A program of the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations,
with the generous support of the Carolina Seminars

2004-2005


2004: July, August, September, October, November, December
2005: January, February, March, April, May, June

Starred events are sponsored by the Seminar.
(Other events are recommended but not Seminar-sponsored)

Maps and directions: UNC-CH, Duke, NCSU


July 13, 2004: Nesreen Ghaddar, professor and chair of Mechanical Engineering, American University of Beirut, "Developing Technologies to Detect Landmines in Lebanon."University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH, 223 E. Franklin Street, Chapel Hill, 12:00-2:00 p.m. Sponsored by the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

August 15, 2004-January 16, 2005: Five Artists * Five Faiths: Spirituality in Contemporary Art, art exhibit at Ackland Art Museum, UNC-CH, featuring the work of London-based artist Ahmed Moustafa.

August 22, 2004: Chris and Hala Doyle, Presbyterians working in Palestine and Egypt, "Joining Hands Against Hunger In The Middle East." 9:30 a.m., Terrace Room, University Presbyterian Church, 209 East Franklin St., Chapel Hill. For more information, contact Mark Peifer at 919-563-8443.

August 27, 2004: Robert Beecroft, U.S. diplomat and former head of the Organization of Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) Mission to Bosnia-Herzegovina, "The Complex Challenges of Bosnia-Herzegovina." 10:10 a.m., Pleasants Family Assembly Room, Wilson Library, UNC-CH. Part of the symposium, "OSCE, EU, and the US: What Prospects for the Western Balkans?" 8:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Sponsored by the Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies, UNC-CH.

August 29, 2004: Nissim Reuben, senior fellow in international relations, American Jewish Committee, Washington D.C., "The Indian Jewish Community and U.S.-India-Israel Relations." 2:45-4:00 p.m., Rosenzweig Gallery, Judea Reform Congregation, 1933 W. Cornwallis Road, Durham. In conjunction with the exhibit by Jay Waronker, Atlanta architect and artist, "In Search of India's Synagogues: Their Architecture and History," August 15-October 10, 2004: Artist talk and reception, October 3, 2004: Sponsored by the Jewish Heritage Foundation of North Carolina.

September 2, 2004: Tawfiq Yousef, coordinator of American studies, University of Jordan, "American Studies in a Global Context: Studying the United States at the University of Jordan." 12:00 p.m., 569 Hamilton Hall, UNC-CH. Refreshments will be served. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of the American South, UNC-CH.

September 2, 2004: Walter Denny, professor of art history, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, "Nomadic Textiles in the Islamic Middle East: Sources and Interchanges." 7:00 p.m., College of Textiles, NCSU. In conjunction with an exhibit of textiles and carpets from the Middle East and Central Asia, August 28-September 30, 2004, Gallery of Art and Design, Student Talley Center, NCSU. Sponsored by NCSU.

September 2, 2004: Jack Sasson, professor of Jewish studies and classics, Vanderbilt University, "How to Make God Talk." 7:30 p.m., Hanes Art Center Auditorium, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies.

September 7, 2004: Chris Schroeder and Scott Silliman, professors of law, Duke Law School, "Civil Liberties and the War on Terror: Preventing, Detaining, and Prosecuting Terrorists." 12:00 p.m., Blue Lounge, Duke Law School. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law and the Center for Law, Ethics, and National Security, Duke Law School.

September 9, 2004: Michael Carnahan, senior advisor to the finance minister of the government of Afghanistan, "Post Conflict Resolution in Afghanistan." 12:00 p.m., Sanford Institute, Duke University. Sponsored by the Duke-UNC Rotary Center for International Studies in Peace and Conflict Resolution and the Duke Center for International Development, Duke University.

September 9-10, 2004: Film: Peace, Propaganda, and the Promised Land (United States, 2004, 80 minutes), directed by Bathsheba Ratzkoff and Sut Jhally. 7:00 p.m. both evenings, Pullen Memorial Baptist Church, 1801 Hillsborough St., Raleigh (September 9); Binkley Baptist Church, 1712 Willow Dr., Chapel Hill (September 10). Sponsored by the Coalition for Peace with Justice, Chapel Hill.

 September 10, 2004: Film: Shocking and Awful: A Grass Roots Response to War in Iraq (United States-Iraq, 2004, 13 28-minute segments), produced by Deep Dish TV. 7:00 p.m., Hanes Art Center Auditorium, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Coalition for Peace with Justice, Chapel Hill.

September 11, 2004: L. Kendall Palmer, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, UNC-CH, "Power-Sharing Extended: Policing and Education Reforms in Northern Ireland and Bosnia-Herzegovina." 10:50 a.m., Thomas Center, Duke University. Part of the Fifth Annual New Faces Conference, Triangle Institute for Security Studies.

September 12, 2004: Imam Earl Abdul Malik Mohammed, a representative of The Mosque Cares, "Islam." 3:00-5:00 p.m., Exploris Museum, 207 East Hargett St., Raleigh. Part of the Global Faith Community Forum Series, Presentations on World Religions.

September 14, 2004: U.S. - Islamic World Relations. Town hall meeting, 7:00 p.m., 111 Carroll Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by Americans for Informed Democracy's Hope Not Hate initiative. Speakers include:

  • Rajai Al-Khanji, dean of faculty of arts, University of Jordan.
  • Jibril Hough, president of the Islamic Political Party of America.
  • Curtis Jones, retired U.S. diplomat in the Middle East.

September 16, 2004: Film: Tehzeeb (India, 2003, 147 minutes), directed by Khalid Mohamed. 7:00 p.m., Erdahl Cloyd Theatre, D.H. Hill Library, NCSU. Part of the Fall 2004 South Asian Film Festival "Singer and Song Series." Sponsored by the Hindi-Urdu Section of the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures and the D.H. Hill Library, NCSU, and the N.C. Center for South Asia Studies.

September 16-17, 2004: Play: "The Gods Are Not to Blame," by Ola Rotimi, performed by the National Troupe of Nigeria. 8:00 p.m., Reynolds Theater, Bryan Center, Duke University. Tickets: $20. Sponsored by Duke Performances and the Rotimi Foundation. Cancelled due to delays in issuance of visas to performers.

September 17, 2004: Conference: Interrogation, Detention, and the Commander in Chief Power, a Roundtable. 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Room 3037, Duke Law School. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law, Duke Law School.

Septemer 20, 2004: Film: Yazgi (Fate) (Turkey, 2001, 120 minutes), directed by Zeki Demirkubuz. 8:00 p.m., Griffith Film Theater, Bryan Center, Duke University. Part of the series, Arada/Between: Contemporary Turkish Cinema, sponsored by Screen/Society, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Film-Video-Digital Program, and the Program in Literature, Duke University.

September 21, 2004: Charles Kurzman, professor of sociology, UNC-CH. Reading from The Unthinkable Revolution in Iran. 3:30 p.m., Bull's Head Bookshop, UNC-CH.

September 21, 2004: Robert C. Gregg, professor of religious studies and classics, Stanford University, "Murder in Three Traditions: Jewish, Christians and Muslim Readings in the Cain and Abel Story." 4:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University.

September 22, 2004: Film: Itiraf (Confession) (Turkey, 2001, 91 minutes), directed by Zeki Demirkubuz. 8:00 p.m., Griffith Film Theater, Bryan Center, Duke University. Part of the series, Arada/Between: Contemporary Turkish Cinema, sponsored by Screen/Society, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Film-Video-Digital Program, and the Program in Literature, Duke University.

 September 23, 2004: Conversation with Ahmed Moustafa, in connection with his exhibit at the Five Artists * Five Faiths: Spirituality in Contemporary Art exhibit, held in the gallery of the Ackland Art Museum, 4:00 p.m.

September 23, 2004: Mustapha Shoukee Ensemble,  Songs from Islam. The Diwan of Shaykh Muhammad Ibn al-Habib, the great Qur'anic scholar and composer, in a concert of choral music accompanied by handheld drum. The ensemble will perform and interpret four songs from this world-renowned devotional masterpiece. Thursday Evenings at the Ackland performance series, part of the Five Artists * Five Faiths: Spirituality in Contemporary Art exhibit, Ackland Art Museum, 7:30 p.m. A reception, included in the ticket price, will follow the final performance. Series tickets $25; $15 for students. Individual performances $8; $5 for students. Complimentary admission for Ackland Art Museum members. Space is limited and advance registration required. To register or request more information, please call (919) 843-3676.

September 23, 2004: Julius Nyang'oro, professor of African studies, UNC-CH, and Andrew Reynolds, professor of political science, UNC-CH, and State Department advisor to the Sudanese government, "The Humanitarian Crisis and Conflict in Sudan." 7:00 p.m., 08 Gardner Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by Adocates for Human Rights Committee of the Campus Y, Amnesty International at UNC, Students United for a Responsible Global Enviroment, Feminist Students United.

September 24, 2004: Shemeem Abbas, Pakistani scholar and professor of English, University of Texas, "Potent Knowledge: Unaware Scholarship." 2:00 p.m. Jacqueline Moudeina, Chadian human rights lawyer and professor of law, Dickinson School of Law, "Jacqueline's Fight." 3:45 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Part of "Beautiful Minds, Risky Times," a Franklin Humanities Institute Conference Featuring the Scholars at Risk Network, September 23-24, 2004, Duke University. Live Webcast available.

September 25, 2004: Film: Masumiyet (Innocence) (Turkey, 1997, 105 minutes), directed by Zeki Demirkubuz. 2:00 p.m., Griffith Film Theater, Bryan Center, Duke University. Followed by panel discussion with director Zeki Demirkubuz, 4:30 p.m., Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture, Duke University. Part of the series, Arada/Between: Contemporary Turkish Cinema, sponsored by Screen/Society, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Film-Video-Digital Program, and the Program in Literature, Duke University.

September 25, 2004: African dinner-dance party and fund raiser: "From Durham to Linguere - Kick a Killer Disease Out of Africa." 6:00 p.m.-12:00 a.m., Five Oaks Club House, Chapel Hill Road, Durham. Tickets $10 - all proceeds go to purchase malaria medications for children in Linguere, Senegal. Hosted by Bouna Ndiaye of Bonjour Africa, WNCU.

September 26, 2004: Ahmed Moustafa, gallery talk, part of the Five Artists * Five Faiths: Spirituality in Contemporary Art art exhibit at Ackland Art Museum, UNC-CH, 5:00-6:30 p.m. Follows reception, which begins at 2:00 p.m.

September 27, 2004: Ahmet Karamustafa, professor of Islamic thought and religious studies, Washington University, St. Louis, roundtable discussion about Islam and modernity in seminar, "Towards New Ethical Paradigms: Christian and Muslim Liberation Theologies." 4:45-6:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Center for Global Studies and the Humanities and the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University.

September 27, 2004: Anne Garrels, National Public Radio, "Naked in Baghdad." 6:30-7:30 p.m., Amphitheater, Meredith College, Raleigh (rainsite Jones Auditorium). Sponsored by Meredith College Asia Week.

September 27, 2004: Film: Bekleme Odasi (Waiting Room) (Turkey, 2003, 94 minutes), directed by Zeki Demirkubuz. 8:00 p.m., Griffith Film Theater, Bryan Center, Duke University. Part of the series, Arada/Between: Contemporary Turkish Cinema, sponsored by Screen/Society, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Film-Video-Digital Program, and the Program in Literature, Duke University.

September 28, 2004: Chibli Mallat, professor of European law, Universite Saint-Joseph, Beirut, Lebanon, "Constitutions for the 21 st Century: Emerging patterns—the EU, Iraq, Afghanistan." 12:00 p.m., Room 3041, Duke Law School. Sponsored by the Herbert L. Bernstein Memorial Lecture in International and Comparative Law, Duke Law School.

September 28, 2004: Ahmet Karamustafa, professor of Islamic thought and religious studies, Washington University, St. Louis, "Translating Islamic Civilization," followed by discussion moderated by Bruce Lawrence, professor of religion, Duke University. 7:00-9:00 p.m., Room 230-232, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Center for Global Studies and the Humanities and the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University. Attendance limited; please RSVP to sponsoring organizations.

September 29, 2004: Ahmet Karamustafa, professor of Islamic thought and religious studies, Washington University, St. Louis, "Islam: A Civilizational Project in Progress." 12:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Center for Global Studies and the Humanities and the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University.

September 29, 2004: Film: Çamur (Mud) (Turkey, 2003, 97 minutes), directed by Dervis Zaim. 8:00 p.m., Griffith Film Theater, Bryan Center, Duke University. Part of the series, Arada/Between: Contemporary Turkish Cinema, sponsored by Screen/Society, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Film-Video-Digital Program, and the Program in Literature, Duke University.

September 30, 2004: Film: Sargam (Solfege) (Pakistan, 1995, 180 minutes), directed by Syed Noor. 7:00 p.m., Erdahl Cloyd Theatre, D.H. Hill Library, NCSU. Part of the Fall 2004 South Asian Film Festival "Singer and Song Series." Sponsored by the Hindi-Urdu Section of the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures and the D.H. Hill Library, NCSU, and the N.C. Center for South Asia Studies.

 September 29-October 2, 2004: Rumi Festival. Events include:

September 30, 2004: Rifai Marufi Zikr, under the guidance of Sufi master Sherif Baba. 8:00 p.m., Unity Center of Peace Church, 8800 Seawell School Road, Chapel Hill.

October 1, 2004: "An Evening with Rumi." Meditative music by setar artist Soheil Zolfunun, kanun instrumentalist Osman Aksu, accompanied by Shahram Mazhari playing the daf (frame drum with rings) and santur, and ney artist Fahir Zulfikar, and turning by Aziz Abbatiello. Introduction by Carl Ernst, professor of religious studies, UNC-CH. 8:00 p.m., Eno River Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Center, 4907 Garrett Road, Durham. Tickets $15 ($12 students).

October 2, 2004: Zikr Ceremony, with music by Osman Aksu and friends. 8:00 p.m., Immaculate Conception Catholic Church Gymnasium, 810 West Chapel Hill Street Durham, NC (right off the Durham Freeway, Chapel Hill Street Exit).

October 1, 2004: Sabine Henry, geographer and visiting scholar, Carolina Population Center, UNC-CH, "The Influence of the Natural Environment on Migration in Burkina Faso: A Multilevel Event-History Analysis."12:00 p.m., Room 405, Carolina Population Center East, 123 West Franklin Street, Chapel Hill. Sponsored by the Carolina Population Center.

October 3, 2004: Whirling Dervishes, Sufi Music Concert and Sema Performance. 6:00 p.m., Memorial Auditorium, Raleigh Convention and Conference Center, 500 Fayetteville St. Mall, Raleigh.

October 4, 2004: Writing Jerusalem: a conversation between Linda Zisquit, poet, manager of Artspace gallery, Jerusalem, and professor of creative writing, Bar Ilan University, and Sidra DeKoven Ezrahi, professor of comparative Jewish literature, Hebrew University, and visiting professor of Asian and African languages and literatures, Duke University. 4:00 p.m., Pink Parlor, East Duke Building, Duke University. Wine and cheese will be served. Sponsored by Triangle Tikkun.

October 4, 2004: Seyyed Hossein Nasr, professor of Islamic studies, George Washington University, "The Role of Religion and Science in the Dialogue Among Civilizations." 7:30 p.m., 116 Murphey Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences and the Departments of Religious Studies, Physics and Astronomy, Chemistry, and Marine Sciences, UNC-CH.

October 4, 2004: Film: Insaat (Under Construction) (Turkey, 2003, 113 minutes), directed by Ömer Vargi. 8:00 p.m., Griffith Film Theater, Bryan Center, Duke University. Part of the series, Arada/Between: Contemporary Turkish Cinema, sponsored by Screen/Society, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Film-Video-Digital Program, and the Program in Literature, Duke University.

October 6, 2004: Robert Stevenson, professor of journalism, UNC-CH, and Fissehaye Tecle, graduate student from Eritrea, "International Political and Media Response to the Sudanese Crisis." 4:00 p.m., Carolina Union Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH. Sponsored by Advocates for Human Rights, Campus Y, UNC-CH.

October 6, 2004: Film: Kucuk Ozgurluk / Kleine Freiheit (A Little Bit of Freedom) (Germany, 2003, 102 minutes), directed by Yüksel Yavuz. 8:00 p.m., Griffith Film Theater, Bryan Center, Duke University. Part of the series, Arada/Between: Contemporary Turkish Cinema, sponsored by Screen/Society, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Film-Video-Digital Program, and the Program in Literature, Duke University.

October 7, 2004: Theta Pi Tackles the Middle East. Discover the facts... Judge for yourself. 7:30 p.m., 105 Gardner Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Theta Pi Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

October 12, 2004: Humala Aqrawee, interpreter for the 101st Airborne Division of the United States Army, the municipal government of Iraq and numerous coalition-led training courses for the judiciary and police of Mosul, Iraq, "Democratization and Liberation in Iraq from an Iraqi Woman's Point of View." 6:00 p.m., 106 Gardner Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, UNC College Republicans, and Carolina Troop Supporters.

October 12, 2004: "The Lessons of Beslan?  Terrorism and the 'New Security' in Russia." 7:00-9:00 p.m., Toy Lounge, Dey Hall, UNC-CH. Public roundtable discussion sponsored by the UNC-Duke Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies and the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, UNC-CH. Participants include:

  • Anatoly Isaenko, professor of history, Appalachian State University
  • Martin Miller, professor of history, Duke University
  • Graeme Robertson, professor of political science, UNC-CH
  • Jonathan Weiler, professor of Russian and East European studies, UNC-CH

 October 13, 2004: Film: Route 181: Fragments of a Journey in Palestine-Israel (Israel-Palestine-France-Belgium-UK-Germany, 2003, 270 minutes), directed by Eyal Sivan and Michel Khleifi. 7:00 p.m., Richard White Auditorium, East Campus, Duke University. First in a yearlong UNC-CH/Duke film series, "Through Palestinian Eyes: Palestinian Representations of Self." Co-sponsored by the Robertson Collaborative Fund; the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Department of Asian & African Languages & Literature, the Film/Video/Digital section of the Program in Literature, and the Program in Women's Studies, Duke University; and the Department of Asian Studies the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

October 14, 2004: Daniel Pipes, author, newspaper columnist, and board member, U.S. Institute of Peace, "The Palestinian-Israeli War: Where Did It Come From, How To End It." 6:30 p.m., Love Auditorium, Levine Science Research Center, West Campus, Duke University. Sponsored by the Duke Conservative Union, the Intercollegiate Studies Institute, Young America’s Foundation; and the Freeman Center for Jewish Life, Chabad of Duke, Sanford Institute of Public Policy, and the Department of Political Science, Duke University.

October 14, 2004: Film: Baiju Bawra (India, 1952, 155 minutes), directed by Vijay Bhatt. 7:00 p.m., Erdahl Cloyd Theatre, D.H. Hill Library, NCSU. Part of the Fall 2004 South Asian Film Festival "Singer and Song Series." Sponsored by the Hindi-Urdu Section of the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures and the D.H. Hill Library, NCSU, and the N.C. Center for South Asia Studies.

October 15, 2004: Dalia Kaikhasraw, Oscar Farfan, and Zaur Muslumov, fellows, Program in International Development Policy, Duke University, Panel Discussion: "National Development Strategies and Mineral Resources: The Cases of Iraq, Bolivia and Azerbaijan." 12:00 p.m., Sanford Institute, Duke University. Sponsored by the Duke Center for International Development, Duke University.

October 15-16, 2004: Israel Teach-in. Duke University. See website for specific events, time, and locations. Sponsored by the Freeman Center for Jewish Life, Duke University; and by Mitchell Rubenstein and Laurie Silvers, Hillel International, The Israel on Campus Coalition, Hadassah, the Toleo Foundation, the Jewish Federation of Greensboro, and the Jewish Community Council of Winston-Salem. Speakers include:

  • Avram Burg, former speaker of the Israeli parliament
  • Bernard Avishai, visiting professor of business, Fuqua School, Duke University
  • Malachi Hacohen, professor of History, Duke University
  • Mitchell Bard, American Israeli Cooperative Enterprise
  • Ed Beck, Scholars for Peace in the Middle East
  • Joseph Shatzmiller, professor of Jewish studies, Duke University
  • Martin Cominsky, Anti-Defamation League
  • Yaakov Ariel, professor of religious studies, UNC-CH
  • Stephanie Schwartz, Hillel/Israel on Campus Coalition
  • Sidra DeKoven Ezrahi, professor of comparative Jewish literature, Hebrew University, and visiting professor of Asian and African languages and literatures, Duke University
  • Eric Meyers, professor of Jewish studies, Duke University
  • Avi Goldwasser and Rachel Fish, The David Project

October 15-17, 2004: Palestine Solidarity Movement, Fourth Annual Conference. Duke University. See website for specific events, times, and locations. Sponsored by Hiwar, Duke University; and more than a dozen other organizations. Speakers and performers include:

  • Dennis Brutus, South African anti-apartheid activist and professor of African Studies and African Literature.
  • Dianna Buttu, legal advisor, Negotiations Affairs Department, Palestinian Liberation Organization.
  • Mark Davidson, Presbyterian minister, Chapel Hill, NC.
  • Mazin Qumsiyeh, professor of genetics, Yale University, and co-founder of Al Awda, Palestine Right to Return Coalition, Academics for Justice, and Boycott Israeli Goods campaign.
  • Rebecca Stein, professor of anthropology, Duke University.
  • Nasser Abufarha, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Wisconsin.
  • Brian Avery, human rights activist.
  • Rauda Morcos, Palestinian poet and founder of Aswat, the Palestinian gay women group.
  • Rania Masri, fellow at the Institute for Southern Studies, writer, filmmaker, activist, and human rights advocate.
  • Mark Gonzales, Human Writes Project spoken word performer
  • Son of Nun (S.O.N.), hip hop solo
  • Life Convicts, hip hop duo
  • Rauda Morcos, poet
  • Ellen O'Grady, artist
  • Melissa Malouf, author
  • Tracy, singer
  • Sean Krebs, poet
  • Morgan Guyton, singer
  • Osu Debka, dance and oud performers

October 16, 2004: Double Violin Concert: L. Shankar and Gingger, accompanied by Zakir Hussain on tabla and Sivamani on drums. 7:30 p.m., Page Auditorium, Duke University. Tickets: $20. Presented by the Indian Classical Music and Dance Society and Duke Performances.

October 16-17, 2004: Conference on "'I Am No Prophet': The Function of Prophecy in Holy Books and Beyond." Location and times to be announced. Sponsored by the Department of Religious Studies, UNC-CH.

Ancient Mediterranean Religion I
  • Beate Pongratz-Leisten, professor of Near Eastern studies, Princeton University, "On the Authority of Written Speech in the Ancient Near East."
  • Klaus Koch, professor of theology, University of Hamburg, "The Protest of Israelite Prophets against Politics and Economics of the Ruling Classes and their Legitimation."
Ancient Mediterranean Religion II
  • Zlatko Plese, professor of religious studies, UNC-CH, "Plato and Plutarch on Prophetic Inspiration."
  • George Brooke, professor of Biblical criticism and exegesis, University of Manchester, "From Moses to Messianism: The Politics and Practices of Prophecy in Second Temple Judaism."
  • Michael Palmer, professor of religion and philosophy, Meredith College, TBA.
Medieval Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
  • Philip Alexander, professor of post-Biblical Jewish studies, University of Manchester, TBA.
  • David Steinmetz, professor of the history of Christianity, Duke University, "The Domestication of Prophecy in the Early Reformation."
  • Carl Ernst, professor of religious studies, UNC-CH, "Prophetic Authority vs. Authority of Tradition: Shifting Voices in the Qur'an."
Modern Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
  • Yaakov Ariel, professor of religious studies, UNC-CH, TBA.
  • Jan Shipps, professor of history and religious studies, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, "Prophets and Prophecy in the Mormon Tradition."
  • Edward Curtis, professor of religious studies, UNC-CH, "What Manner of a Messenger? How Elijah Muhammad Became a Religious Prophet."
Concluding Panel

October 17, 2004: Panel Discussion: Finding Common Ground in a Fractious World. 3:30-5:45 p.m., Durham Friends Meeting House, 404 Alexander Ave., Durham. Sponsored by Triangle Tikkun and Durham Friends Meeting. Pre-register by e-mailing Mara Evans. Panel includes:

  • Susannah Heschel, professor of Jewish studies, Dartmouth College
  • David Potorti, author of September 11th Families for Peaceful Tomorrows: Turning Our Grief into Action for Peace
  • Samia Serageldin, author of The Cairo House and lecturer in Arabic, Duke University

October 17, 2004: Film: Guantanamobile Project Documentary (United States, 2004, filming continues), directed by Lisa Lynch and the Guantanamobile Project. 7:00 p.m., Witherspoon Campus Cinema, NCSU, introduced by the filmmaker and followed by Q&A. Sponsored by the Film Studies Program, Africana Studies and The Africa Project, and International Studies, NCSU.

October 18, 2004: Ray McGovern, retired CIA analyst and co-founder of Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity, "Intelligence and the Iraq War." 12:00 p.m., 569 Hamilton Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Distinguished Visitor Luncheon Series, Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense (PWAD), UNC-CH. Reservation required through PWAD.

October 18, 2004: Steven Wilkinson, professor of political science, Duke University, "Ethnic Riots as Campaign Expenditure in Indian Elections." 6:00 p.m., 040 Trent Hall, Duke University. Sponsored by the Program for Advanced Research in the Social Sciences (PARISS) and the Social Science Research Institute, Duke University.

October 18, 2004: Gerdien Jonker, professor of Oriental studies, Marburg University, "Muslim Women in Europe: A Force for Ethnic Understanding?" 7:00 p.m., East Duke Building, Duke University. Preceded by reception in East Duke Parlors, 6:00 p.m. Part of Women's Studies 260, Ford Foundation Seminar on "Gender and Ethnic Violence." Sponsored by Feminist Studies Across the Disciplines lecture series, Duke University.

October 18, 2004: Film: Kasaba (The Small Town) (Turkey, 1997, 82 minutes), directed by Nuri Bilge Ceylan. 8:00 p.m., Griffith Film Theater, Bryan Center, Duke University. Part of the series, Arada/Between: Contemporary Turkish Cinema, sponsored by Screen/Society, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Film-Video-Digital Program, and the Program in Literature, Duke University.

October 20, 2004: Ray McGovern, retired CIA analyst and co-founder Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity, "Cooking Intelligence for the War in Iraq." 7:00 p.m., Hanes Auditorium, UNC-CH. Sponsored by Campaign to End the Cycle of Violence.

October 20, 2004: Film: Final Solution (India, 2003, 218 minutes), directed by Rakesh Sharma. 8:00 p.m., Richard White Auditorium, East Campus, Duke University. Film to be introduced by the director. Sponsored by the Contemporary South Asia Forum, the Film-Video-Digital Program, and the Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke University.

October 20, 2004: Film: Mayis Sikintisi (Clouds of May) (Turkey, 1999, 117 minutes), directed by Nuri Bilge Ceylan. 8:00 p.m., Griffith Film Theater, Bryan Center, Duke University. Part of the series, Arada/Between: Contemporary Turkish Cinema, sponsored by Screen/Society, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Film-Video-Digital Program, and the Program in Literature, Duke University.

October 21, 2004: Will A. Gunn, Air Force colonel and chief defense counsel for the Department of Defense's Office of Military Commissions, "Honor Bound." 12:15 p.m., Room 3043, Duke Law School. Sponsored by the Center for Law, Ethics, and National Security, the Program in Public Law, and the Office of Student Affairs, Duke Law School.

October 21, 2004: Julia Clancy Smith, professor of history, University of Arizona, and fellow, National Humanities Center, "Women, Gender, and Social Control Along a Mediterranean Migratory Frontier." 6:30-9:00 p.m., Room 300, Tate-Turner-Kuralt Building, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Carolina Seminar on Ecology and Social Process in Africa.

October 21-22, 2004: Film: Uzak (Distant) (Turkey, 2002, 110 minutes), directed by Nuri Bilge Ceylan. 7:00 and 9:30 p.m., Griffith Film Theater, Bryan Center, Duke University. Admission: $1.00 (free for Duke students)Part of the series, Arada/Between: Contemporary Turkish Cinema, sponsored by Screen/Society, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Film-Video-Digital Program, and the Program in Literature, Duke University, and cosponsored by Freewater Presentations with support from the Duke Union.

October 22, 2004: Rebecca Stein, professor of cultural anthropology, Duke University, "Rural Imaginaries: Tourism, the Israeli State and the Production of the Palestinian Village." 3:30 p.m., 210 Gardner Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Department of Geography Colloquium Series, UNC-CH.

October 22, 2004: Concert: Youth and Children's Turkish Folk Dance Group. Part of Kaleidoscope: An Array of Cultural Diversity, Multi-Cultural Showcase. 7:00-9:00 p.m., Talley Ballroom, NCSU. Sponsored by the International Activities Council of the Union Activities Board, NCSU.

October 22-23, 2004: State Apologies Conference, Freedom Forum Conference Center, 305 Carroll Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH. Presentations include:

  • Surain Subramaniam, professor of political science, University of North Carolina, Asheville, "Perceiving Western Apologies in the Changing Security Environment of Malaysia." 8:30–10:00 a.m., October 23.
  • Mark Gibney, professor of political science, University of North Carolina, Asheville, and Niklaus Steiner, executive director, University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH, "Apology and the 'War on Terror.'"
  • Jonathan Marks, professor of public health, Johns Hopkins University, "The Fourth Estate and the Case for War in Iraq: Apology or Apologia?"

October 25, 2004: Eli, a gay Palestinian seeking refuge in Jerusalem, "The Persecution of Homosexuals by the Palestinian Authority and Palestinian Society." 6:00 p.m., 02 West Union Building, Duke University. Sponsored by the Sexuality and Citizenship Series of the Center for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Life and by Women's Studies, Duke University.

October 28, 2004: Jean Bauberot, researcher at the CNRS and Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Paris, "France-USA: deux modeles de separation Eglise/Etat" (France-USA: Two Models of Separation of Church and State). Lecture in French. 5:00 p.m., Room 230, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Center for French and Francophone Studies, Duke University.

October 28, 2004: Ebrahim Moosa, professor of religion and co-director, Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University, "The Dilemma of Islamic Rights Schemes." 7:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the UNC-Duke University Seminar on Human Rights/Civil Rights.

October 28, 2004: Film: Saaz (India, 1997), directed by Sai Paranjpye. 7:00 p.m., Erdahl Cloyd Theatre, D.H. Hill Library, NCSU. Part of the Fall 2004 South Asian Film Festival "Singer and Song Series." Sponsored by the Hindi-Urdu Section of the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures and the D.H. Hill Library, NCSU, and the N.C. Center for South Asia Studies.

November 1, 2004: Film: Inch'Allah Dimanche (God Willing, Sunday) (France-Algeria, 2001, 98 minutes), directed by Yamina Benguigui. 8:00 p.m., Guthridge Screening Room (Room 205), R. B. House Undergraduate Library, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Media Resources Center Fall Film Series and the Film Movement Series.

November 4, 2004: Alisher Ishanov, Muskie Fellow and master's student in public health, UNC-CH, "USAID Health Projects in Uzbekistan." 12:30-1:30 p.m., 101 Rosenau Hall, UNC-CH. Part of the 2004-2005 Brown Bag Seminar Series, Student Global Health Committee, School of Public Health, UNC-CH.

November 5, 2004: Anna Secor, professor of geography, University of Kentucky, "Law, Policing, and the State of Exception: Everyday Encounters in Istanbul." 3:15 p.m. coffee and cookies, 3:30 lecture. 210 Gardner Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Department of Geography Colloquium Series, UNC-CH.

November 5, 2004: Ken Bowers, member of the National Spiritual Assembly of the Baha'i Faith, speaking on his new book, God Speaks Again. 3:00 p.m., Room 2518 Carolina Union, UNC-CH.

November 5, 2004: Concert: Abdullah Ibrahim Trio. 8:00 p.m., Baldwin Auditorium, East Campus, Duke University. Tickets: $20. Presented by Duke Performances.

November 7, 2004: Carl Ernst, professor of religious studies, UNC-CH, interviewed by D. G. Martin about his book, Following Muhammad. 5:00 p.m., North Carolina Bookwatch, WUNC-TV.

November 9, 2004: Carl Ernst, professor of religious studies, UNC-CH, and F. Canguzel Zulfikar, translator and historian, "On Translating American Scholarship on Islamic Studies into Turkish." 12:00-1:00 p.m., 2nd Floor Conference Rooms, Davis Library, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Scholarly Communication Working Group, Odum Institute for Research in Social Science, UNC-CH.

November 11, 2004: Concert: Jerusalem Lyric Trio. 7:30 p.m., Judea Reform Congregation, 1955 W. Cornwallis Road, Durham. Tickets: $12. Presented by Duke Performances and Judea Reform Congregation, and made possible with support from the Evans Family Fund.

November 12, 2004: Carl Dahlman, professor of geography, University of South Carolina, "Fighting the Peace: The Geopolitics of Post-War Bosnia and Iraq." 3:15 p.m. coffee and cookies, 3:30 lecture. 210 Gardner Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Department of Geography Colloquium Series, UNC-CH.

November 15, 2004: Film: Trembling Before G-d (U.S.A.-France-Israel, 2001, 84 minutes), directed by Sandi Simcha DuBowski. Followed by discussion. 7:00 p.m., Freeman Center for Jewish Life, Duke University. Sponsored by the Sexuality and Citizenship Series of the Center for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Life, Duke University.

November 16, 2004: Film: Yossi veJager (Yossi and Jagger) (Israel, 2002, 65 minutes), directed by Eytan Fox. Followed by dinner discussion. 7:00 p.m., 02 West Union Building, Duke University. Sponsored by the Sexuality and Citizenship Series of the Center for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Life, Duke University.

November 17, 2004: David C. Litt, former U.S. ambassador to the United Arab Emirates and diplomat-in-residence, Center for International Studies, Duke University, "Challenges for Diplomacy in the Age of Terrorism: A Personal View." 4:00 p.m., Room 04, Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke University. The Anthony Joseph Drexel Biddle, Jr. Lecture on International Studies is sponsored by the Anthony J. Drexel Biddle Lectureship Endowment and by the Mary Trent Jones-Sarah Trent Harris-Rebecca Trent Kirkland Endowment.

November 18, 2004: Film: Israeli-Palestinian Film Festival, Room 039, Graham Memorial Hall, UNC-CH. Organized by the students in History 006J, "The Conflict Over Israel/Palestine," UNC-CH. Students will be present to discuss the films and answer questions.

3:45 p.m. Film: Wedding in Galilee (France-Israel, 1987, 113 minutes), directed by Michel Khleifi.

5:45 p.m. Film: Children of Fire (Israel-Palestine, 1990, 28 minutes), directed by Mai Masri

6:50 p.m. A Search for Solid Ground: The Intifada through Israeli Eyes (Israel-Palestine, 1990, 33 minutes), produced by Steve Brand.

7:40 p.m. Film: Battle for the Holy Land (United States, 2002, 60 minutes), produced by PBS Frontline.

9:05 p.m. Film: Peace, Propaganda, and the Promised Land (United States, 2004, 80 minutes), directed by Bathsheba Ratzkoff and Sut Jhally.

10:20 p.m. Slides and Conclusion

November 18, 2004: Two anonymous Sudanese immigrants, "The Current Crisis in Darfur." 6:30-7:00 p.m., The Pit, UNC-CH. Followed by silent candlelight vigil. Sponsored by SUDAN, Students for the Advancement of Race Relations and Adocates for Human Rights (committees of the Campus Y), and Students United for a Responsible Global Enviroment, UNC-CH.

November 19, 2004: Josh Lepawsky, professor of geography, University of Kentucky, "The Multimedia Super Corridor, the Digital Divide, and the Moral Economy of Access to Information Technology in Malaysia." 3:15 p.m. coffee and cookies, 3:30 lecture. 210 Gardner Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Department of Geography Colloquium Series, UNC-CH.

November 19, 2004: Zaur Muslumov and Tserannadmid Osorpurev, fellows, Program in International Development Policy, Duke University, Panel Discussion: "Corruption in Transition Countries: The Cases of Mongolia and Azerbaijan." 12:00 p.m., Sanford Institute, Duke University. Sponsored by the Duke Center for International Development, Duke University.

November 19, 2004: Dance: "Darbouka: The Rhythm of the Middle East," with DJ Ramy. 10:00 p.m.-3:00 a.m., George's Garage, 737 9th St., Durham. $7 cover includes free hookah and Middle Eastern desserts. Sponsored by the Turkish Students Assocation, Arab Students Organization, and Persian Students Association, Duke University.

November 20, 2004: Concert: Sviraj, A Balkan Jam. 8:00 p.m., Carrboro ArtsCenter, 300-G East Main Street, Carrboro. Tickets: $18.

November 21, 2004: Concert: Gamelan Nyai Saraswati, Javanese gamelan ensemble, with Charanga Carolina, Cuban danzon music. 4:00 p.m., Hill Hall Auditorium, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Department of Music, UNC-CH.

November 22, 2004: Deepali Dewan, associate curator, Royal Ontario Museum, and professor of art history, University of Toronto, "'Colonial Paparazzi': Strategies of Photographing the Elite in 19th Century South Asia." 5:00 p.m., 121 Hanes Art Center, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Art Department and the College of Arts and Sciences, UNC-CH.

November 22, 2004: Tanya Reinhart, professor of linguistics and media studies, University of Tel Aviv, "Lies About Peace: Sharon's Pullout Plan and Other Dangers." 5:30 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Franklin Humanities Institute, Women's Studies, Cultural Anthropology, Asian and African Languages and Literature, and HIWAR, Duke University; and Jews for a Just Peace.

November 22, 2004: Round Table Discussion and Memorial for Margaret Hassan, kidnapped and murdered Iraqi aid worker. 7:00 p.m., Alumni Lounge, West Union, Duke University. Sponsored by students in Islamic studies, Duke University.

November 29, 2004:  Rebecca Brown, Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, "'Walking on the Moon': The Impact of Science and Technology on Modern Indian Art." 5:00 p.m., 121 Hanes Art Center, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Art Department and the College of Arts and Sciences, UNC-CH.

November 29, 2004: Film: The Killing Zone (Britain-Israel-Palestine, 2003, 52 minutes), directed by Channel 4 News (U.K.). 7:00 p.m., 209 Manning Hall, UNC-CH. Discussion will follow with Brian Avery, International Solidarity Movement volunteer shot by Israeli Defense Forces; Rann Bar-On, Duke University student organizer of the Palestine Solidarity Movement conference this fall; and Rebecca Hylander, recently returned from a trip to the region. Sponsored by UNC-CH students in commemoration of International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People.

December 2, 2004: Akeel Bilgrami, professor of philosophy, Columbia University, "The Ethics of Secular and Religious Critique." 3:30 p.m., Room 230, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University.

December 2, 2004: Film: The Fourth World War (United States, 2004, 72 minutes), directed by Rick Rowley and Jacqueline Soohen. Event hosted by the directors. 8:00 p.m., 111 Carroll Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Department of Communication Studies, Institute for Latin American Studies, Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, Institute for African American Research, University Program in Cultural Studies, UNC-CH; Southerners On New Ground, NC.Indymedia.org, NC Coalition for Peace , Students United for a Responsible Global Environment, UNC Campaign to End the Cycle of Violence, Internationalist Books & Community Center,and Balance and Accuracy in Journalism.

December 10, 2004: Concert: Shaam-e Ghazal, an evening of ghazals in memory of Noor Jehan, the late renowned singer of Pakistan and India by vocal maestro Indrani Joshi, who will recapture the magical voice of Noor Jehan in ghazals, songs, and selected qawwalis. 8:30 p.m., G107 Caldwell Hall, NCSU. Tickets: $7. Sponsored by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, NCSU; the N.C. Center for South Asia Studies; Mihir Chakraborty; Urdu Majlis; and Geet Bazaar.

December 12, 2004: Concert: Fourth Annual Evening of Songs For Peace. A benefit concert for building a clinic and renovating a school in the West Bank town of Tuwani, a town that has been adopted by the Israeli-Arab alliance Ta'ayush. 7:00 - 10:00 p.m., Carrboro Arts Center's West End Theater, 300-G East Main Street, Carrboro. Performers include area singer-songwriters Jamie Anderson, Robert Baldwin, Tracy S. Feldman, Kathleen Hannan, The Parsons Trio, Jamie Purnell, Mary Rocap, John Saylor, and Greg Taylor. Guest speaker: Donna Hicks, Christian Peacemaker team member. Door price: $10.

January 11, 2005: Richard L. Guerrant, professor of internal medicine and division head, Division of Geographic and International Medicine, University of Virginia Health System, "A Tsunami Awakening to Global Health: Why We Must Care." Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the University Seminar on Global Health, "Exploring Medicine: Cross-Cultural Challenges to Medicine in the 21st Century" (Interdisciplinary Course at Duke Medical College), and the Duke Center for International Studies, Duke University.

January 14, 2005: Concert: Shaam-e Ghazal, an evening of Urdu-Hindi poetry set to music, with Mehnaz, "Sitara-e-Imtiyaz," renowned vocalist from Pakistan, accompanied by Umed Hussain on tabla and Ustad Rashid Bukhari on keyboard. 8:30 p.m., G107 Caldwell Hall, NCSU. Tickets: $20. Sponsored by the N.C. Center for South Asia Studies; Mihir Chakraborty; Urdu Majlis; and Geet Bazaar.

January 14 - February 27, 2005: Exhibit: "Dead Sea Scrolls to the Bible in America." Providence Place, 1701 Westchester Drive, High Point. Tickets: $8-12.

January 18, 2005: Jeremy Prestholdt, professor of history, Northeastern University, "Peripheral Visions: East African Consumering in a Global Age." 3:30 p.m., 569 Hamilton Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Department of History, UNC-CH.

January 19, 2005: Naomi Chazan, professor of political science, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and former member of the Israeli parliament, "Where Do We Go From Here? A New Chance for Israel-Palestine." 4:00 p.m., Freeman Center for Jewish Life, Duke University. Sponsored by the Department of Asian & African Languages & Literature, the Center for Judaic Studies, and the Freeman Center for Jewish Life, Duke University.

 January 24, 2005: "Films by Palestinian Women." Part of the Duke University/UNC-CH Film Series, "Through Palestinian Eyes: An Exploration into Palestinian Representations of Self." Co-sponsored by the Robertson Collaborative Fund; the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Department of Asian & African Languages & Literature, the Film/Video/Digital section of the Program in Literature, and the Program in Women's Studies, Duke University; and the Department of Asian Studies the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

5:00-6:30 p.m.: Film: Like Twenty Impossibles (Palestine, 2003, 17 minutes), directed by Annemarie Jacir, followed by lecture by the director. Richard White Lecture Hall, East Campus, Duke University.

7:00-8:00 p.m.: Reception, East Duke Building, Duke University.

8:00 p.m.: Film: 3 Cm. Less (Palestine, 2003, 60 minutes), directed by Azza El-Hassan.

9:00 p.m.: Film: Frontiers of Dreams and Fears (Palestine, 2001, 56 minutes), directed by Mai Masri.

 January 25, 2005: Kamran Rastegar, professor of comparative literature, Brown University, "Excavating Palestinian Cinema: A Historical and Cultural Perspective." 6:00 p.m., 204B East Duke Building, Duke University. Part of the Duke University/UNC-CH Film Series, "Through Palestinian Eyes: An Exploration into Palestinian Representations of Self." Co-sponsored by the Robertson Collaborative Fund; the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Department of Asian & African Languages & Literature, the Film/Video/Digital section of the Program in Literature, and the Program in Women's Studies, Duke University; and the Department of Asian Studies the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

January 26, 2005: Susan Willis, professor of literature, Duke University, "Quien es mas macho? The Abu Ghraib Photos." 12:00-1:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Part of the Wednesdays at the Center series sponsored by the Franklin Humanities Institute.

January 26, 2005: Christopher Lee, lecturer in history, Stanford University, "Colonial Kinships: The British Dual Mandate, Anglo-African Status, and the Politics of Race and Race Mixture in British Central Africa, 1915-1964." 3:30 p.m., 569 Hamilton Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Department of History, UNC-CH.

 January 26, 2005: Efdaluddin Kilic and Gulnihal Kupeli, Turkish artists, "Calligraphy and Illumination Exhibition." Reception with opening remarks by Wesley Kort, professor of religion, Duke University, 4:30-6:30 p.m., Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture, Duke University. Exhibit runs January 24-February 3, 2005. Presentation also on February 3, 2005, 12:30 p.m., 116 Murphey Hall, UNC-CH. Cosponsored by the Department of Religion, Duke University; the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH; and the Islam and Dialogue Student Association, NCSU.

January 27, 2005: African Justice. 7:00-9:00 p.m., Hanes Art Auditorium, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Minor in Social and Economic Justice, UNC-CH:

7:00-8:10 p.m. Concepts of African Justice
  • Presider: Ann Dunbar, professor of African studies, UNC-CH
  • Araia Berhane, doctoral candidate in sociology, UNC-CH
  • Julius Nyang'oro, professor of African studies, UNC-CH
  • Eunice Sahle, professor of African studies, UNC-CH
8:15-9:00 p.m. Practice of Justice: Kibera, Nairobi

January 28, 2005: Marty Rosenbluth, Amnesty International USA's country specialist for Israel, the Occupied  Territories and the Palestinian Authority, "Prospects for Peace in the Middle East after the Palestinian Elections." 12:15 p.m., Room 3037, Duke University School of Law. Sponsored by Duke University School of Law.

January 28, 2005: Robert Conrad, director, Duke Center for International Development, "Any Magical Recipes for Transition? Lessons from Eurasia." 2:30-3:30 p.m., Room 225, Sanford Institute for Public Policy, Duke University. Sponsored by the Eurasian Working Group, Duke University.

January 29, 2005: Reb Mimi Feigelson, lecturer in rabbinic literature, Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, University of Judaism, Bel Air, California, "Holding on While Letting Go," a mystical Havdallah experience full of song, story and Chasidic gems. 7:00 p.m., North Carolina Hillel, 210 West Cameron Avenue, Chapel Hill. Sponsored by NC Hillel and Beth El Synagogue, Durham. If you can come please let contact info@nchillel.org.

January 30, 2005: Jeff Halper, director of the Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions (ICAHD), "Reframing the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: A View from the Ground." 7:00 p.m., Pullen Memorial Baptist Church, 1801 Hillsborough St., Raleigh. Sponsored by ICAHD-USA, Coalition for Peace with Justice, and Jews for a Just Peace NC.

February 2, 2005: Kate Winskell, professor of global health, and program development coordinator, Center for the Study of Health, Culture, and Society, Emory University, "Narratives of HIV: Scenarios from Africa." 7:00 p.m., 1301 McGavran-Greenberg, School of Public Health, UNC-CH. Sponsored by Student Global Health Committee, Office of Global Health, Center for AIDS Research, Student Global AIDS Campaign, and the Student Congress, UNC-CH.

February 3, 2005: Richard Doner, professor of political science, Emory University, "Systemic Vulnerability and the Origins of Developmental States: Northeast and Southeast Asia in Comparative Perspective." 10:00 a.m., Old Trinity Room, West Union, Duke University. Sponsored by the Markets and Democratic Institutions program, Duke University.

February 3, 2005: Robin Moore, professor of music, Temple University, "Yoruba Drumming and Song Traditions in Cuba." 12:00 p.m., Conference Room, Coates Building, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Brown Bag Lunch Series, Institute for Latin American Studies, UNC-CH.

February 3, 2005: William Itoh, former U.S. ambassador to Thailand and ambassador-in-residence, Kenan Institute in Washington, and Kevin Hewison, director of the Carolina Asia Center, UNC-CH, "After the Tsunami: The Economic, Political, and Social Implications of the Tsunami in Southeast Asia." 8:00 p.m., 116 Murphey Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Southeast Asia Interest Association and Young Democrats, UNC-CH.

February 4, 2005: Meeting the Threat: A Symposium on Counter-Terrorism. 9:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m., Room 3041, Duke Law School. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law, Duke Law School.

 February 4-5, 2005: "Mapping Muslim Ethics," 2nd Annual Duke-UNC Graduate Conference on Islamic Studies. Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, the Department of Religion, Duke Center for International Studies, Program in Islamic Studies, Department of Art & Art History, Department of Literature, Department of Asian & African Languages & Literature, and Department of History, Duke University; the Curriculum in International and Area Studies, University Center for International Studies, Curriculum in Women's Studies, Department of Religious Studies, Department of Political Science, and Department of Asian Studies, UNC-CH; and the Triangle South Asia Consortium of the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies.

February 4, 2005:

9:00 a.m.: Ebrahim Moosa, professor of religion, Duke University, "Conceptualizing Muslim Ethics."

9:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m.: Anthropological and Literary Perspectives on Ethical Issues:
  • Chair: Anna Bigelow, professor of religion, NCSU.
  • Zareena Grewal, graduate student in anthropology and history, University of Michigan - Ann Arbor, "Native Orientalist: The Ethics of the Production of Knowledge in Anthropology."
  • Attiya Ahmad, graduate student in anthropology, Duke University, "Thinking Through Differences Among Muslims: Foucault's Ethics and Deleuze's Ontology of Becoming."
  • Firat Oruc, graduate student in literature, Duke University, "The Poetical Ethics of the Early Twentieth-Century Modernist Islam."
1:30-4:20 p.m.: Bioethics:
  • Chair: Ebrahim Moosa, professor of religion, Duke University.
  • Tehseen Thaver, graduate student in religious studies, University of Virginia, "Islamic Bio-Conjectural Ethics."
  • Sherine Hamdy, graduate student in anthropology, New York University, "Rethinking Islamic Legal Ethics in the Debate on Organ Transplants in Egypt."
  • Hamada Hamid, medicine student, New York University, "Moral Reasoning in Islamic Medical Ethics: The Abortion Debate as a Case Study."

February 5, 2005:

9:00 a.m.: Muhammad Qasim Zaman, professor of religion, Brown University, "Linguistic Communities, Religious Discourse, and the Public Sphere in Contemporary Islam."

10:10 a.m.-12:50 p.m.: Ethics in History:

  • Chair: Muhammad Qasim Zaman, professor of religion, Brown University.
  • Ian Straughn, graduate student in archaeology, University of Chicago, "Bridging Theology and Politics: The Ethics of Spatial Practice in the Fiqhi Doctrine of Territoriality and Early Siyar."
  • Muhammad Khalil, graduate student in Islamic studies, University of Michigan - Ann Arbor, "Islam, Ethics and the Intellect's Ability to Discern Good and Evil."
  • Ahmad Atif Ahmad, graduate student in Islamic studies, Harvard University, "Legal Agency, Legal Responsibility and Rights in Muslim Ethno-Legal Discourse."

2:30-5:10 p.m.: Contemporary Ethical Concerns:

  • Chair: M. Brett Wilson, graduate student in religion, Duke University.
  • Peter Wright, graduate student in religious studies, UNC-CH, "'The Broad and Open Way':  Critical Reflections Upon the 'Constitutive Rhetorics' of Islamic Law."
  • Saeed Khan, graduate student in Islamic studies, Wayne State University, "The Ethos of "Voluntary Otherness" and the Hijab: American Muslim Women and their Attempt to Define their Identity and Create Space in the Public Sphere."
  • Ashraf Joseph, graduate student in Islamic law, University of Michigan - Ann Arbor, "Martyrdom Operations, Suicide Bombings and Political Expediency."

February 5, 2005: SURGE Conference 2005: Student Union, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Fund for Southern Communities, Strowd Roses, the Greensboro Justice Fund, the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, Charles M. Jones Peace & Justice Committee of the Community Church of Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill/Carrboro Carolina Interfaith Taskforce on Central America (CITCA), and other organizations. Workshops include:

9:30–10:45 a.m. The Occupation of Iraq: Where We Can Go From Here, led by Lou Plummer, member of Veterans for Peace and Military Families Speak Out, and Jessica Gonzalez, student at UNC-Greensboro.

11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Palestine/Israel: Developing a Path Toward Peace & Justice, led by Bryan Avery and Dave Reed, activists with the International Solidarity Movement; Marguerite Lawn, member of People to People International; and Ruba Marshood, graduate student in international policy & the environment, Duke University.

February 7, 2005: Mohammed Hirchi, visiting assistant professor of French and Arabic, Colorado State University, "Rewriting History in Postcolonial (?)." 3:30 p.m., faculty lounge, 1911 building, NCSU. Sponsored by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, NCSU.

February 7, 2005: Kimuli Kasara, doctoral candidate in political science, Stanford University, "Tax Me if You Can: Ethnic Geography, Democracy, and the Taxation of Agriculture in Africa." 5:00-6:30 p.m., Breedlove Room, Perkins Library, Duke University. Sponsored by the Comparative Politics Workshop, Duke University.

February 8, 2005: Shaun Lopez, post-doctoral fellow in history, UNC-CH, "The Dangers of Dancing: Gender, Moral Order, and the Mass Media in Modern Egypt" 3:30 p.m., 569 Hamilton Hall. Sponsored by the Department of History, UNC-CH.

February 8, 2005: John Prendergast, special adviser to the president of the International Crisis Group, "Confronting Genocide in Darfur." 111 Carroll Hall, UNC-CH. Part of the Great Decisions lecture series, UNC-CH, and the Monthly Rotary Peace Seminar, Duke-UNC Rotary Center for International Studies in Peace & Conflict Resolution.

February 11, 2005: John Hope, professor of Russian, Williams College, "Fearsome under Sultry Skies? The East of Alexander Griboedov." 4:00 p.m., 303 Dey Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, UNC-CH.

February 12, 2005: M. Anis Ahmed, Bangla Service, Voice of America, "Growth and Evolution of Language Movement in Bangladesh." 6:30-8:30 p.m., Miller-Morgan Auditorium, Health Sciences Building, North Carolina Central University. Followed by music, recitation, and slide show by Dhroopod, Washington, DC. Sponsored by the NC Center for South Asian Studies with cooperation from the Triangle Bangladesh Society, NC.

February 16, 2005: Matthew Sherman, director of national security affairs in Iraq, U.S. Department of State, "Iraq: Facts on the Ground." 3:30 p.m., Conference Room, Coates Building, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

 February 16, 2005: "Remembering Edward Said." 8:00 p.m., Richard White Lecture Hall, East Campus, Duke University. Part of the Duke University/UNC-CH Film Series, Through Palestinian Eyes: Palestinian Representations of Self." Co-sponsored by the Robertson Collaborative Fund; the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Department of Asian & African Languages & Literature, the Film/Video/Digital section of the Program in Literature, and the Program in Women's Studies, Duke University; and the Department of Asian Studies the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

8:00 p.m. Film: Selves and Others: A Portrait of Edward Said (U.S., 2003, 54 minutes), directed by Emmanuel Hamon.

9:00 p.m. Film: Edward Said on Orientalism (U.S., 1998, 40 minutes), directed by Sut Jhally.

February 17, 2005: Dennis Ross, former U.S. ambassador and currently distinguished fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, "The Battle for Peace in the Middle East." 4:00-5:30 p.m., Fleishman Commons, Sanford Institute, Duke University. Sponsored by Foundation Impact Research Group of the Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy, the Department of Political Science, the Freeman Center for Jewish Life, the Duke Center for International Studies and the Duke Center for Judaic Studies.

February 17, 2005: Film: Islam: Empire of Faith, Part I (U.S., 2001, 50 minutes), produced by PBS. 4:00 p.m., Erdahl-Cloyd Theater, D.H. Hill Library, NCSU. Sponsored by the Islam and Dialogue Student Association, NCSU. Enjoy ashura (Noah's Pudding) after the documentary.

February 17, 2005: Temma Kaplan, professor of history, Rutgers University, "Torture and Terrorism in Shameful Times." 5:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Department of History, the Program in Women's Studies, the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, the Institute for Critical U.S. Studies, and theFranklin Humanities Institute, Duke University.

February 17, 2005: Film: No Man's Land (Bosnia, 2001, 98 minutes), directed by Danis Tanovic. Introduced by Robert Jenkins, director of the Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies, UNC-CH. 7:00 p.m., Student Union Auditorium. Part of the Human Rights Film Festival sponsored by Amnesty International at UNC.

February 18, 2005: Lamia Karim, professor of anthropology, University of Oregon, "Struggles within Islam: The Emergence of Human Rights for Women and Minorities in Bangladesh." 12:00 p.m., Room 5042, University of North Carolina School of Law. Sponsored by the UNC School of Law Clinical Law Programs and the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

February 18, 2005: Films: Osama (Afghanistan, 2003, 82 minutes), directed by Siddiq Barmak, 7:00 p.m., and Jinnah (1999, Pakistan, 1999, 110 minutes), directed by Jamil Dehlavi, 9:00 p.m., 116 Murphey Hall, UNC-CH. Part of the South Asia Film Festival sponsored by Sangam, UNC-CH.

February 19, 2005: Cemil Aydin, professor of history, UNC-Charlotte, "Visions of A World Order: Pan-Asian and Pan-Islamic Thought in Japan and Turkey." 3:45 p.m., Boyd Room, 229 Carr Building, Duke University. Part of the Triangle East Asia Colloquium, "Borderlands and Multicultural Politics in Modern China and Japan." Sponsored by Duke University, UNC-CH, NCSU, the Asian/Pacific Studies Institute and the Department of History, Duke University.

February 20, 2005: Concert: A World Music Concert for the Whole Family, with Zindagi (World Beat), Saludos (Latin), and Jaafar (Middle Eastern Fusion). 7:30 p.m., Carrboro Century Center. Tickets $10. Proceeds go to U.S. Fund for UNICEF (Tsunami Relief) or Mercy Corps (Tsunami Relief).

February 21, 2005: Adventures in Peace: video and panel presentation by four Palestinians and Israelis who participated in an outdoor expedition to build intercultural and interracial understanding. 4:00-5:30 p.m., 104 Peabody Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the School of Education, UNC-CH, and the North Carolina Outward Bound School. Please RSVP to Linda Baucom.

February 21, 2005: Catherine Boone, professor of government, University of Texas, "Structural Adjustment and Economic Liberalization in Africa." 5:00-6:30 p.m., Breedlove Room, Perkins Library, Duke University. Sponsored by the Comparative Politics Workshop, Duke University.

February 21, 2005: A Forum on Sudan and Darfur: Taking Action on Campus and Beyond. 7:00 p.m., Campus Y Lobby. Sponsored by S.U.D.A.N. (Students United for Darfur Awareness Now): A Project of NC Hillel, Campus Y's Advocates for Human Rights, and Amnesty International at UNC.

 February 22, 2005: Charles Kurzman, professor of sociology, UNC-CH, "Radical Sheik and the Challenges of Islamic Terrorism." 7:00 p.m., 111 Carroll Hall, UNC-CH. Part of the Great Decisions lecture series, UNC-CH.

February 22, 2005: Dror Elner, Israeli attorney and speaker for the Zionist Organization of America, "Human Rights in the Middle East." 8:00 p.m., 103 Bingham Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by Carolina Students for Israel, UNC-CH.

 February 22, 2005: Film: Ford Transit (Palestine-Israel, 2002, 80 minutes), directed by Hany Abu Assad. 7:00 p.m., 100 Hamilton Hall, UNC-CH. Part of the Duke University/UNC-CH Film Series, Through Palestinian Eyes: Palestinian Representations of Self."  Co-sponsored by the Robertson Collaborative Fund; the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Department of Asian & African Languages & Literature, the Film/Video/Digital section of the Program in Literature, and the Program in Women's Studies, Duke University; and the Department of Asian Studies and the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

February 23, 2005: Michael Kennedy, professor of sociology, University of Michigan, "Linking Culture and Security: The Future of Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies." 4:00-5:00 p.m., Room 039, Graham Memorial Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the UNC-Duke Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies and the Robertson Scholars Collaboration Fund.

February 24, 2005: Cemalnur Sargut, Turkish author and chair of the Turkish Women Cultural Association’s Istanbul branch, "Sufism and Interfaith Dialogue." 4:00 p.m., 314 Harrelson Hall, NCSU. Sponsored by the Islam and Dialogue Student Association, NCSU.

February 24, 2005: Film: Mayis Sikintisi (Clouds of May) (Turkey, 1999, 130 minutes), directed by Nuri Bilge Ceylan. Introduction by Erdag Goknar, professor of Turkish language and culture, Duke University. 5:00 p.m., Kresge Foundation Commons Room (GM 039), Graham Memorial Hall, UNC-CH. Part of the Comparative Literature Spring 2005 Film Series, sponsored by the Curriculum of Comparative Literature, the Comparative Literature Organization for Undergraduate Discussion (CLOUD), and the Graduate Student Association of the Curriculum of Comparative Literature, UNC-CH.

February 24, 2005: Matthew Hull, professor of anthropology, UNC-CH, "The Expropriation of Land and the Appropriation of Records in Islamabad." 7:00 p.m., contact the Triangle South Asia Colloquium for location. Sponsored by the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies.

 February 24, 2005: Carolina-Duke Graduate Islamicist Reading and Discussion Group, "New Crusades, Culture Wars, and the Study of Islam in the American Academy." 7:30 p.m., Graduate Student Center, UNC-CH.

February 26, 2005: Conflict and the Environment: 15th Annual Duke University International Environmental Conference. 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Love Auditorium (Room B101), Levine Science Research Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Student International Discussion Group (SIDG), the Carolina and Duke Consortium Working Group on the Environment in Latin America, the Pan-Amazon Group, and the Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University. Speakers include:

Avner Vengosh, senior lecturer in geochemistry and isotope hydrology, Ben Gurion University, Israel, "Salinity and Natural Radioactivity in Shared Water Resources as a Potential Source for Conflicts in the Middle East."

Erika Weinthal, senior lecturer in political science, Tel Aviv University, Israel, "Collaborative Management of Water Resources in the Gaza Strip Between Israel and the Palestinian Authority."
February 27, 2005: Religions of India Field Trip. 12:00-5:00 p.m., meet in front of Witherspoon Student Center Annex, NCSU. From there we will proceed to the Sikh Gurudwara, Hindu Bhavan, and the Raleigh Islamic Center. At the Sikh Gurudwara langar (lunch) is served after the service. Carpooling is encouraged. For more information, and to reserve a space, click here. Participants are *strongly* urged to attend all three segments and come with an open mind. This is a unique opportunity to learn about three major world faiths and observe first-hand how they are practiced. Sponsored by the Hindi-Urdu Program, NCSU, and the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies.

February 27-28, 2005: Rotem Mor and Eyal Brami, Israeli conscientious objectors, and Deanna Kashani, American Friends Service Committee, Philadelphia, "Faces of Hope: Acts of Conscience." February 27, 4:00 p.m., Durham Friends Meeting House, 404 Alexander Drive, Durham. Sponsored by Triangle Tikkun, the Coalition for Peace with Justice, the Israeli Committee against House Demolitions, and the Peace and Social Concerns Committee of Durham Friends Meeting. February 28, 8:00 p.m., 8:00PM-10:00 p.m., Room 124, Social Sciences Building, Duke University. Sponsored by Hiwar, Duke University

February 28, 2005: Azar Nafisi, visiting professor at Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies, "Reading Lolita in Tehran." 10 a.m., Jones Auditorium, Meredith College. Sponsored by the Department of English, Meredith College, as part of Meredith College's Founders' Day Celebration.

February 28, 2005: The Emerging Rule of Law in Afghanistan. Panel discussion with 10 Afghan judges, moderated by Donald Horowitz, professor of law, Duke University. 12:00–1:15 p.m., Room 4047 Duke Law School. Sponsored by the Duke-UNC Rotary Center for International Studies in Peace & Conflict Resolution, the Center for International Development, the Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke Human Rights Initiative & the International Law Society, Duke Law School.

February 28, 2005: Erika Weinthal, professor of political science, Tel Aviv University, Israel, "From Environmental Peacemaking to Environmental Peacekeeping: Lessons from Central Asia and Middle East." 12:30-1:30 p.m., Room 225, Sanford Institute for Public Policy, Duke University. Sponsored by the Eurasian Working Group, Duke University.

February 28, 2005: Judea Pearl, professor of computer science, UCLA, and father of assassinated journalist Daniel Pearl, and Akbar Ahmed, professor of Islamic studies, American University, "The Daniel Pearl Dialogue for Muslim-Jewish Understanding." 7:00 p.m., Page Auditorium, Duke University. Sponsored by the Office of the President, the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Duke University; the Ar-Razzaq Islamic Center, Durham; the Freeman Center for Jewish Life, Duke Chapel, and the Office of Student Affairs, Duke University.

 March 1, 2005: Khalil Shikaki, director of the Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research, Ramallah, Palestine, "Palestinians in the Post Arafat Era." 3:00 p.m., Fleishman Commons, Sanford Institute of Public Policy. Cosponsored by the Sanford Institute of Public Policy.

March 1, 2005: Mark McCarthy, data coordinator in the Humanitarian Information Center (HIC) for Darfur, Sudan, United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, "Inside Darfur." 4:00 p.m., Freedom Forum Conference Center, 3rd Floor, Carroll Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by ibiblio.org.

March 2, 2005: Ahmad Dallal, professor of Arabic and Islamic studies, Georgetown University, "Ethics and the Challenge of History." 4:00 p.m., Room 230, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University, and the Ford Foundation.

March 2, 2005: Children of War: A panel of UNC students who have lived through wars in Iraq, Kosovo, Liberia, and Lebanon share their personal stories of survival and talk about the real effects of war. 6:30 p.m., Cobb Theatre, Stone Center for Black Culture and History, UNC-CH. Part of the "Series on War and Health" sponsored by the Student Global Health Committee, Physicians for Human Rights, Campus Y Health Focus, Student Congress, Graduate and Professional Student Federation, Office of the Dean of the School of Public Health, Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs, Injury Prevention Research Center, UNC-CH.

March 3, 2005: Film: Islam: Empire of Faith, Part II (U.S., 2001, 50 minutes), produced by PBS. 4:00 p.m., Erdahl-Cloyd Theater, D.H. Hill Library, NCSU. Sponsored by the Islam and Dialogue Student Association, NCSU.

March 3, 2005: Rela Mazali, Israeli author and co-founder of New Profile, "Militarization, Gender and Anti-Militarist Activism in Israel." 7:30 p.m., Toy Lounge, 4th floor, Dey Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Curriculum in Women's Studies, UNC-CH.

March 3-5, 2005: The Jean Fox O’Barr Symposium in Women’s Studies: Gender and Ethnic Conflict. Richard White Auditorium, Duke University, unless otherwise noted.

March 3-4, 2005, 7:00 and 9:30 p.m. Film: Moolaade (Senegal, 2004, 120 minutes), directed by Ousmane Sembene. Griffith Theater, West Campus, Duke University.

March 4, 2005, 5:00 p.m. Amrita Basu, director of the Five Colleges Women's Studies Research Center, Amherst, Massachusetts, "The Power of Women’s Violence."

March 5, 2005, 9:00-10:30 a.m. Gender and Ethnic Consciousness
  • Eunice Sahle, professor of African studies and international studies, UNC-CH, "Ethnic Consciousness Formation, Gender and Conflict in Africa."
  • Iris Berger, professor of history, African-American studies and women's studies, State University of New York, Albany, "Whose Wife is Going To Do It?"

March 5, 2005, 10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Women Activists for Ethnic Reconciliation in Israel/Palestine

  • Rela Mazali, Israeli author, "Ethnicity as Responsibility: Asking Israelis to Re-imagine Community."
  • Hilary Rantisi, associate director, Middle East Initiative, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, talk title TBA.
March 5, 2005, 1:30-3:00 p.m. Gender in Ethnic War Zones
  • Greg Grandin, professor of history, New York University, "Is the Guatemalan Genocide Unique? Gender, Genocide, and State Formation."
  • Mehrangiz Kar, Iranian lawyer and visiting scholar, Washington College of Law, American University, "Democracy and Human Rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran."
March 5, 2005, 3:15 p.m., Cynthia Enloe, professor of international development, community & environment, and professor of women's studies, Clark University, "Masculinity Matters; So Do Women: What We Miss if We Don't Ask Feminist Questions About Ethnic Conflict?

March 4, 2005: W. D. Muhammad, African-American Muslim leader, "Panel Discussion on Sudan." 2:30-4:00 p.m., Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture, Duke University. Imam Muhammd will also participate in a fundraising dinner for Sudan on March 7, 2005, 7:00 p.m., at the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture, Duke University. Participants at the dinner are asked to bring at least a $2 donation.

March 5, 2005: Theater: "Hum Le Gaye, Tum Rah Gaye," a hilarious super hit Hindi comedy starring Jaaved Jafferi. 7:00 p.m., Weaver Auditorium, Durham School of Arts, 400 N. Duke St., Durham. Tickets: $25 ($20 for students with ID), $35, $50, VIP. Sponsored by Little Kingdom Day Care, Galaxy Cinema, Travellinks, Taj Mahal Restaurant, Geet Bazaar 88.1FM, Dr. Vinod K. Jindal, India Bazaar of Cary, Friends Travel, Little India (New Management, Durham), Western Union.

March 7, 2005: Suliman A. Giddo, founder of Darfur Peace & Development, "Darfur: Genocide We Can Stop!" With a special musical performance by eight-year-old Gabonese citizen, Symphonie Paoty. 7:00 p.m., Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture, Duke University. Minimum $2.00 donation appreciated. Sponsored by the Sponsored by the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture and Duke Africa.

March 7, 2005: Daniel Ayalon, Israeli ambassador to the U.S., "Prospects for Peace in the Middle East." 4:00 p.m., Duke Law School. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law, Duke Law School.

March 10, 2005: Abdulkader Tayob, professor of Islamic studies, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands, "The Recognition of Muslim Marriages in South Africa in Comparative Religious Perspective." 4:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University.

March 10, 2005: Film: Moolade (Senegal, 2004, 120 minutes), directed by Ousmane Sembene. 7:00 p.m.,  Student Union Film Auditorium, UNC-CH. Discussion to follow. Sponsored by the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, the Organization of African Students' Interests and Solidarity (OASIS), the Curriculum in Women's Studies, the Carolina Women's Center, UNC-CH; and the St. Augustine's College Theatre and Film Program.

March 11, 2005: Anthony So, director, Program in Global Health and Technology Access, Sanford Institute for Public Policy, Duke University, "Trading Tobacco for Health: Enabling Tobacco Control in Southeast Asia." 1304 McGavran-Greenberg Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Student Global Health Committee Brownbag Seminar, School of Public Health, UNC-CH.

March 16, 2005: Film: Muhammad: Legacy of a Prophet (U.S., 2001, 120 minutes), directed by Michael Schwarz. 5:00-7:00 p.m., Library Media Room, NCSU. Part of Islamic Awareness Week, Muslim Student Association, NCSU.

March 17, 2005: Abdelhadi Hantash, land surveyor and cartographer for the Hebron Municipality, Palestine, and head of the Land Defense Committee for the Hebron District, a Palestinian NGO, "Optimism, Hopefulness, and the Facts on the Ground." 7:30 p.m., Parish Hall, St. Philip's Episcopal Church, 403 East Main Street, Durham. Sponsored by Christian Peacemaker Teams and the Coalition for Peace with Justice.

March 21, 2005: Film: Crimson Gold (Iran, 2003, 97 minutes), directed by Jafar Panahi. 7:00 p.m., Erdahl-Cloyd Theater, D.H. Hill Library, NCSU. Part of the 2nd annual Middle East Film Festival sponsored by the Middle East Studies Program, NCSU.

March 21, 2005: Film: "Hold Your Breath" (U.S., 2005, 57 minutes), directed by Maren Grainger-Monsen. 12:00 p.m., Duke Clinic Amphitheater. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Medical Ethics and Humanities and the Multicultural Resource Center, Duke School of Medicine.

March 22, 2005: W. Michael Scheld, professor of internal medicine, University of Virginia Health System, "The Academic Alliance for AIDS Care and Prevention in Africa." 4:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the Duke Center for International Studies, the Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs, the Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, and the Duke Human Immunology Center, Duke University.

March 22 and 29, April 5 and 12, 2005: Sarah Shields, professor of history, UNC-CH, "A Century of Conflict in the Middle East." 7:00-9:00 p.m., Friday Center, UNC-CH. Part of the Community Classroom Series, Friday Center, UNC-CH. Cost for course: $115, pre-registration required.

 March 22, 2005: Film: The Olive Harvest (Palestine, 2003, 90 minutes), directed by Hanna Elias. 7:30 p.m., Student Union, UNC-CH. Part of the Duke University/UNC-CH Film Series, Through Palestinian Eyes: Palestinian Representations of Self." Co-sponsored by the Robertson Collaborative Fund; the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Department of Asian & African Languages & Literature, the Film/Video/Digital section of the Program in Literature, and the Program in Women's Studies, Duke University; and the Department of Asian Studies the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

March 23, 2005: Erdag Goknar, professor of Turkish language and culture, Duke University, "Literary Translation: Mediating Between Cultures." 12:00-1:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Part of the Wednesdays at the Center series at the Franklin Humanities Institute. Sponsored by Duke University Center for International Studies.

March 23, 2005: Terry Maguire, director of the Mediterranean Media Center, "The Mediterranean and European Media: Big Fish or Fish Out of Water?" 5:00 p.m., Conference Room, Coates Building, UNC-CH. Sponsored by Alliance française and the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

March 24, 2005: Ayodeji Olukoju, professor of history, University of Lagos, "Criminality and Resistance in
Colonial and Contemporary West Africa."
3:30 p.m., 569 Hamilton Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Global History Group, UNC-CH.

 March 27, 2005: Film: The Inner Tour (Israel, 2002, 98 minutes), directed by Ra'anan Alexandrowicz. 8:00 p.m., Richard White Lecture Hall, East Campus, Duke University. Part of the Duke University/UNC-CH Film Series, Through Palestinian Eyes: Palestinian Representations of Self." Co-sponsored by the Robertson Collaborative Fund; the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Department of Asian & African Languages & Literature, the Film/Video/Digital section of the Program in Literature, and the Program in Women's Studies, Duke University; and the Department of Asian Studies the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

 March 28, 2005: Salim Yaqub, professor of history, University of Chicago, "Containing Arab Nationalism: The Eisenhower Doctrine and the Middle East." 4:00 p.m., 104 Murphey Hall, UNC-CH.

March 28, 2005: Pamela DeLargy, head of the Humanitarian Assistance Unit of the United Nations Population Fund, "The Unique Impact of War on the Health of Women." 5:30 p.m., 116 Murphey Hall, UNC-CH. Part of the "Series on War and Health" sponsored by the Student Global Health Committee, Physicians for Human Rights, Campus Y Health Focus, Student Congress, Graduate and Professional Student Federation, Office of the Dean of the School of Public Health, Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs, Injury Prevention Research Center, UNC-CH.

March 28, 2005: "Religion and Immigrants in North Carolina." Panel includes speakers from the SV Temple, the Swaminarayan Temple, the SGI Buddhist Organization, and the Islamic Ahlul Bayt Assocation of the Triangle. 7:00 p.m., 100 Harrelson Hall, NCSU. Part of International Connections Week, NCSU.

March 29, 2005: Film: The Closed Doors (Egypt, 1999, 110 minutes), directed by Atef Hetata. 7:00 p.m., Erdahl-Cloyd Theater, D.H. Hill Library, NCSU. Part of the 2nd annual Middle East Film Festival sponsored by the Middle East Studies Program, NCSU.

March 30, 2005: Stephen Smith, Africa specialist, Le Monde, "Globalized Africa: Victim of Integration or Exclusion?" 12:00-1:00 p.m., Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Part of the Wednesdays at the Center series at the Franklin Humanities Institute. Sponsored by Center for French and Francophone Studies, Duke University.

March 31, 2005: Mark A. Baskin, political scientist and field practitioner in post-conflict administration, Center for International Development, State University of New York, "Between Exit and Engagement: Balkan Lessons for Baghdad." 2:00-4:00 p.m., Conference Room, Coates Building, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies, UNC-CH.

March 31, 2005: Film: Tales from Arab Detroit (U.S., 1995, 45 minutes), directed by Joan Mandell. 5:30 p.m., Erdahl-Cloyd Theater, D.H. Hill Library, NCSU. Part of International Connections Week, NCSU.

March 31, 2005: "U.S. Diplomatic and Military Operations and Strategies in Iraq." 6:00 p.m., 101 Greenlaw Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Carolina Union Activities Board Forum Committee. Panelists include:

  • David Litt, former U.S. ambassador to the United Arab Emirates and diplomat-in-residence, Center for International Studies, Duke University.
  • Steven M. Sutey, professor of naval sciences, UNC-CH and Duke University, and U.S. Marine Corps captain who served in Iraq.
  • Tony Smith, undergraduate student, UNC-CH, and U.S. Marine Corps soldier who served two tours in Iraq.

April 1-16, 2005: Sports: India-Pakistan One-Day International (ODI) Cricket Matches, live on big-screen television. 11:25 p.m., April 1, 4, 8, 11, 14, 16, Main Cultural Hall, 309 Aviation Parkway, Morrisville. $5 donation suggested. Sponsored by the Hindu Society of North Carolina.

April 4, 2005: Film: Satin Rouge (Tunisia, 2003, 95 minutes), directed by Raja Amari. 7:00 p.m., Erdahl-Cloyd Theater, D.H. Hill Library, NCSU. Part of the 2nd annual Middle East Film Festival sponsored by the Middle East Studies Program, NCSU.

April 4, 2005: Edem Effiong, graduate student in maternal and child health, UNC-CH, "Perspectives on Female Genital Cutting." 12:00 p.m., 1304 McGavran-Greenberg Hall, UNC-CH. Part of the Student Global Health Committee Brownbag Series, UNC-CH.

 April 6, 2005: Mary Lou Smith, human rights activist, and Stephen Zunes, professor of peace and justice studies, University of San Francisco, "Peace in the Promised Land." 7:00 p.m., 111 Carroll Hall, UNC-CH. Part of Human Rights Week, organized by the Advocates for Human Rights, Campus Y, and co-sponsored by the University Center for International Studies, the Department of African and Afro-American Studies, the Student Environmental Action Coalition, the Carolina Undergraduates American Civil Liberties Union, Linking Immigrants to New Communities, the Department of Political Science, and the James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence, UNC-CH.

April 6, 2005: Nasr Abu Zayd, professor of Islamic studies, University of Leiden, Netherlands, "Contemporary Muslim Ethics: Hermeneutical Approach." 3:00 p.m., Room 230 John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Part of the Mapping Muslim Ethics Project of the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, Duke University, and the Ford Foundation.

April 6, 2005: David Grossman, Israeli author, "Writing in a Time of War." 5:00 p.m., Richard White Lecture Hall, Duke University. Sponsored by the Center for Judaic Studies, Duke University.

April 7, 2005: Mohamed al-Homsi, imam of the Islamic Center of Augusta, Georgia, "Differences with Harmony: A Discussion on Secretarian Islam." 7:30 p.m., 103 Bingham Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Muslim Students Association, UNC-CH.

April 7-8, 2005: Conference: "Strategies for the War on Terrorism: Taking Stock." Panels at the Geneen Auditorium, meals at the R. David Thomas Center, Fuqua School of Business, Duke University. Sponsored by the Center for Law, Ethics, and National Security and the Program on Public Law, Duke University School of Law, with the support of Warren and Faye Wickersham and Duke University's Vice Provost for International Affairs and Development, and co-sponsored by the the Sanford Institute of Public Policy, the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University, and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies. Designated as a Centennial Regional Meeting of the American Society of International Law

April 7, 2005:

8:30 a.m. Opening Comments
  • Scott L. Silliman, professor of the practice of law and executive director, Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, Duke University.
  • Christopher H. Schroeder, professor of law and public policy studies, Duke University.
8:45 a.m. Panel I: Defining and Understanding the Causes of Terrorism
  • Charles Kurzman, professor of sociology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Mohammed M. Hafez, professor of political science, University of Missouri-Kansas City
  • Mamoun Fandy, president of Fandy Associates, Washington DC
  • Ebrahim Moosa, professor of religion, Duke University
10:45 a.m. Panel II: Key Policy Challenges
  • Michael Vickers, director of strategic studies, Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments
  • Thomas E. McNamara, former assistant secretary of state for political-military affairs and former ambassador to Colombia
  • Martha Crenshaw, professor in global issues and democratic thought, Wesleyan University
  • Bruce W. Jentleson, director, Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke University
12:45 p.m. Luncheon, R. David Thomas Center, Fuqua School of Business, Duke University
  • James L. Pavitt, principal, The Scowcroft Group, and former director of operations, Central Intelligence Agency
2:15 p.m. Panel III: Interrogating Terrorists: The Torture Debate
  • John D. Hutson, dean, Franklin Pierce Law Center
  • John Smith, deputy general counsel for international affairs, U.S. Department of Defense
  • Heather MacDonald, John M. Olin Fellow, Manhattan Institute for Policy Research
  • Marty Lederman, attorney, Washington D.C.
7:00 p.m. Dinner, R. David Thomas Center, Fuqua School of Business, Duke University
  • Nabil Fahmy, ambassador of the Arab Republic of Egypt to the United States
April 8, 2005:

8:30 a.m. Panel IV: The President and International Law in the War on Terrorism
  • Derek Jinks, professor of law, Arizona State University College of Law
  • Michael D. Ramsey, professor of law, University of San Diego School of Law
  • Ingrid Wuerth, professor of law, University of Cincinnati College of Law
  • John C. Harrison, professor of law, University of Virginia School of Law
10:15 a.m. Keynote Address
  • Jane Harman, Democrat of California, United States House of Representatives
11:15 a.m. Panel V: Military Commissions
  • Louis Fisher, senior specialist in separation of powers, Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress
  • John D. Altenburg, Jr., major general, U.S. Army (retired), appointing authority, Office of Military Commissions, Department of Defense
  • Toni Locy, reporter, USA Today
  • David B. Rivkin, Jr., attorney, Baker & Hosteller LLP, Washington DC
1:15 p.m. Luncheon, R. David Thomas Center, Fuqua School of Business, Duke University
  • Jane Harman, Democrat from California, United States House of Representatives
2:15 p.m. Panel VI: PATRIOT Act Issues
  • William C. Banks, professor of law, Syracuse University College of Law
  • Mary Derosa, senior fellow, Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, D.C.
  • Robert Chesney, professor of law, Wake Forest University School of Law
  • Tim H. Edgar, national security policy counsel, American Civil Liberties Union
April 7, 2005: Elizabeth McClintock, senior associate, Conflict Management Group. Brown-bag lunch discussion; Ms. McClintock's experiences include serving four years in the Peace Corps in Morocco, facilitating dialogue between Israeli and Palestinian negotiation units, problem-solving workshops for marginalized youth in Rwanda, and running leadership development for Burundian officials. 12:30 p.m., 3515 Student Union, UNC-CH. Seating is limited; please RSVP to Janaka Lagoo (lagoo@email.unc.ed) no later than April 4. Sponsored by the Health Focus Committee, Campus Y, UNC-CH.

April 7-10, 2005: Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, Durham. Includes:
April 7, 2005: Film: The Brooklyn Connection (Netherlands-United States-Kosovo, 2004, 59 minutes), directed by Klaartje Quirijns. 2:30 p.m., Durham Armory, followed by Q&A.

April 7, 2005: Film: Good Times (Italy-Israel-Palestine, 2004, 32 minutes, directed by Alessandro Cassigoli and Dalia Castel. 3:30 p.m., Durham Armory, followed by Q&A.

April 8, 2005: Film: The Beauty Academy of Kabul (United States-Afghanistan, 2004, 75 minutes), directed by Liz Mermin. 9:30 a.m., Durham Armory, followed by Q&A.

April 8, 2005: Film: How to Fix the World (Uzbekistan-United States, 2004, 29 minutes), directed by Jacqueline Goss. 12:15 p.m., Durham Armory, followed by Q&A.

April 8, 2005: Film: Bride Kidnapping in Kyrgyzstan (Canada-Kyrgyzstan, 2004, 51 minutes), directed by Petr Lom. 12:45 p.m., Durham Armory, followed by Q&A.

April 8, 2005: Film: Occupation: Dreamland (United States-Iraq, 2005, 79 minutes), directed by Garrett Scott and Ian Olds. 1:15 p.m., Cinema 1, Carolina Theatre, Durham, followed by Q&A.

April 10, 2005: Film: Infidels (Iran, 2003, 40 minutes), directed by Bahman Kiarostami. 9:00 a.m., American Tobacco, Durham.

April 10, 2005: Film: The Color of Love (Iran, 2004, 70 minutes), directed by Maryam Keshavarz. 11:15 a.m., American Tobacco, Durham.

April 8, 2005. Julius Atashili, master's candidate in public health, UNC-CH, "Is HIV Prevalence Decreasing in Cameroon?" 8:30-9:30 a.m., Conference Room, Lineberger Cancer Center, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the School of Public Health, UNC-CH.

April 11, 2005: "Islam 101 Workshop," including film: "Hold Your Breath" (U.S., 2005, 57 minutes), directed by Maren Grainger-Monsen. 6:30-10:00 p.m., 124 Social Sciences Building, Duke University. Part of Islamic Awareness week, sponsored by the Muslim Students Association, Duke University.

April 12, 2005: Discussion of "Women Claim Islam," by miriam cooke, professor of Arabic, Duke University. 6:30-8:30 p.m., 130 Sociology/Psychology Building, Duke University. Part of Islamic Awareness week, sponsored by the Duke University.

April 12, 2005: Film: Fictitious Marriage (Israel, 1988, 90 minutes), directed by Haim Bouzaglo. 7:00 p.m., Erdahl-Cloyd Theater, D.H. Hill Library, NCSU. Part of the 2nd annual Middle East Film Festival sponsored by the Middle East Studies Program, NCSU.

April 12, 2005: Karel Innemee, professor of Coptic studies, University of Leiden, "Deir al-Surian (Egypt): The Iconographical Program of the 8th Century Paintings in the Church of the Virgin." 5:00 p.m., location to be announced. Sponsored by the Center for Late Ancient Studies, Duke University.

April 13, 2005: Nicholas Kristof, New York Times columnist, "Today's Genocide: A Report from the Killing Fields of Darfur." 6:00 p.m., 111 Carroll Hall, UNC-CH. Part of 2005 Holocaust Remembrance Week, sponsored by NC Hillel, Carolina Union Activities Board, and Students United for Darfur Awareness Now (SUDAN), UNC-CH.

April 14, 2005: Amina Wadud, professor of Islamic studies, Virginia Commonwealth University, "Inside the Gender Jihad." 4:00 p.m., 210 Harrelson Hall, NCSU. Sponsored by the Department of Philosophy & Religion and the Middle East Studies Program, NCSU.

April 14, 2005: Beth Baron, professor of history, City University of New York, "American Foundations and Family Planning in Egypt."7:00 p.m., J.C. Raulston Arboretum, NCSU. Sponsored by the Middle East Studies Program,and the Institute for Nonprofits, NCSU.

April 14, 2005: Panel Discussion: "Unification and Integration of the Islamic Community." Panelists representing Shi'ism, Nation of Islam, and Sunni Islam discussing the commonalities within a various beliefs of Islam. 6:30p-8:30 p.m., Von Canon Room A, Duke University. Part of Islamic Awareness week, sponsored by the Muslim Students Association, Duke University.

April 16, 2005: Conference: "Building Sustainable Development and Durable Peace." 8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m., School of Government, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Duke-UNC Rotary Center for International Studies in Peace & Conflict Resolution; University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH; and the Duke Center for International Development. Papers include:

  • Yung Le, Australia, Rotary Peace Scholar, "Democratizing Education (Iraq)."
  • Susan Stigant, Canada, Rotary Peace Scholar, "Power Sharing in Sudan: A Recipe for Stability and Democracy?"
  • Ahmed Shakeel, Pakistan, Rotary Peace Scholar, "The Role of Civil Society in Conflict Minimization (Kashmir)."
  • Jose Tenga, Sierra Leone, Rotary Peace Scholar, "The Role of Regional Organizations in the Ivory Coast."

April 16, 2005: Arabian Night, presenting a sample of traditional Middle Eastern foods, a variety of different musical forms, dances from several areas spanning the region, and a tent and hookahs meant to represent the traditional Bedouin living style. 7:00-9:00 p.m., Harris Field (in front of Witherspoon Hall), NCSU. Sponsored by the Middle East and North African Student Association, NCSU.

April 18, 2005: Film: Rana's Wedding (Palestine, 2002, 90 minutes), directed by Hany Abu-Assad. 7:00 p.m., Erdahl-Cloyd Theater, D.H. Hill Library, NCSU. Part of the 2nd annual Middle East Film Festival sponsored by the Middle East Studies Program, NCSU.

 April 18, 2005: Film: The Milky Way (Israel, 1997, 104 minutes), directed by Ali Nassar. 8:00 p.m., Richard White Lecture Hall, East Campus, Duke University. Part of the Duke University/UNC-CH Film Series, Through Palestinian Eyes: Palestinian Representations of Self."  Co-sponsored by the Robertson Collaborative Fund; the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks, the Duke Center for International Studies, the Department of Asian & African Languages & Literature, the Film/Video/Digital section of the Program in Literature, and the Program in Women's Studies, Duke University; and the Department of Asian Studies the University Center for International Studies, UNC-CH.

April 18, 2005: Film: Islam, Empire of Faith, Part I (U.S., 2001, 50 minutes), produced by PBS. 7:00 p.m., 116 Murphey Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Muslim Students Association, UNC-CH.

April 18, 2005: Film: The Zionist Ventriloquist (Israel, 2005), directed by various artists. 4:30 p.m., Room 240 John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Followed by discussion with the director. Part of the Arts in April series, sponsored by the Franklin Seminar in the Humanities at the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke University.

April 18-May 27, 2005: Exhibit: Roee Rosen, Israeli artist, "Roee Rosen -- Justine Frank (1900-1943): A Selection." New Media Space and Cafe, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Opening reception, April 18, 2005, 6:30 p.m. Part of the Arts in April series, sponsored by the Franklin Seminar in the Humanities at the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke University.

April 19, 2005: Film: Islam, Empire of Faith, Part II (U.S., 2001, 50 minutes), produced by PBS. 7:00 p.m., 116 Murphey Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Muslim Students Association, UNC-CH.

April 19, 2005: Michel Warschawski, Israeli writer and activist, "On the Border." 7:00 p.m., Social Sciences Building, Duke University. Sponsored by Jews for a Just Peace; and Hiwar, Duke University.

April 20, 2005: Film: "Muhammad, Legacy of a Prophet" (U.S., 2001, 120 minutes), directed by Michael Schwarz. 7:00 p.m., 116 Murphey Hall, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Muslim Students Association, UNC-CH.

April 20, 2005: Jewish-Muslim Arts Festival: A Night Under the Moon and Stars. 9:00-11:00 p.m., La Residence, 202 W. Rosemary St., Chapel Hill. Sponsored by the Muslim Students Association and NC Hillel, UNC-CH. All are welcome to attend and submit art -- visual art, spoken word, etc. The theme is "traditions."

April 20, 2005: Roee Rosen, Israeli artist, "Hostility to Art." 4:30 p.m., Room 240 John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Part of the Arts in April series, sponsored by the Franklin Seminar in the Humanities at the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke University.

April 21, 2005: Concert: Gamelan Nyai Saraswati, Javanese gamelan ensemble, with Charanga Carolina, Cuban danzon music. 4:00 p.m., Hill Hall Auditorium, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Department of Music, UNC-CH.

April 21, 2005: Karim Kawar, Jordanian ambassador to the U.S., "Jordan: Building a Knowledge Society." 12:45-1:30 p.m., Washington Duke Inn. Part of the North Carolina Technology Association; conference, "A CEO Conversation 2005."

April 22, 2005: Michael McQuestion, professor of public health, Johns Hopkins University, "Using Ranked Residuals to Identify Unobservable Social Effects on Contraceptive Use in Indonesia." 11:00 a.m., 14 Manning Hall, UNC-CH. Part of the 2005 Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association Section on Methodology, sponsored by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science, UNC-CH.

April 25, 2005: Rasul Bukhsh Rais, professor of political science, Lahore University of Management Sciences, Pakistan, "Pakistan's Post-Taliban Afghan Policy." 12:00 p.m., Room 230, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. Sponsored by the N.C. Center for South Asian Studies.

April 25, 2005: Samil Ocal and Mustafa Tekin, educational attaché and social/religious affairs attaché of the Turkish Consulate General in New York, "The Educational and Religious Life of Turks Living in the United States." 8:00 p.m., 1393 SE Maynard Rd., Cary. Sponsored by the Divan Cultural Center.

April 27, 2005: Elizabeth Koepping, lecturer in theology and religious studies, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, "The Irrelevance of Labels: Islamic-Oriented Peoples of Eastern Sabah." 12:30 p.m., 218 Hanes Art Center, UNC-CH. Sponsored by the Department of Religious Studies, UNC-CH.

April 28, 2005: Film: "Casablanca" (U.S., 1942, 102 minutes), directed by Michael Curtiz. 8:00 p.m., patio in front of the Lenoir Hall Coffee Shop, UNC-CH. Part of the Finehout & Film Movement Summer Series, sponsored by the Media Resources Center and Davis Library, UNC-CH.

April 29, 2005: Vehbi Vakkasoglu, Turkish author, "Love Communication in Family and Society." 7:30 p.m., 1393 SE Maynard Rd., Cary. Sponsored by the Divan Cultural Center.

April 29-30, 2005: Conference: "Muslim Ethics and Culture: Translation and the Public Sphere." Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University. A two-day colloquium exploring ethics, law, and culture in the
public sphere. This event is free and open to the public. Presented by the Center for the Study of Muslim Networks. This colloquium is part of the "Mapping Muslim Ethics" project, supported by a grant from the Ford
Foundation.

April 29: Ethics: Translation into Public Space - Constitutionalism and Law

9:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m.: Breakfast, Room 130, Franklin Center

10:00 a.m.-10:15 a.m.: Opening Remarks: Ebrahim Moosa, professor of religion, Duke University.

10:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m.:

  • Presentation: Ebrahim Moosa, professor of religion, Duke University.
  • Respondent: Kevin Reinhart, professor of religion, Dartmouth University.

12:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.: Lunch, Room 130, Franklin Center

2:30-5:00 p.m.:

  • Chair: Ebrahim Moosa, professor of religion, Duke University.
  • Speaker: Fazel Manawi, former deputy justice, Supreme Court, Afghanistan.
  • Interviewer: Sherman Jackson, professor of Near Eastern languages and civilizations, University of Michigan - Ann Arbor.
  • Interviewer: Muneer Fareed, professor of Near Eastern and Asian studies, Wayne State University.
  • Interviewer: Ebrahim Moosa, professor of religion, Duke University.


April 30: Culture and Muslim Ethics - Tradition and Dynamics of Change

9:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m.: Breakfast, Room 230, Franklin Center

10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.:

  • Presentation: Kecia Ali, professor of Near Eastern and Judaic studies, Brandeis University.
  • Respondent: Sherman Jackson, professor of Near Eastern languages and civilizations, University of Michigan - Ann Arbor.

12:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m.: Lunch, Room 230, Franklin Center

2:30-5:00 p.m.:

  • Chair: Bruce Lawrence, professor of religion, Duke University.
  • Speaker: Umar Faruq Abd-Allah, Nawawi Foundation.
  • Interviewer: Muneer Fareed, professor of Near Eastern and Asian studies, Wayne State University.
  • Interviewer: Ebrahim Moosa, professor of religion, Duke University.
  • Interviewer: Kevin Reinhart, professor of religion, Dartmouth University.

May 2, 2005: Informal discussion with U.S. ambassador John W. Limbert, president of the American Foreign Service Association (AFSA) and a former hostage in Iran. This will be a small gathering intended especially for undergraduates. 10:30-11:30 a.m., Room 205 South Building, UNC-CH.

May 11, 2005: Bernard Avishai, visiting professor of business and public policy, Duke University, "Does the Israeli Economy Really Need Peace?" 1:00 p.m., Seminar Room 1, Magat Management Center, Fuqua School of Business, Duke University. Part of the Management Faculty Seminar, Fuqua School of Business, Duke University.

May 11, 2005: Video-Conference: Dialogue on Islamic Studies Curriculum: A New Agenda for the Study of Islam & Muslims. 9:00 a.m., 124 Saunders Hall, UNC-CH. Co-sponsored by the Centre for Civilisational Dialogue, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur. Participants include:

  • Azizan Baharuddin, director of the Centre for Civilisational Dialogue, University of Malaya.
  • Carl W. Ernst, professor of Islamic studies, UNC-CH, and Fulbright scholar, Centre for Civilisational Dialogue, University of Malaya.
  • Faridah Noor bt. Mohd. Noor, deputy director, Centre for Civilisational Dialogue, University of Malaya.
  • Idris Awang, deputy director, Academy of Islamic Studies, University of Malaya.
  • Ishak Sulaiman, department of Al-Quran and Al-Hadith, Academy of Islamic Studies, University of Malaya.

  • Zumrad Ahmedjanova, visiting scholar in Russian and East European studies, UNC-CH.
  • miriam cooke, professor of Arabic, Duke University.
  • Charles Kurzman, professor of sociology, UNC-CH.
  • Bruce Lawrence, professor Islamic studies, Duke University.
  • Youshaa Patel, doctoral student in Islamic studies, Duke University.
  • Brett Wilson, doctoral student in Islamic studies, Duke University.
  • Peter Wright, doctoral student in Islamic studies, UNC-CH.
  • Canguzel Zulfikar, post-doctoral fellow in Islamic studies, UNC-CH.

May 12, 2005: Zumrad Ahmedjanova, visiting scholar in Russian and East European studies, UNC-CH, "Muslim Brotherhoods in Uzbekistan." 2 p.m., Conference Room, Coates Building, UNC-CH. Part of the 2005 Piedmont Slavic Colloquium, sponsored by the Center for Slavic, Eurasian and Eastern European Studies, UNC-CH.

May 13, 2005: Concert: Dave Lippman, musician and activist, "Star of Goliath," based on a 2004 visit to Palestine and Israel. 7:30-9:30 p.m., Church of Reconciliation, 110 N. Elliott Rd, Chapel Hill. Sponsored by Coalition for Peace with Justice, Chapel Hill, and Peace 1st, Research Triangle.

May 14, 2005: Concert: Syed Abdul Hadi, musical icon of Bangladesh and award-winning vocal artist, with his daughter Tonima Hadi and tabla player Himu Rozario. 7:00-10:00 p.m., Cary Senior Center Ball Room, 120 Maury O'Dell Place, Bond Park, Cary. Suggested donation: $6. Sponsored by the Triangle Bangladesh Society, North Carolina.

May 19-29, 2005: Theater: "Hard Love," by Motti Lerner, Israeli playwright. Thursdays and Fridays at 8:00 p.m., Saturdays at 8:15 p.m Sunday matinee at 2:00 p.m., Common Ground Theatre, 4815-B Hillsborough Road, Durham. Produced by Theatre Or.

June 11, 2005: Concert: Mamadou Diabate, kora musician from Mali, and WNCU deejay Bouna Ndiaye. African Dinner-Dance Party: The Second Fundraising Event to Fight Malaria. 7:30 p.m.12:30 a.m., Ivy Community Center, 4418 Fayetteville Road, Durham. Tickets: $20, enough to buy malaria medicine to treat two children. Sponsored by Bonjour Africa Malaria Project and IntraHealth International

June 18, 2005: Concert: Alamgir, the sensational multi-cultural singer who has captured the hearts and minds of millions of Bengali-, Urdu- and Hindi-speaking music fans all around the globe. 7:00 p.m., Cary Academy Auditorium, 1500 Harrison Avenue, Cary. Tickets: $25, $15, $10 and $6 (for youth). Sponsored by the Triangle Bangladesh Society, North Carolina.

June 23, 2005: Film: "Viva L'Aldgérie" (Long Live Algeria) (Algeria, 2004, 113 minutes), directed by Nadir Mokneche and James Brown. 8:00 p.m., patio in front of the Lenoir Hall Coffee Shop, UNC-CH. Part of the Finehout & Film Movement Summer Series, sponsored by the the Media Resources Center and Davis Library, UNC-CH.

June 27-29, 2005: Performance: Emanuel Gat Dance, Israeli contemporary dance company, "The Rite of Spring" and "Winter Journey." 8:00 p.m., Reynolds Industries Theater, Duke University. Post-Performance
Discussion: June 28, 2005. Part of the American Dance Festival. Sponsored by the Office of Cultural Affairs, Consulate General of Israel in New York.

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