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Tip Sheet

For immediate use

Sept 7, 2006 -- No. 412

UNC experts available for Sept. 11 anniversary stories

Topics:
National political issues

Military, terrorism, national security
Public health issues

Impact of public opinion, media on decisions
Understanding Islam
Historical contexts, the Middle East
The economy
Impact on families, children

Psychological issues


National political issues

Dr. William E. Leuchtenburg, (919) 967-1257, one of the nation's top experts on the U.S. presidency and a UNC-Chapel Hill professor emeritus of history, commented for national networks during George Bush's inauguration in 1989, for PBS, and Ronald Reagan's second inauguration in 1985, for CBS. Leuchtenburg, whose books include "In the Shadow of FDR: From Harry Truman to Bill Clinton" and "The FDR Years," was an expert commentator for C-SPAN during Clinton's second inauguration in January 1997 and for CBS during Clinton's first inauguration, with Dan Rather and the late Charles Kuralt. A past president of the American Historical Association, Leuchtenburg  joined UNC's faculty in 1982.

Military, terrorism, national security

Dr. Mark J.C. Crescenzi (cre-SIN-zi), (919) 962-0401, crescenzi@unc.edu, associate professor of political science, is an expert on international conflict and war. He can discuss political options the United States faces in the international arena. He also specializes in links between international economic interdependence and conflict, as well as the linkage between democracy and peace, and reputation and war.

Public health issues

Dr. Bennet Waters, (919) 966-7368, (202) 360-3219, jbwaters@email.unc.edu, clinical assistant professor of health policy and administration and Chief of Staff for the Chief Medical Officer, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, can speak about preparedness, especially in regards to hospitals and medical systems.

Dr. Edwin Fisher, (919) 966-6693, fishere@email.unc.edu, professor of health behavior and health education, can speak about social support for health and well-being.

Dr. David J. Weber, (919) 966-2536, pager (919) 347-0639, dweber@unch.unc.edu,  professor of epidemiology in the School of Public Health and  professor of medicine and pediatrics in the School of Medicine, can talk about bioterrorist agents such as anthrax and smallpox.

Dr. Michael Aitken, (919) 966-1024, aitken@email.unc.edu, professor of environmental sciences and engineering, can talk about soil contamination.

Dr. Philip Singer, (919) 966-3865, phil_singer@unc.edu, is a professor of environmental sciences and engineering and director of the Drinking Water Research Center in the School of Public Health. He can speak to drinking water quality, water systems management and threats to drinking water supplies.

Dr. Mark Sobsey, (919) 966-7303, mark_sobsey@unc.edu, is a professor of environmental sciences and engineering in the School of Public Health. He can speak to drinking water quality, safe water supplies and water-related threats.

Dr. Carol Runyan, (919) 966-2251, carol_runyan@unc.edu is director of the UNC-Chapel Hill Injury Prevention Research Center. Runyan, also associate professor of health behavior and health education in the UNC School of Public Health, can speak to injury prevention and occupational health issues.

Dr. Steve Rappaport, (919) 966-5017, rappapor@email.unc.edu, professor of environmental sciences and engineering, who can talk about exposure to and health effects of airborne contaminants. He has done work, funded by National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, on human exposure in the vicinity of the World Trade Center area after 9/11.

Dr. James Swenberg, (919) 966-6139, james_swenberg@unc.edu, professor of environment science and engineering and director of the UNC Center for Environmental Health and Susceptibility and the UNC Curriculum in Toxicology, can talk about exposure to chemicals, especially DNA damage from such exposures.

Impact of public opinion, media on decisions

Dr. Cori Dauber, (919) 962-4938, home (919) 967-4419, cdauber@email.unc.edu, an associate professor of communication studies, specializes in the influence of argument and rhetoric on decision-making in defense policy. She analyzes how policy decisions are influenced by public opinion and the media, including visual imagery. Dauber served on the Defense Advisory Committee on Women in the Services from 1997-99, and on its executive committee from 1998-99. Dauber earned a doctorate in communication studies from Northwestern University. Her work has been published in journals including Armed Forces and Society, Security Studies, and Defense Analysis. She also teaches in UNC's curriculum in peace, war and defense and has received grants and awards from the Military History Institute of the U.S. Army War College, the Naval History Center and the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

Dr. Dauber chooses to work only with print media and radio.

Understanding Islam

Dr. Carl Ernst, (919) 962-3924, cernst@email.unc.edu, Carl W. Ernst is a specialist in Islamic studies, with a focus on West and South Asia. His published research, based on the study of Arabic, Persian, and Urdu, has been mainly devoted to the study of Islam and Sufism. His most recent book, Following Muhammad: Rethinking Islam in the Contemporary World (UNC Press, 2003), has received several international awards, including the 2004 Bashrahil Prize for Outstanding Cultural Achievement. His current projects include Muslim interpretations of Hinduism and the literary translation of the Qur'an. He studied comparative religion at Stanford University (A.B. 1973) and Harvard University (Ph.D. 1981), and has done research tours in India (1978-79, 1981), Pakistan (1986, 2000, 2005), and Turkey (1991), and has also visited Iran (1996, 1999) and Uzbekistan (2003). He has taught at Pomona College (1981-1992) and has been appointed as visiting lecturer in Paris (EHESS, 1991, 2003), the University of Seville (2001), and the University of Malaya (2005). On the faculty of the Department of Religious Studies since 1992, he has been department chair (1995-2000) and Zachary Smith Professor (2000-2005). He is now William R. Kenan, Jr., Distinguished Professor (2005- ) and Director of the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations.

Historical contexts, the Middle East

Dr. Sarah Shields, (919) 962-8078, (919) 843-5797, home (919) 933-0187, sshields@email.unc.edu, associate professor of history, teaches courses on the modern Middle East. She is a specialist on historical contexts and ideologies of the people and interest groups of the region.

The economy

Dr. Stanley W. Black III, (919) 966-5926, home (919) 967-6059, sblack@unc.edu, Lurcy professor and former chairman of economics at UNC-Chapel Hill, can discuss international monetary issues and the effects of the terrorist attacks on the U.S. economy. In 2000, he was at the International Monetary Fund in Washington, D.C., and has much experience with national and world economic issues.

Dr. Michael Salemi, (919) 966-5391; home 929-9504, Michael_Salemi@unc.edu, professor of economics, is a macroeconomist who can talk about potential threats to the U.S. economy, both direct and indirect. He also can discuss world and national financial markets.

Impact on families, children

Joanne Caye, (919) 962-3598, jscaye@email.unc.edu, a clinical instructor in the UNC School of Social Work, has done extensive research and taught classes on managing the effects of disasters on families and children. She, along with colleagues, conducted several workshops in eastern North Carolina after hurricane Floyd on how families cope with disasters and tragedy. She also teaches students who plan to go into social work after they graduate how to help families and children deal with disasters and conflicts.

Psychological issues

Dr. Thomas M. Haizlip, (919) 733-5344, a professor in the division of child and adolescent psychiatry of the School of Medicine, also directs the child mental health training program at Dorothea Dix Hospital, a state psychiatric facility. One of his areas of expertise is on how to help families and children handle disaster situations.

Dr. Erica H. Wise, (919) 962-5432, voice mail (919) 962-5034, ewise@email.unc.edu,clinical associate professor of psychology, directs the department's training clinic for graduate students. She has counseled clients who have experienced trauma and trained in the American Red Cross model for critical incident stress debriefing. The latter involves counseling emergency services personnel who have combated disaster on the front lines, but it also is adaptable for helping survivors and people experiencing "vicarious trauma," a term for distress about a massive tragedy even when one was not directly involved.

Contacts: News Services staff (919) 962-2091 or news@unc.edu