financial Assistance

Roy H. Park Fellowships are available to seven to eight new doctoral students and 8 to 9 incoming master's students each year. These fellowships provide generous stipends, payment of tuition and fees, and health insurance for the student. The stipend for doctoral students each year is $20,500, and master's students receive a $14,000 annual stipend. Doctoral student funding is for three years, and master's student funding lasts for two years. Continuation of funding beyond the first year is dependent on satisfactory progress in the program. In return for this funding, doctoral and master's students must work as graduate assistants. These are 15-hour work weeks, and assignments vary according to the needs of the faculty and interest and skill levels of the students. The Roy H. Park Fellowships are available only to United States citizens. There is no special application for these fellowships. All U.S. citizens qualified for admission to the program are considered for Roy H. Park Fellowships. Other financial assistance available for graduate students includes the Richard Cole Eminent Professor Graduate Fellowship, which provides the same level of funding with the same work requirement as the Roy H. Park Ph.D. Fellowships; the Peter DeWitt Pruden Jr. and Phyllis Harrill Stancill Pruden Fellowship (for an incoming master's student), which provides the same level of funding with the same work requirement as the Roy H. Park Fellowships; and the Graduate Dean's Research Assistantship (work requirement of 15 hours per week), awarded each year to an incoming master's student with an interest in print journalism or public relations. The school also offers the William F. Clingman Award ($4,000–$8,000) for the study of ethics to continuing students and the $1,000 Tom Wicker Scholarship to continuing master's students interested in reporting careers. In addition, limited funds for dissertation or thesis research are available through the Minnie S. and Eli A. Rubinstein Awards and The Margaret Blanchard Dissertation Support Fund. Continuing MATC students may also be considered for academic scholarships.

The Master's Program

The master's program has three major tracks. The professional track is designed to prepare students for professional careers in public relations, advertising, journalism, and other mass communication fields. The mass communication track gives students the background needed for teaching or research. The Interdisciplinary Health Communication (IHC) track prepares students to effectively communicate with diverse audiences about health issues. In all tracks, students are taught to critically examine the role of media in society and are provided with a firm grounding in theory and analysis. By setting high standards for both scholarly and professional achievement, the school seeks to prepare graduates to be leaders and critical thinkers, no matter what career paths they might take.

The M.A. is designed to meet the needs of 1) holders of the bachelor's degree in fields other than journalism-mass communication who wish to enter the field, 2) journalists who want more education in a specialized field, 3) experienced journalists or communicators who wish to prepare themselves for teaching, 4) individuals primarily interested in education for media research, and 5) journalism-mass communication graduates who wish to continue their education and career development.

In other words, this is not strictly a professional master's program that aims to teach technical skills in writing, editing, photography, and graphic design. Nor is the focus solely academic and theoretical. Rather, the school seeks to achieve a balance.

Areas of Specialization

Early in the program, each master's student, with his or her advisor, chooses an area of specialization and selects courses that lead to a coherent goal. The area of specialization is usually determined by a career interest and includes courses numbered 400 and above both inside and outside the school. Students in the professional track take at least one 800-level seminar, and those in the mass communication track take two 800-level seminars. Students complete a traditional thesis or thesis project during the final semester of their coursework.

Some examples of specializations in the professional track (please visit jomc.unc.edu/academics/graduate-studies) for a complete listing of specializations):

Paths in the mass communication track can be just as diverse. Students learn the theory and research methods that they need to teach at a small college or to pursue a doctorate degree. Students can study mass communication law or history, media effects, new communication technologies, or international communication, among other subjects. Depending on the course of study they select, they may also be prepared for a variety of research positions in the public and private sectors. Students in this track do not take professional skills courses such as news writing and editing.

Students interested in mass communication law may want to consider the M.A./J.D. dual degree program. The program is intended for students with a variety of goals including those who plan to practice mass communication law, pursue academic careers in law and mass communication fields, pursue a Ph.D. degree in a related field or perhaps plan to practice professionally in a communication-related field such as journalism or strategic communication with a law-related emphasis. Information about the M.A./J.D. dual degree program can be obtained by visiting medialaw.unc.edu/for-students/dual-degree-program.

Requirements

Master's students must earn at least 36 credits for the professional track and the IHC track and 39 credits for the mass communication track (30 of which must be at the graduate level), which includes three credits for a thesis or nontraditional thesis option. Course requirements for the professional track are divided into five categories: required School of Journalism and Mass Communication courses (12 credits); School of Journalism and Mass Communication specialization (nine credits); advanced School of Journalism and Mass Communication courses (six credits): courses outside the School of Journalism and Mass Communication (six credits); and thesis (three credits). Course requirements for the mass communication track are divided into four categories: foundation courses (nine credits); required School of Journalism and Mass Communication courses (nine credits); Path (18 credits which are School of Journalism and Mass Communication courses and outside courses); and thesis (three credits). This includes a research methods course, generally JOMC 703 or 704, appropriate to the thesis or nontraditional thesis option. Two to four of the graduate-level courses should be taken from other University departments. Students may select from courses offered by other departments or schools at UNC–Chapel Hill, Duke University, and North Carolina State University.

All residential master's students must pass the school's usage and grammar test. This exam is a basic requirement for graduation for our undergraduate students and normally poses no major problems for graduate students. Information on the spelling and grammar test, including instructions on how to study for it, is included in the orientation packet sent to new students each summer.

Required Courses: All master's students must take Mass Communication Research Methods (JOMC 701) and Mass Communication Law (JOMC 740). Master's students in the mass communication sequence must also take Theories of Mass Communication (JOMC 705). In addition, all professional track master's students must take JOMC 753 Reporting and Writing News (except for strategic communication students who take JOMC 732, Public Relations Writing) and JOMC 782, Multimedia Storytelling (with the exception of students in the multimedia specialization).

If a student receives an L in any required course, he or she must pass a comprehensive examination given during the second semester. If the student fails the exam, he or she must retake the course the following fall. If the student again makes an L, he or she will not be allowed to continue in the program. In addition, if a student earns three Ls (9 credits) or an F in his or her courses, he or she will not be allowed to continue in the program.

Areas of Specialization courses: The master's program is designed to allow students, under the direction of their advisors, to design a course of study, or an area of specialization, that addresses their research and skills interests. Regardless of the area of specialization or path, each student must define a coherent theme connecting courses in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication and those outside the school. Those courses must be appropriate to the thesis or nontraditional thesis option. All students must pass the appropriate examinations, which include a comprehensive written examination covering the material in the student's path courses (given at the completion of course work), and an oral examination on the thesis or professional project, given by the student's thesis committee.

M.A. students have five calendar years from the date of first registration in the master's program to complete the master's program. Reapplication is required to continue pursuit of the degree if the five-year time limit expires. In extenuating circumstances, a student in good academic standing may petition for an extension for a definite, stated period of time (up to one year).

Thesis, Articles, or Project

In the mass communication track, students must do a traditional research thesis. In the professional track, students have the option of writing a thesis or presenting a professional-quality series of articles (JOMC 993) or project (JOMC 992). The series of articles or project requires the same effort and professionalism as the traditional thesis. In addition to the professional product itself, the nontraditional thesis option requires an extensive review of the literature and statement of methods.

Students enroll in Master's Thesis, JOMC 993, or Non-Traditional Thesis Option, JOMC 992, for three credits as they do the thesis, articles or project. A maximum of three thesis credits can be counted toward the credits required for the M.A.

Length of Program

Most students complete the master's program in two years, typically attending classes full-time during three consecutive semesters and completing the thesis, articles, or project in the fourth semester. Some students find it necessary to stay the summer after their second year to complete their theses, articles, or special projects. Although it is possible to complete the degree by taking courses part time, the school does not recommend it and generally admits no more than one part-time M.A. student per year.

Graduate Committee

To gain the most from the program, students should select a three-member advisory committee early. Led by a member of the school's graduate faculty who serves as the student's advisor, the committee acts as a resource as well as referee of the thesis, articles, or special project. One member of the committee should be a faculty member from outside the school with whom the student has taken a course.

Master of Arts in Technology and Communication

matc.jomc.unc.edu

Admission

The MATC application process is administered online by the UNC Graduate School at gradschool.unc.edu. This site allows you to complete and submit an application and supporting materials electronically. The link to the M.A. in technology and communication application is under degrees listed for "Journalism and Mass Communication." From the drop-down listing, select "Journalism and Mass Comm." Then select "Master of Arts Technology and Communication" to start an application.

The minimum criteria for admission to the M.A. in technology and communication are:

In addition, international applicants must submit Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores and the financial certificate as required by The Graduate School.

Applicants should be aware that the number of applications exceeds the number of spaces available and that qualified applicants may be rejected because of limited space in the program. New students are admitted only for the fall semester. The application deadline is in January for the following fall.

Overview of Program

Dramatic changes in the way news and information are created and delivered in today's wired world have left many media and communication professionals searching for ways to update their skills and knowledge. The M.A. in Technology and Communication is an online master's degree that focuses on interactive media, the Internet and digital economics, addressing issues that are reshaping media and communication in the 21st century. The MATC draws on the expertise of the school's acclaimed faculty to position students for leadership roles in digital media and Web-based communication.

Classes are taught online, allowing working professionals to advance their educations while maintaining their work and family responsibilities. Students travel to Chapel Hill twice: for a two-day orientation before starting the program and for a weeklong summer residency after completing the first year.

Curriculum

The Master of Arts in Technology and Communication offers a rigorous and unique curriculum, enabling communication professionals to address challenges and opportunities posed by technology. The MATC provides students with the knowledge and skills to solve communication problems using the new media tools that are transforming business practices. The program prepares students to take on leadership positions in new media, journalism, advertising, public relations and internal communication.

MATC courses are designed to take full advantage of the inherent benefits of online instruction by seamlessly integrating access to the Web-based content covered in the curriculum. The instruction methods used in the MATC perfectly complement the digital media focus of the curriculum.

All courses use an asynchronous course management system, which means students do not have to be online at the same time. MATC students are able to continue their careers and maintain their family commitments with the flexibility to complete course work around other activities.

The MATC admits annually one group of no more than 20 students. Each student group progresses through the program together over the course of two and a half years. Classes are small to simulate a seminar-like experience with an emphasis on interaction between faculty and students. Students take a set curriculum of nine courses and complete a final project and examination at the end of the second year. There are no electives.

Requirements

MATC students must earn 30 graduate-level credits, including three credits for a non-traditional thesis. There is a set curriculum, meaning there is a prescribed list of courses that are taken in order. The MATC has no electives.

Required Courses:

JOMC 711: Writing for Digital Media

JOMC 715: New Media and Society

JOMC 716: Research Methods and Applications

JOMC 717: Information Visualization

JOMC 718: Media Law for the Digital Age

JOMC 719: Leadership in Digital Media Economics

JOMC 720: Strategic Communication

CJOMC 721: Usability and Multimedia Design

JOMC 890: Digital Data and Analytics

JOMC 992: Non-Traditional Thesis

Other Requirements

Non-Traditional Thesis (Final Project)

Student work in the MATC culminates with enrollment in JOMC 992: Non-Traditional Thesis, a final project that includes:

The final project involves a study around an issue or challenge facing an organization or business with a digital media focus. It emphasizes both scholarly and practical application in line with the professional orientation of the MATC. The subject of the project may be the student's employer or may be selected based on the scope of the study.

Students complete the final project under the direction of a full-time School of Journalism and Mass Communication faculty member who serves as chairperson of the student's final project committee. Two additional faculty members and/or an industry professional join the chairperson on the committee.

Students enroll in Nontraditional Thesis Option, JOMC 992, following completion of their course work. A maximum of three thesis credits can be counted toward the 30 credits required for the M.A.T.C.

Length of Program

The MATC is designed to be completed in two and a half years on a part-time schedule. There is a set curriculum, meaning there is a prescribed list of courses that are taken in order. During the first year, students enroll in two courses in the fall, two courses in the spring, and one course in the summer. In the second year, students enroll in two courses in the fall and two courses in the spring. In the third year, students enroll in Non-Traditional Thesis in the fall.

On-Campus Sessions

MATC students must attend two on-campus sessions–a two-day orientation and a weeklong summer residency. These sessions provide essential supplementary training and opportunities to build relationships among students and faculty. Students pay a one-time, non-refundable $500 fee with their first semester tuition to cover these sessions.

The sessions are held in Carroll Hall, the home of the UNC School of Journalism and Mass Communication, on the UNC–Chapel Hill campus. Completion of the residencies is a pre-requisite for subsequent MATC course registration and is a required portion of the program.

Transportation, lodging and meal expenses to attend the on-campus sessions are the responsibility of the student and are in addition to tuition and fees.

Graduate Committee

To gain the most from the program, students should select a three-member advisory committee early. Led by a member of the school's graduate faculty who serves as the student's advisor, the committee acts as a resource as well as referee of the final project.

Financial Assistance

Federal financial aid is available for MATC students who are enrolled a minimum of 4.5 hours per semester and who show financial need. The aid is typically limited to federal loans. No grants, assistantships or fellowships are currently available through the UNC School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Continuing MATC students may also be considered for academic scholarships.

Ph.D. Program

The Ph.D. in mass communication is designed to prepare students for college teaching and research positions or research careers in mass communication industries, advertising agencies, market or opinion research firms, business, or government. The school works closely with each student to develop a program of study that is both interdisciplinary, allowing the student to take full advantage of the University's rich academic offerings, and tailored to meet the specific needs and interests of the student. The goal of the program is to produce outstanding scholars who are highly knowledgeable about mass communication and highly skilled as researchers.

The program is small and very selective; 10 to 12 students are admitted each year. Admissions decisions are based not only on the standard criteria described elsewhere in this catalog–GRE scores, grade averages, and letters of recommendation–but also on a determination of whether the applicant's interests and goals fit with those of the program and faculty. For that reason, the statement of purpose and statement of research interests that must accompany an application are extremely important, and applicants are encouraged to be as specific as possible in outlining their research interests and career goals.

Requirements

Ph.D. students are required to develop 1) a broad understanding and knowledge of mass communication in modern society, 2) expertise in two areas of specialization in mass communication and 3) competence in an appropriate research methodology. Students have considerable flexibility in designing their programs around a core of four courses, which should be taken during the first year of study. The four core courses are Mass Communication Research Methods (JOMC 701), Readings in Mass Communication History (JOMC 742), Theories of Mass Communication (JOMC 705), and Mass Communication Law (JOMC 740). If a student receives an L in any core course, he or she must pass a comprehensive examination given during the second semester. If the student fails the exam, he or she must retake the course the following fall. If the student again makes an L, he or she will not be allowed to continue in the program. In addition, if a student earns three Ls (9 credits) or an F in his or her courses, he or she will not be allowed to continue in the program.

Forty-eight graduate credits (400-level and above courses), in addition to at least six dissertation credits, are required for the Ph.D. Those 48 hours must be arrayed into three groups of courses: two substantive areas of specialization, a primary area consisting of at least 15 credits and a secondary area consisting of at least nine credits; and research methods consisting of at least four courses. Major and minor substantive areas should be selected from the list of approved substantive areas of study set by the program. The research methods that a student chooses to study must be appropriate to the student's areas of specialization and dissertation topic.

Other requirements include:

Length of Program

Students normally spend two years taking courses, then take comprehensive exams very early in their third fall semester. They then write their dissertation proposals. After the student's doctoral committee approves the proposal, the dissertation must be completed and defended. The nature of the dissertation research will govern the length of time a student spends on the project, but many students find it takes about one year to complete a dissertation. In general, it takes three years, and often more, to complete the Ph.D. The Graduate School requires students to complete the degree within eight years of first registration in the doctoral program. Reapplication is required to continue pursuit of the degree if the eight-year time limit expires. In extenuating circumstances, a student in good academic standing may petition for an extension for a definite, stated period of time (up to one year).

Doctoral Committee

Each Ph.D. student selects a five-member dissertation committee, which is approved by the associate dean for graduate studies. This committee consists of three School of Journalism and Mass Communication faculty members and two graduate faculty members from outside the school. The student's advisor serves as chair of the committee. The committee should consist of professors with whom the student has taken courses. The committee guides the student's academic development, administers and evaluates the comprehensive exams, and approves the dissertation proposal and dissertation.

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students

JOMC

421 Television News Reporting and Producing (3). Prerequisites, JOMC 221 and 252. This course covers writing, reporting, and producing television news stories and programs, with emphasis on basic as well as innovative broadcast story forms.

422 Producing Television News (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 421. Permission of the instructor. Students work under faculty guidance to produce "Carolina Week," a television news program, and are responsible for all production tasks such as producing, reporting, anchoring, directing, and others.

423 Television News and Production Management (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 422. Permission of the instructor. Students participate in a collaborative-learning environment to hone skills learned in earlier courses and help less-experienced students acclimate to the broadcast news experience within the school. By invitation only.

424 Media Management and Policy (3). An introduction to media management, generally, and the supervision and motivation of employees, specifically. The course also delves into policy and legal issues impacting modern media operations. It explores the special skills associated with management of media properties in the context of constant change.

425 Voice and Diction (3). Designed to help students develop presentation skills and use voices effectively as professional broadcast journalists.

426 Producing Radio (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 252. Students work under faculty guidance to produce "Carolina Connection," a weekly 30-minute radio news program, and are responsible for all production tasks: producing, reporting, anchoring, and editing.

427 Studio Production for Television News (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 221. This course is a project-based, hands-on studio production course with special focus on technical skill development and directing in a news environment.

428 Broadcast History (3). A theoretical course designed to help students develop an understanding of and an appreciation for the role broadcast journalism has played in recent American history.

429 Sports Xtra (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 221. In this course students will produce a weekly sports highlights, analysis, and commentary program for distribution via cable television. Students fill all editorial, field production, and studio production positions.

431 Case Studies in Public Relations (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 137. Helps students think as public relations professionals who deal with the demanding, dynamic environment of corporate, government, and nonprofit public relations. Students examine real-world situations and strategies, discussing factors that affect how public relations is practiced in organizations, including identifying stakeholder groups, developing strategies, embracing diversity, and recognizing ethical issues.

433 Crisis Communication (3). Prerequisites, JOMC 137 and 153. Provides an assessment and understanding of crises, examining the role public relations professionals play in helping organizations use mass communication theories and best practices. Includes media training. Introduces students to areas of crisis research, allowing them to complete the Federal Emergency Management Agency's National Incident Management System certification.

434 Public Relations Campaigns (3). Prerequisites, JOMC 232, 279, and 431. In this capstone experience, students apply concepts and skills from earlier classes to develop a campaign plan for a client organization. Activities include conducting background and audience research; developing realistic objectives, strategies, tactics, and evaluation plans; producing a portfolio of supporting materials; and pitching the campaign to the client.

435 Public Information Strategies (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 137. This course provides a comprehensive assessment and understanding of the role of public relations professionals throughout government and the nonprofit sector as well. The course examines the unique requirements placed on communicators who are simultaneously responsible for representing their respective organizations while keeping the public informed.

440 Law of Cyberspace (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 340. Explains legal issues raised by Internet communication and guides students in thinking critically about how those issues can be resolved. Reviews how courts, other branches of government, the private sector, and legal scholars have responded to the Internet. Topics may include digital copyright, net neutrality, privacy, and Internet censorship abroad.

441 Diversity and Communication (3). An examination of racial stereotypes and minority portrayals in United States culture and communication. Emphasis is on the portrayal of Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanics, and Asian Americans in the mass media.

442 Gender, Class, Race, and Mass Media (WMST 442) (3). The media play a critical role in the construction and contestation of ideas about gender, class, and race. Using a range of methods, students will analyze media messages past and present to understand how gender, race, and class influence media production and consumption.

443 Latino Media Studies (3). An introductory course to the study of United States Latina/os and the media. It analyzes the media portrayal of Latina/os in United States mainstream media. The course also examines media that cater to Latina/os and explores the way in which Latina/o audiences use the multiple media offerings available to them.

445 Process and Effects of Mass Communication (3). Mass communication as a social process, incorporating literature from journalism, social psychology, sociology, political science, and history. To acquaint students with factors in message construction, dissemination, and reception by audiences.

446 Global Communication and Comparative Journalism (3). Covers theories explaining the workings of global and local communication systems, the transnational flow of news, and opportunities and challenges that social media and other new platforms pose to the production and distribution of news. It also familiarizes students with the media communication systems of key countries.

447 International Media Studies (3). The study of media system operations in a particular country, such as Mexico, including how news and information are disseminated and used by audiences. Taught in the spring semester and includes a trip to that country during spring break.

448 Freedom of Expression in the United States (3). An examination of the development of freedom of expression in the United States within the context of the nation's history.

449 Blogging, Smart Mobs, and We the Media (3). For advanced undergraduates through Ph.D. students. Practical and theoretical approaches to understanding, designing, building, and using virtual communities, including studies of network capital, social capital, and social production.

450 Business and the Media (3). Role of media in United States society and effects on public perceptions of business. Relationship of business press and corporate America. Current issues in business journalism.

451 Economics Reporting (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 153. Coverage of Wall Street and the economy, including stocks, bonds, and economic indicators. Reporting on the Federal Reserve, labor, consumer sector, manufacturing and inflation, and certain industries.

452 Business Reporting (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 153. Methods and tactics of covering businesses for mass communication. Why and how companies operate and how to write stories about corporate news from public records and other sources.

453 Advanced Reporting (3). Prerequisites, JOMC 153 and 253. Rigorous, in-depth instruction and critiques of students' news and feature assignments done with different reporting methodologies: interviewing, official records, direct and participant observation, and survey research (the Carolina Poll).

454 Advanced Feature Writing (3). Prerequisites, JOMC 153 and 256. Writing and reporting important topics in in-depth feature articles. Discussion and utilization of writing and reporting techniques in order to complete articles for publication or other dissemination. In-depth instruction and critiques of student work.

455 Sports Writing (3). Researching and writing sports stories, including game coverage, magazine features, and opinion columns. Students complete reporting and writing exercises inside and outside of the classroom.

456 Magazine Writing and Editing (3). Prerequisites, JOMC 153 and 256. Instruction and practice in planning, writing, and editing copy for magazines.

457 Advanced Editing (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 157. Concentration on the editing and display of complex news and features stories and other print media content with a significant emphasis on newspaper design and graphics.

458 Southern Politics: Critical Thinking and Writing (3). Interpretive-contextual journalism focused on the trends, issues, and politics that influence democracy in North Carolina, the American South, and the nation. Through readings and the practice of analytical journalism, the course explores government policy making, election campaigns, social and economic trends, ethics, and citizen-leader relationships.

459 Community Journalism (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 153. Comprehensive study of the community press, including policies, procedures, and issues surrounding the production of smaller newspapers within the context of the community in its social and civic setting.

463 News Lab: Creating Tomorrow's News Products (3). Students work under faculty guidance to develop and test an idea for a start-up news product. Students will create a prototype, test it on a target market, and compile a business feasibility report for the product. The course emphasizes collaboration among students with a variety of skills and experiences.

471 Advanced Advertising Copywriting (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 271. Permission of the instructor. Rigorous, in-depth instruction and critiques of student advertising writing.

472 Art Direction in Advertising (3). This course provide students with finished advertising for their portfolios through visual theory instruction, creative exercises, and strategy application.

473 Advertising Campaigns (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 271 or 272. Planning and executing advertising campaigns; types and methods of advertising research; the economic function of advertising in society.

474 The Branding of Me (3). What have you done to brand yourself? Students will use YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook in a calculated plan with other new-media marketing tools to land that first job.

475 Concepts of Marketing (3). Designed to provide the larger business context for students anticipating careers in advertising, public relations, and other media industries, the course teaches the vocabulary and basic concepts of marketing as it will be practiced.

476 Ethical Issues and Sports Communication (3). Permission of the instructor. Ethical dilemmas and decisions in the commercialization and coverage of sports, including the influence of television, pressure to change traditions and standards for monetary reasons, and negative influences on athletes.

477 New Media Technologies: Their Impact on the Future of Advertising, Marketing, and Public Relations (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 474. This course will introduce you to the nontraditional, future vision required to be successful in advertising, marketing, and public relations and the more personal, individualized technologies that will grab people's attention in the future.

478 Media Marketing (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 137. Principles and practices of retail advertising in all media, with emphasis on selling, writing, and layout of retail advertising for the print media.

480 Advanced Photojournalism (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 180; pre- or corequisite, JOMC 153. Permission of the school. Advanced course in photojournalism content gathering, history, ethics and storytelling. Students shoot advanced newspaper and magazine assignments and create short multimedia stories combining photography, audio, and video.

481 Documentary Photojournalism (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 480. Permission of the school. Students study the documentary tradition and produce stories within the social documentary genre of photojournalism. Students choose a relevant social issue and create a multimedia Web site featuring long-form documentary storytelling.

482 News Design (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 182; pre- or corequisite, JOMC 153. Detailed study of page layout and graphics techniques for all forms of news media.

483 Magazine Design (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 482. Permission of the school. Detailed study of page layout and graphics techniques in magazines.

484 Information Graphics (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 182. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Study and application of graphic design and information-gathering techniques to creating charts, maps, and diagrams.

485 Publication Design (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 182; pre- or corequisite, JOMC 153; permission of the instructor. Detailed study and application of graphic design techniques in magazines, newspapers, advertising, and corporate communication.

486 Motion Graphics (3). Detailed study and application of motion-graphic techniques that utilize the combination of words, photos, graphics, video, sound, and voice-overs to convey stories for news and entertainment. Students learn Adobe After Effects software and the art of storytelling to enable them to conceptualize and execute digital animations.

490 Special Topics in Mass Communication (1–3). Small classes on various aspects of journalism–mass communication with subjects and instructors varying each semester. Descriptions for each section available on the school's Web site under Course Details.

491 Special Skills in Mass Communication (1–3). Courses on various skills in journalism–mass communication with subjects and instructors varying each semester. This course satisfies a skills- or craft-course requirement. Descriptions for each section available on the school's Web site under Course Details.

551 Digital Media Economics and Behavior (3). The course will focus on the changing economics affecting 21st-century news organizations and the economic drivers of other content providers such as music companies, the film industry, online aggregators, and commerce sites for lessons that can be applied across industry segments.

552 Leadership in a Time of Change (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 452, 475, or 551. During a time of fast-paced technological innovation, this course examines the critical strategic choices facing media executives. Students will observe and research a media company that is making the transition, as well as produce a case study on that effort.

560 Medical and Science Journalism (HBEH 660, HPM 550) (3). Prepares students to work as medical and science journalists. The course emphasizes writing skills in all delivery formats and interpreting medical, health, and science information for consumers.

561 Medical and Science Video Storytelling (HBEH 561, HPM 551) (3). Students work in teams to produce, shoot, script and report medical, environmental, and science stories for broadcast on "Carolina Week," the award-winning, student-produced television newscast.

562 Science Documentary Television (HBEH 562, HPM 552) (3). Students work in teams to conceive, produce, and script mini-documentaries on science and environmental topics for broadcast on North Carolina Public Television.

564 Medical and Science Reporting (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 153. Required preparation, a second reporting or writing course. Focuses on developing strategies to research and write about medical issues, specifically selecting topics, finding and evaluating sources, and information gathering. Students produce a range of stories, from short consumer pieces to in-depth articles.

565 Environmental Storytelling (ENEC 565) (3). An interdisciplinary course for students interested in environmental issues or journalism to produce stories about environmental issues that matter to North Carolinians. Students learn to identify credible sources, manage substantial amounts of information, and find story focus as they report on technical and often controversial subjects in a variety of media.

581 Multimedia Design (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 187. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Theory and practice of multimedia design with an emphasis on usability, design theory, and evaluative methodologies, including focus groups, survey research, eye-track testing, and search engine optimization.

582 Multimedia Narratives (3). Prerequisites, JOMC 180 or 187, and 221. Permission of the school. Students learn how to gather audio and video content, editing and storytelling techniques, and how to publish these media onto a variety of multimedia platforms.

583 Multimedia Programming and Production (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 187. Permission of the school. Advanced course in multimedia programming languages that includes designing and building dynamic projects.

584 Documentary Multimedia Storytelling (3). Permission of the instructor. Students work on a semester-long documentary multimedia project that includes photo and video journalists, audio recordists, designers, infographics artists, and programmers. Open by application to students who have completed an advanced course in visual or electronic communication.

586 Intermediate Interactive Media (3). Prerequisite JOMC 187. Web programming, graphic design, and storytelling for the Web. Students will use HTML5 CSS3, JavaScript, and other Web publishing languages while learning how to design, storyboard, and script an interactive storytelling project. Students will collect and incorporate photos, text, video, graphics, and database information into interactive multimedia presentations.

585 3D Design Studio (3). Prerequisites, JOMC 187 and 182. Permission of the instructor. The use of three-dimensional design and animation to create visual explanations.

587 Multimedia Storytelling: Carolina Photojournalism Workshop (3). The Carolina Photojournalism Workshop has a dual mission: to provide an immersive, real-world learning experience for students, and to create and publish exceptional multimedia content on the culture of North Carolina that can be a resource for people in our state and the world.

602 Mass Communication Education in the Secondary School (3). Graduate standing. Readings, discussion, and projects fostering excellence in teaching journalism–mass communication in the high school, from philosophy and practice to professional skills.

603 Mass Communication Law in the Secondary School (3). Graduate standing. Application of First Amendment speech and press freedoms to secondary school media, including libel, privacy, access to information, journalistic privilege, prior restraint, advertising and broadcast regulations, and ethical practices.

604 Mass Communication Writing and Editing in the Secondary School (3). Graduate standing. High school journalism teachers and advisors learn to teach the skills journalists need to communicate. Emphasis on writing and thinking skills necessary to convert information into clear messages.

605 Design and Production of Secondary School Publications (3). Graduate standing. High school journalism teachers and advisors learn to teach the skills journalists need to produce publications. Designed for persons with no background in design. Degree-seeking students may not use both JOMC 182 and 605 to complete degree requirements.

671 Social Marketing Campaigns (3). Social marketing is the application of marketing concepts and practices to bring about behavior change for a social good. This course is designed as a service-learning course and fulfills the experiential education requirement.

690 Special Topics in Advertising (1–3). Courses on special topics in advertising with subjects and instructors varying each semester.

691H Introductory Honors Course (3). Permission of the instructor. Required of all students reading for honors in journalism.

692H Honors Essay (3). Permission of the instructor. Required of all students reading for honors in journalism.

Courses for Graduate Students

JOMC

701 Mass Communication Research Methods (3). Covers a broad range of research methods used in industry and academic research. Course content includes: the process and organization of writing research; applying a variety of quantitative and qualitative research methods; evaluating research design; and ethical issues inherent in research. Required course for all graduate students.

702 Mass Communication Pedagogy (3). Investigation of college teaching and academic life, including course planning, syllabus preparation, interpersonal skills, presentational modes, evaluation and ways of balancing teaching with other expectations.

704 Statistics for Mass Communication Research (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 701. Statistics with emphasis on application to studies in mass communication. Prior knowledge of statistics and familiarity with computer software are NOT assumed.

705 Theories of Mass Communication (3). Students prepare analytical papers on theories of mass communication based upon extensive review of behavioral science literature. Required of Ph.D. students and master's students in the mass communication sequence.

711 Writing for Digital Media (3). Communication in digital/online environments–learning/understanding the audience(s); how different media work (their unique limits/possibilities); developing appropriate content for different formats/environments. Students analyze technical/rhetorical elements of online content (i.e., interactivity, hyperlinking, spatial orientation, nonlinear storytelling). Limited to students admitted to Certificate in Technology/Communication program and JOMC graduate students.

712 Visual Communication and Multimedia (3). This course provides an understanding of current visual communication and multimedia storytelling theories and practices. Students will read scholarly and professional publications and critique media work across disciplines. A final project includes the creation of an original article or multimedia presentation that adds to the knowledge base in this area.

714 Database and Web Research (3). Online research often means going to Google and entering search terms. What strategies might improve the effectiveness of your research? What about authority and timeliness of information? This course answers those questions and others. Enrollment limited to students admitted to Certificate in Technology/Communication program and JOMC graduate students.

715 New Media and Society (3). This course examines digital environments from diverse conceptual perspectives (e.g., journalism, mass communication, psychology, information science and technology, sociology, business) and outlines theoretical implications and practical applications of new media.

716 Research Methods and Applications (3). This course is designed to help communication professionals make better and more informed research decisions given compelling research challenges and resource constraints.

717 Visual Communication and Information Architecture (3). This course explores the overlap between several related disciplines: information visualization and architecture, cognitive science, graphic design and journalism. Content covered includes cognitive psychology, information design, visualization, and ethics.

718 Media Law for the Digital Age (3). This course identifies and explains complex legal issues raised by Internet technology and guides students in thinking critically about how those issues can best be resolved.

719 Leadership in Digital Media Economics (3). This course examines the broad economic issues facing the media industry, including the changing dynamics of consumer behavior, pricing, loyalty, market segmentation, creative destruction, economic cycles, and global competition.

720 Strategic Communication (3). Underpinned by appropriate theory, this course examines strategic communication in today's cluttered information environment. While developing strategic communication programs, students will analyze case studies and research comprehensive digital-influence strategies.

721 Usability and Multimedia Design (3). Introduces students to five basic areas of multimedia design and develops expertise in each. By examining the latest eye-tracking research and usability testing, students will assess the practical application of many concepts. Through critiques and original storyboards, students will work to expertly integrate all this knowledge into well-designed packages.

730 Public Relations Foundations (3). Introduction to the growing field of public relations practice: its history, legal and ethical issues, types and areas of practice and construction of public relations campaigns. Must be used as a basic competency class by master's students. This course cannot be counted toward a program of study for doctoral students.

732 Public Relations and Strategic Writing (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 730. Graduate-level public relations writing course that provides hands-on practice in developing multi-platform communication tools used by public relations practitioners. News writing module completed as part of this course.

740 Media Law (3). Survey media law areas: First Amendment, libel, privacy, intellectual property, corporate and commercial speech, media and judiciary, confidential sources, freedom of information, electronic and new media regulation, international issues. Semester topics may vary with class interests. Conduct legal research, identify/analyze secondary and primary legal resources, produce original graduate-level legal research.

742 Readings in Mass Communication History (3). Directed readings in mass communication history. Required course for Ph.D. students.

743 Media Management (3). A study of planning policy functions related to media management concerns.

752 Leadership in a Time of Change (3). Required preparation, students should have taken a core business course or have equivalent professional experience before enrolling. Examines critical strategic choices facing media executives and offers students the opportunity to observe and research a media company making the transition and produce a case study on that effort.

753 Reporting and Writing News (3). Provides study and practice of the primary activities of a print journalist: gathering the news and writing about it for publication. Must be used as a basic competency class by master's students. This course cannot be counted toward a program of study for doctoral students.

754 Specialized Reporting (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 753. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Reporting of complicated topics, using in-depth backgrounding, investigative reporting techniques, story conferences, and documents and other research data. Required of news-editorial master's students who plan to complete the articles option.

782 Multimedia Storytelling (3). Theories and practices of multimedia content creation. Students gain critical understanding of various multimedia presentation methods. Hands-on experience with audio/video collection/editing.

795 E-Health (3). An overview of the positive and negative impacts of the Internet on public health. Covers research, evaluation sites, ethics, and use of theory that addresses key public health problems.

801 Seminar in Mass Communication Research Methods (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 701. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Advanced work in quantitative data analysis and research preparation.

810 Seminar in the Psychology of Human-Computer Interaction (3). Examines effects of computers, the Internet, and World Wide Web from a psychological perspective. Adopts an empirical approach to understand ways in which people respond to computers and new technologies.

825 Seminar in Interdisciplinary Health Communication (HBHE 825) (3). See HBHE 825 for description.

826 Interdisciplinary Health Communication Colloquium (HBHE 826) (1.5). Open to Interdisciplinary Health Communication graduate certificate and master's track students only. This course is structured for interactive student/faculty discussion on health communication research and practice. Seminar and online blog format.

830 Seminar in Public Relations (3). Readings, discussions, and research that explores theoretical foundations of public relations and strategic communication and how they are applied academically and professionally.

840 Seminar in Media Law (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 740. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Explore free expression theory, research media law perspective and methods. First Amendment theories and interpretations, exposition to, and critical evaluation of, legal research in communication. Identify legal research question, produce paper, and present findings in a scholarly convention presentation and/or publication.

841 Seminar in Mass Communication and Society Perspectives (3). Readings, discussion, and papers on the roles and responsibilities of mass communication in society.

842 Seminar in Mass Communication History (3). Readings, discussion, and projects in mass communication history.

846 Seminar in International Communication (POLI 846) (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 446. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Reading and research in selected topics. Focus in recent years has included global news flow, communication and social change, communication in the collapse of communism, Western dominance in international communication, global culture and the influence of technology.

847 Communication for Social Justice (3). Examines the role of media and communication projects in advancing social justice goals. Surveys canonical literature and introduces students to the most recent approaches. Traditionally, the field has considered Global South projects and grassroots communication; this course pays attention to projects and programs for underserved populations of the Global North.

850 Seminar in Qualitative Methods (3). Prerequisite, JOMC 701. Survey of naturalistic methods applied to mass communication research, including ethnography, in-depth interviews, life histories, and text-based analysis.

860 Seminar in Content Analysis (3). Students will use appropriate research designs to collect content data for coding and analysis, conceptual and operational definitions of variables for coding, reliability testing of coding protocol and procedures, and appropriate statistical analysis of collected data. Additionally, students will select a topic, produce a content analysis study, and submit the study to a peer-reviewed convention or journal.

870 Seminar in Social and Economic Problems in Advertising (3). Readings, discussion, and papers on advertising as a social and economic force in contemporary society.

879 Seminar in Advertising Research (3). Readings and discussion examining theories underlying advertising and the testing of those theories through research projects.

890 Seminar in Special Topics in Mass Communication (3). Seminar on various aspects of mass communication, with content and instructors varying each semester.

900 Reading and Research (3). Permission of the instructor. Advanced reading or research in a selected field.

992 Master's (Non-Thesis) (3).

993 Master's Research and Thesis (3).

994 Doctoral Research and Dissertation (3).