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People briefs

For immediate use

May 22, 2007

Malone named new associate vice chancellor for human resources

Brenda Malone, who is currently vice chancellor for faculty and staff relations at the City University of New York, will become Carolina’s new associate vice chancellor for human resources effective August 1.

Malone has more than 27 years’ experience in human resources and labor relations. For the past 14 years, she has managed classification and compensation, academic and non-academic labor relations, benefits, compliance and diversity, payroll, and staff training and development for the City University of New York, a system that includes more than 200,000 students and 30,000 full-time and part-time employees.

“I am delighted that Brenda has agreed to come to Chapel Hill,” said Richard Mann, vice chancellor for finance and administration. “With her long and distinguished career in human resources administration, and the level of experience in public higher education she brings, Brenda emerged as the leading candidate in our national search to fill this position. She will be a tremendous asset to our university.”

Malone succeeds Laurie Charest, who served as Carolina’s associate vice chancellor for human resources from 1990 until she retired at the end of January 2007.

As associate vice chancellor, Malone will oversee benefits administration, staffing, compensation, employee relations, training and development, Human Resources Information Systems, work-family programs and temporary staffing, with a central human resources staff of 75 and an annual $5 million operating budget.

Malone said she looked forward to her new role in Chapel Hill.

“I have always admired UNC as a progressive and dynamic institution that is committed to excellence,” she said. “I look forward to leading the human resources team to provide services that are innovative, service-oriented, strategically aligned with the University’s mission, and responsive to the needs of the UNC community. Joining UNC represents an extraordinary professional opportunity to contribute to the continued success of this great University. I can’t wait to get started!”

In New York, Malone directed a $1.2 million budget and led a unit of 70 employees. Among her many accomplishments, Malone managed the development and administration of the standards, rules and policies guiding the human resources and labor relations functions for the system’s 20 colleges and professional schools. She also has experience in collective bargaining matters.

Before joining the New York educational system, Malone served as deputy general manager and general counsel with Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation in Detroit. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Swarthmore College and a law degree from Hofstra University School of Law.

Photo link here: http://www.unc.edu/news/pics/admin/vice_chancellors/BrendaMalone5x7.jpg

News Services contact: Mike McFarland, (919) 962-8593

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Chapel Hill pharmacogenomics institute announces therapy awards

The Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy (IPIT) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has named the three winners of its 2007 awards. The awards were presented at the second annual Chapel Hill Drug Conference May 18 and 19.

Dr. Janet Woodcock, chief medical officer of the Food and Drug Administration, received the institute’s award for clinical service. The award honors a person who has made significant direct contributions to the advancement of individualized therapy in clinical practice.

Larry Lesko, Ph.D., director of the FDA Office of Clinical Pharmacology and Biopharmaceutics, received the institute’s award for public service. This award is presented to a person who has made a significant impact on the advancement of individualized therapy across society.

Sharon Terry, president and CEO of Genetic Alliance, was honored with the IPIT award for patient service. The award is given to individuals who have made significant contributions to empowering patients and who champion a focus on patient in the advancement of individualized therapy. Genetic Alliance, which is based in Washington, D.C., is a coalition of more than 600 advocacy organizations dedicated to improving the quality of life for people living with genetic conditions.

“The completion of the Human Genome Project brought the promise of new tools for choosing the safest and most beneficial medicines for patients,” said Howard McLeod, director of the institute. “But realizing these tools requires great dedication and leadership by experts from diverse areas of health sciences, leaders such as Janet Woodcock, Larry Lesko and Sharon Terry.”

The Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy brings together researchers and clinicians across the University to create personalized therapies and treatments for patients suffering from a wide variety of conditions.

IPIT Web site: http://www.ipit.unc.edu

Note: Howard McLeod can be reached at (919) 966-0512 or hmcleod@unc.edu.

IPIT contact: Teji Rakhra-Burris, (919) 843-1961, teji@unc.edu
School of Pharmacy contact: David Etchison, (919) 966-7744, david_etchison@unc.edu

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School of Medicine professor elected to American Board of Family Medicine
 
The American Board of Family Medicine elected Dr. Warren P. Newton to a 5-year term on its board of directors. Newton is the William B. Aycock distinguished professor and chairman of the department of family medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Newton has held local, state and national leadership positions within family medicine and has been involved in the development of the North Carolina Governor’s Quality Initiative. As a member of the board, he will serve on the information and technology committee, the research and development committee and the communications/publications committee.

The American Board of Family Medicine is the second largest medical specialty board in the United States. Founded in 1969, it is a voluntary, not-for-profit, private organization whose purposes include improving the quality of medical care available to the public.

School of Medicine contact: Stephanie Crayton, (919) 966-2860 or scrayton@unch.unc.edu