A program of the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations,
with the generous support of the Carolina Seminars

2001-2002


2001: September, October, November
2002: January, February, March, April, May

Starred events are sponsored by the Seminar.
(Other events are recommended but not Seminar-sponsored.)

Maps and directions: UNC-CH, Duke, NCSU


 September 25, 2001: Michaelle Browers, Department of Political Science, Wake Forest University: "The Hermeneutics of Contemporary Islamic Reformists." 6:30 p.m., University Center for International Studies (UCIS), UNC-CH, 223 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill.

 October 13, 2001: "The Gnawa: African Trance Culture in Morocco." POSTPONED

Speakers: Chouki El Hamel (Duke University), Deborah Kapchan (University of Texas at Austin), and Tim Fuson (University of California at Berkeley).

This seminar forms part of a week-long series of events relating to the Gnawa; for further information, call 919-220-6292 or write to wolsrh@aol.com.
 October 18, 2001: 12:00 - 1:00 p.m., Muslim Networks Consortium Teleconference: This teleconference is intended to generate a conversation among as many participants as possible to discuss where the Muslim Networks Consortium should focus its energies in light of the September 11 catastrophe, and how we should react locally and globally. Location: John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University, 204 Erwin Road, Durham, N.C.

 November 1-2, 2001: "Women Fight Fundamentalisms: Before and After September 11."

November 1, 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.:
  • Gita Sahgal, documentary film-maker, writer, member of the UK-based Women Against Fundamentalism, and co-editor of Refusing Holy Orders: Women and Fundamentalism in Britain: "Secular Spaces in Women's Organizing."
  • Mab Segrest, activist, Visiting Professor in Women's Studies at Duke University, and author of several books, including the forthcoming Born to Belonging, essays on travel and globalization: "Women, the Rise of the Religious Right and the New Global Order."
  • Cathy Lutz, Professor of Anthropology, UNC-Chapel Hill: Closing Remarks.
Location: Hanes Art Center Auditorium, UNC-CH (click here for a map).

November 2, 3:00 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.:

  • Nawal el-Saadawi, Egyptian novelist, doctor and militant writer on Arab women's problems and their struggle for liberation: "Religious Fundamentalism, Globalization and Women."
  • Plenary Session: Nawal el-Saadawi, Gita Sahgal and Mab Segrest.
Location: 107 Richard White Auditorium, Duke University East Campus.
Co-sponsors: the North Carolina Center for South Asian Studies; the Dean of Arts and Sciences, UNC; Women's Studies, Duke; Women's Studies, UNC; Muslim Networks, Duke; Vice-Provost of Interdisciplinary Studies, Duke; University Center for International Studies, UNC; Dept. of Sociology, UNC; Dept. of Political Science, UNC; Carolina Seminars for Comparative Islamic Studies, UNC; Carolina Seminars on Bridging the Divide: Academics, Activists and Social Justice, UNC; Center for International Studies, Duke; Vice Provost for International Affairs, Duke; Dept. of Religion, Duke; Dept. of Asian & African Languages & Literature, Duke; Hiwar (Duke Students for Middle East Understanding) and PROGRESS: the Progressive Students, Staff and Faculty of UNC-Chapel Hill.

January 30, 2002: Chad Haines, Research Associate, University Center for International Studies, "Faith Uprooted: Making Sense of the Rise of the Taliban," 3:00-4:30 p.m., UNC-CH Student Union 205. Organized by the UNC-CH University Center for International Studies.

 February 5, 2002: Bruce Lawrence & Ebrahim Moosa, Department of Religion, Duke University, "Debating Islam and the West: 12th to 21st Century," 7:00 p.m., Franklin Center (click here for directions), Duke University, 2204 Erwin Road, Durham. Organized by the Debating Civilizations Series and the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University.

February 5, 2002: Graham Fuller, Senior Political Scientist, RAND Corporation, "Why Do They Hate Us? The Roots of Terrorism." 7:00 p.m., 111 Carroll Hall, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Part of the Great Decisions Lecture Series.

February 7, 2002: Orayb Najjar, Professor of Journalism, Northern Illinois University, "Deconstructing Fouad Ajami's Al-Jazeera." 12:30 p.m., 3rd floor, Carroll Hall, UNC-CH. Organized by the UNC-CH School of Journalism.

 February 11, 2002: Scott Kugle, Professor of Religious Studies, Swarthmore College, "The Body in Ritual: The Situation of Islam at the Emergence of Modernity." 3:00 p.m., 306 Saunders Hall, UNC-CH. Organized by the UNC-CH Department of Religious Studies.

February 12, 2002: Don Peretz, Professor of Political Science, Binghamton University, "Middle East Peace Process." 7:00 p.m., 111 Carroll Hall, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Part of the Great Decisions Lecture Series.

February 18, 2002: Edward Curtis, Professor of Religious Studies, Trinity University, "An Islam for One People or Many? African-American Islamic Thought from Edward W. Blyden to W. D. Muhammad." 3:00 p.m., 306 Saunders Hall, UNC-CH. Organized by the UNC-CH Department of Religious Studies.

February 18, 2002: Robert W. Jordan, U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia,  "U.S.-Saudi Relations After September 11." 5:00 p.m., Fleishman Commons, Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke University. A reception will follow the lecture. Both events are free and open to the public. Limited parking is available near the Institute and in the Visitor Parking Lot on Science Drive. Click here for directions to the Institute. Organized by the Sanford Institute.

February 18, 2002: Meir Wieseltier, Israeli poet and winner of the Bialik Prize, Israel's highest cultural honor, reading from his poetry. 5:30 p.m., Breedlove Room, 204 Perkins Library, Duke University.

 February 20, 2002: Farid Esack, Visiting Professor of Religion, College of William and Mary, "The Jihad for Gender Justice: Progressive Muslim Reflections." 7:00 p.m., 240 Franklin Center (click here for directions), Duke University, 2204 Erwin Road, Durham. Organized by the Debating Civilizations Series and the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University.

 February 22, 2002: Stephen Zunes, Chair of the Peace & Justice Studies Program, University of San Francisco, "U.S. Middle East Policy and the Roots of Terrorism." 8:00 p.m., 121 Hanes Art Center, UNC-CH. Co-sponsored with the University Center for International Studies and the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense.

February 24, 2002: Anand Patwardhan, South Asian, film-maker, premiering his new documentary film, "War and Peace" (Jang aur Aman), 9 a.m., Hanes Art Center Auditorium UNC-CH; second screening at 2 p.m., Room 139 (La Barre Auditorium), Social Sciences Building, Duke West Campus. Filmed over three tumultuous years in India, Pakistan, Japan and the USA following nuclear tests in the Indian sub-continent, "War and Peace/Jang aur Aman" is an epic documentary journey of peace activism in the face of global militarism and war. (On Saturday, Feb 23, the Progressive South Asia Forum is hosting an informal potluck dinner and discussion with Anand Patwardhan. For more information on that, e-mail cshaines@unc.edu.) Organized by the Triangle South Asia Consortium, Progressive South Asia Forum, Duke Center for International Studies, and DIYA (South Asian-American Student Association of Duke University).

February 25, 2002: Anna Bigelow, Ph.D. Candidate in Religious Studies, University of California at Santa Barbara, "Sharing Saints: Sufi Shrines and Community in Modern India." 3:00 p.m., 306 Saunders Hall, UNC-CH. Organized by the UNC-CH Department of Religious Studies.

February 27, 2002:  Gorham “Hap” Kindem, Professor of Communications Studies, UNC-CH, premiering the video he taped during his tour of Al-Jazeera TV in Qatar in 2001. 4:00 p.m., 103 Bingham Hall, UNC-CH.

February 27, 2002: Sarah Shields, Professor History, UNC-CH, "Behind the Tragedy: A Discussion of Islamic Culture and the Events Leading up to September 11." 6:30 p.m., Auditorium, Tate-Turner-Kuralt Building, UNC-CH. Organized by the UNC-CH School of Social Work.

February 28 - March 7, 2002: Exploring Islam and the Muslim World, North Carolina State University, A week-long series of events sponsored by the International Studies Program, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, NC State University.

February 28, 2002 (Thursday): Muslim Student Association, panel discussion, "Student Perspectives on Islam." 12:40 p.m., Talley Student Center Blue Room. Co-sponsorship with university chaplains’ Peace Lunch Forum series.

February 28, 2002 (Thursday): Film, "The Color of Paradise," directed by Majid Majidi (Iran, 2000), co-sponsored by campus cinema's Passport series. Witherspooon Cinema, 7 p.m.

March 1, 2002 (Friday): Women’s and Gender Studies panel, "Myth and Reality: Women in Islam." 5 p.m., Caldwell Lounge.

March 2, 2002 (Saturday): Film, "Silences of the Palace," directed by Moufida Tlatli (Tunisia/France, 1994). 2 p.m., Witherspoon Cinema.

March 4, 2002 (Monday): Benazir Bhutto, former prime minister of Pakistan, "Terrorism, Islam, Democracy and the West." 7:30 p.m., Stewart Theatre. Free, but tickets required. Contact Ticket Central in Talley Student Center, 515-1100. Co-sponsorship with NC State Committee on International Programs and the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures.

March 5, 2002 (Tuesday): Bruce Lawrence, an Islamicist and a comparativist, the Nancy and Jeffrey Marcus Humanities Professor of Religion, and chair of the Department of Religion, at Duke University, "Islamic Politics." 7 p.m., Winston 29.

March 5, 2002 (Tuesday): Library presentation, "Researching Islam and the Muslim World: Library Strategies and Collections." 4 p.m., D. H. Hill Library Assembly Room, east wing.

March 6, 2002 (Wednesday): Askia Muhammed, White House correspondent for The Final Call newspaper, the official publication of the Nation of Islam. "Jihad, Jingoism & Jive: Post-September 11 Reflections on Muslims, Americans and Homeboys." 7 p.m., Poe 216. Co-sponsorship with Africana Studies program.

March 7, 2002 (Thursday): George Saliba, Columbia University, "Arabic Science and Its Influence on Europe." 4:30 p.m., Caldwell G-107. A reception in Caldwell Lounge will follow Dr. Saliba’s program. Co-sponsorship with the Kenan Institute for Engineering, Technology and Science.
February 28, 2002: Larry Goodson, Professor of International Studies, Bentley College, and author of "Afghanistan's Endless War: State Failure, Regional Politics, and the Rise of the Taliban" (2001), speaking on "Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Militant Islam: The Challenge to America." 7:30 p.m., 100 Hamilton Hall, UNC-CH. Organized by the Department of Political Science and the Curriculum on Peace, War and Defense.

February 28, 2002: Steven Wilkinson, Professor of Political Science, Duke University, "Minority Representation and Hindu-Muslim Violence." 7:15 p.m., Raleigh. For meeting location and a draft of the paper, see the web site of the session organizers, the Triangle South Asia Consortium.

February 28, 2002: Orhan Pamuk, Turkish novelist, reading from "My Name is Red" (2001). 8:00 p.m., Dick White Auditorium, Duke East Campus. Part of the Oceans Connect Conference on Maritime Perspectives, Duke University.

March 1, 2002: Gautam Premnath, University of Massachusetts at Boston, Professor of English, "The Afterlife of National Liberation: Fanon in Diaspora." 3:00 p.m., Donovan Lounge, Greenlaw Hall, UNC-CH. Organized by the Critical Speakers' Series, Department of English, UNC-CH.

March 2, 2002: Robert Fradkin, Professor of Hebrew, Russian and Linguistics, University of Maryland at College Park, "Language, Alphabet, and Regime in the Former Soviet Union." 1:30 p.m., Room 305, Foreign Languages Building, West Campus, Duke University. Organized by the Duke Center for Slavic, Eurasian and East European Studies.

March 2, 2002: Global Feminism, Islamic Fundamentalism and the Crisis of Liberalism, with presenters Aisha Karim (graduate student, Literature), Jaya Kasibhatla (graduate student, English), Firat Oruc (graduate student, Literature). Part 2 of 4 in the series, "After September 11: Towards an Intervention." 10 a.m., 240 Franklin Center (click here for directions), Duke University, 2204 Erwin Road, Durham. Organized by the Duke Graduate Program in Literature.

March 3, 2002: Writing the Mediterranean. Panel discussion:

  • Orhan Pamuk, Turkish author, "The Turkish Mediterranean."
  • Dalenda Largueche, University of Tunis, "The Mediterranean Subaltern."
  • Ammiel Alcalay, Queens College, topic to be announced.
  • Eric Zakim and Roberto Dainotto, Duke University, "Writing the Mediterranean."
  • Grant Parker, Duke University, "The Porosity of Borders in the Classical Mediterranean."
9:00 a.m., VonCanon A-B-C, Bryan Center, Duke University. Part of the Oceans Connect Conference on Maritime Perspectives, Duke University.

March 3, 2002: Janet Abu-Lughod, Professor Emerita, New School for Social Research, "Oceans Also Disconnect: Some Reflections on the Movement of People, Goods, and Capital." 11:15 a.m., VonCanon A-B-C, Bryan Center, Duke University. Part of the Oceans Connect Conference on Maritime Perspectives, Duke University.

March 3, 2002: Ammiel Alcalay, poet, novelist, and Professor of Comparative Literature, Queens College and Graduate Center of the City University of New York, fiction reading. 3:00 p.m., Breedlove Room, 204 Perkins Library, Duke University. Organized by the Oceans Connect Conference on Maritime Perspectives, Duke University.

March 4, 2002: Tessa Rajak, Reader in Clasics, University of Reading, “The Historian Josephus as a Jew of the Diaspora.” 3:00 p.m., 08 Peabody Hall, UNC-CH. Organized by the Department of Religious Studies, UNC-CH.

March 4, 2002: Taha Muhammed Ali, Palestinian poet, reading his work in Arabic (with translation). 5:00 p.m., Breedlove Room, 204 Perkins Library, Duke University. Followed by a reception at Asian and African Languages and Literatures (2101 Campus Drive) at 7:00 p.m. Organized by the Duke University Department of Asian & African Languages and Literature, Jewish Studies, and Mediterranean Studies. For additional information please contact Eric Zakim at 684-6104.

 March 4-6, 2002: Iranian Film Festival. Each film introduced by Godfrey Cheshire, film critic, New York City. Co-sponsored with the North Carolina Center for South Asian Studies, the UNC-CH College of Arts and Sciences, Curriculum in Asian Studies, Curriculum in International and Area Studies, Department of Communication Studies, and the University Center for International Studies.

March 4, 2002: "The Mirror," directed by Jafar Panahi (1998). 7:00 p.m., Student Union Auditorium, UNC-CH. This film won the Golden Leopard Prize at the Locarno Film Festival, among other honors. For a synopsis and review, see the IranMedia website.

March 5, 2002: "Gabbeh," directed by Mohsen Makhmalbaf (1996). 7:00 p.m., Student Union Auditorium, UNC-CH. This film won prizes at the Tokyo International Film Festival and elsewhere. See the film's official website.

March 6, 2002: "Close-Up," directed by Abbas Kiarostami (1990). 7:00 p.m., Hanes Art Auditorium, UNC-CH. This film was voted the best Iranian film ever made in a poll of international film critics. For a synopsis and a sampling of reviews, see the website of the film's distributor, Zeitgeist Films.

 March 5, 2002: Jamal Malik, Professor of Islamic Studies, Universität Erfurt, Germany, "Islamic Traditionalism and Reform on the Indian Sub-Continent." 7:00 p.m., 240 Franklin Center (click here for directions), Duke University, 2204 Erwin Road, Durham. Organized by the Debating Civilizations Series and the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University.

March 5, 2002: Riva Kastoryano, Research Fellow, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique/Centre d'Etudes de Recherche International, France; Visiting Scholar, Princeton University, "Integration and Citizenship of Muslims in France and Germany." 4:00 p.m., Franklin Center (click here for directions), Duke University, 2204 Erwin Road, Durham. Organized by the Duke University Center for International Studies and the Mellon/Sawyer Seminar on Negotiating Cultural Difference: Immigration, Ethnicity, Citizenship, and the Law.

March 6, 2002: Charles Burnett, Professor of the History of Islamic Influences in Europe, Warburg Institute, University of London School of Advanced Study, "The Translation of Arabic Science into Latin in the Middle Ages: A Case of Alienation of Intellectual Property?" 4:00 p.m., Johnson Center for Undergraduate Excellence (Graham Memorial Hall), UNC-CH, Room 039. Organized by the UNC Program in Medieval Studies and Curriculum in Asian Studies. Reception to follow.

March 14, 2002: Donald Johnson, Librarian, Ames Library of South Asia, University of Minnesota, "Textiles in Mughal India: Evidence from the Reign of Jahangir." 7:15 p.m., Durham. For meeting location, contact the session organizers, the Triangle South Asia Colloquium.

March 17, 2002: The World Is My Home: Iranian Films Made in Exile, with introduction by Hossein Mahini, cinematographer and director of the International Exile Film Festival, Gothenburg, Sweden. 6:00 - 9:00 p.m., Hanes Art Auditorium, UNC-CH. Organized by the Iranian Cultural Society of North Carolina.

March 19, 2002: Carl Ernst, Professor of Religious Studies, "Mediating Islam from Print Culture to the Internet," 4:00 p.m., 15 Manning Hall, UNC-CH. Organized by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science, UNC-CH.

 March 21, 2002: Jan Goodwin, journalist, human rights activist, and author of Price of Honor: Muslim Women Lift the Veil of Silence on the Islamic World, "Afghanistan After the Taliban." 7:30 p.m., 33 Carroll Hall, UNC-CH. Co-sponsored with the UNC School of Journalism, Curriculum in Women's Studies, and University Center for Internaitonal Studies.

March 22-24, 2002: Muslim Minorities in Western Europe and North America after September 11, a Mellon-Sawyer Workshop, Duke University. Limited public seating -- anyone wishing to attend should contact Nisa Moosa (Nisa.Moosa@duke.edu) for more information. Participants include:

  • Hoda Badr, Department of Social Sciences, University of Houston
  • Ann Chih Lin, Public Policy and Political Science, University of Michigan
  • Jane M. Cohen, University of Texas Law School
  • Kambiz GhaneaBassiri, Department of Religion, Harvard University
  • Karen Hunt Ahmed, Committee on Human Development, University of Chicago
  • Munir Jiwa, Applied Anthropology, Columbia University
  • Craig Joseph, Committee on Human Development, University of Chicago
  • Jamillah Karim, Department of Religion, Duke University
  • Karen Leonard, Department of Anthropology, University of California at Irvine
  • Heather Lindkvist, Committee on Human Development, University of Chicago
  • Kathleen Moore, Political Science, University of Connecticut
  • Larry Sager, University of Texas Law School
  • Garbi Schmidt, The Danish National Institute of Social Research
  • Richard Shweder, Committee on Human Development, University of Chicago
  • Greg Starrett, Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina-Charlotte
  • Hakan Yavuz, Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame
 March 26, 2002: Carl Ernst, Professor of Religious Studies, UNC-CH, "Understanding Islam: Religion and Civilization in the Modern World."  7:00 p.m., Franklin Center (click here for directions), Duke University, 2204 Erwin Road, Durham. Organized by the Debating Civilizations Series and the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University.

March 26, 2002: Amiya Kumar Bagchi, Professor of Economics, Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta, "The Political and Economic Implications of Globalization in South Asia." 4:00-6:00 p.m., Asian Pacific Studies Institute (APSI), 2111 Campus Drive, Duke University. Free parking available at APSI or across the street behind the Latin American Studies Center. Organized by Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, Duke University.

 March 28, 2002: Ziba Mir-Hosseini, Hauser Global Law School Program, New York University, "Divorce Iranian Style: A Film by Kim Longinotto and Ziba Mir-Hosseini." 8:00 p.m., Richard White Auditorium, East Campus, Duke University. Organized by the Debating Civilizations Series and the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University.

March 28, 2002: Imam Wallace D. Mohammed, American Muslim leader, "Where We Celebrate Together: The Human Struggle - Part 2." 2:30 p.m., New School of Education Building Auditorium, North Carolina Central University.

April 2, 2002: Michael Zakim, Professor of History, Tel Aviv University, "Zionism as a Fashion War." 5:30-7:00 p.m., Carpenter Board Room, Perkins Library, 2nd floor, Duke University. Organized by Jewish Studies, Mediterranean Studies, and Asian and African Languages and Literature, Duke University.

 April 2, 2002: Farian Sabahi, Researcher, Graduate Institute of International Studies, Geneva, Switzerland, "Economies and Radicalisms in the Islamic World." 7:00 p.m., University Center for International Studies (UCIS), UNC-CH, 223 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill.

April 3, 2002: Before and After 9/11: Ethnic Profiling in the USA. 7:30 p.m., Love Auditorium, LSRC, Duke University. Organized by the Robertson Scholars Program in Civil Rights and National Security. Speakers include:

  • Joseph Jordan, Director of the Sonja Haynes Stone Black Cultural Center, UNC-CH
  • Sami Al-Arian, Professor of Computer Science, University of South Florida
  • Garrett Epps, Professor of Law, University of Oregon
 April 3, 2002: Michael Sells, Professor of Comparative Religions, Haverford College, "Muslim Identity in Europe: The Bosnian Case." 7:00 p.m., 240 Franklin Center (click here for directions), Duke University, 2204 Erwin Road, Durham. Organized by the Debating Civilizations Series and the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University.

April 4, 2002: Afghanistan: A Precedent? 12:15-2:00 p.m., Moot Court Room, Duke Law School. Organized by International Law Society, American Civil Liberties Union, JD/LLM Program, and Office of External Affairs, Duke University. A panel discussion with:

  • Urs Boegli, International Commission of the Red Cross
  • Michael Glennon, Professor of Law, University of California
  • T. Kumar, Amnesty International USA
April 4-7, 2002: Double-Take Documentary Film Festival. Films related to the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations include:
April 5: "Ha Shachen Shel Yeshu" (Raging Dove), 12:15 p.m, Durham Arts Council, 120 Morris Street. Johar Abu-Lashin, an Israeli-born Palestinian and the former World Lightweight Champion of boxing who is the subject of this film, will be at the film and participate in the Q&A immediately following.

April 6: "Hostage: The Bachar Tapes." 5:30 p.m., Durham Marriott, 201 Foster Street. Souheil Bachar was kidnapped in Beirut in 1983. He was held in solitary confinement for ten years, except for 27 weeks in 1985, when he was held in the same room with Americans Terry Anderson, Thomas Sutherland, Benjamin Weir, Martin Jenco and David Jacobsen. Bachar has made 53 videotapes. Of those, these are the two, packaged together, that he wants Americans to see.

April 6: "Afghan Alphabet." 9:30 a.m., Durham Arts Council, 120 Morris Street. Mohsen Makhmalbaf tracks the children of Afghan refugees who are living in villages between Iran and Afghanistan but unable to attend school because of their refugee status. Also being shown April 7, 2002: 6:00 p.m., Durham Marriott, 201 Foster Street.
 April 5-6, 2002: Life in the Middle East: Social Change and Family Structure. Carroll Hall, UNC-CH. A conference sponsored by the University Center for International Studies, the Carolina Population Center, and the Mellon Foundation. Between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. April 6, there will also be a concurrent series of lectures, films, and workshops on Islam, women, and families in the Middle East.
April 5:

7:00-7:30 p.m. Registration

7:30-8:30 p.m. Ideology, Nation and Family
Lisa Pollard, UNC-Wilmington, "The Promise of Things to Come: The Image of the Modern Family in State-Building, Colonial Occupation, and Revolution in Egypt (1805-1922)"
8:30-9:30 p.m. Reception

April 6:

9:00-10:00 a.m. Registration

10:00-12:00 noon. Encouragements and Impediments to Marriage

Diane Singerman, American University, Washington, DC, "The Costs of Marriage in Egypt: Material Matters, Gender Norms and Survey Silences"
Attila Hancioglu, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey, "Ethnicity, Nuptiality Patterns, and Demographic Behavior in Contemporary Turkey"
12:00-1:00 p.m. Lunch

1:00-3:00 p.m. Women, Education, and Childbearing
Charles Kurzman, UNC-Chapel Hill, "Lonely Pioneers of Fertility Transition: Educated Women and Family Choices in the Islamic Republic of Iran."
Mandana Hajj, American University in Cairo, Egypt, "Education, Childbearing, and Female Labor Market Participation: Evidence from Lebanon."
3:00-3:30 p.m. Break

3:30-5:30 p.m. War, Ideology and Fertility
Akbar Aghajanian, UNC-Fayetteville, "The Fertility Transition in Iran: Revolutionary Ideals and Pragmatic Policies."
Prem Saxena, American University of Beirut, Lebanon, "Nuptiality and Fertility in Lebanon: Consequences of Sixteen Years of Civil War."
6:00-7:00 p.m. Films

7:00 p.m. Middle Eastern Dinner and Cultural Show
April 5, 2002: Embargoes, Sanctions, Interventions, Occupations: Failed Foreign Policies? 4:00 p.m., Richard White Auditorium, East Campus, Duke University. Part of the series, "Framing September 11: Conversations Across Communities." Sponsored by the Women's Studies Program, Franklin Center, Center for International Studies, Department of Anthropology, and Marxism and Society at Duke University; and the Department of English, University Program in Cultural Studies, and Institute for Latin American Studies at UNC-CH. Film: "The Hidden Wars of Desert Storm," directed by Audrey Brohy and Gerard Ungerman (2000), and discussion with:
  • David Carlson, Professor of History, UNC-CH
  • Robin Kirk, human rights worker and writer
  • Mary Layoun, Professor of Comparative Literature, University of Wisconsin at Madison
  • Rania Masri, Arab American activist and writer.
April 8, 2002: Philip Bennett, Assistant Managing Editor for Foreign News, The Washington Post, "Covering and Uncovering the War on Terrrorism." 7:30 p.m., 240 Franklin Center (click here for directions), Duke University, 2204 Erwin Road, Durham. Organized by the Duke University Center for International Studies and the DeWitt Wallace Center for Communications and Journalism.

 April 9, 2002: Farish Noor, Secretary General of the International Movemant for a Just World, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, "Islam, Politics and the Media." 7:00 p.m., Franklin Center (click here for directions), Duke University, 2204 Erwin Road, Durham. Organized by the Debating Civilizations Series and the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University.

April 9, 2002: Terror, Justice and Zionism: A Panel on the Situation in Israel-Palestine. 8:00 p.m., Social Sciences Room 139, Duke University. For questions/suggestions, contact Yousuf Al-Bulushi. Speakers include:

  • Sarah Shields, Professor of History, UNC-CH, "History of the Arab-Israeli Conflict."
  • Eric Zakim, Professor of African and Asian Languages and Literatures, Duke University, "Zionist Theory."
  • Ken Surin, Professor of Literature, Duke University, "The Question of Justice."
  • Krista Wiegand, Ph.D. candidate in Political Science, Duke University, "State vs. Non-state Violence, Terrorism, and Political Violence."
April 10, 2002: Etgar Keret, Israeli writer and film director, "Skin Deep." Video screening and discussion with the director. 5:30-7:00 p.m., 103 Carr Building, East Campus, Duke University. Organized by the Department of Asian and African Languages and Literature, Jewish Studies, and Mediterranean Studies, Duke University.

April 12-14, 2002: The Work of the Imaginaire in South Asian Islam. "The purpose of this workshop is to examine the many ways that Muslims from the Asian subcontinent have pressed their imaginative skills to create South Asian cultures that are at once vibrant and adaptive to the challenges of living in a region that has remained predominately non-Muslim. ... To address the general problematic of the role of the imagination and creativity in South Asian Islamicate cultures, we propose to examine three distinctly different forms of cultural production: literary fictions, public polity -- the ulama discourse and Sufi alternatives -- and material culture, especially art and architecture.  In an effort to identify what is distinctly South Asian about these innovations we seek comparisons throughout the Islamicate world.  We are also inviting local faculty who are not necessarily Islamic or South Asian specialists to offer alternative perspectives by way of formal response." Organized by the Triangle South Asia Consortium.

April 12: Literary Fictions, 8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m., Faculty Senate Chambers, D.H. Hill Library, Hillsborough St., North Carolina State University
  • Moderator: Karen Ruffle, UNC-CH
  • Shantanu Phukan, UNC-CH, "Issues of Voice in Mughal-era Persian Literature"
  • Amit Dey, University of Kalyani, India, "Images of the Prophet in Bengali piety, 1850-1947"
  • Tony K. Stewart, North Carolina State Universty, "Iblish Nama in 19th century Bengal"
  • S. Akbar Hyder, University of Texas, "Reconfigurations of the Trope of Karbala in Urdu Literature"
  • Respondent: Allison Busch, UNC-CH
April 12: Public Polity and Law: The Ulama Discourse and Institutional Organization, 2:00-4:30 p.m., Alumni Room, Alumni Building, Pullen Road, North Carolina State University.
  • Moderator: John Richards, Duke
  • Robert Nichols, Stockton College, "Lineage Narrative as Islamic Polemic: A 16th Century Critique of Pashtun Genealogical Stories"
  • Qasim Zaman, Brown University, "Education/Science and Legal Systems"
  • Respondent: Carl W. Ernst, UNC-CH
April 12: Reception and dinner for participants, 7:00 p.m.

April 13: Public Polity and Law: Sufi Alternatives, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon, Brooks Hall, Conference Room A002, Pullen Road, North Carolina State University

  • Moderator: Katherine P. Ewing, Duke
  • Rob Rozehnal, Duke University, "Imaging Sufism: Reconstituting the Chisti Sabiri Silsila in Contemporary Pakistan"
  • Peter Bertocci, Oakland University, "Form and Variation in Maijbhandari Sufism”
  • Dennis McGilvray, University of Colorado, "Transnational Sufism and Islamic change in Contemporary Sri Lanka"
  • Respondent: Leela Prasad, Duke University
April 13: The Instantiated Imagination: Royal Imprimatur of the Imagination, 2:00-5:00 p.m., Kamphofner Projection Auditorium (adjoining the conference room), North Carolina State University
  • Moderator: Pika Ghosh, UNC-CH
  • Palmira Brummett, University of Tennessee, "Imagining India: Babu, Sidi Ali, Religious Rhetorics, Ceremonies of Submission, and the Projection of Power in the 16th Century"
  • Barry Finbarr Flood, Sackler Museum, Smithsonian Institute, "Pillars, Palimpsests, and Princely Practices: Translating the Past in Sultanate Delhi"
  • Respondent: David Gilmartin, North Carolina State University
April 14: The Instantiated Imagination: Public Monuments, Public Space, 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m., Alumni Room, Alumni Building, Pullen Road, North Carolina State University
  • Moderator: Mary Beth Coffman-Heston, College of Charleston
  • Naveeda Khan, Columbia University, "Making Sound Matter: The Contestation over Azan ['Call to Prayer'] in Pakistan"
  • Will Glover, University of Michigan, "Narrating the Useful Past: The City and its Monuments in Local History"
  • Respondent: Sandria Freitag, University of California at Santa Cruz
  April 14: Closing Responses, 11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
  • David Gilmartin, NCSU
  • Bruce B. Lawrence, Duke University
  • Carl W. Ernst, UNC-CH
  • Tony K. Stewart, NCSU
April 15, 2002: Tariq Ali, author, activist, editor of New Left Review and Verso Books, "The Clash of Fundamentalisms." 7:00 - 10:00 p.m., 240 Franklin Center, Duke University, 2204 Erwin Road, Durham. Organized by the Center for Global Studies and the Humanities, the John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies, the Center for International Studies, the Center for South Asian Studies, and the Department of Religion, Duke University.

April 17, 2002: Anthony Oberschall, Professor of Sociology, UNC-CH, "The Future of Jerusalem: Berlin Wall or One City, Two Capitals?" 12:00 noon, 15 Manning Hall, UNC-CH. Organized by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science, UNC-CH.

April 19, 2002: Yakup Bektas, Post-Doctoral Fellow in the New Beginnings Program, Duke University Franklin Center, and Research Scholar in the Duke University History Department, "Southerners on the Sultan's Model Farm: American Scientific Mission to the Ottoman Empire, 1845-1850." 4:00 p.m., Boyd Seminar Room, 229 Carr Building, Duke University.

April 20, 2002: Women's Voices in the Franco-Arabic World. 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence (Graham Memorial Hall), UNC-CH. A website with multimedia clips, lesson plans, teaching guides, readings, and other supporting materials will complement the event. Co-organized by Sahar Amer, Martine Antle, and the UNC Center for European Studies. Presentations include:

  • Martine Antle, UNC-CH, Visions from the Franco-Arabic World: A Self-Examination Test
  • Film: A Female Cabby in Sidi Bel-Abbès (Algeria), directed by Belkacem Hadjadj, followed by discussion with Nadia Yaqub, UNC-CH
  • Sahar Amer, UNC-CH, Tales of Seduction: French Encounters with the Arab World
  • Akram Khater, North Carolina State University, Historicizing Gender: Women in the Arab World
  • Ghada Amer and Typhaine Leservot, Egyptian Francophone Art: Reading between the Threads
April 20, 2002: Asian Documentary Film Festival, featuring the documentaries of Sandeep Ray, who will attend and discuss his work. 2:00 p.m., Hanes Arts Center, UNC-CH. Organized by the Visual Media Lecture Series, North Carolina Center for South Asian Studies. Films include:
"Leaving Bakul Bagan" (1994, 43 minutes). Three generations of the extended Roychowdury family have resided for decades at 160 Bakul Bagan Road, Calcutta, India. In "Leaving Bakul Bagan," Saborna, age 21, prepares to leave for higher studies in the United States. The film is an intimate portrayal of her interactions with her family during her last few days at home, against a backdrop of race riots throughout India in the aftermath of the destruction of a mosque by Hindu fanatics.

"A Life Familiar" (a work in progress, 15 minutes).

"Miyah, the Life of a Javanese Woman" (1999, 30 minutes). Co-produced with Laurie Rothstein. An intimate portrait of a Javanese woman who works as a  servant and a cook for a prominent family in Jakarta, Indonesia.

"A Trial in East Kalimantan: The Benoaq Dayak Resistance" (2002: 50 minutes). On the island of Kalimantan in Indonesia, a Dayak village organizes a sit-in to protest the  destruction of their agricultural land and the desecration of sacred funeral sites by a multinational palm oil company.

"Upriver/Downriver: A Dayak Journey" (a work in progress, 8 minutes).
April 20, 2002: Fatemeh Keshavarz, Professor of Persian and Comparative Literature, Washington University in St. Louis, "Reading and Lecture on Rumi," accompanied by the Liän Ensemble from Los Angeles. 8:00 p.m., Nelson Hall, North Carolina State University. Organized by the Triangle South Asia Consortium. No children under 8 years old, please.

April 20-21, 2002: Inaugural Conference of the Southeast European Studies Association. 8:30 a.m. - 5:45 p.m., Toy Lounge, 4th floor, Dey Hall, UNC-CH. See preliminary program for list of papers relating to Muslim civilizations in Southeast Europe.

April 23, 2002: Perspectives on How We Can Achieve Peace in Palestine/Israel. 7:00 p.m., 100 Hamilton Hall, UNC-CH. Organized by Students United for a Responsible Global Environment (SURGE).

April 24, 2002: Cori Dauber, Professor of Communication Studies, UNC-CH, "Gary Condit and the Battle of Shah-e-Kot: How the Press Failed America." 7:30 p.m., National Humanities Center, Research Triangle Park.

April 25, 2002: Tom Boellstorff, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of California at Irvine, "Dubbing Culture: Gay Subjectivity and 'Globalization' in Postcolonial Indonesia." 3:00 - 5:00 p.m., Anthropology Department Lounge, 313A Alumni Building, UNC-CH. Organized by the UNC-CH Working Group in Southeast Asian Studies and Department of Anthropology.

April 25, 2002: Sunil Gangopadhyay, Bengali playwright, poet, novelist, and newspaper editor, "Religious and Social Reformation in India/Bengal during the Nineteenth Century," 4:30 p.m., Caldwell Lounge, North Carolina State University. Organized by the Triangle South Asia Consortium.

April 27, 2002: Prothom Alo (First Light), drama performed by playwright Sunil Gangopadhyay and the EPIC theatre group of New Jersey. 6:00 - 9:00 p.m., Martin Middle School, 1701 Ridge Road, Raleigh. (From I-40, exit 289, take Wade Avenue and turn right to Ridge Road.) General admission: $5, students free. Organized by the Triangle South Asia Consortium, which acknowledges with gratitude the generous support of the Bengali community in making this seminar and drama possible. The play is based on a magnificent novel set at the turn of the twentieth century in a Bengal where the old and young India are jostling for space. First Light is a spectacular tableau involving complicated theatrical elements, traditional costumes, live music, dance, and slide shows. Prominent among its many characters is Rabindranath Tagore, the Nobel laureate poet from India. Grand in its scale and crackling with the energy of its prose, First Light is a rich and comprehensive portrait of Bengal renaissance. Equally, it is a chronicle of a whole nation waking up to a new, modern sensibility.

April 27, 2002: Saghir Tahir, New Hampshire State Assembly Representative, speaking on Pakistani-American relations. 3:30 p.m., McKimmon Center, North Carolina State University.

 April 30, 2002: Malcolm Brown, Department of Sociology, University of Exeter, "The Muslim as Terrorist: The Making of an Image and the De-Racialisation of History." 6:30 p.m., University Center for International Studies, 223 East Franklin St., Chapel Hill. Limited parking available behind the building.

May 19-July 28, 2002: Empire of the Sultans: Ottoman Art from the Khalili Collection. North Carolina Museum of Art, 2110 Blue Ridge Road, Raleigh.

 May 22, 2002: Dr. Seyed Mustafa Azmayesh, a Paris-based scholar who specializes in Sufism, "Exploring Rumi: Transmutation of Soul." 7 p.m., Room
205-206, Student Union, UNC-CH. The lecture will be primarily in Persian, with some accommodation for French and English speakers.

 May 30, 2002: Henry Azar, Professor of Pathology, UNC-CH, "Medical Schools and Hospitals of Seville, 1000-2001 A.D." 8:30 a.m., Room 101, Brinkhouse-Bullitt Building, UNC-CH. [an error occurred while processing this directive]