August 3, 2005

Carolina in the News

Here is a sampling of links and notes about Carolina
people and programs cited recently in the media:

National Coverage

Game Design 101
The Washington Post

In Tuesday's edition of Random Access I examined Scotland's plan to offer $175 to every resident to get up to speed on their information technology skills. ...For Sara Knechtel, a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, RSS comes as a relief from the proliferating sea of bogus information on the Web.

Dark side of subprime loan
The Boston Globe

Loans to homeowners with less-than-sterling credit are the fastest-growing segment of the mortgage market as lenders reach out to those unable to qualify for conventional mortgages. ...About 3.5 percent of subprime mortgages and refinancing loans go into foreclosure, but a study by the University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School found that 20 percent of refinancings in 1998 through 2000 that were examined wound up in foreclosure.

Caution and journalism (Opinion-editorial column)
USA Today

Years ago, when newspapers were having one of their episodic attacks of self-doubt over ethical standards, a wise old philosophy professor shared a concern. ...Philip Meyer is the Knight Professor of Journalism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a member of USA TODAY's board of contributors.

State & Local Coverage

WUNC adds 'Diane Rehm' to lineup
The News & Observer (Raleigh)

WUNC 91.5 FM hopes that its core audience will find "The Diane Rehm Show" a balm for the painful loss of "The Connection." ..."She's a Washington institution," WUNC program director George Boosey said of Rehm, who has hosted the show for more than 25 years. "The big thing about Diane is her ability to get Washington insiders."
UNC News Release: http://www.unc.edu/news/archives/aug05/wuncskedconnex.a05080205.htm

HIV-AIDS in North Carolina
"The State of Things," WUNC-FM

Sonia Napravnik, an assistant professor at the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine, was featured on Wednesday's edition of "The State of Things." A study examining the connection between unprotected sex and antiretroviral drug resistant HIV was recently presented at the 3rd International Aids Society Conference in Rio Di Janeiro. The study, conducted by Napravnik noted the high relation between those who were afflicted with drug-resistant HIV and who practiced unprotected sex. Host Melinda Penkava speaks with Napravnik about the new challenges in fighting the HIV-AIDS epidemic.

Electronic state high school offers flexibility
The Charlotte Observer

The State Board of Education wants to launch a virtual high school in 2006 that would offer Web-based classes and other electronic courses to all N.C. public school students. ...Kids in several Carolinas districts now take electronic courses taught by in- and out- of-state teachers.The N.C. Department of Public Instruction makes courses available through UNC Chapel Hill's LEARN NC and the N.C. School of Science and Mathematics, a statewide magnet.

Principal shortage hits N.C.
The News & Observer (Raleigh)

The 2,100 students at Southeast Raleigh High School aren't the only ones trying to adjust to the new school year. ...The shortfall is likely to intensify in North Carolina in coming years. More than half of the state's principals are age 50 and older and have 25 or more years of experience, according to a March survey by the Principals' Executive Program at the University of North Carolina system.

Utility Help On Way for Community
The Southern Pines Pilot

Water and sewer services may soon be in the works for Jackson Hamlet. ...In February a delegation from the unincorporated community appeared before the commissioners and officially asked for additional assistance in meeting water and sewer needs. About 50 Jackson Hamlet residents attended the meeting. Accompanying them were representatives of the N.C. Rural Communities Assistance Project and the University of North Carolina Center for Civil Rights.

UNC, hospital merger remote
The Fayetteville Observer

Cape Fear Valley Health System's chief executive says a merger with the UNC Health Care System is unlikely. But officials for Cape Fear Valley say they intend to collaborate with UNC to improve patient care and doctor-retention rates in Cumberland County.
Related Links: http://www.fayettevillenc.com/story.php?Template=opinion&Story=7115474
http://www.fayettevillenc.com/story.php?Template=opinion&Story=7115436
Note: In the August 3 Letters, 2 of the 6 discuss the Cape Fear Hospital merger.

UNC, Cape Fear med ties may get closer
The Chapel Hill Herald

More emergency helicopter and fertility services for Fayetteville-area residents are among the expansion possibilities being discussed by health officials at UNC and their peers at Fayetteville's Cape Fear Valley Health System. UNC officials traveled to Fayetteville last Friday for the first date in what's expected to become a more serious relationship with CFVHS.

Issues & Trends

N.C. legislative Democrats seeking budget agreement
The Associated Press (N.C.)

Democrats worked Tuesday to settle differences over pay raises, cigarette taxes and a lottery so they can close a budget deal for state government. ...The House and Senate also are at odds over whether to give University of North Carolina system schools _ particularly N.C. State and UNC-Chapel Hill _ authority to raise a portion of their tuition rates on their own.

Democrats feel heat on lottery
The News & Observer (Raleigh)

Legislative leaders trying to break a logjam on the state's budget are pressing reluctant House Democrats to support a much more aggressively advertised lottery than the version that squeaked through the House in April. ...House Speaker Jim Black said the two chambers are still trying to settle on a cigarette tax increase of 25 cents or more, pay raises for state employees of 2 percent or more, and a Senate proposal to let UNC-Chapel Hill and N.C. State University set their own tuition.

Open the doors! (Editorial)
The Charlotte Observer

Not since the days of the late state Rep. Billy Watkins have N.C. legislators spent so much time behind closed doors deciding how to spend billions of the public's dollars. ...Some of the issues being debated in private don't even belong in a budget bill. Giving UNC Chapel Hill and N.C. State University special authority to raise tuition ought to be debated in separate legislation.

Student-athletes are members for life
The News & Observer (Raleigh)

After the July release of a University of Kansas report detailing possible NCAA violations in football, women's basketball and men's basketball -- including possible secondary infractions under then-men's coach Roy Williams -- Williams made a point that was relevant both to his situation and to NCAA athletes past, present and future. ...UNC athletics director Dick Baddour said he understands why the rule extends to players who have finished their college eligibility -- to prevent anyone from enticing an athlete to come to a school with the promise of payment after graduation.

Bowles gets lesson from UNC's living legend
The News & Observer (Raleigh)

Erskine Bowles got a little tutelage from the master last week. Bowles, a two-time candidate for the U.S. Senate, received a lesson on University of North Carolina history and policy from retired UNC President William Friday, the legendary leader who guided the university system for 30 years. Bowles has been mentioned as a favorite to succeed Molly Broad, who will step down as UNC president next year.

Produced by News Services, Carolina in the News is an e-mail sampling of current news media coverage about Carolina people and programs, as well as issues and trends that affect the university. Stories usually will be online and available free for a limited time - often one to two weeks. Expiration dates before stories move to archives vary by media outlet. Some outlets require free user registration or a subscription.

Carolina in the News is also posted daily to the News Services Web page, http://www.unc.edu/news/clips/index.shtml.

Please share any questions, comments or suggestions at news@unc.edu.