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Inside the February 2003 edition of FYI Carolina

New science Web site supports initiative to turn undergraduates into scientists

Tar Heel, Blue Devil scholars switch campuses in Robertson program

International studies major wins Rhodes Scholarship

True to form: new technology can capture a crime scene
GlaxoSmithKline gift to create Center for Excellence in Pharmacoepidemiology
Study abroad programs are ranked sixth largest nationwide
Fragile X Syndrome focus of new federally funded center

New science Web site supports initiative to turn undergraduates into scientists
Carolina's undergraduates are building on the university's history of innovative, hands-on science education through their research endeavors. They learn about research opportunities from their faculty members, the Office of Undergraduate Research and a new Web site, sciencecarolina.unc.edu. As a result, the science programs train some of the nation's most promising young scientists. Now the Web site is part of a recruiting initiative to help showcase Carolina's leading programs in science, engineering and technology for high school students.

Tar Heel, Blue Devil scholars switch campuses in Robertson program
Colleen Owen, Chris Paul and Crystal Sanders aren't your typical Duke students. This spring, they aren't what you'd expect of Carolina students either. As part of the Robertson Scholars Program -- a unique joint scholarship at Carolina and Duke -- they are among 15 Blue Devil sophomores spending the spring living, learning and immersing themselves in life at Chapel Hill. At the same time, their Carolina counterparts are exploring Durham. This historic switch is part of a larger effort to enhance UNC-Duke collaborations made possible by a $24 million gift from Julian and Josie Robertson.

International studies major wins Rhodes Scholarship
Karine Dubé, a senior international studies major from Quebec, won a 2003 Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford University in England, one of the most prestigious scholarships awarded for graduate studies. She is Carolina's 36th recipient since the prestigious Rhodes program began in 1902. Carolina has produced the second highest number of Rhodes winners among major U.S. public universities.

True to form: new technology can capture a crime scene
Lars Nyland, research associate professor of computer science, can create realistic 3D models of rooms, buildings, historical landmarks, caves - just about anything tangible. It's called image-based rendering, which uses photographs of real places to create computer-generated images. With help from students and colleagues, Nyland created the technology using a laser rangefinder as its source. Practical applications include recreating a crime scene. To learn more, click on the headline above for a story and images in endeavors, Carolina's magazine about research and creative activity.

GlaxoSmithKline gift to create Center for Excellence in Pharmacoepidemiology
To advance pharmacoepidemiology through innovation in research and training, the School of Public Health and GlaxoSmithKline are creating a Center for Excellence in Pharmacoepidemiology. This field studies the use and effects of drugs in large numbers of people. GlaxoSmithKline has committed $3 million over five years for the center through the Carolina First Campaign (http://carolinafirst.unc.edu/).

Study abroad programs are ranked sixth largest nationwide
Carolina ranks sixth among all U.S. research universities for the total number of students receiving academic credit for studying abroad during the 2000-2001 academic year. The ranking comes from Open Doors 2002, an annual report published by the Institute of International Education. When measuring the percentage of students going abroad, the institute ranks Carolina third among major public research universities and 13th among all major research universities.

Fragile X Syndrome focus of new federally funded center
The School of Medicine has received a $3.5-million federal grant to study brain development in young children with Fragile X Syndrome, the most common inherited cause of mental retardation. Researchers from UNC and Duke are teaming up with scientists at Stanford who were awarded an identical grant to conduct the joint study.


If you have comments or questions about FYI Carolina, contact the Office of University Communications by e-mail at FYICarolina@unc.edu or (919) 962-2093.