2010 Workshop

POPULAR BELIEFS, RELIGIOUS IDENTITIES AND CONFLICT IN GERMANY

Friday and Saturday, APRIL 9/10, 2010

EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Joyner LibraryConference Room 209
Greenville, North Carolina

Scholars concede that one of the great mistakes of modern social science was the assumption that religion and religious belief retreated in the face of modernization. Now it is clear to scholars in all fields that piety and religious fervor do not necessarily give way to modernization. On the contrary, industrialization, modernity, and commercialization with its dislocations and uncertainties seem to have generated not a decline but a remarkable global resurgence of religiosity. This resurgence has provided identity during an age of uncertainty at the same time that it has contributed to conflict, oppression, terrorism, and war.

In German scholarship, research in diverse fields has developed a body of work on religious resurgence, life, and diversity in the modern era from a number of perspectives, countering presumptions of stasis and homogeneity. This work has cast new light on a remarkable range of tolerance, assimilation, exclusion, coercion, and ultimately genocide in the past two hundred years of modern Germany. Ultimately, research has suggested that religion, its use and abuse, has been inextricably enmeshed in the attempt to define what it means to be German.

Scholarship on religious belief and identity represents some of the most innovative and provocative work on modern Germany. This workshop takes stock of this research and seeks to move beyond the state of current scholarship: What have been the roles of forms of coercion and exclusion in beliefs? How do we account for religious resurgence and waning in the modern period? How have different religious populations influenced the belief of other religious populations? In what ways have religious beliefs been embedded in social, cultural and gender mores and relationships? Leading scholars from different disciplines including literature, history, and religious studies will address these and other issues.

PROGRAM

FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010

OPENING and WELCOME
5:00 pm

KEY NOTE ADDRESS:
5:15 – 7:00 pm

RESPONSE:

RECEPTION
7:00 pm

DINNER
8:00 pm


SATURDAY, APRIL 10, 2010

Welcome COFFEE
8:30 - 9:00 am

PANEL I: BELIEF
9:00 - 10:30 am

Chair: Susanne Jones (East Carolina University, Dept. of Foreign Languages and Literatures)

Coffee BREAK
10:30 - 11:00 am

PANEL II: IDENTITY
11:00 - 12:30 pm

Chair: David Smith (East Carolina University, Dept. of Foreign Languages and Literatures)

LUNCH
12:30 - 2:00 pm

PANEL III: CONFLICT
2:00 - 3:30 pm

Chair: Birgit Jensen (East Carolina University, Dept. of Foreign Languages and Literatures)

Coffee BREAK
3:30 - 4:00 pm

ROUNDTABLE: BELIEF, IDENTITY, AND CONFLICT
4:00 - 5:25 pm

Chair: Chad Ross (East Carolina University, Department of History)

CLOSING REMARKS
5:25 - 5:30 pm


Workshop Convener:

Organizer:

Sponsors:

East Carolina University
Office of the Provost
Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Studies
Thomas Harriot College of Arts & Sciences, Office of the Dean
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures
Department of History
International Studies Program

Carolina-Duke Graduate Program in German Studies

Duke University, Department of Germanic Languages and Literature

German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), New York

For more information please contact Michael Gross.