Jan. 23, 2007

Carolina in the News

Here is a sampling of links and notes about Carolina people and programs cited recently in the media:

International Coverage

Selenium may slow HIV
Health24.com (South Africa)

Supplements of the mineral selenium appear to reduce or slow the progression of HIV, University of Miami researchers report. ..."Most of the study subjects are African-American men, most are on antiretroviral therapy, and most have low or undetectable viral loads," noted Dr. David Margolis, a professor of medicine, microbiology and immunology and epidemiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Science blogger Bora Zivkovic
Nature.com (United Kingdom)

Three years ago, Bora Zivkovic, a zoology graduate student at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, was in a tough spot. ...He's also at the centre of an emerging community; he co-organized the North Carolina Science Blogging Conference, which took place on 20 January on the campus of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, with about 170 people in attendance.

National Coverage

Study Finds Growing Use of Research-Ethics Boards in Africa, but Problems Remain
The Chronicle of Higher Education

A study from the Johns Hopkins University of how well research-ethics boards are functioning in Africa has found a mixed picture. ...Those expectations raise the question of
what sorts of responsibilities researchers have toward the subjects of their studies, said Stuart Rennie, a bioethicist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who is helping to create a center for bioethics in Kinshasa, Congo. m

Scientists hope blogging boosts public's interest
McClatchy Newspapers

Offline, Bora Zivkovic is an unemployed biologist struggling with his dissertation in Chapel Hill. ...More than 150 scientists, teachers, bloggers and journalists came to the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to talk about the technology that some think could reshape the world of science and bring it to the masses.

Selenium Supplements May Slow Progression of HIV
HealthDay News

Supplements of the mineral selenium appear to reduce or slow the progression of HIV, University of Miami researchers report. ..."Most of the study subjects are African-American men, most are on antiretroviral therapy, and most have low or undetectable viral loads," noted Dr. David Margolis, a professor of medicine, microbiology and immunology and epidemiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

A Knight (Commission) Roundtable
Inside Higher Ed

In a year that saw college football’s first $4 million-a-year coach, an ugly brawl involving two Division I teams and a Congressional inquiry into college sports’ tax-exempt status, it’s no surprise that a leading college athletics reform group cast a wide net for discussion during a meeting on Monday. “The angst is that we don’t have enough fingers to place on the problems,” said Hodding Carter III, a member of the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics and a professor of public policy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Genetic Link for Anorexia
PsychCentral.com

Despite lay comments to the press, there is no scientific evidence that families cause anorexia nervosa. ...“We need to understand all the factors that influence eating disorders, both genetic and environmental, and find ways to address them in order to prevent people from developing these potentially deadly conditions,” said Cynthia Bulik, Ph.D., William and Jeanne Jordan Distinguished Professor of Eating Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
UNC News Release: http://www.unc.edu/news/archives/feb06/geneticsanorexia022806.htm

State and Local Coverage

'Stones' hits easy target
The News & Observer (Raleigh)

As comedic targets go, Hollywood has a bull's eye bigger than Texas. ...Stones" is theatrical gymnastics. Guest actor David Brian Alley and UNC grad student David Friedlander are energetic and agile, and their transformations are precise.
UNC News Release: http://www.unc.edu/news/archives/jan07/stones010507.htm

UNC eases penalty for frat convicted of hazing
The News & Observer (Raleigh)

UNC-Chapel Hill has reduced sanctions against a fraternity accused of forcing pledges to drink, go without sleep and perform menial tasks. ..."We wish to thank the Office of
Student Affairs for their professionalism throughout the appeals process," the statement said. "We believe that this experience will improve our new member program and our chapter as a whole."
Related link: http://www.wral.com/news/local/story/1175702/

Political money surged in 2006
The Charlotte Observer

Led by Realtors and supporters of UNC Chapel Hill, interest groups have been giving record amounts of money to candidates for the General Assembly. ...Citizens for Higher Education, a five-year-old PAC that lobbies for support for UNC Chapel Hill, gave at least $6,000 to 25 sitting legislators and smaller amounts to others.
Related link: http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/news/local/16521063.htm

Harvard call 'Kaps' a special two days (Opinion-column)
The Herald-Sun (Durham)

UNC senior Brienne Letourneau probably is still grinning from what happened to her around Thanksgiving. That's when she was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa, the nation's highest academic honorary society. And the very next day -- now tell me if this doesn't beat all -- Brienne gets a call from Harvard University, right? The person on the other end of the line was talking about her having been accepted into law school there.
Note: No link available.

Victim's death 14 years later changes case
The Charlotte Observer

Charlotte-Mecklenburg homicide detectives got an unusual call last fall from the Medical Examiner's Office: A 40-year-old man had died from complications of a urinary tract infection. ...Medical science back then couldn't explain how people died, said UNC School of Law assistant professor Richard Myers, so the courts set the 366-day deadline.

Getting better all the time
The News & Observer (Raleigh)

The Hippie Era reminders are coming hot and heavy these days. ..."Our conception of what is old has changed dramatically," says Victor Marshall, director of the Institute
on Aging at UNC-Chapel Hill.

A newcomer's perspective (Column)
The News & Observer (Raleigh)

You met Joe Cole last week. Now allow us to introduce Beth Millbank, the second of three new additions to the "Our Lives" community writers rotation. ...Millbank works as public relations manager for information technology services at UNC-Chapel Hill. Writing these essays gives her, she says, a chance to write from a personal rather than a professional perspective.

Retrieving exuberance in the heart (Commentary)
The News & Observer (Raleigh)

Barbara Ehrenreich causes trouble for her readers, a good thing for us all. She has done it most memorably in works about the precarious lives of working people ("Nickel and Dimed," "Global Woman," "Fear of Falling"), evoking our understanding that the economy we experience is only partly about money. ...David Carr teaches librarianship at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Cancer treatment (Letter to the editor)
The News & Observer (Raleigh)

Your Jan. 19 article "Duke plans cancer center" conspicuously left out Cancer Centers of North Carolina, a community-based practice in Raleigh, Cary and Dunn that has been providing care for patients for over 27 years. ...The other programs in the area including Duke and UNC/Rex are new university-based practices, not freestanding cancer centers.

UNC researcher faces indecency charge in Atlanta
The News & Observer (Raleigh)

A prominent public-health researcher at UNC-Chapel Hill was arrested in the Atlanta airport and charged with public indecency after an incident in a men's restroom.


Produced by News Services, Carolina in the News is an e-mail sampling of current news media coverage about Carolina people and programs, as well as issues and trends that affect the university. Stories usually will be online and available free for a limited time - often one to two weeks. Expiration dates before stories move to archives vary by media outlet. Some outlets require free user registration or a subscription.

Carolina in the News is also posted daily to the News Services Web page, http://www.unc.edu/news/clips/index.shtml.

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