Jan. 5, 2007

Carolina in the News

Here is a sampling of links and notes about Carolina people and programs cited recently in the media:

National Coverage

Louisville follows UNC lead on aid plan
The Associated Press (National)

The University of Louisville plans to offer low-income students a new type of financial assistance in the fall using a plan modeled after one in North Carolina. ...In North Carolina, the program has proven to be successful and popular, with the first class of "Covenant Scholars" set to graduate next year, said Shirley Ort, the associate provost and director of scholarships and student aid at the University of North Carolina.
Related link: http://insidehighered.com/news/2007/01/05/qt

Edwards Courts Unions Heading into ‘08
The New York Times

Coming out of a 2004 campaign year in which he staged an upstart bid for the Democratic presidential nomination and ended up on the ticket as the party’s vice presidential running mate, former North Carolina Sen. John Edwards could have bided his time before committing to another White House try in 2008. ...Edwards’ official occupation as he entered the presidential derby was head of a recently established center on poverty issues at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill, where he attended law school.

More Moral and Practical Law Schools
Inside Higher Ed

Law schools need to do a better job integrating the teaching of legal doctrine with a much stronger focus on helping students develop practical “lawyering” skills and understandings of ethical and moral considerations, according to a new study from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. ...But our hope is that there could be more of these, more places for more students,” said Judith Welch Wegner, who led the study. Wegner is a professor of law at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a past president of the Association of American Law Schools.
Related link: http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601082&sid=aTDpgUooX1no&refer=canada

Impulsive Behavior Linked to Risk of Alcoholism
HealthDay News

A lack of impulse control may be a warning sign for an increased risk of alcoholism, a new study suggests. ..."This finding extends work that this group [of researchers] and others have been doing for many years," said Dr. J.C. Garbutt, a professor of psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Current drugs are toxic and don't rid body of latent HIV, experts note
HealthDay News

In the hide-and-seek game played out between scientists and HIV over the last 25 years, the virus has so far been winning. ...Cutting-edge drug therapies have already beaten HIV down to infinitesimally low levels. In 2005, a team led by Dr. David Margolis of the University of North Carolina made a big splash by announcing in the New England Journal of Medicine that it had significantly depleted levels of latent virus in four patients.

Researchers Raise Concerns About Damage to Heart Valves From 2 Parkinson's Drugs
WebMD

Two drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson's diseaseParkinson's disease appear to increase the risk of heart valve disease, according to new research that also raises safety questions about similar-acting drugs. ...(Brian) Roth, who is a professor of pharmacology at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, says all investigational drugs and byproducts should be screened for 5-HT2B activity in the future.

Regional Coverage

U of L will help poorest students
The Courier-Journal (Louisville, Ky.)

To offset rising tuition, the University of Louisville plans to pay its lowest-income students the difference between college costs and financial aid. ...The new program is based on a similar program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill that began in 2003.
Related link: http://www.kentucky.com/mld/kentucky/news/local/16388008.htm

New U of L program will cover college costs for low-income students
Business First of Louisville

The University of Louisville is launching a new program to make college more affordable for low-income students. ...Cardinal Covenant is modeled after the University of North Carolina's Carolina Covenant program.

Proposals issued to curb TAKS cheating
The Houston Chronicle

Schools would be randomly audited and students' test scores would be subject to regular statistical analysis under a set of recommendations released Thursday to try to curb cheating on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills. ...Gregory Cizek, a professor of educational measurement and evaluation at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill who advised Texas' task force, said he's pleased with the recommendations.

'Let the World Listen' film documents the influence of hip-hop in the Delta
The Clarion-Ledger (Jackson, Miss.)

A documentary on a Mississippi Delta hip-hop artist shows that fertile dirt that grew blues and gospel music hasn't lost its juice. ...The half-hour documentary is co-directed by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students Ali Colleen Neff and Brian Graves with Delta hip-hop artist Jerome "TopNotch the Villain" Williams. It focuses on Williams and his group Da FAM (For All Mississippi), their struggles and community values expressed through improvised rhyme and song.

State and Local Coverage

Learning law: Beyond case analysis
The Herald-Sun (Durham)

Legal education should emphasize the ethical and practical skills needed to succeed as a lawyer alongside case analysis, a new study led by a former UNC law school dean recommends. ..."This is such a potent approach to teaching and learning that in a way it has driven out the other aspects [of what it means to be a lawyer]," said Judith Wegner, a professor and former dean of the UNC School of Law and leader of the study.

Slow down on rural roads (Editorial)
The Daily Dispatch (Henderson)

Speed kills, especially excessive speed on roads not meant to accommodate such rapid transit. The University of North Carolina Highway Safety Center and AAA Carolinas in evaluating traffic fatality data from 2005 found that Warren County was the place where motorists were most likely to die in a crash that year.
Related link: http://www.hendersondispatch.com/articles/2007/01/05/news/news02.txt

Peeling the Orange (Editorial)
The Chapel Hill Herald

So, Happy 2007. According to surveys that UNC Chapel Hill and Washington University conducted, about 40 percent of us have made resolutions for the new year. As for the other 60 percent, well, they're probably having another cup of coffee, smoking a cigarette or slathering more cream cheese on a cinnamon crunch bagel as they read this.

Edwards helped (Letter to the editor)
The News & Observer (Raleigh)

In response to a Jan. 1 People's Forum letter questioning where John Edwards was after Hurricane Katrina, here's an answer: in New Orleans, working alongside college students to rebuild a broken city. In March 2006, Edwards led students from 10 universities to New Orleans during their spring break, including the group that I was in, from UNC-Chapel Hill.

Issues and Trends

WakeMed gets approval for air ambulance service
The News & Observer (Raleigh)

Critically ill and injured patients in Eastern North Carolina will have more and faster options for care by the end of the year. ...The county's emergency services have called on helicopters from UNC Hospitals and Duke University Medical Center occasionally, but those hospitals are too far away to always be practical, Myers said.

Students can start applying for aid
The Winston-Salem Journal

The new year will bring a new source of money for some North Carolina college students. ...The maximum financial-aid award is $2,300 - likely not enough to cover the cost of tuition, books and fees at a school in the University of North Carolina system, or such living expenses as room and board - but it adds to a growing pot of state aid for college.


Produced by News Services, Carolina in the News is an e-mail sampling of current news media coverage about Carolina people and programs, as well as issues and trends that affect the university. Stories usually will be online and available free for a limited time - often one to two weeks. Expiration dates before stories move to archives vary by media outlet. Some outlets require free user registration or a subscription.

Carolina in the News is also posted daily to the News Services Web page, http://www.unc.edu/news/clips/index.shtml.

Please share any questions, comments or suggestions at news@unc.edu.