A program of the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations,
with the generous support of the Carolina Seminars

2003-2004


2003: July, August, September, October, November, December
2004: January, February, March, April, May, June

Starred events are sponsored by the Seminar.
(Other events are recommended but not Seminar-sponsored.)

Maps and directions: UNC-CH, Duke, NCSU


July 22, 2003: "Ethics Across Faith Traditions: Finding Common Ground." 7:00-9:00 p.m., Martin Luther King, Jr., Resource Center, 130 E. Morgan Street, Raleigh. Diverse Traditions / Common Ideals project funded by the Bureau of Public Affairs, U.S. Department of State.

August 10, 2003: "Dispelling the Myths: Truths About Our Faiths." 2:00-4:00 p.m., Exploris, 201 E. Hargett Street, Raleigh. RSVP by Aug. 6 at the International Visitors Council website. Diverse Traditions / Common Ideals project funded by the Bureau of Public Affairs, U.S. Department of State.

August 25, 2003: Saad Eddin Ibrahim, professor of sociology at American University in Cairo and director of the Ibn Khaldun Center in Egypt, "Building Democracy in the Arab World." 4:30 p.m., Richard White Auditorium, East Campus, Duke University. Reception to follow in the East Duke Parlors. Sponsored by the Department of Asian and African Languages and Literature, the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, the Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs, and Amnesty International, Duke University.

September 6, 2003: Robert Jensen, professor of journalism, University of Texas at Austin. "Public Interest Betrayed? NPR and the Selling of the War in Iraq." 10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m., Chapel Hill Public Library meeting room, 100 Library Drive, Chapel Hill. Sponsored by Balance & Accuracy in Journalism, Committee for Media in the Public Interest, Carolina Interfaith Taskforce Connecting the Americas, and Carolina Seminars Program, University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

 September 10, 2003: Bruce Lawrence, professor of Islamic studies, and miriam cooke, professor of Arabic, Duke University, "Cybering Muslim History." 12:00-1:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University.

September 10, 2003: Sidra Ezrahi, professor of literature, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, "When Exiles Return: Jerusalem as Topos of Mind and Soil." 5:00 p.m., 119 East Duke Building, Duke University. Reception follows. Sponsored by the Department of Asian and African Languages and Literatures, Duke University.

September 10, 2003: "What Next in Iraq and Afghanistan? Some Historical Perspectives on Military Occupation." 5:30 p.m., Hanes Art Center, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Campus Y, the University Center for International Studies, and the Carolina Asia Center, UNC-CH. Speakers include:

  • Miles Fletcher, professor of history, UNC-CH, "The U.S. in Japan."
  • Willis Brooks, professor of history, UNC-CH, "The Soviet Union in Central Asia."
  • Moderator: Michael Hunt, professor of history, UNC-CH.
September 10, 2003: Hana Eshel, professor of Land of Israel studies, Bar-Ilan University, "How Can We Learn Political History of the Hasmonean Kingdom from the Dead Sea Scrolls." 7:30 p.m., Room 038, Graham Memorial Building, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies.

September 11, 2003: 5:30-7:00 p.m. "Reconstruction of Afghanistan" Discussion led by Philippe Dongier, manager of the World Bank's support to the reconstruction of Afghanistan since November 2001,  in room 04 at Duke's Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy under the series "Rethinking Development Policy," organized by the Duke Center for International Development (DCID). For more information, call 613-7333.

September 12-14, 2003: "Institutions, Ideologies, and Agency: Family Change in the Arab Middle East and Diaspora." Conference hosted by the the University Center for International Studies and the Carolina Population Center, UNC-CH, and supported by the Andrew Mellon Foundation. Coordinated by Kathryn Yount, professor of sociology and international health, Emory University.

September 12, 2003
5:00-7:00 p.m. Welcome Reception, University Center for International Studies, 223 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill.

September 13, 2003, Toy Lounge, 4th floor, Dey Hall, UNC-CH.
8:30-9:00 a.m. Breakfast.
9:00-11:00 a.m. Panel Session 1:

  • Mohammed Jalal Abbasi-Shavazi, professor of sociology, University of Tehran, and Meimanat Hossein-Chavoshi, graduate student in sociology, Australia National University, "Changes in Family, Fertility Behavior and Attitudes in Iran."
  • Akbar Aghajanian, professor of sociology, Fayetteville State University, Abbas Tashakkori, and Vaida Thompson, "Changing Roles and Goals of Female Adolescents in Iran: Educational and Labor Force Aspirations and Achievements."
  • Homa Hoodfar, professor of anthropology, Concordia University, "Families on the Move: The Changing Structure of Afghan Refugee Families."
  • John Casterline, Population Council, and Leila El Zeini, Social Research Center, American University in Cairo, "Consanguinity in the Arab Region: A Demographic Analysis."
  • Discussants: Hoda Rashad, director, Social Research Center, American University in Cairo, and Kathryn Yount, professor of sociology and international health, Emory University.
11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Lunch
12:30-2:30 p.m. Panel Session 2
  • Nadia El Afify, New Woman Research Center, "The Feminist Movement in Egypt and Ideologies of the Family and Private Sphere."
  • Amira Sonbol, professor of Islamic History, Georgetown University, "Divorce Laws in Comparative Perspective."
  • Attila Hancioglu, Institute for Population Studies, Hacettepe University, "Join the Crowd, Break the Law: A Socio-Demographic Profile of Religious Marriage in Turkey."
  • Kathryn Yount, professor of sociology and international health, Emory University, "Symbolic Gender Politics, Religious Group Identity, and the Decline in Female Genital Cutting in Minya, Egypt."
  • Discussant: Barbara Ibrahim, Population Council, Cairo, Egypt.
2:30-2:45 p.m. Break
2:45-3:45 p.m. Summary Discussion
6:30 p.m. Meet in the Lobby of the Carolina Inn to go to dinner
7:00 p.m. Conference Dinner, Acme Restaurant, 110 E. Main St., Carrboro

September 14, 2003:
9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Wrap Up Session, Conference Room, University Center for International Studies, 223 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill

September 16, 2003: Omar Bashir, master of the Iraqi oud (lute). 8:00 p.m., Nelson Music Room, Duke East Campus. Duke University Institute of Arts series. Tickets available from Duke Box Office.

September 17, 2003: Grant Parker, professor of classical studies, Duke University, and miriam cooke, professor of Arabic, Duke University, "Moments in the Mediterranean:  A New Volume from the Duke University Press." 12:00-1:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Part of the John Hope Franklin Center's noontime series "Wednesdays at The Center." Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University.

September 17, 2003: Sunaina Maira, professor of Asian American studies, University of California, Davis, "Imperial Feelings: South Asian Muslim Immigrant Youth and Citizenship after 9/11." 4:00 p.m., Rooms 130-132, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Center for Asian & Asian American Studies, Duke University.

September 19, 2003: "The Arab-Muslim Mediterranean: An International Colloquium." 2:00-5:00 p.m., Room 230, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsors: Department of African and Asian Languages and Literatures, Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Center for French & Francophone Studies, International Studies, Mellon Humanities Grant, Duke University. Panelists include:

  • Taieb Belghazi, professor of cultural studies,Muhammad V University, Rabat, Morroco, "Barzakh."
  • Sadok Boubaker, professor of history, Tunis I University, Tunisia, "Lepanto."
  • Nabiha Jerad, professor of French, Tunis I University, Tunisia, "Language."
  • Bruce B. Lawrence, professor of Islamic studies, Duke University, "Conquest."
  • Grant Parker, professor of classics, Duke University, "Loot."
  • Lucas Van Rompay, professor of religion, Duke University, "Christian."
  • Chaired by miriam cooke, professor of Arabic, Duke University.
September 21, 2003: 2:00-5:00 p.m. Riffat Hassan, professor of religious studies, University of Louisville, "Women and Sacred Texts." Diverse Traditions / Common Ideals project funded by the Bureau of Public Affairs, U.S. Department of State. Exploris, 201 E. Hargett Street, Raleigh. Reception, 5:00-6:00 p.m. Free tour of museum, 1:00-2:00 p.m. RSVP at the International Visitors Council website or at 919-838-9191 or ivc@northcarolina.edu.

September 23, 2003: Roman Horak, professor of cultural studies, University of Applied Arts, Vienna, "Turkish Migrants and Adopted Blackness: Diaspora Experience, American Popular Music, and Hybrid Youth Cultures in Vienna." 4:30 p.m., Old Chemistry 119, West Campus, Duke University. Sponsored by the German Studies Program, the History Department, the Sanford Institute for Public Policy, and the Center for European Studies, Duke University.

September 25, 2003: Jihan Ammar, Egyptian photojournalist, Photography Exhibition and Discussion. 3:00-4:30 p.m., 308 Venable Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

September 25, 2003: Marwen El Hicheri, Tunisian artist, opening reception for the exhibit "passion, grace, fire." 6:30 p.m., University Center for International Studies, 223 East Franklin Street, Chapel Hill. Sponsored by the Internationart Program, University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

September 25, 2003: "War Panel." 7:00 p.m., School of Education Auditorium, North Carolina Central University. Sponsored by the NCCU Department of English's Mass Communication Program, the Triangle Association of Black Jounralists and NCCU Continuing Education. Panelists include local television reporters:

  • Gilbert Baez, war correspondent, ABC-11
  • Rucks Russell, war correspondent, NBC-17
  • Ken Smith, war correspondent, WRAL/FOX-50.
September 25, 2003: Film: "Mr. and Mrs. Iyer" (India, 2002, 120 minutes), directed by Aparna Sen. Two travelers on a bus are thrown into an unexpected relationship when communal violence breaks out. 7:00 p.m., Erdahl Cloyd Theater, D.H. Hill Library, North Carolina State University. Part of the South Asian Film Festival, "Women Directors Series," sponsored by the North Carolina State University Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies, D.H. Hill Library, EKTAA, and Geet Bazaar (South Asian Radio, Sundays 10 a.m. to 12 noon, 88.1 FM).

September 25-28, 2003: Sixth Annual Rumi Festival of Chapel Hill. Dogwood Hall, Camp New Hope, 2805 New Highway 86, Chapel Hill.

September 25, 2003:

9:30 a.m. Spiritual Discourse ($40) with:
  • Shahabuddin David Less, direct student of Pir Vilayat Khan, Murshid Samuel Lewis, Shamcher Beorce and Mother Krishna Bai, and founder of Rising Tide International in Florida.
  • Sherif Baba, M. Serif er-Rifai Catalkaya, spiritual leader of the Rifai Marufi School of Sufism, headquartered in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
2:00-4:00 p.m. Dances of Universal Peace, with Shahabuddin David Less ($20)

September 26, 2003:

9:30 a.m. Spiritual Discourse with Shahabuddin David Less and Sherif Baba ($40)

2:00-4:00 p.m. Whirling, workshop with Raqib Brian Burke ($20), founder of Open Secret School of Whirling, Vancouver, British Columbia. Raqib has 28 years of study and experience in spiritual dance, and performed in the first ever Sema Ceremony by North American dervishes at the tomb of Mevlana Jelalauddin Rumi, the founder of whirlinga meditative movement described by one semazen as invoking the feeling of being “turned by God.”

7:30 p.m. Multimedia Concert of Sufi Music, Dance, and Chanting ($20). Friday night concert will feature a multimedia experience integrating modern and traditional music and dance by performers who are also students of Sufism and other spiritual traditions. The concert will be interactive and invite audience participation in vocal zikr and movement. Performers will include:

  • Beloved’s LuAnne Hightower performing Sufi and Islamic devotional music.
  • Jemal and Victoria Angela in an audio/visual interactive performance of acoustic music with hints of pop, sacred chant, Sufi poetry, experimental electronic and other world music.
  • Ahimsa and a Groove Goddess, practicing yogis from Wilmington, NC, who use drumming, original lyrics, spoken word and traditional songs to create “world spiritual music with groove.”
  • Marguerite Barnett, spiritual dancer from Sarasota, Florida. When not dancing with snakes, swords and fire, Marguerite is a practicing physician and surgeon.
September 27, 2003:

9:30 a.m. Spiritual Discourse ($40) with:
  • Pir Zia Inayat Khan, son and successor of Pir Vilayat Khan and president of the Sufi Order International of North America.
  • Devi Tide, executive director of the Sufi Order International and a teacher in the Sufi Healing Order Universal.
  • Sarmad Tide, minister of the Universal Worship, created by Hazrat Inayat Khan, and leader of the Dances of Universal Peace.
  • Sherif Baba
2:00-4:00 p.m. Dance of Universal Peace, with Sarmad Tide ($20)

7:30 p.m. Unity Zikr (donation). Excerpts from the Sema, the dance ceremony initiated by Rumi, performed by Semazen (whirling dervishes) from North Carolina, Vermont, and Canada, and accompanied by musicians from Turkey and the U.S. This demonstration will lead into the annual Unity Zikr, a joyous celebration of prayer, movement, song, and chanting dedicated to world peace and unity.

September 28, 2003:

9:30 a.m. Spiritual Discourse with Pir Zia Inayat Khan, Devi Tide, Sarmad Tide, and Sherif Baba ($40).

11 a.m. Universal Worship Service (donation).

September 26, 2003: John Dancy, professor of communications and journalism, Duke University, "Journalism and War." 12:00-1:30 p.m., Room 150, Sanford Institute for Public Policy, Duke University. First meeting of the sixth year of the Eurasian Working Group, Duke University.

September 28, 2003: Osman Aksu, specialist in the Kanun, a Turkish stringed instrument, performer with the Galata Mevlevi Music and Sema Ensemble in Istanbul, Turkey, "Hicaz Makami." An informal session on Turkish music with the Osman Aksu Ensemble, with emphasis on the Hicaz Makami. Bring voice, drum, instrument or just your interest. Suitable for those new to the eastern makam system, as well as for those who enjoy the companionship of singing and playing world music. $15.00 donation includes handouts and/or sheet music; $5.00 for students. 5:00-7:00 p.m., International House, Duke University, 2022 Campus Drive, Durham. Sponsored by the American-Turkish Association of North Carolina.

September 29, 2003: H. Samy Alim, professor of linguistics, Duke University, “Bismillah Al-Rahman Al-Rahim”: Uncovering the Hidden Histories of African American Muslim Movements in the Hip Hop Nation." 4:30-5:30 p.m.., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks and the Department of Asian and African Languages and Literatures, Duke University.

October 2, 2003: Film: "Bhaji on the Beach" (U.K., 1994, 100 minutes), directed by Gurinder Chadha. A group of South Asian women on a beach outing face a series of personal crises. 7:00 p.m., Erdahl Cloyd Theater, D.H. Hill Library, North Carolina State University. Part of the South Asian Film Festival, "Women Directors Series," sponsored by the North Carolina State University Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies, D.H. Hill Library, EKTAA, and Geet Bazaar (South Asian Radio, Sundays 10 a.m. to 12 noon, 88.1 FM).

October 5, 2003: "Headlines from the Frontlines." Symposium of journalists who have covered the recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, discussing the effect of recent U.S. initiatives in those theaters on the media's ability to gather and report. 3:00 p.m., 111 Carroll Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the James M. Johnston Issues Forum, UNC-CH. Panelists include:

  • Laurie Dhue, Fox News
  • Donna Leinwand, USA Today
  • Colin Soloway, CNN and Newsweek
  • David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
October 6, 2003: John Baily, professor of music, Goldsmiths College, and Paul Berliner, professor of musicology, Northwestern University, "Archiving Performance: Musical Repatriation after Times of Crisis." 3:00-4.30 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center.

October 7, 2003: 8:00 p.m. Music from Afghanistan. John Baily and Veronica Doubleday on Afghan lutes (dutar and rebab). Nelson Music Room, Duke East Campus. Duke University Institute of Arts series. Tickets available from Duke Box Office.

October 8, 2003: "Celebrating Algeria: Women, Culture, Religion." Hors d'oeuvres at 6:30 p.m., talks at 7:00 p.m., 230 Franklin Center, Duke University. Part of the Feminist Studies Across the Disciplines series, in conjunction with the "Year of Algeria" (2003) in France. Co-sponsored by the Center for French and Francophone Studies, International Studies, and the Department of Romance Studies, Duke University. Speakers include:

  • Sahar Amer, professor of Asian studies, UNC-CH, "The Changing Status of Muslim Maghrebian Women in France"
  • Martine Antle, professor of French, UNC-CH, "Public Space/Private Space in Women's Art"
  • Dominique Fisher, professor of French, UNC-CH, "Assia Djebar and Anamnesis: Re-thinking History and Literature in Extreme Situations"
  • Response by Ranjana Khanna, professor of English, Duke.
October 8-11, 2003: Iranian Film Festival: “‘The Day I Became a Woman’: Portrayals of Gender and Society in Iranian Cinema.”Carolina Student Union Theater, UNC-CH. Organized by the Persian Cultural Society, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the University Center for International Studies, Department of Sociology, Department of Asian Studies, the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies, UNC Parents Fund, UNC Student Congress, Duke University Program in Literature, Duke University Film/Video/Digital Program.
October 8, 2003:

6:30 p.m. Opening Address: Persheng Sadegh-Vaziri, documentary film-maker [Journal from Tehran (1986), Far from Iran (1990), and A Place Called Home (1998)].

7:30-8:30 p.m. Film: "Women Like Us" (Iran, 2000-2002, 61 minutes), directed by Persheng Sadegh-Vaziri. Five women are interviewed--a journalist, a piano teacher, a rice farmer, a nurse, and a religious student--about their lives. The documentary implicitly rebukes both the Western stereotype of Iranian women as being utterly oppressed and conservative Muslim teachings about the subservience of women. In Farsi with English subtitles.

9:00-9:45 p.m. Film: "The Afghan Alphabet" (Iran-Afghanistan, 2001, 46 minutes), directed by Mohsen Makhmalbaf. In this documentary shot in the border villages between Iran and Afghanistan, Makhmalbaf tracks the children who do not attend school with his digital camera and questions why they are not being educated. Finding poverty, ignorance, prejudice, male chauvinism and superstition prevalent, the film seeks to address some of the problems that have come to imprison Afghani girls in a subtle and pervasive way. In Farsi with English subtitles.

October 9, 2003:

6:00-8:00 p.m. "World Visions of Contemporary Iranian Cinema." Panel with Negar Mottahedeh, Arnal Dayaratna, Abigail Salerno, and Shilyh Warren of Duke University. Dr. Mottahedeh and four graduate students from Duke University’s Program in Literature will address various topics current in Iranian film. All presentations will include film clips.

8:00-9:25 p.m. Film: "The Apple" (Iran, 1997, 86 minutes), directed by Samira Makhmalbaf. Directed by the 18-year-old daughter of Iranian filmmaker Mohsen Makhmalbaf, The Apple was an Official Selection at the Cannes Film Festival. The film reenacts a real-life event in which the characters play themselves. The story unravels in a poor area of Tehran, where some people inform the local welfare authorities that one of their neighbors is keeping his twin 11-year-old girls locked up in his house. In Farsi with English subtitles.

October 10, 2003:

7:00-7:15 p.m. Film: "Candidate" (Iran, 1999, 15 minutes), directed by Mohammad Shirvani. An old woman wishes to marry away her son, who has just returned from military service. She goes out to meet young girls in the city, and insists on obtaining their photographs. In Farsi with English subtitles.

7:15-8:45 p.m. Film: "Ten" (Iran, 2002, 94 minutes), directed by Abbas Kiarostami. Celebrated Iranian writer-director Abbas Kiarostami (Taste of Cherry, Through the Olive Trees) once again casts his masterful cinematic gaze upon the modern sociopolitical landscape of his homeland -- this time as seen through the eyes of one woman as she drives through the streets of Tehran over a period of several days.

9:00-10:30 p.m. Film: "Kandahar" (Iran-Afghanistan, 2001, 85 minutes), directed by Mohsen Makhmalbaf. Kandahar is a politically urgent story of a young female journalist named Nafas who escaped Afghanistan with her family but must return and race against time in an attempt to rescue her sister.

October 11, 2003:

6:30-7:30 p.m. Closing Address: Hamid Dabashi, professor of Iranian studies, Columbia University, and author of Close Up: Iranian Cinema, Past, Present, Future (2001).

7:30-8:45 p.m. Film: "The Joy of Madness" (Iran-Afghanistan, 2003, 73 minutes), directed by Hana Makhmalbaf. This documentary, made by Mohsen Makhmalbaf’s 14-year old daughter, was shot in Afghanistan and follows a mad man, a Mulla, and two women. Join us for its US premier! In Farsi with English Subtitles.

9:00-10:15 p.m. Film: "The Day I Became a Woman" (Iran, 2000, 78 minutes), directed by Marzieh Meshkini. Stages of women's lives in Iran are examined through three separate stories of a small girl, a young lady, and an old woman. The struggle is to become a woman where freedom is not clearly defined. Each episode stands on its own and in the end, all tie together. In Farsi with English subtitles.
October 9, 2003: "India-Pakistan: A Roadmap for Peace." 6:00-7:00 p.m. dinner, 7:00-9:00 p.m. panel discussion, Comfort Suites, 5219 Page Road, Durham. Sponsored by the Indian American Forum For Political Education. Free for IAFPE members, $10 for non-members, $5 for students and seniors. RSVP by October 7th to nananthrao@hotmail.com. Panelists include:
  • Amit Pandya, counselor, Open Society Institute
  • Hussain Haqqani, senior fellow, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
  • Raju Thomas, professor of international affairs, Marquette University
October 9, 2003: William G. Dever, professor of Near Eastern archeology, University of Arizona, "Who Were the Early Israelites and Where Did They Come from?" 7:30 p.m., 101 Greenlaw Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies.

October 10, 2003: Rahul Mahajan, author of The New Crusade: America's War on Terrorism (2002)andFull Spectrum Dominance: US Power in Iraq and Beyond (2003) and coordinator of the NoWar Collective, "The "Bush Doctrine" and Building an Antiwar Movement." 7:00 p.m., 111 Carroll Hall, UNC-CH. Part of the "Triangle Solidarity Summit," sponsored by SURGE and the Campaign to End the Cycle of Violence, UNC-CH.

October 14, 2003: "In Memory of Edward W. Said 1935-2003: Reflections and Recollections." 4:00-5:00 p.m., Film: "Edward Said: On Orientalism" (United States, 1998, 40 minutes), directed by Sut Jhally. 5:00-7:00 p.m., Panel Discussion with UNC-CH and Duke faculty, graduate and undergraduate students, Palestinian and other peace activists. Gerrard Hall, UNC-CH.

October 19, 2003: "Mystic Songs of Kabir: Musical Traditions of a Great South Asian Sufi Poet." Musicians Prahlad Singh Tipanya of Malwa, Madhya Pradesh, India, and Krishna Kant Sukla of Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India, with accompanists. Introduced by Linda Hess, professor of religious studies, Stanford University. 4:00 p.m., Long View Center at Exploris, Hargett and Person Streets, Raleigh. Tickets: General Admission $10, Students and Seniors $5, Sponsors $25. Sponsored by the N.C. Center for South Asia Studies.

October 20, 2003: Judith Ernst, author and illustrator. Reading from Song of Songs: Erotic Love Poetry (Eerdmans, 2003). 3:30 p.m., Bull's Head Bookstore, UNC-CH.

October 20-21, 2003: 6th Annual World View Symposium: "Globalization: What It Means and How to Teach It." Complete program available here.

October 21, 2003: Helene and Celia Faussart, French-Camerounian musical group Les Nubians. Luncheon Discussion. 12:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University.

October 24, 2003:  Mark Schneider, senior vice-president of International Crisis Group (ICG), "Conflict in Europe and Eurasia and the Role of the International Crisis Group." 12:00-1:30 p.m., Room 03, Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke University. Sponsored by the "Rethinking Development" seminar of the Duke Center for International Development and the International Crisis Group; the Eurasian Working Group, Duke University; and the
Duke-UNC Rotary Program for Peace and Conflict Resolution.

 October 29, 2003: Carl W. Ernst, UNC-Chapel Hill. Reading from Following Muhammad: Rethinking Islam in the Contemporary World  (UNC Press, 2003). 3:30 p.m., Bull's Head Bookstore, UNC-CH.

 October 29, 2003: Peter Coates, professor of psychology, University of Lincoln, "Ibn `Arabi and Postmodernism." 7:00 p.m., Room 130/132, John Hope Franklin Center. Talk preceded by iftar (meal breaking the daytime fast during the month of Ramadan) at 6:00 p.m.; for iftar please RSVP to Nisa Moosa at 919-668-2146. Sponsored by the Departments of Religion at Duke and UNC-CH and the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke.

October 29, 2003: Gurmeet Rai, conservation architect and founder, Cultural Resource Conservation Initiative, New Delhi, India. Screening and discussion of the film: "Lime Buildings Breathe" (India, 60 minutes), directed by Satyan Wanchoo, a documentary film about communities saving buildings and building communities in North India. 7:00 p.m., Caldwell Hall Lounge, North Carolina State University. Sponsored by the NC Center for South Asia Studies.

October 29, 2003: "From Pain to Reconciliation: A Frank Discussion about the Occupation," with members of the Parents' Circle, 7:30 p.m., North Carolina Hillel, 210 West Cameron Ave., Chapel Hill. Sponsored by Jews for a Just Peace-NC. The speakers will also appear October 30, 2003, 7:00 p.m., at United Church of Christ, 814 Dixie Trail, Raleigh (cosponsored by Jews for a Just Peace-Raleigh/Cary, the Triangle Palestinian/Jewish Dialogue group, and the Temple Beth Or Sisterhood); October 31, 2003, 1:30 p.m., Weatherspoon Student Center, North Carolina State University (cosponsored by North Carolina State Hillel and the Middle East and North African Students Association, NCSU); November 1, 2003, 7:30 p.m., Durham Arts Council, 120 Morris Street, Durham (catered by the Mediterranean Deli and cosponsored by the Coalition for Peace with Justice, CITCA, The Eno River Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, Triangle Tikkun, and the Peace and Social Concerns Committee of the Durham Friends Meeting):

  • Rihab Essawi, professor of education, sociology and social work, Al Quds University, Jerusalem, general director of the Department of Care and Rehabilitation for Special Needs for the Palestinian Ministry of Social Welfare; Rihab lost her nephew, mother and brother in three separate incidences of Israeli violence in the West Bank. She is co-founder of the Bereaved Family Forum and the Parents' Circle.
  • Yitzhak Frankenthal, co-founder of the Parents' Circle and Hello Peace, a free Israeli-Palestinian chat line boasting over 200,000 calls since October 2002; Yitzhak's son Arik was abducted and murdered by Hamas terrorists.
 November 3, 2003: William Hart, professor of religion, University of North Carolin at Greensboro, "Revisiting Dark Passages," a work in progress on black religion, Malcolm X and his own experience. Responses from Sherman Jackson, professor of Arabic and Islamic studies, University of Michigan, and Edward Curtis, professor of religious studies, UNC-CH, to be followed by general discussion. 5:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Department of Religion and the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University.

November 3, 2003: Azeddine Chergui, fellow in international development policy, Sanford Institute, Duke University, "A Conversation in French on the Controversial Autobiographical Narrative of Moroccan Writer, Mohamed Choukri, Le pain nu." 5:00 p.m., 305 Languages Building, Duke University. Sponsored by the Department of Romance Studies and the Center for French and Francophone Studies, Duke University.

November 3, 2003: Film: "Kedma" (Israel/France/Italy, 2002, 100 minutes), directed by Amos Gitai. 8:00 p.m., Griffith Theater, Bryan Center, Duke University. Sponsored by Screen/Society, Duke University.

November 4, 2003: Lawrence Schiffman, professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies, New York University, "Scholars, Scrolls and Scandals: The Dead Sea and the History of Judaism." 7:30 p.m., 201 Coker Hall. Sponsored by the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies.

November 4, 6, 11, 13, 2003: Middle East Film Showcase: Comparative Perspectives on Media in the Middle East and the Arab-Israeli Conflict. Co-sponsored by the University Center for International Studies and the Undergraduate Library's Media Resources Center

November 4, 2003: "Lines in the Sand" (U.S., 1991, 15 minutes), directed by Laura J.E. Marini; and "Media and the War, Part I" (U.S., 1991, 30 minutes), produced by CNN. Moderator: Malik Athamneh, Jordanian columnist and founding co-director of the International Center for Media Studies, Amman, Jordan. 7:00-9:00 p.m., Undergraduate Library Screening Room 207, UNC-CH.

November 6, 2003: "Media and Democracy in the Arab World" (Germany, 1999, 45 minutes); and "Media and the War, Part II" (U.S., 1991, 30 minutes), produced by CNN. Moderator: Jefara Budeiri, Palestinian correspondent for Al-Jazeera. 7:00-9:00 p.m., Undergraduate Library, Guthridge Screening Room 205, UNC-CH.

November 11, 2003: "Children of Fire" (Israel-Palestine, 1990, 28 minutes), directed by Mai Masri; and "A Search for Solid Ground: The Intifada through Israeli Eyes" (Israel-Palestine, 1990, 33 minutes), produced by Steve Brand. Moderator: Rebecca Stein, professor of anthropology, Duke University. 7:00-9:00 p.m., Undergraduate Library, Guthridge Screening Room 205, UNC-CH.

November 13, 2003: "Gaza Ghetto: Portrait of a Palestinian Family, 1948-1984" (Palestine, 1984, 82 minutes), directed by Joan Mandell, Per-Ake Holmquist, and Pierre Bjorklund; and "A Soldier’s Diary" (Israel-Palestine, 1991, 47 minutes), directed by Gideon Gitai.  Moderator: Stephen Zunes, professor of politics and chair of the peace and justice studies program, University of San Francisco. 7:00-9:00 p.m., Undergraduate Library, Gurthridge Screening Room 205, UNC-CH.
November 5, 2003: John Richards, professor of history, Duke University, and president of the American Institute of Afghanistan Studies, "Organizing a New Overseas Research Center in Afghanistan." 12:00-1:00 p.m., Room 240, . Part of the John Hope Franklin Center's noontime series "Wednesdays at The Center." Sponsored by the American Institute of Afghanistan Studies, Duke University.

November 5, 2003: Francois Burgat, Institut de Recherches et d'Etudes sur le Monde Arabe et Musulman, Paris, "Face to Face with Political Islam." 5:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Center for French and Francophone Studies, Duke University, and the Cultural Services of the Embassy of France in the U.S.A.

November 6, 2003: Vita Plume, profesor of art and design, North Carolina State University, "Textiles Revealed: The Technology of Symbols and Storytelling." 7:00 p.m., Brown Room, 4th floor of Talley Student Center, North Carolina State University. Sponsored by the Point of View Lecture Series, Gallery of Art and Design, North Carolina State University. Among the objects to be discussed from the gallery's permanent collection are several examples of 5th century Coptic textiles.

November 6, 2003: Film: "The Day I Became a Woman" (Iran, 2000, 78 minutes), directed by Marzieh Meshkini. 8:30 p.m., Mini-Theater, D.H. Hill Library, North Carolina State University. Part of the South Asian Film Festival, "Women Directors Series," sponsored by the North Carolina State University Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies, D.H. Hill Library, EKTAA, and Geet Bazaar (South Asian Radio, Sundays 10 a.m. to 12 noon, 88.1 FM).

November 7, 2003: G. Thomas Goodnight, professor of communication studies, Annenberg School for Communication, University of Southern California, "The Annual Jay Pence Lecture: War and Peace in the Global Age: The War We Saw, the War They Saw, and the Wars that Went Unseen." 2:30 p.m., 116 Murphey Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Department of Communication Studies, UNC-CH.

November 7-9, 2003: Critical Perspectives on Arab and American Media Coverage of the Iraq War:  Media, Public Opinion, and the Iraq War Perceptions and Perspectives in the U.S. and Arab Media. A Public Forum. Hanes Auditorium, UNC-CH. Organized by the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH, and the International Center for Media Studies, Amman, Jordan.

November 7, time TBA. Ray Hanania, Arab-American stand-up comedian.
November 8, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. "Media and the National Interest."
November 8, 1:30-4:30 p.m. "'Official Speak,' Experts, and Embedded Journalists: Sources and Resources for Covering War."
November 9, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. "Media's Audience: The Role of the 'Public' in Shaping News."

Participants include:

  • Jihan Ammar, photo editor for the French news agency AFP.
  • Malik Athamneh, Jordanian columnist and founding co-director of the International Center for Media Studies in Amman.
  • Ghazi Mohammad Balkiz, NBC News producer and documentary filmmaker.
  • Jefara Bodeeri, Palestine-based correspondent for Al-Jazeera TV.
  • Maad Fayad, editor of Al-Majallah mewspaper, London.
  • Rouman Haddad, senior editor for AmmanNet, the first Arab radio news broadcast on the web.
  • Ray Hanania, Arab-American journalist, author, and stand-up comedian.
  • Najwa Kandakji, Syrian TV actress and news personality.
  • Betool Khedairi, Iraqi novelist, currently residing in Jordan.
  • Donna Leinwand, war correspondent, USA Today.
  • Justin Podur, ZNet commentator and developer
  • Jay Price, military affairs reporter, News and Observer, Raleigh, North Carolina.
  • Nancy Snow, professor of communications, California State University, Fullerton.
November 10, 2003: Betool Khedairi, Iraqi writer currently residing in Jordan, reading from her recently published book, A Sky So Close. 1:00-2:30 p.m., Toy Lounge, Dey Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

November 13, 2003: Anna Bigelow, professor of religion, North Carolina State University, "Places of Power; Places of Peace: Sharing Sacred Sites in Punjab." 7:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Duke University Contemporary South Asia Forum.

November 13-14, 2003: Palestine America: A Conversation, from South Atlantic Quarterly's Fall 2003 Special Issue. Part of the "Dissent: Past & Present" series sponsored by the Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke University.

November 13, 2003:
7:00 p.m. Panel, Richard White Auditorium, Duke University East Campus:
  • Roane Carey, copy chief, The Nation, and editor of The New Intifada (Verso, 2001) and The Other Israel: Voices of Refusal and Dissent (New Press, 2003)
  • Saree Makdisi, professor of English, University of California at Los Angeles
  • Ken Surin, professor of literature, Duke University.
9:30 p.m. Reception, Women's Studies Parlor, East Duke Building

November 14, 2003:
12:00 p.m. Lecture: Saree Makdisi, Richard White Auditorium
2:30 p.m. Panel, Richard White Auditorium

  • Amal Amireh, professor of English, George Mason University
  • Mohammed Bamyeh, professor of international studies, Macalester College
  • Melani McAlister, professor of American civilization, Georgetown University
  • John Michael, professor of English, University of Rochester
November 14 and 15, 2003: "Bridging the Divide: Towards a Just Peace in Israel and Palestine." United Church of Chapel Hill, 1321 Airport Road, Chapel Hill. Sponsored by the Coalition for Peace with Justice and Friends of Sabeel/North America.
November 14, 2003:
12:30 p.m. Religious Leaders’ Luncheon at Chapel of the Cross
1:00 p.m. Registration begins. Videos, Exhibits, Book Signing, Networking
2:30 p.m. Welcome and Opening Panel: "Bridging the Divide."
4:00 p.m. Break
4:15 p.m. Workshops. Topics include Rebuilding Homes, Amnesty International, Hope Flowers School, Lobbying, Environmental Issues: Wall, Water and Waste, Peacemaking Skills, Courage to Refuse, Non-Violent Resistance to the Occupation, led by guest speakers and local experts, including Brian Avery, Faraj Ghunaim, Donna Hicks, Rania Masri, Josh Reubner, Marty Rosenbluth, Tom Stern, and Tema Okun.
Sundown: Breaking the Fast for Ramadan
6:00 p.m. Middle Eastern Dinner and Keynote Address. Naim Ateek, Anglican priest and director of the Sabeel Ecumenical Liberation Theology Center, Jerusalem.
9:30 p.m. Arabic Music. Naji Hilal and ensemble; actress/comedienne Maysoon Ziyad.

November 15, 2003:
8:00 a.m. Registration begins
9:00 a.m. Welcome
9:15 a.m. Plenary Session. Jeff Halper, professor of anthropology, Ben Gurion University, Israel, and coordinator of the Israeli Committee Against Home Demolitions, "Building a Bridge Instead of a Wall."
10:30 a.m. Break
11:00 a.m. Workshops (continued)
12:30 p.m. Lunch
1:30 p.m. Panel. "The Faces of Violence."
3:15 p.m. Break
3:30 p.m. Entertainment, including the Dave Lippman (a.k.a. George Shrub, the Singing CIA Agent).
4:00-5:30 p.m. Closing Panel: Voices of Courage, Empowerment and Hope.

Panelists and workshop leaders include:

  • Fahed Abu-Akel, moderator of the Presbyterian Church (USA), 2002-2003:
  • Stav Adivi, major in the Israeli Defense Force, refusenik in the Courage to Refuse movement, activist with Rebuilding Homes.
  • Malik Athamneh, Jordanian journalist and founding co-director of the International Center for Media Studies (Amman, Jordan).
  • Jefara Bodeeri, Palestine-based correspondent for Al-Jazeera TV.
  • Cindy Corrie and Craig Corrie, parents of Rachel Corrie, who was killed by a bulldozer in Rafah, Gaza on March 16, 2003:
  • Ibrahim Issa and Ghada Issa, co-directors of the peace-oriented Hope Flowers School in Bethlehem, West Bank.
  • Phillip L. Jones, executive director, Church of the Brethren's Washington, DC office; board member, Churches for Middle East Peace and On Earth Peace.
  • Daniel McGowan, director, Deir Yassin Remembered, and professor of economics, Hobart & William Smith Colleges.
  • Stephen Sizer, reverend and author on Christian Zionism and the indigenous church of Israel/Palestine.
  • Dorothy Jean Weaver, professor of New Testament, Eastern Mennonite Seminary, Harrisonburg, Virginia.
  • Jean Zaru, international peace and justice consultant to World Council of Churches, American Friends Service Committee and other organizations.
  • Stephen Zunes, professor of politics and chair of the peace and justice studies program, University of San Francisco.
November 16, 2003: "Religions of India Field Trip." 12:00 - approximately 5:00 p.m. Rendezvous in front of Witherspoon Student Center, North Carolina State University. The field trip will proceed to the Sikh Gurudwara, the Hindu Bhavan, and the Islamic Center. At the Sikh Gurudwara langar (lunch) is served after the service. Carpooling is encouraged. All are invited to participate, but participants are urged to attend all three segments. This is a unique opportunity to learn about three major world faiths and observe first-hand how they are practiced. Friends, family, and children are welcome. Sponsored by the Hindi-Urdu Program, North Carolina State University, and the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies.

November 17, 2003: Peter Hervik, lecturer in international migration and ethnic relations studies, Malmö University, Sweden, "The Perils of Public Anthropology? Multiculturalism in Neo-Nationalist Scandinavia." On the basis of recent developments in Scandinavian anthropology, this talk will discuss the controversy raised by Norwegian professor of social anthropology, Unni Wikan. In her three books Wikan has used her insight into Muslim cultural practice and thought, her skills in expert witnessing in local courts, and her public popularity as a basis to argue against multiculturalism and for individual human rights, social justice, and equality for children in Muslim families in Norway, Sweden and Denmark. ... In the talk, I will look closely at Wikan's work using my own research and public anthropology to contextualize her claims and situate them within the emergence of neo-nationalism in Scandinavia. Following this I will argue that Public Interest Anthropology needs to develop forums for critical, reflexive debate of all political stances from science as neutral to enlightenment to liberal and radical democratic.  Otherwise, we stand at risk of giving unwitting support to neo-racist, neo-nationalist and populist governmental legislation targeting non-Western immigrants, particularly Muslims. 3:15 p.m., 308 Alumni Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology Colloquium Series, UNC-CH.

 November 19, 2003: Film: "Wedding in Galilee" (France-Israel, 1987, 113 minutes), directed by Michel Khleifi. Moderated by Carl Ernst, professor of religious studies, UNC-CH. 3:00-5:00 p.m., 205 Undergraduate Library, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the UNC Arab Club and the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

November 20, 2003: Duke University Campus Wide Fast. Fast to Feed the Hungry. 1) Pledge: For everyone who pledges to fast Thursday the 20th, sponsors will donate to the Durham branch of the Food Bank of North Carolina.  Help feed the hungry in your community this Ramadan. 2) Fast:  November 20th refrain from eating or drinking from dawn to dusk. You are invited to join fellow fasters for breakfast at Rick's Diner before dawn, 5 a.m. 3) Dinner:  Break your fast with a free dinner in the LSRC Dining Room, 5:00 p.m. catered by the Blue Express. Sponsored by the Muslim Students Association, Duke University.

November 25, 2003: Oren Yiftachel, professor of geography, Ben Gurion University, Beer-Sheva, Israel, "Land, Settlements and Walls: Israel's Spatial Policies and the Zionist-Palestinian Conflict." 4:00 p.m., Carpenter Board Room, Perkins Library, Duke University. Sponsored by the  Department of Asian and African Languages and Literature, Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Franklin Humanities Institute, and Judaic Studies, Duke University.

December 3, 2003: Edward Curtis IV, professor of religious studies, UNC-CH, "Are Black Muslims Really Muslim? Reconsidering African-American Islamization." 12:00-2:00 p.m., 405 Carolina Population Center, 123 West Franklin Street. Sponsored by the Institute of African American Research, UNC-CH.

 December 3, 2003: Thomas Burman, professor of history, University of Tennessee-Knoxville, "Polemic, Philology, and Ambivalence: Reading the Qur'an in Latin Christendom." 4:00 p.m., Toy Lounge, Dey Hall, UNC-CH. Co-sponsored by the Medieval Studies Program, UNC-CH.

December 4, 2003: Film: "Khamosh Pani (Silent Water)" (Pakistan, 2003, 95 minutes), directed by Sabiha Sumar. A widow sees her son being drawn toward fundamentalism and she remembers her experiences during the Partition. 7:00 p.m., Erdahl Cloyd Theater, D.H. Hill Library, North Carolina State University. Part of the South Asian Film Festival, "Women Directors Series," sponsored by the North Carolina State University Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies, D.H. Hill Library, EKTAA, and Geet Bazaar (South Asian Radio, Sundays 10 a.m. to 12 noon, 88.1 FM). Showing postponed til Spring 2004.

December 9, 2003: Jeff Jennette, M.A. student in Russian and East European Studies, "Conflict Resolution in Chechnya:  The Security Dilemma and Ripeness." 4:00 p.m., University Center for International Studies, 223 East Franklin Street, Chapel Hill. Part of the Piedmont Slavic Colloquium, sponsored by the Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies, UNC-CH.

January 8, 2004: Film: "No Man's Land" (Bosnia, 2001, 98 minutes), directed by Danis Tanovic. Introduced by Marko Dumancic, doctoral candidate in history, UNC-CH. 5:00 p.m., 039 Graham Memorial Hall, UNC-CH. Part of the International Film Series, "Border Crossings," sponsored by the Curriculum of Comparative Literature, the Comparative Literature Organization for Undergraduate Discussion, and the Graduate Students Association of the Curriculum of Comparative Literature, UNC-CH.

January 10, 2004: Rahim AlHaj, Iraqi oud player, and Jose Manuel Osorio (Portuguese fado singer), accompanied by Viriato Ferreira (Spanish guitar), and Jose Silva (Portuguese guitar), "Voices in Struggle." Performances will be accompanied by commentaries by Ellen Gray, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Duke University (for Osorio), and Steven Feld, professor of anthropology and music, University of New Mexico (for AlHaj), talking with the performers about their music and their experiences as artists who have lived under repressive regimes. 8.00 p.m., Nelson Music Room, East Duke Building, Duke University East Campus. Sponsored by the Social Science Research Council, Duke University's John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies, and the Duke University Department of Music as part of the weekend workshop on "Music in Conflict and Reconciliation."

January 11-12, 2004: Rahim AlHaj, Iraqi oud player, Benefit Concert for the Iraqi Children's Fund: Music and Stories of Life in Iraq Today. January 11: 7:30 p.m., 100 Hamilton Hall, UNC-CH. January 12: 7:30 p.m., Church of Reconciliation, 110 N. Elliott Rd., Chapel Hill. Admission free; suggested minimum donation: $10. Sponsored by the Coalition for Peace with Justice; Binkley Baptist Church; Church of Reconciliation; Music Department, UNC-CH; Peace 1st; University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH; Womens International League of Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

January 15, 2004: Steven Wilkinson, professor of political science, Duke University, "Explaining Ethic Violence in India." 7:00 p.m., John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Triangle Institute for Security Studies. RSVP to Carolyn Pumphrey.

January 16, 2004: Robert P. Jackson, director of the Office of Promotion of Human Rights and Democracy in the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, U.S. Department of State, Question and Answer on issues relating to Iraq and the Middle East, Africa, or the role of the State Department. 10:00-11:30 a.m., 105 South Building (conference room), UNC-CH; Democracy-Building Around the World, 2:00-5:00 p.m., Gertrude Cox Statistics Building, RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Road, Research Triangle Park, NC. Sponsored by the International Visitors Council / World Affairs Council and RTI International. For the RTI event, please RSVP at the IVC-RTP website.

January 20, 2004: Sahar Amer, professor of Asian studies, UNC-CH, "Diversity in Islam." 7:00 p.m., 111 Carroll Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Great Decisions Program, UNC-CH.

January 22, 2004: Wesley Jordan, microfinance specialist, "One Year In Kosovo: Reflections On Post-Conflict Development." 3:30 p.m., Coates Building Conference Room, 223 East Franklin Street, Chapel Hill. Sponsored by the Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies, UNC-CH.

January 23, 2004: William B. Taylor, Afghanistan Coordinator, U.S. Department of State, "Afghanistan: The Challenge of Commitment." 1:00-3:00 p.m., Lecture Hall Room 05, Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke University. Part of the workshop series, "Rethinking Development Policy." Sponsored by the Duke Center for International Development, the Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy, the Eurasian Working Group, the American Institute of Afghanistan Studies, and the Duke/UNC Rotary Center for International Studies in Peace and Conflict Resolution.

January 26 and 28, 2004: Film: "Nile Voices: Perspectives from Young Adults in Egypt on America and the Middle East" (Egypt, 2003, 30 minutes), produced by Julie Norman. 9:30 p.m., January 26, House G Commons; 8:30 p.m., January 28, Blackwell Commons, Duke University. Sponsored by Hiwar, Duke University.

January 28, 2004: Seyyed Hossein Nasr, professor of Islamic studies, George Washington University, and former president of the University of Tehran. Sponsored by the Muslim Student Association of Guilford College, the Muslim Student Association of UNC-Greensboro, the American Muslim Student Association of Guilford Technical Community College, and the Guilford Council of Religious Organizations.

  • "Forum on Religion and Science." 3:45 p.m., Joseph M. Bryan Jr. Auditorium, Guilford College.
  • "The Heart of Islam." 7:00 p.m., Dana Auditorium, Guilford College.
 January 30-31, 2004: Second Annual Meeting of the Muslim Networks Consortium. John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University.

February 3, 2004: Zahra A. Hussein Ali, professor of English, Kuwait University, "The Art of Perturbing: A Semiotic Approach to Dystopia in the Sculptures of Sami Mohammed." 4:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Department of Asian and African Languages and Literature, the Department of Art and Art History, and the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University.

February 3, 2004: Dale Klein, assistant to the secretary of defense for nuclear, chemical, and biological defense programs, "Weapons of Mass Destruction." 7:00 p.m., 111 Carroll Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Great Decisions Program, UNC-CH.

February 3, 2004: Yaron Ezrahi, professor of political science, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, "The Effects of Terrorism on Civil Liberties in the United States and Israel." 4:00 p.m., Duke University Law School. Sponsored by the Freeman Center for Jewish Life, Duke University.

February 4, 2004: Necdet Ipekyuz, president of the Diyarbakir Chapter of the Turkish Medical Association and a general medical practitioner in Diyarbakir Pulmonary Diseases Hospital, and Selim Olcer, past president of the Turkish Medical Assocation (1990-1995) and an ear-nose-throat surgeon at the Diyarbakir Regional Hospital, "Healthcare in Southeastern Turkey in the New Millennium: Problems, Solutions, and Opportunities." 12:00-1:00 p.m., 335 Rosenau Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the School of Public Health Office of Global Health, UNC-CH.

February 4, 2004: Charles Kurzman, professor of sociology, UNC-CH, "Weaving Iran into the Tree of Nations." 7:00 p.m., RSVP with sponsor for location. Part of the Triangle South Asia Consortium Colloquium Series, sponsored by the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies.

February 5-28, 2004: David Hare’s play “Via Dolorosa,” recounting the British playwright’s travels and conversations with residents in Israel and Gaza. Deep Dish Theater Company, in Chapel Hill’s University Mall,  Estes Drive and US 15-501. Thursday through Saturday performances begin at 8 p.m., with Sunday matinees at 3 p.m. There will also be a special early show at 7:30 on Wednesday, Feb. 25. Discussions will follow both the evening performance on Thursday, Feb. 19, and the matinee performance on Sunday, Feb. 15. Tickets for all performances are $14, $12 for seniors, and $10 for students. Sunday, Feb. 8, admission is pay-what-you-can. For reservations and information, call 968-1515 or go to www.deepdishtheater.org.

February 6, 2004: Matthew Hull, professor of anthropology, University of Michigan, "Land Expropriations and Urban Expansion in Islamabad." 3:15 p.m., 308 Alumni Building, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, UNC-CH.

February 7, 2004: Film: "Luna Papa" (Austria-Germany-Russia-Switzerland-France-Tadjikistan, 1999, 107 minutes), directed by Bakhtiar Khudojnazarov. 4:00 p.m., 116 Murphy Hall, UNC-CH. Part of the Russian Filmathon sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, UNC-CH.

February 7, 2004: A Concert to Benefit Bam's Earthquake Victims: Part one: Persian Pop Music by Omid and Armin. Part two: Traditional Persian Music by Naghmeh Ensemble (Shahram Mazhari, tonbak, daf and vocal; Mohammad Nahavandi, santour; Reza Ghaderkhani, violin). 7:00 p.m., 100 Hamilton Hall 100, UNC-CH. Tickets: General admission $20, students $7. Information: (919) 960-0063. Sponsored by: Persian Art Center, Iranian Cultural Society of North Carolina, Persian Students Association at UNC-CH, Persian Students Association at Duke, Persian Students Association at North Carolina State University. Click here for more information about Bam Earthquake and Relief Agencies.

February 7, 2004: Concert: Asif Ali, "Shahenshah-e Ghazal" (The King of Ghazal). 9:00 p.m., G107 Caldwell Hall, North Carolina State University. Dinner catered by India Garden Restaurant will be available, 6:00-8:30 p.m., for a nominal charge in Caldwell Hall Lounge (upstairs from the concert venue). Co-sponsored by Pakistani American Anjuman, N.C. Center for South Asian Studies, Urdu Majlis, and Geet Bazaar (South Asian Radio, Sundays 10 a.m. to 12 noon, 88.1 FM). Tickets: $100 (Sponsor), $50, $20, $10. For tickets or more information contact: Afroz Taj  919-851-1119.

 February 11, 2004: F. Canguzel Zulfikar, visiting scholar, UNC-CH, "An Ottoman Charitable Sufi Endowment (Wakf) and Its Social-Religious-Cultural Functions in the 16th century." 4:00 p.m., 304 Dey Hall, UNC-CH.

February 12, 2004: Film: "Divine Intervention" (Palestine, 2003, 92 minutes), directed by Elia Suleiman. Introduced by Marty Rosenbluth, documentary filmmaker. 5:00 p.m., 039 Graham Memorial Hall, UNC-CH. Part of the International Film Series, "Border Crossings," sponsored by the Curriculum of Comparative Literature, the Comparative Literature Organization for Undergraduate Discussion, and the Graduate Students Association of the Curriculum of Comparative Literature, UNC-CH.

February 12, 2004: Film: "Pinjar" (India, 2003, 192 minutes), directed by Chandraprakash Dwivedi. 7:30 p.m., Erdahl Cloyd Theatre, D.H. Hill Library, North Carolina State University. Part of the Spring 2004 South Asian Film Festival, "Crossing Borders Series." Sponsored by the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies.

February 16, 2004: Brian Crowe, former director-general for external and politico-military affairs in the European Council of Ministers, "US-EU Relations in Light of Iraq." 12:00-1:30 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. RSVPs kindly requested; please email katie.joyce@duke.edu. Sponsored by the Duke Center for International Studies, Duke Center for European Studies, and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies.

February 16, 2004: Eran Feitelson, professor of geography, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel, and Marwan Haddad, professor of civil engineering, al-Najah University, Nablus, Palestine, "The Politics of Water Management in Israel-Palestine." 5:00-6:30 p.m., 111 Carroll Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

February 18, 2004: Film: "Forget Baghdad" (Germany/Switzerland, 2003, 112 minutes), directed by Samir. Introduction and discussion with Ella Shohat, professor of cultural studies, New York University. 8:00 p.m., Griffith Film Theater, Bryan Center, Duke University. Sponsored by Screen/Society, Duke University.

 February 19, 2004: Jalil Roshandel, visiting professor of political science, Duke University, "Iran and the Upcoming Elections: Implications for the Greater Middle East." Lecture followed by discussion. 7:00 p.m., 105 Gardner Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Middle East Student Forum, UNC-CH.

February 21, 2004: Film: "What's Up With Love?" (Indonesia, 2002, 112 minutes), directed by Rudy Soedjarwo. 10:30 a.m., Room 039, Graham Memorial Hall, UNC-CH. Part of the Festival of Southeast Asian Films, sponsored by the Working Group in Southeast Asian Studies and the First Year Seminar Program, UNC-CH.

February 21, 2004: Film: "Matir Moina" (The Clay Bird) (Bangladesh, 2002, 98 minutes), directed by Tareque Masud. 5:00 p.m., G107 Caldwell Hall, North Carolina State University. Part of the 21 February and United Nations International Mother Language Day celebration. Sponsored by the Bangladeshi Community and the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies.

February 22-24, 2004: North Carolina Jewish Film Festival. Carolina Theatre, 309 West Morgan Street, Durham. Events include:

  • February 23, 10 a.m. Film: "In Search of Peace, Part One: 1948-1967" (U.S., 2000, 112 minutes), directed by Richard Trank.
  • February 23, 11:45 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Film: "Kedma" (Israel, 2002, 100 minutes), directed by Amos Gitai.
  • February 23, 12:00 p.m. Film: "Schmelvis: Searching for the King’s Jewish Roots" (Canada, 2001, 76 minutes), directed by Max Wallace.
  • February 23, 12:30-1:00 p.m. Israeli Dancing.
  • February 23, 8:00 p.m. Film: "Ramleh" (Israel, 2001, 58 minutes), directed by Michal Aviad.
  • February 24, 8:30 p.m. Film: "Primetime War" (Israel/Palestine, 1998, 52 minutes), directed by Noam Shalev.
  • February 24, 9:30 p.m. Film: "Between the Lines" (Israel/Palestine, 2001, 58 minutes), directed by Yifat Kedar.
February 23, 2004: Saba Mahmood, professor of anthropology, University of California at Berkeley, "Politics of Piety and Bodily Ethics: Some Reflections on the Islamic Revival." 2:00-3:30 p.m., 133 Social Sciences Building, Duke University. Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, Duke University.

February 23, 2004: Naveeda Khan, professor of anthropology, Johns Hopkins University, "Embodying the Mullah: Parody and Play in Everyday Life." 3:30 p.m., 308 Alumni Building, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology Colloquium Series, UNC-CH.

February 23, 2004: Rania Masri, human rights activist and Arab Women's Solidarity Association's representative to the United Nations, "Reconstruction of Iraq." 7:00 p.m., 105 Gardner Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Economics Club, UNC-CH.

February 25, 2004: Shantanu Phukan, professor of Asian studies, UNC-CH, "None Mad as a Hindu Woman: Indianizing the Islamic Imaginaire." 12:00 p.m., 223 Greenlaw Hall (Donovan Lounge), UNC-CH. Part of the Medieval Studies Curriculum Brown Bag Series.

February 25, 2004: Film: "Salut Cousin!" (Hello, Cousin!) (Algeria-Belgium-France, 1996, 104 minutes), directed by Merzak Allouache. 5:00 p.m., 303 Dey Hall. Sponsored by the Center for European Studies, UNC-CH.

February 26, 2004: Catherine Gaston-Mathe, lecturer on cinema at  Enseignement, Art et Culture (ENAC), Paris, France, "Women in European Cinema and Algeria in French Cinema." 5:00 p.m., 303 Dey Hall. Sponsored by the Department of Romance Languages and the Center for European Studies, UNC-CH.

February 26, 2004: Laura Gordon, activist with the International Solidarity Movement, speaking about her recent 10-month say in Rafah, Gaza Strip, Palestine. 7:00-10:00 p.m., WEL Media Room, 2nd floor, McClendon Tower, West-Edens Link, Duke University. Middle Eastern food will be served. Sponsored by the Coalition for Peace with Justice.

March 1, 2004: Bruce Robbins, professor of English and comparative literature, Columbia University, "On Solidarity at a Distance (A Lecture on Palestine)." Response by Rebecca Stein, professor of anthropology, Duke University. 4:30 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the University Scholars Program, Duke University.

March 2, 2004: Stephen Sizer, vicar of Christ Church, Virginia Water, England, "The Challenge of Christian Zionism for the Middle East and the United States." 7:30 p.m., 130 Sociology-Psychology Building (Zener Auditorium), Duke University. Sponsored by the Coalition for Peace with Justice and Friends of Sabeel-UK.

March 3, 2004: Jalil Roshandel, visiting professor of political science, Duke University, "Current Iranian Politics and US Policy Options." 12:00 p.m., 204 Breedlove Room, Perkins Library, Duke University. Sponsored by the Department of Political Science, Duke University.

March 5, 2004: Elif Shafak, Turkish novelist and visiting scholar in women's studies, University of Michigan, "Transgender Bolero: Patriarchy, Homophobia and Writing in Turkey." 4:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by Globally Queer Thinking, Duke University Center for International Studies.

March 11-15, 2004: Art Exhibit: "Life in the Shadow of Terror." 320 Israeli students' drawings and pictures depicting the issue of terror and its impact on life in Israel. Opening reception: March 11, 2004, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Judea Reform Congregation, 1933 West Cornwallis Road, Durham.

March 16, 2004: Maen Nsour, United Nations Development Programme's Regional Bureau for Arab States, "Reform in the Middle East." 7:00 p.m., 111 Carroll Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Great Decisions Program, UNC-CH.

March 17, 2004: Sandria Freitag, director of the Monterey Bay History and Cultures Project, University of California at Santa Cruz, "South Asian Ways of Seeing, Muslim Ways of Knowing." 11:00 a.m., 569 Hamilton Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Carolina Asia Center, UNC-CH. March 17, 2004: Film: "West Beirut" (Lebanon, 1998, 105 minutes), directed by Ziad Doueiri. 7:00 p.m., Witherspoon Cinema, NCSU. Part of the Arabic Film Festival sponsored by the Middle East Studies Program and the Middle Eastern and North African Student Association, NCSU.

March 19, 2004: Rebecca Stein, professor of anthropology, Duke University, "Cultures of Conquest: Rethinking the Palestinian/Israeli Conflict." 1:00 p.m., 329 Sociology/Psychology Building, Duke University. Sponsored by the Department of Sociology, Duke University.

March 19, 2004: Admiral Dennis Blair, former head of the Pacific Command and current head of the Institute for Defense Analyses, "The Global War on Terrorism." 3:00 p.m., 100 Hamilton Hall. Sponsored by the Frey Foundation Distinguished Visiting Professorship, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense, UNC-CH.

March 19, 2004: Concert: Simon Shaheen & The Near Eastern Music Ensemble. This special program will be a tribute to the great Egyptian composer Mohammed Abdel Wahab (1910-1991), and to Um Kalthum, indisputably the Arab world's greatest singer. 8:00 p.m., Reynolds Theater, Bryan Center, Duke University. Tickets: $25/$12. Call 684-4444 or go to tickets.duke.edu.

March 22, 2004: Panel: "Translating Islam, Translating the West: Double Critique in an Age of Clashing Fundamentalisms." 4:00-7:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. A special public session of the graduate seminar "Rethinking the Humanities: Globalization and the Limits of Translation," Duke University. Panelists include:

  • miriam cooke, professor of Arabic, Duke University, "Contesting Campus Watch: Middle East Studies under Fire: The Academy and Democracy at Risk."
  • Ebrahim Moosa, professor of Islamic studies, Duke University, "The Dilemma of Islamic Rights Schemes."
  • Bruce Lawrence, professor of Islamic studies, Duke University, "No More Crusades: Rethinking Islam in the West."
March 24, 2004: Dominique Roche, Jerusalem correspondent for Radio France Internationale and fellow, Media Fellows Program, DeWitt Wallace Center for Communications and Journalism, Duke University, "Daily Life in Gaza and the West Bank: A First-Hand Account of How Palestinian Civilian Populations Cope with the Situation and Reflections on Their Prospects for the Future." 12:00-1:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Center for French and Francophone Studies, Duke University. Part of the John Hope Franklin Center's noontime series "Wednesdays at The Center." Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University.

March 24, 2004: Banu Gokariksel, lecturer in geography, UNC-CH, "Situated Modernities: Moral Geographies of Gender, Class and Religion in Istanbul and Jakarta." 3:30-5:00 p.m., 307 Dey Hall, UNC-CH. Refreshments will be served. Sponsored by the Department of Geography, UNC-CH.

March 24, 2004: Kate Lowe, professor of history, Goldsmiths College, University of London, and visiting professor of Renaissance culture, UNC-CH, "Ambassadors from Sub-Saharan Africa to the Renaissance Papacy: Cultural Assumptions and Perspectives." 5:15 p.m., 116 Murphey Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Department of History, UNC-CH. Also to be delivered April 14, 2004, 4:00 p.m., room to be announced, North Carolina State University, sponsored by the Department of History, North Carolina State University.

March 24, 2004: Anna Bigelow, professor of religious studies, North Carolina State University, "Unmaking Partition in Punjab: Staying in Malerkotla." 7:00 p.m., RSVP with sponsor for location. Part of the Triangle South Asia Consortium Colloquium Series, sponsored by the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies. March 24, 2004: Film: "The Extras" (Syria, 1993, 100 minutes), directed by Nabil Maleh. 7:00 p.m., Witherspoon Cinema, NCSU. Part of the Arabic Film Festival sponsored by the Middle East Studies Program and the Middle Eastern and North African Student Association, NCSU.

March 25, 2004: Lorraine Aragon, adjunct professor of anthropology, UNC-CH, "Mobilization at the Crossroads of Asia: Religious Networks, Migration, and Contestation in Indonesia." 3:30 p.m., 151 Hamilton Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Carolina Asia Center, UNC-CH.

 March 25, 2004: "Humanitarian Aid in the Middle East." 7:00-9:00 p.m., 205 Undergraduate Library, UNC. Sponsored by the UNC Middle East Student Forum. Panelists include:

March 26, 2004: Concert: Sudhir Narain, the renowned young vocalist of India, "Shaam-e-Ghazal" (An Evening of Ghazals), featuring the works of Mirza Ghalib, accompanied by Pravine Balkaran on tabla. 8:30 p.m., G107 Caldwell Hall, North Carolina State University. Admission: $10 and $20; tickets available from local South Asian stores. Sponsored by Urdu Majlis, North Carolina State University Department of Foreign Languages & Literatures, the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies, Vibhom Enterprises, Travelinks, and Geet Bazaar (South Asian Radio, Sundays 10 a.m. to 12 noon, 88.1 FM).

 March 26-27, 2004: First Annual Duke - UNC Islamic Studies Conference: New Directions in the Study of Islam and Culture. Alumni Common Room, New Divinity Building, Duke University. Co-sponsored by the Department of Religion, Duke University Center for Internationatal Studies, Program in Women's Studies, Department of Art & Art History, Program in Literature, Department of Asian & African Languages & Literature, and Department of History, Duke University; the Curriculum in International and Area Studies, University Center for International Studies, Curriculum in Women's Studies, Department of Religious Studies, Political Science Department, and Curriculum in Asian Studies, UNC-CH; and the Triangle South Asia Consortium of the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies.

March 26, 2004:
9:00- 10:30 a.m. Muslims Networking
  • Panel Chair: Bruce B. Lawrence, professor of Islamic studies, Duke University
  • Jumana Vasi, University of Michigan, "American Muslim Environmental Activism."
  • Ja'far Muhibullah, Duke University,"Internet Fatwas."
  • Emilio Spadola, Columbia University, "Virtuous Networks of Fez Medina."
10:30- 10:45 a.m. Coffee

10:45 a.m.- 12:45 p.m. Aesthetics and Ritual

  • Panel Chair: Anna Bigelow, professor of religious studies, North Carolina State University
  • Babak Rahimi, European University Institute, "Ritual and Carnivalesque: The Case of Muharram Commemorative Ceremonies in Post-Revolutionary Iran."
  • Kristen Voss, University of New Orleans, "Bakhtin, Carnivalesque and Gender."
  • Sam England, University of California at Berkeley, "Abu Nuwas and the Poetics of Audacity ‘Sakratun ba’da sakratin’ and ‘Laa shuub.’"
  • Ming Yong Cho, University of Michigan, "The Poetic Dimension of the North Dome of the Great Mosque of Isfahan."
12:45- 2:30 p.m.Lunch

2:30- 5:00 p.m.Law, Reform, and the Idea of the State

  • Brian Didier, Dartmouth University, "Making the Insider Other: Kufr and the Dynamics of Religious Dispute in Archipelagic South Asia."
  • Zana Citak, Middle East Technical University/Bilkent University, Turkey, "Islam and Nationalism: The Origins of Secularism in Turkey."
  • Fareeha Khan, University of Michigan, "Being Muslim in Pre-Partition India: Maulana Ashraf 'Ali Thanvi's Negotiation of Identity and Politics."
  • Ahmad Atif Ahmad, Harvard University, "Islamic Legal History between Two Perspectives."
5:45- 7:15 p.m. Keynote Address
Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na`im, professor of law, Emory University Law School, "The Future of Shari`a."
March 27, 2004:
9:00-10:45 a.m. Culture, Orthodoxy, and Isla
  • Dilek Harmanci, University of California at Los Angeles/Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, "Culture and Religion East of Eden: The Case of Political Islam in Iraqi Kurdistan."
  • Usep Matin, Duke University, "The Mature and Immature Cultures."
  • Brett Wilson, Duke University, "The Concept of Orthodoxy in Islamic Studies."
10:45- 11:00 a.m. Coffee

11:00 a.m.- Noon. Querying the Idea of Culture in Islamic Studies

  • Chris Haufe, Columbia University, "The Limits of the Culture Concept in the Study of Islam."
  • Zareena Grewal, Columbia University, "Islam as Tradition: A Trans/Formation of Historical Anthropology."
Noon- 1:00 p.m. Lunch

1:00- 2:45 p.m. Conceiving Gender in the Muslim Imaginaire

  • Eleanora Bell, Columbia International University, "Uncovering Muslim and Roman Catholic Perceptions of Women."
  • Bridget Blomfield, Claremont Graduate Union, "Women’s Azah Ritual."
  • Neelma Alli, Duke University, "Encouraging Dialogue: Sexuality and Islam."
2:45- 3:00 p.m. Coffee

3:00- 5:15 p.m. Dimensions of Encounter

  • Kabir Tambar, University of Chicago, "Rethinking the Semiotics of Religious Tolerance: Practices, Freedom and Democracy in Liberal Islamic Thought"
  • al-Husein al-Madhany, University of Chicago, "Are Christians and Jews Going to Hell?"
  • Rachel Scott, School of Oriental and Asian Studies, "The Concept of Dhimma in the Thought of Egyptian Islamists."
5:45 p.m. Graduate Student Documentary Films
  • Youshaa Patel, Duke University, "Rhythm and Faith."
  • Zareena Grewal, Columbia University, "By the Dawn's Early Light: Chris Jackson's Journey to Islam."
March 27, 2004: "Autonomy and Self-Determination: Global Perspectives." 130 Social/Psychology Building, Duke University. Sponsored by the International Association, Diya, Safar, Hiwar, Duke Students for a Free Tibet, and the Center for Race Relations, Duke University. Panel 1 on "Autonomy and Occupation in the Americas" is on March 25, 2004, 7:00 p.m., in 114 Physics Building, Duke University.
12:00 p.m. Panel 2: Occupations in the Middle East
  • Netta Van Vliet, graduate student in anthropology, Duke University, "Palestine."
  • Rania Masri, human rights activist and Arab Women's Solidarity Association's representative to the United Nations, "Iraq."
3:00 p.m. Panel 3:  Struggles for Autonomy in South and East Asia
  • Mark Driscoll, professor of Asian studies, UNC-CH, "Japan."
  • Tenzin Dorjee, Tibetan activist, "Tibet."
  • Charles Kennedy, professor of political science, Wake Forest University, "Kashmir."
March 27, 2004: Film: "The Battle of Algiers" (Italy-Algeria, 1966, 123 minutes), directed by Gillo Pontecorvo. Introduced by Dominique Fisher, professor of French, UNC-CH. 5:00 p.m., Coates Building, 223 Franklin St., Chapel Hill. Part of the symposium, "Adjacencies: Images Across Cultures," March 26-28, 2004, sponsored by the Center for European Studies and the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

March 28, 2004: Michael Lerner, rabbi and editor of Tikkun magazine, "Healing Israel/Palestine: A Path to Peach and Reconciliation" and "A Vision for Social Healing and Spiritual Survival in the Age of George Bush and Ariel Sharon." 10:00 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., Millennium Hotel, 2800 Campus Walk Avenue, Durham. Part of the Tikkun Community Conference, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Cost: $40, including lunch. Sponsored by Triangle Tikkun.

March 28, 2004: Film: "9'11"01 (September 11)" (France etc., 2002, 135 minutes), segments directed by Samira Makhmalbaf, Claude Lelouch, Youssef Chahine, Danis Tanovic, Idrissa Ouedraogo, Ken Loach, Alejandro González Inárritu, Amos Gitai, Mira Nair, Sean Penn, and Shohei Imamura. Introduced by Martine Antle, professor of French, UNC-CH, with discussion afterward by Sahar Amer, professor of Asian and international studies, UNC-CH, and Nicholas Allen, professor of English, UNC-CH. 5:00 p.m., Coates Building, 223 Franklin St., Chapel Hill. Part of the symposium, "Adjacencies: Images Across Cultures," March 26-28, 2004, sponsored by the Center for European Studies and the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH..

March 29, 2004: "Effects and Affects of Terror: Roundtable on the Aftermath of 11-M (The Madrid Bombings of 11 March 2004)." 5:00 p.m., Room 230/232, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Light dinner and refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to Marina Whelan <mlw14@duke.edu> or Marta Hernández <mh5@duke.edu>. Sponsored by the  John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Participants include:

  • Alberto Moreiras, director of the Center for European Studies, Duke University
  • Teresa Vilaros, professor of romance studies, Duke University
  • Srinivas Aravamudan, director of the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke University
  • Ranjana Khanna, professor of English and literature, Duke University
  • Grant Farred, professor of literature and general editor of the South Atlantic Quarterly
March 29, 2004: Performance: Uri Katzenstein, Israeli artist, "Surnames." 5:30 p.m., Duke University Museum of Art. Sponsored by the Freeman Center for Jewish Life, Duke University.

March 29, 2004: Stephen Kinzer, New York Times foreign correspondent, "Turkey and Europe: Can This Marriage Work?" Introduction by Bruce Kuniholm, professor of public policy studies, Duke University. 7:00 p.m., Von Cannon B & C, Bryan Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Turkish Students Association, Office of Vice Provost for International Affairs, Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy, and History Department, Duke University, and American Turkish Association of North Carolina.

March 30, 2004: "Jerusalem Women Speak: Three Women, Three Faiths, One Shared Vision." 1:00-2:30 p.m., Carol Woods Retirement Community, Community Room, 750 Weaver Dairy Road, Chapel Hill. 6:30-8:30 p.m., Community United Church of Christ, 814 Dixie Trail, Raleigh. Sponsored by Partners for Peace and the International Visitors Council / World Affairs Council /UN Association - Triangle Chapter. Speakers:

 March 31, 2004: Abdullahi An-Na`im, professor of law, Emory University, "Mediating Competing Visions of Justice in Islamic Societies in the 21st Century: The Future of Shari`a between State and Society." 12:00 p.m., 151 Hamilton Hall, UNC-CH. Cosponsored by the Cecil G. Sheps Visiting Scholarship in Social Justice, the Department of Sociology, and the Minor in Social and Economic Justice, UNC-CH.

March 31, 2004: Film: "My Son the Fanatic" (Great Britain, 1997, 88 minutes), directed by Udayan Prasad. 5:00 p.m., 303 Dey Hall. Sponsored by the Center for European Studies, UNC-CH.

March 31, 2004: Anna Bigelow, professor of religion, North Carolina State University, "Unmaking Partition in Punjab: Staying in Malerkotla." 7:00 p.m., RSVP with sponsor for location. Part of the Triangle South Asia Consortium Colloquium Series, sponsored by the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies.

March 31, 2004: Robert Spencer, author, "Unveiling Islam: Disturbing Questions about the World's Fastest Growing Faith." 7:00-8:00 p.m., 105 Gardner Hall. Sponsored by the student group Faith and Scholarship, UNC-CH.

April 1, 2004: Ellen Lust-Okar, professor of political science, Yale University, "Why the Failure of Democratization? Explaining Middle East Exceptionalism." 5:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Comparative Politics Workshop, Duke University.

April 1, 2004: Film: "Yeh Dil Aapka Hua"(Pakistan-Spain, 2002), directed by Javed Sheikh. 7:00 p.m., Erdahl Cloyd Theatre, D.H. Hill Library, North Carolina State University. Part of the Spring 2004 South Asian Film Festival, "Crossing Borders Series." Sponsored by the Sponsored by the NC Center for South Asia Studies.

April 2, 2004: Film: "Thabh-Ul-Azim" (Noble Sacrifice) (Lebanon, 2002, 40 minutes), directed by Vatche Boulghourjian, followed by a panel discussion. 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Durham Arts Council, 120 Morris Street, Durham. Part of the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, April 1 - 4, 2004: Sponsored by the Duke University Center for International Studies.

  • Moderator: Amy Nelson, WUNC radio
  • Vatche Boulghourjian, director of the film
  • miriam cooke, professor of Arabic, Duke University
  • Negar Mottahedeh, professor of film and literature, Duke University
  • Ja'far Muhibullah, graduate student in Islamic studies, Duke University

April 5, 2004: Negar Mottahedeh, professor of film and literature, Duke University, "New Iranian Cinema, 1982-Present: Veiling and the Modest Camera Gaze." 5:30-7:00 p.m., Room 028, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. A special public session of the graduate seminar "Rethinking the Humanities: Globalization and the Limits of Translation," Duke University.

April 5, 2004: Film: "The Tale of the Three Jewels" (Palestine, 1995, 112 minutes), directed by Michel Khleifi. 7:00 p.m., Witherspoon Cinema, NCSU. Part of the Arabic Film Festival sponsored by the Middle East Studies Program and the Middle Eastern and North African Student Association, NCSU.

April 5-8, 2004: Human Rights Week 2004: Sponsored by Advocates for Human Rights, Campus Y, UNC-CH. Events include:

April 5. While men simper and leer. Presentation/teach-in on women's rights around the globe, i.e. Afghanistan and Juarez, Mexico. 4:00 p.m., 202 Dey Hall, UNC-CH. Co-sponsored by Amnesty International.

April 5. Are some cultural practices human rights abuses? Where should the line be drawn between allowing people to practice their culture and affirming human rights? Clips from two videos about female genital mutilation will be shone. 6:00 p.m., 103 Bingham Hall, UNC-CH. Co-sponsored by Table Talk.

April 5. Maha Al-Attar, professor of neurology, UNC-CH, and activist with Women for a Free Iraq, "Chaos of War." The speaker will talk about fleeing Iraq because of Saddam, and the hope she has for Iraq’s future. 7:00 p.m., Multipurpose Room, New Student Union, UNC-CH. Co-sponsored by The Foundation for Defense of Democracies, Washington D.C.

April 6. O Gulf, giver of pearls, shells, and death: Should Saddam Hussein receive the death penalty? Does the right to life extend to perpetrators of heinous crimes? 4:00 p.m., Room 2518A UNC Student Union, UNC-CH. Co-sponsored by Campaign to End the Death Penalty.

April 7. Witnesses to Abuses. Panel of South Asian students speak of their experiences of human rights abuses. 4:30 p.m., 206 Dey Hall, UNC-CH. Co-sponsored by SANGAM.

April 7. The lonely prisoner. Is justice served by denying Guantanamo Bay Prisoners human rights? 7:30 p.m., 106 Greenlaw Hall, UNC-CH. Co-sponsored by Dialectic and Philanthropic Society.

April 8. We didn’t see our dead. A discussion about the Israeli occupation of Palestine, and specifically about the wall dividing the region, currently under construction. Sarah Shields, professor of history, UNC-CH, and other professors will provide insight about the situation. 5:00 p.m., 208 Dey Hall, UNC-CH.

April 6, 2004: Muhammad Yunus, founder and managing director, Grameen Bank, Bangladesh, The 2004 Leadership in Social Entrepreneurship Award and Lecture. 12:00 p.m., Geneen Auditorium, The Fuqua School of Business, Duke University. RSVP by April 2 to 919-660-7823 (phone), 919-684-2818 (fax), or rubiera@duke.edu (e-mail). Sponsored by The Center for the Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship, The Fuqua School of Business, Duke University.

April 6, 2004: Frangois Pouillon, anthropologist, Centre d'histoire sociale de l'Islam miditerranien, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris, "Imaging Algerian Society: Social History, Art and Politics." 5:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Center for French and Francophone Studies, Duke University

April 6, 2004: Film: "The Inner World of Shah Rukh Khan" (India, 2004, 50 minutes), directed by Nasreen Kabir, who will introduce and discuss the film. 8:00 p.m., Richard White Lecture Hall, East Campus, Duke University. Sponsored by the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies and the Department of Asian and African Languages and Literature, the Film/Video/Digital Program, and Screen/Society, Duke University.

April 8, 2004: Sharon Mars, rabbi of North Carolina Hillel, "The Cost of Freedom: A Passover Discussion." 7:00-8:00 p.m., North Carolina Hillel, 210 West Cameron Ave., Chapel Hill. RSVP to meals@nchillel.org. Sponsored by North Carolina Hillel.

 April 9-11, 2004: Conference: "Comparative Perspectives on Religious Coexistence: The State and the Everyday." Sponsored by the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies. Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University.

April 9, 2004:
9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Panel I. Developing Comparative Perspectives on Religious Coexistence
  • Roger Friedland, professor of religious studies, University of California-Santa Barbara, "The Institutional Rationality of Religious Nationalist Violence."
  • Wayne TeBrake, professor of history, Purchase College, State University of New York, "The Contentious Politics of Religious Coexistence."
1:30-4:30 p.m. Panel II. Colonial India
  • Robert Travers, professor of history, Harvard University, "Orientalism, Religion and Colonial State-Formation in India, c. 1750-1800."
  • Gyan Pandey, professor of anthropology, Johns Hopkins University, "Dalits, Hindus and Buddhists: Coexistence and Conversion."
  • Sandria Freitag, director of the Monterey Bay History and Cultures Project, University of California-Santa Cruz, "Between the State and the Everyday: Public Arenas in Negotiating Living with the 'Religious Other.'"
April 10, 2004:
9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Panel III. Post-Reformation Western Europe
  • Philip Benedict, professor of history and religion, Brown University, "Un roi, une loi, deux fois: Parameters for the History of Catholic-Reformed Coexistence in France, 1555-1685."
  • Christine Kooi, professor of history, Louisiana State University, "Negotiating the 'Multitude of Opinions': Religious Coexistence in the Dutch Golden Age."
  • Randolph Head, professor of history, University of California at Riverside, "Negotiating the Non-Negotiable in Post-Reformation Germany and Switzerland: Christian Division, Fragmented Politics and Local Practice in the Production of Religious Coexistence."
1:00-3:00 p.m. Panel IV. Contemporary Balkans
  • Amila Buturovic, professor of Islamic studies, York University, "Can Politics Override History? Religion, Ethnicity, and Statehood in the Balkans."
  • Snjezana Buzov, lecturer in history, University of Pittsburgh, "Archive as a Sufi Genre? Mecmua of Mulla Mustafa Basheski from

  • Sarajevo."
3:30-5:30 p.m. Panel V. Contemporary India
  • Peter Gottschalk, professor of religion, Wesleyan University, "Knowing the Difference Everyday: State and Popular Classifications in Arampur Village."
  • Steven Wilkinson, professor of political science, Duke University, "The Political Incentives for Communal Riots in the Pre-Independence India."
April 11, 2004:
9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Panel VI. Wrap-up and Discussion
April 12, 2004: Burham Karacam, chair and chief executive of Kocbank, Turkey, "Overcoming a Crisis in an Emerging Market." 6:30-8:00 p.m., Conference Rooms 11 & 12 (Fox Center), Fuqua School of Business, Duke University. Sponsored by the Fuqua European Business Club (EBC) and Duke Turkish Student Association, Duke University.

April 13, 2004: "The Politics of Religious and Secular Archaeology: Contemporary Uses of Ancient and Medieval Pasts." National Webcast Colloquium, 4:00-6:30 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke University. Panelists include:

  • Moderator: Gregson Davis, professor of classics and comparative literature, Duke University
  • Stanley Abe, professor of art and art history, Duke University, "Buddhist Monuments."
  • Carla Antonaccio, visiting scholar in classical studies, Duke University, "Early Greece."
  • Pika Ghosh, professor of art history and South Asian art, UNC-CH, "Temples in Mughal Bengal."
  • Jodi Magness, professor of early Judaism, UNC-CH, "Ancient Palestine."
  • Eric Meyers, professor of Judaic studies, Duke University "Eretz Israel."
  • Grant Parker, professor of classical studies, Duke University, "Afghanistan."
  • Phiroze Vasunia, professor of classics, UNC-CH, "The Parthenon."
  • Annabel Wharton, professor of art and art history, Duke University, "Jerusalem."
  • Response: Romila Thapar, Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South, Library of Congress

April 13, 2004: Film: "A Wedding in Ramallah" (U.S.-Palestine, 2002, 90 minutes), directed by Sherina Salama. Film will be followed by discussion. 6:00-8:00 p.m., Room 205 Undergraduate Library, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

April 13, 2004: Film: "Alexandria... Why?" (Egypt, 1978, 133 minutes), directed by Youssef Chahine. 7:00 p.m., Witherspoon Cinema, NCSU. Part of the Arabic Film Festival sponsored by the Middle East Studies Program and the Middle Eastern and North African Student Association, NCSU.

 April 15, 2004: L. Carl Brown, professor of Near Eastern studies, Princeton University, "'Consult Them in the Matter': The Idea of Representative Government in the 19th Century Middle East." 4:00-5:30 p.m., University Center for International Studies, 223 East Franklin Street, Chapel Hill.

April 15, 2004: Panel Discussion: "The Marketplace of Ideas? Censorship, Surveillance, and Academic Freedom." 7:00-9:00 p.m., 1301 McGavran-Greenberg, UNC-CH. Sponsored by an informal group of faculty and students. Panelists include:

  • Karen Booth, professor of women's studies, UNC-CH, "This is Not About Free Speech."
  • Trude Bennett, professor of public health, UNC-CH, "Research, Science, and Women's Right to Life."
  • Rashmi Varma, professor of post-colonial studies, University of Warwick, UK, "Post-Colonial Studies in the Age of Empire."
  • Sarah Shields, professor of history, UNC-CH, "Free Exchange of Ideas: The Middle East in the Classroom."
  • Mark Driscoll, professor of Asian studies, UNC-CH, "Self-Censorship under Occupation."
  • Jessica Albrecht, undergraduate in political science, UNC-CH, "Campus Climate and Silence."
  • Michael Schwalbe, professor of sociology, North Carolina State University, "Academic Freedom is Good For You, But It Might Not Be What You Think It Is."
April 16, 2004: Jean-Luc Racine, senior fellow, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, and head of the International Programme for Advanced Studies, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, France, "India and Pakistan: From Limited War to Limited Peace? Old Paradigms and New Constraints in a Transformed World Order." 3:00-5:00 p.m., Boyd Room, 226 Carr Building, East Campus, Duke University. Sponsored by the Department of History and the Center for International Studies, Duke University, and the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies.

April 16, 2004: Peter Matthews Wright, doctoral candidate in religious studies, UNC-CH, "Islam: Spirituality Naturalized." 4:00 p.m., 2215 Williams Hall, North Carolina State University. Sponsored by the Islam and Dialogue Student Assocation, North Carolina State University.

 April 19, 2004: Jodi Magness, professor of religious studies, UNC-CH, "The Archaeology of the Early Islamic Settlement in Palestine." 7:00 p.m., 105 Murphey Hall, UNC-CH. Co-sponsored by the Programs in Islamic Studies at Duke and UNC-CH and the Department of Religious Studies, UNC-CH.

April 20, 2004: Film: Mechina: A Preparation; (2004, Israel-U.S., 45 minutes), directed by Maital Guttman. 7:30 p.m., Griffith Film Theater, Duke University. Followed by discussion with the director. Sponsored by Avi Chai Israel Advocacy Grant, Hillel, Benenson Award in the Arts, Duke Center for International Studies, Freeman Center for Jewish Life, Comparative Area Studies at Duke, Freewater Presentations and Duke's Judaic Studies Department.

April 20, 2004: Film: "Summer in La Gullet" (Tunisia, 1996, 100 minutes), directed by Firid Boughedir. 7:00 p.m., Witherspoon Cinema, NCSU. Part of the Arabic Film Festival sponsored by the Middle East Studies Program and the Middle Eastern and North African Student Association, NCSU.

April 21, 2004: Film: "East is East" (Great Britain, 1999, 96 minutes), directed by Damien O'Donnell. 5:00 p.m., 303 Dey Hall. Sponsored by the Center for European Studies, UNC-CH.

April 21, 2004: Raphael Danziger, editor of Near East Report, Special Briefing, with dessert reception. 7:30 p.m., North Carolina Hillel, 210 West Cameron Ave., Chapel Hill. Please RSVP to Alisha Marks, AIPAC area director, (770) 541-7610. Sponsored by the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), The Jewish Federation of Durham-Chapel Hill, and North Carolina Hillel.

April 23, 2004: Film: "The Messenger" (United States, 2004, 11 minutes), directed by Youshaa Patel. Premier screening of documentary exploring the connections between hip hop and Islam through an in depth look at one local student artist. 10:45 p.m., Richard White Auditorium, East Campus, Duke University. Part of the Duke Student Film Showcase, Duke University.

April 24, 2004: Film: "The Olive Garden" (Palestine/United States, 2003, 94 minutes), directed by Hanna Elias. 2:00 p.m., North Carolina School of the Arts,  1533 South Main St., Winston-Salem. Part of the 6th annual River Run International Film Festival.

April 29, 2004: Saad Eddin Ibrahim, director of the Ibn Khaldun Center for Development Studies, and professorof sociology, American University in Cairo, "Believing in Change: Civil Society and Democratization in the Arab World." 4:00 p.m., Great Hall, Frank Porter Graham Student Union, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH, as part of its Distinguished Speakers Series.

May 1, 2004: Grand Mehfil-e Mushaira 2004 (Urdu Poetry Gathering). 6:30 p.m. (after dinner), C.C. Jones Memorial Park, 309 Holleman Street,Apex. Snack will be served. Admission: $10. An exquisite evening with some of the predominant Urdu poets in the United States, including:

  • Humaira Rehman (NY)
  • Shehla Naqvi  (NY)
  • Raees Warsi (NY)
  • Moona Shahab (NY)
  • Naseem Farogh (MD)
  • Baqar Zaidi (MD)
  • Wasif Hussain Wasif (NY)
  • Altaf Tirmizi (NY)
  • Noon Meem Danish (NY)
  • Khaleeque Hussain (NC)
  • Afroz Taj (NC)
  • Jafar Abbas (NC)
May 14, 2004: Concert: Munni Begum, acclaimed South Asian vocalist, "Shaam-e-Ghazal: An Evening of Ghazal & Qawwali" (Urdu Poetry set to music). 8:30 p.m., G107 Caldwell Hall, North Carolina State University. Admission: $10, $20 (Sponsor). Sponsored by the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies, WKNC Geet Bazaar, and Mihir Chakraborty.

May 16, 2004: Film: "Salt of the Earth: Palestinian Christians in the Northern West Bank" (Palestine, 2004, still unfinished), directed by Marthame and Elizabeth Sanders. Discussion by the directors and Father Aktham Hijazin, principal of the Latin Patriarchate School of Zababdeh, West Bank. 1:30 p.m., Terrace Room, University Presbyterian Church, 209 East Franklin Street, Chapel Hill. Sponsored by the Global Outreach Committee of the University Presbyterian Church.

June 14, 2004: Brent Bianchi, South Asian Studies Fellow, Department of International and Area Studies, Perkins Library, Duke University, "Reflections on the Study of Music and Culture in South and Southeast Asia." 12:00 p.m., Room 226, Perkins Library, Duke University. Sponsored by International and Area Studies and Perkins Reference, Duke University.

June 14, 15, 17, 2004: Film: "About Baghdad" (U.S.-Iraq, 2004), direted by the Incounter Productions collective. 7:00 p.m. each day. June 14: Varsity Theater, Chapel Hill. June 15: Carolina Theater, Durham. June 17: Rialto Theater, Raleigh. Suggested donation: $5. Follow-up with a 20-minute Q&A with one of the film's producers, Rania Masri. Sponsored by the Independent Weekly. [an error occurred while processing this directive]