Department of Art

art.unc.edu

JIM HIRSCHFIELD, Chair

Professors

Christoph Brachmann, S. Elizabeth Grabowski, Jim Hirschfield, Yun-Dong Nam, Mary D. Sheriff, Daniel J. Sherman, elin o'Hara slavick, Mary C. Sturgeon, Dennis Zaborowski.

Associate Professors

Glaire Anderson, John Bowles, Eduardo Douglas, Pika Ghosh, Cary Levine, Carol Magee, Mario Marzan, Mary Pardo, Tatiana String, Dorothy Verkerk, Jeff Whetstone, Lyneise Williams.

Assistant Professors

Sabine Gruffat, Wei-Cheng Lin, Roxana Pérez-Méndez, Hong-An Truong, Jina Valentine.

Adjunct Professor

Bernard Herman.

Lecturers

Jennifer J. Bauer, Joy Cox, Michael Sonnichsen.

Ackland Art Museum

Adjunct Professor

Timothy Riggs.

Adjunct Associate Professor

Peter Nisbet.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Carolyn Allmendinger.

North Carolina Museum of Art

Adjunct Associate Professor

John Coffey.

Professors Emeriti

Jaroslav T. Folda, James Gadson, Frances Huemer, Juan Logan, Arthur Marks, Jerry Noe, Marvin Saltzman.

Introduction

From a strong central core in the traditional practices of making and interpreting art, the faculty and students at UNC–Chapel Hill move out in innovative and personal directions. As a department, we are committed to working closely with our students and to guiding them in developing an individual voice, and we are diverse enough to offer a variety of choices in materials and methods. We cultivate exchange between studio art and art history and offer maximum flexibility within our individual programs. We invite our studio art students to work in different media and across the various disciplines. We encourage art history students to develop connections with other fields of inquiry and to intertwine historical analysis with theoretical speculation.

The department welcomes undergraduates to take its introductory courses as electives. Introductory studio art courses without prerequisites (ARTS 101, foundations courses, and Tier I courses) and introductory, 100-level courses in art history do not assume previous work in high school. Some students with sufficient high school experience may be eligible for placement at the 200 level of studio media classes. Nonmajors seeking placement in these upper-level studio or art history classes should see the appropriate department advisor, or in the case of studio art courses, students may seek permission directly from the instructor. For placement in studio classes, students should be prepared to show evidence of proficiency in the prerequisite by a portfolio review. Note, however, that studio art majors cannot use this permission of the instructor as a waiver of foundation course requirements. For official waiver of foundation courses, students must submit work for a formal portfolio review. (See also a more specific discussion of advanced placement under the studio art program description.)

Programs of Study

The degrees offered are the bachelor of arts with a major in art history, the bachelor of arts with a major in studio art, the bachelor of fine arts in studio art, and a combined studio/art history degree: the bachelor of fine arts with an emphasis in art history. This combined degree was designed for those wishing a depth of study in both programmatic areas of the Department of Art. Minors are offered in art history and studio art.

Majoring in Art History: Bachelor of Arts

Core Requirements

The undergraduate program in art history is directed toward two main educational goals: 1) to provide students with an excellent liberal arts foundation through an understanding of the historical and global significance, cultural diversity, and intellectual richness of human artistic traditions from prehistoric times to the present; and 2) to provide these students with the intellectual tools needed to investigate the complex roles played by the arts in a variety of social contexts. Skills in visual analysis, historical research, critical reading, analytical and descriptive writing, and oral communication are developed throughout the course of the study. The practice of art history is interdisciplinary, dynamically engaged with many fields in the humanities and social sciences, as well as with the University's diverse area studies programs and the Ackland Art Museum. The art history major equips students with skills, knowledge, and values to negotiate rapidly changing, richly diverse, and increasingly interconnected local, national, and worldwide communities.

A maximum of two cross-listed courses taught by faculty members outside the Department of Art may count toward the major. It is strongly recommended that before taking a course numbered above 399, students take a lower-level course devoted to the same period. Advanced courses numbered 400 to 699 are lecture and discussion classes open to both graduate and undergraduate students.

All General Education Foundations, Approaches, Connections, and Supplemental General Education requirements must be satisfied.

Minoring in Art History

Students majoring in another department may elect to pursue a minor in art history. The minor consists of five courses at any level in art history. Studio art majors may not pursue an art history minor.

Credit by Examination

Students who pass the Advanced Placement (AP) examination in art history and earn a score of 4 or 5 will receive credit for ARTH 152 History of Western Art II.

Honors in Art History

The honors program is open to students with a 3.3 grade point average who have demonstrated overall excellence in the discipline. Honors are generally pursued in the senior year. Students enroll in the honors courses (ARTH 691H in the fall; ARTH 692H in the spring) through the student services assistant in the Department of Art office. This should be done after consultation with the faculty honors advisor and department honors advisor. For more information, see the honors program description elsewhere in this bulletin and the departmental honors announcement. Honors work will allow a student to graduate with honors or with highest honors.

Advising

All majors and minors have a primary academic advisor in Steele Building. Students are strongly encouraged to meet regularly with their advisor and review their Tar Heel Tracker each semester. The department's directors of undergraduate studies and undergraduate advisors work with current and prospective majors by appointment (see "Contact Information" below); on request, art history majors may be assigned an individual faculty advisor. Departmental academic advising is particularly important for those majors who are considering honors thesis work or graduate school. Further information on courses, undergraduate research opportunities, and the honors program may be obtained from the department's Web site.

ART courses were renumbered under two new subject codes, ARTH (art history courses) and ARTS (studio art courses). The listing of ARTH courses below includes the former ART numbers in brackets.

ARTH (Art History Courses)

52 First-Year Seminar: Celts—Druid Culture (3). Who were the Celts, and more specifically, who were the Druids? Little is known about the ancient Druids, yet they have captured the imagination of Western Europeans and North Americans for centuries. They have defined ethnic identity for disparate cultures. So who were they, and who are they today?

53 [ART 53] First-Year Seminar: Art and the Body (3). This course will examine presentations and representations of the body in Western art and how such portrayals relate to their social, cultural, and political contexts.

54 [ART 54] First-Year Seminar: Art, War, and Revolution (3). Focusing on one or two works of art per week in a variety of media, this course explores the complex relationship between art, war, and conflict in the modern world.

55 [ART 55] First-Year Seminar: Gender and Power in Early Modern Europe (3). This first-year seminar introduces students to some of the issues related to representations of western European men and women in the period 1400–1700. Portraits, mythological and biblical imagery, and even architecture will be studied for their attention to gender.

56 First-Year Seminar: Lives of East Asian Artworks at the Ackland Art Museum (3). This course traces the "lives" of East Asian artworks as to how they entered the Ackland Art Museum, transformed, and became part of its collection, as well as related issues.

61 [ART 61] First-Year Seminar: Introduction to African American Art (3). The purpose of this class is to examine African American art and some of the historical considerations that affected the nature of its developments.

64 [ART 64] First-Year Seminar: Picturing Nature (3). This seminar focuses on how the collecting and study of natural and aesthetic wonders shaped ideas about knowledge in the arts and sciences.

66 [ART 66] First-Year Seminar: Art, Money, and the Market (3). This seminar explores the complex relationship between art and economy in the age of capitalism, focusing on artworks that interpret market activities and address the subject of economic value.

77 [ART 77] First-Year Seminar: Seeing the Past (3). This seminar will introduce students to practices of critical analysis that inform academic work in all the core humanistic disciplines: how do we ask analytical questions about texts, artwork, and other cultural artifacts that come down to us from the past or circulate in our own culture?

79 [ART 79] First-Year Seminar: Meaning and the Visual Arts (3). In the course of the semester, each student will learn to become an art historian. Students will undertake a series of viewing, research, and writing exercises, which will culminate in the production of an exhibition catalogue on world art titled "In the Eye of the Beholder."

84 [ART 84] First-Year Seminar: Society of the Spectacle: Impressionism and Post-Impressionism (3). Students will pay special attention to recent historical and theoretical studies of Impressionist and post-Impressionist painting, as well as selected French novels of the period.

89 First-Year Seminar: Special Topics (3). Content varies by semester.

150 [ART 150] World Art (3). This course provides an introductory survey of some of the major traditions of art making throughout the world, from prehistory to the present.

151 [ART 151] History of Western Art I (3). This is the first semester of a two-semester survey that is designed to acquaint the beginning student with the historical development of art and with the offerings and instructors of the art history faculty. ARTH 151 covers ancient, medieval, and early Renaissance periods.

152 [ART 152] History of Western Art II (3). This is the second semester of the two-semester survey course including Western art from the Renaissance to the modern period. ARTH 151 is not a prerequisite for ARTH 152.

153 [ART 153] Introduction to South Asian Art (ASIA 153) (3). An introductory survey of the visual arts of South Asia.

154 [ART 154] Introduction to Art and Architecture of Islamic Lands (Eighth–16th Centuries CE) (ASIA 154) (3). This course introduces the arts of the Islamic lands from the seventh-century rise of the Umayyad dynasty of Syria to the 16th-century expansion of the Ottoman Empire.

155 [ART 155] African Art Survey (3). A selective survey of sub-Saharan African art (sculpture, painting, architecture, performance, personal decoration) in myriad social contexts (ceremony, politics, royalty, domestic arenas, cross-cultural exchanges, colonialism, postcolonialism, the international art world).

156 [ART 156] Introduction to Architecture (3). What is architecture? What does it do? This course is designed to encourage students to consider architecture less as something technical, existing in a separate sphere from everyday life, but as social space.

157 [ART 157] Introduction to Latin American Visual Culture (3). This course examines manifestations of visual culture such as festivals and their related objects, comics, and painting in Latin America according to themes like indigenismo, religion, race, modernism, and identity.

158 [ART 158] Introduction to East Asian Art and Architecture (ASIA 158) (3). This course traces the history of art and architecture in premodern East Asia, emphasizing ideas and ways of seeing and representing that were common or different across East Asia.

159 [ART 159] The Film Experience: Introduction to the Visual Study of Film (3). A critical and historical introduction to film from a visual arts perspective. The course surveys the history of film from its inception to the present, drawing upon both foreign and American traditions.

160 [ART 160] Introduction to the Art and Architecture of Pre-Hispanic Mesoamerica (3). This course introduces the art, architecture, and cultures of pre-Hispanic Mesoamerica, from the rise of Mesoamerica's first high civilization in the second millennium BCE to the defeat of the Aztec Empire in 1521 CE.

161 [ART 161] Introduction to American Art (3). This course surveys American art and architecture, analyzing paintings, sculpture, buildings, and popular imagery produced between the early colonial period and World War I.

251 [ART 251] Art and Architecture in the Age of the Caliphs (Seventh–12th Centuries CE) (ASIA 251) (3). Introduces the art and architecture of the caliphal period, concentrating on the seventh through 12th centuries (the "classical" period of Islamic art).

254 [ART 254] Women in the Visual Arts I (WMST 254) (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. This course analyzes the role of women in Western art as art producers and consumers of art and looks at how women have been represented.

255 [ART 255] African Art and Culture (3). This course explores the art and culture of sub-Saharan Africa on the levels of both production and consumption both locally and globally.

258 [ART 258] Chinese Art and Culture: From Han to Tang (3). This course investigates cultural and artistic complexities and diversities in medieval China, resulting from its exchanges with neighboring peoples during the period between the Han and Tang dynasties.

259 [ART 259] Native American Art and Culture (3). A selective survey of Native North American art (sculpture, painting, architecture, performance, personal decoration) in myriad social contexts (ceremony, politics, domestic arenas, cross-cultural exchanges, colonialism, postcolonialism, the international art world).

262 [ART 262] Art of Classical Greece (CLAR 262) (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. A chronological study of the main developments of Greek sculpture, architecture, and painting from the fifth to the first centuries BCE.

263 [ART 263] Roman Art (CLAR 263) (3). See CLAR 263 for description.

264 [ART 264] Medieval Art in Western Europe (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. Survey of major developments in painting and sculpture in Europe during the Latin Middle Ages (300–1400 CE).

265 [ART 265] Medieval Iconography (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. Understanding the meaning of medieval art by examining the iconography of selected important works.

266 [ART 266] Arts of Early and Medieval India (ASIA 266) (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. This course is an introduction to the visual culture of early and medieval India.

267 [ART 267] Latin American Modernisms (3). This course focuses on the relationship between the national and international and art and politics within Latin American modernist movements from ca. 1900 to 1960.

270 [ART 270] Early Renaissance Art in Italy (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. The course develops a solid acquaintance with representative aspects of Italian art from about 1250 to 1450. In alternate semesters the emphasis may change from central (Florence, Rome) to northern (Venice) Italy.

271 [ART 271] High Renaissance Art in Italy (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. The course is a survey of major Italian painting from about 1490 to 1575. From semester to semester the emphasis may alternate between central Italian and Venetian/northern Italian works.

272 [ART 272] Northern European Art: Van Eyck to Bruegel (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. Survey of painting and sculpture ca. 1400–1600 in the Netherlands—Belgium (Flanders) and Holland—as well as France and England.

273 [ART 273] Arts under the Mughal Dynasty in India (ASIA 273) (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. This course explores the visual culture patronized by the Mughal dynasty in India from the 11th to the 17th centuries.

274 [ART 274] European Baroque Art (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. This course examines 17th-century art and architecture in Europe.

275 [ART 275] 18th-Century Art (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. An introductory survey of architecture, sculpture, and painting with emphasis on European developments in the "fine" and "decorative" arts from the late 17th century to the Napoleonic era.

277 [ART 277] Art and Architecture of Viceregal Latin America (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 152 or 157. This course surveys the art and architecture of Hispanophone and Lusophone America of the Viceregal period (1492–ca. 1810).

279 The Arts in England, 1450–1650 (3). This course explores the visual culture of England during the reigns of the Tudors and Stuarts. This will include portraits of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, and Charles I by artists such as Holbein, Van Dyck, and Rubens, royal palaces, printed books, tomb monuments, heraldry, spectacles, as well as portraits of the middle classes.

282 [ART 282] Modernism I: Impressionism and Post-Impressionism (3). Recommended preparation, any ARTH 50–89 or 100–199. The development of European art from 1850 to 1905, with an emphasis on French avant-garde movements including realism and impressionism.

283 [ART 283] Picturing Paris: 1800–2000 (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. This class explores the cultural, political, and artistic circumstances in which images of Paris have been made and viewed, as well as various visual technologies that have disseminated and marketed.

284 [ART 284] Modernism II: 1905–1960 (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. Major figures, movements, and themes of modernism from cubism and the emergence of abstraction to the transfer of artistic energy and innovation to the United States after World War II.

285 [ART 285] Art since 1960 (3). This course will explore major trends in Western art since 1960. It focuses on key contemporary movements and their relations to social, cultural and political contexts.

287 [ART 287] African American Art Survey (AAAD 237) (3). An introduction to African American art and artists and their social contexts from early slavery.

288 [ART 288] 19th-Century American Art (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 53, 54, 61, 64, 77, 79, 84, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, or 161. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This course surveys the broad spectrum of 19th-century artistic practice in the United States, focusing on academic and popular artworks that addressed the major conflicts and crises of the period.

289 [ART 289] American Modernisms (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 53, 54, 61, 64, 77, 79, 84, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, or 161. This course surveys the wide field of early 20th-century American art, stressing the diverse and contested character of artistic modernism in the United States.

290 Special Topics in Art History (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. Selected topics in art history.

292 [ART 295] Egypt, Near East, and Aegean (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. This course surveys the ancient art and architecture of Egypt, the Near East, and the Aegean Bronze Age, from the Neolithic period to the end of the Neo-Assyrian empire.

293 [ART 397] Art History Practicum (3). Students complete an internship in an art history related field. Students will gain practical knowledge of the practice of art history. Studio majors may use this course to fulfill an art history requirement by pursuing faculty-approved, nonpaid internships working in nonprofit or commercial art sectors.

302 Fashioning Identities (3). This course examines fashion and the political, social, and cultural discourses, conditions, and institutional formations used in the creation of varied social and personal identities.

351 [ART 351] Crusader Art (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. This course surveys the main works of Crusader art in order to understand their nature and development from 1099 to 1291. The Crusader monuments are set in their historical context and in relation to Byzantine and Western European art.

352 [ART 352] Religious Architecture and Visual Culture in Latin America (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 157. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This course uses case studies to introduce students to the visual culture manifested in architecture, festivals, ritual spaces, clothing, and objects associated with religious practices of Latin America.

353 [ART 353] African Masquerade and Ritual (AAAD 319, ANTH 343) (3). Prerequisites, AAAD 101, ANTH 102 or 120, and ARTH 155. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. Explores ideas of and contexts for select sub-Saharan African rituals/masquerades. Examines how people use objects in establishing and mediating relationships with one another, ancestors, and the spiritual world.

361 [ART 361] Saints in Medieval Art (3). The course explores the modes in which saints and issues related to sainthood are visualized in medieval art.

362 [ART 362] Early Christian Art and Modern Responses (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. The early Christian origins of art and architecture in domestic and public contexts of the 200–600 CE Christian communities; the 18th- and 20th-century adaptation of early Christian art.

363 [ART 363] Envisioning Buddhism in Medieval China (3). This course investigates different genres of Buddhist art in medieval China, produced to disseminate religion and give rise to a new religious vision and imagination.

365 [ART 365] Late Medieval Art (3). This course explores the art of the late medieval period in Byzantium and the Latin West.

368 The Renaissance Portrait (3). This course focuses on European portraits produced in the period ca. 1400–1600. Through careful study of specific paintings, prints, and sculptures, by artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Albrecht Dürer, we will explore different ways of interpreting portraiture in the Renaissance, addressing issues of identity, reception, and function.

370 [ART 370] Visual Art in the Age of Revolution (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. This course focuses on the visual arts of Europe between 1750 and 1830, and addresses the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic issues pertinent to art in an age of revolution.

383 [ART 383] Modern Architecture (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. This course will examine the history of architecture from the late 19th century to the present.

385 Pop Art and Its Legacy (3). This course will investigate what is commonly termed "pop art." We will examine the various issues at stake in the appropriation of mass media imagery and techniques, the diversity within the movement, the different arguments surrounding particular artists and artworks, and pop art's continuing legacy in work by contemporary artists.

387 [ART 387] 20th-Century African American Art (AAAD 330) (3). This course will focus upon the expression of African Americans in the United States in the 20th century.

390 Special Topics in Art History (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. Selected topics in art history.

391 [ART 391] Undergraduate Research Seminar (3). Required preparation, art history major and sophomore standing or permission of the instructor. Introduces students to research in art history. Seminar involves a multi-stage research project beginning with close analysis of an art object and culminating with a research paper. Topics are drawn from ancient/medieval, early modern, and modern/contemporary art.

396 [ART 396] Directed Readings in Art History (3). Permission of the instructor. Independent study under the direction of a faculty member.

445 The Mexican Mural Renaissance, 1921–1945 (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 157 or 267. Permission of the instructor. This course investigates mural painting and state patronage in post-Revolutionary Mexico, from 1921 to 1945, when artists engaged politics in monumental public works. Focuses on the murals of Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros, as well as on the relationship between art and politics.

450 [ART 450] The City as Monument (3). A city or cities will be considered as cultural artifact(s), with emphasis given to plans and planning, architecture, public monuments and to various institutions, such as religion, government, the arts, and commerce that initiate or affect these urban developments and forms.

451 [ART 451] Women in the Visual Arts II (WMST 451) (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 151 or 254. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Discussion of topics related to the representation of women in Western art and/or women as producers of art.

452 [ART 452] Brazilian Modernism (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 157 or 267. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This course covers the development of modernism in the visual arts in Brazil from 1917, the year in which a Brazilian artist first exhibited "modernist" artworks in Brazil, to 1960.

453 [ART 453] Africa in the American Imagination (AAAD 486) (3). Restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Examines the ways African art appears in United States popular culture (advertisements, magazines, toys, films, art) to generate meanings about Africa. Addresses intersecting issues of nationalism, multiculturalism, imperialism, nostalgia, race.

454 [ART 454] Cathedrals, Abbeys, Castles: Gothic Art and Architecture, ca.1130–1500 (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 157 or 267. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Covers the development of Gothic church and secular architecture in Europe between 1130 and 1500. Explores formal and constructive progress in architecture (including sculpture and stained glass windows) and social, political, and economic aspects of medieval society that affected these developments.

455 [ART 455] City, Architecture, Art: Nuremberg as a European Artistic Center, 1300–1600 (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 151. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. The course covers the development of art and architecture from ca. 1300 to ca. 1600 in one of the most important medieval and early modern art centers in Europe: Nuremberg, the hometown of the famous German painter Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528).

456 [ART 456] Art and Visual Culture of South Asia (ASIA 456) (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. This thematic course explores how objects and monuments are viewed, experienced, and used in a ritual context in South Asia.

457 [ART 457] Studies in the History of Graphic Art (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. Study of prints and printmaking in Western art from ca. 1400 to the present focusing on selected topics.

458 [ART 458] Islamic Palaces, Gardens, and Court Culture (Eighth–16th Centuries CE) (ASIA 458) (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 154. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This course focuses on palaces, gardens, and court cultures beginning with the eighth-century Umayyad period and ending with the 16th-century reigns of the Mughal, Safavid, and Ottoman dynasties.

460 [ART 460] Greek Painting (CLAR 460) (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. A survey of the development of Greek art from geometric to Hellenistic painting through a study of Greek vases, mosaics, and mural paintings.

461 [ART 461] Archaic Greek Sculpture (CLAR 461) (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. A focused study of sculpture during the Archaic period in Greece.

462 [ART 462] Classical Greek Sculpture (CLAR 462) (3). See CLAR 462 for description.

463 [ART 463] Hellenistic Greek Sculpture (CLAR 463) (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. A focused study of Greek sculpture in the Hellenistic period.

464 [ART 464] Greek Architecture (CLAR 464) (3). See CLAR 464 for description.

465 [ART 465] Architecture of Etruria and Rome (CLAR 465) (3). See CLAR 465 for description.

466 [ART 466] History of the Illuminated Book (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. Chronological survey of major developments in book painting during the European Middle Ages from 300 to 1450 CE.

467 [ART 467] Celtic Art and Cultures (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. This course explores the art and culture from the Hallstat and La Tène periods (seventh century BCE) to the Celtic "renaissance" (ca. 400–1200 CE).

468 [ART 468] Visual Arts and Culture in Modern and Contemporary China (ASIA 468) (3). This course examines visual materials, including those from fine arts, commerce, popular culture, political propaganda, avant-garde movements, etc., produced in modern and contemporary China as an important means of defining China's self-identity in the modern and global world.

469 [ART 469] Art of the Aztec Empire (3). This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the art of the Aztec Empire, including architecture, monumental sculpture, small-scale sculpture, ceramics, painting, lapidary work, gold work, and feather work.

470 [ART 470] The Moving Image in the Middle Ages (3). The course explores the range of contexts in which images in the medieval period were made to move; for instance, in rituals, processions, and miracles.

471 [ART 471] Northern European Art of the 14th and 15th Centuries (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. Advanced study of painting and sculpture in France, England, and the Netherlands, 1300 to 1400.

472 [ART 472] Early Modern Art, 1400–1750 (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. This course explores specialized themes and/or broad topics in Western European art of the early modern period.

473 [ART 473] Early Modern and Modern Decorative Arts (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. This course traces major historical developments in the decorative and applied arts, landscape design, and material culture of Western society from the Renaissance to the present.

474 [ART 474] Roman Sculpture (CLAR 474) (3). See CLAR 474 for description.

475 [ART 475] Icons and Idols: Debates in Medieval Art (3). This course will examine theories and instances of image making and breaking from the classical world to the early modern world, covering late antiquity, iconoclasm in Byzantium, and the medieval West.

476 [ART 476] Roman Painting (CLAR 476) (3). See CLAR 476 for description.

481 [ART 481] American Art and the Civil War (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 53, 54, 61, 64, 77, 79, 84, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, or 161. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. An exploration of the ways that American artists negotiated the Civil War, examining artworks and popular images that addressed slavery and sectionalism, the wartime experience, and the project of Reconstruction.

483 [ART 483] Art, Politics, and Society in France, 1850–1914 (HIST 468) (3). An examination of the interaction of artists, criticism, and the market with larger political and social developments in France, with an emphasis on primary sources.

485 [ART 485] Art of the Harlem Renaissance (3). Examines the Harlem Renaissance (1918–1942) as an instance of both transnational modernism and cultural nationalism through study of how artworks articulate interrelated conceptions of race, gender, sexuality, and social class.

487 [ART 487] African Impulse in African American Art (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. This class will examine the presence and influences of African culture in the art and material culture of Africans in the Americas from the colonial period to the present.

488 [ART 488] Contemporary African Art (AAAD 405) (3). Prerequisite, AAAD 101 or ARTH 152 or 155. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Examines modern and contemporary African art (1940s to the present) for Africans on the continent and abroad. Examines tradition, cultural heritage, colonialism, postcolonialism, local versus global, nationalism, gender, identity, diaspora.

490 Special Topics in Art History (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. Selected topics in art history.

514 [ART 514] Monuments and Memory (GLBL 514) (3). See GLBL 514 for description.

551 [ART 551] Introduction to Museum Studies (3). Introduces careers in museums and other cultural institutions. Readings and interactions with museum professionals expose participants to curation, collection management, conservation, exhibition design, administration, publication, educational programming, and fundraising.

552 [ART 552] The Literature of Art (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. A study of the principal critics and historians who have contributed to the development of modern art history. Also application of the principles to specific works of art.

553 [ART 553] The Body in Social Theory and Visual Representation (3). A study of how the human body has been represented in contemporary art and the relation of those representations to theories of the individual and society.

554 [ART 554] Imagining Otherness in Visual Culture in the Americas (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. This course examines representational othering of black, Asian, Latina/o, and Native American people in images in the Americas through postcolonial topics like racial stereotyping, Orientalism, primitivism, essentialism, and universalism.

555 Urban Africa and Global Mobility (3). The contemporary arts of Africa are framed by urbanization and global mobility. This course examines how artists examine, reflect on, and express visually experiences of these conditions.

556 [ART 556] Visual Cultures of the American City, 1750–1950 (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 53, 54, 61, 64, 77, 79, 84, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, or 161. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. An exploration of the wide field of American art and visual culture inspired by the spaces and social life of the modern city.

561 [ART 561] Art and Society in Medieval Islamic Spain and North Africa (ASIA 561) (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 154. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This course introduces the art and architecture of medieval Islamic Spain and North Africa between the eighth and 16th centuries.

562 [ART 562] Islamic Urbanism (3). Prerequisite, ARTH 154. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This course explores the development, urban forms, and social structures of some of the major cities of the medieval Islamic lands.

583 [ART 583] Theories of Modern Art (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. A study of theoretical issues central to the understanding of trends in modern art (e.g., modernism, the avant-garde, formalism originality).

586 [ART 586] Cultural Politics in Contemporary Art (3). Permission of the instructor. This course will examine the strategies of critique in contemporary art. Organized thematically, it focuses on the tactics employed by artists who address political, social, or cultural issues through their work.

588 [ART 588] Current Issues in Art (3). Addresses select issues that have gained or regained prominence in today's art world, for example globalization, training, the market, and the nature of the "contemporary."

590 [ART 550] Topics in Connoisseurship (3). Permission of the instructor. Works in the Ackland Museum's collection will be studied directly as a means of training the eye and exploring the technical and aesthetic issues raised by art objects.

592 [ART 595] History and Theory of Museums (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. Provides an historical overview of museums. Serves as an introduction to many of the theoretical issues museums face including: ethics, audiences, the role of museums in society, exhibiting dilemmas.

595 [ART 596] Experience in Research (1–3). Required preparation, one 100-level art history course and one 200- to 399-level art history course. An experiential-learning opportunity in independent and original research on a topic or in a field of the student's choosing under the close direction of a faculty supervisor.

597 [ART 597] Studiolo to Wunderkammer (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. This course explores the history of early modern collecting, encompassing scholars' and merchants' "study rooms," aristocrats' menageries, humanists' "sculpture gardens," and princely cabinets of wonders.

683 [ART 683] Etruscan Art (CLAR 683) (3). See CLAR 683 for description.

691H Honors in Art History (3). Permission of the instructor. Independent research directed by a faculty member leading to an honors thesis.

692H Honors in Art History (3). Permission of the instructor. Independent research directed by a faculty member leading to an honors thesis.

Studio Art Program

Mission Statement

The studio art program is a community of ardent and diverse fine arts professionals who facilitate studio art experiences for undergraduate and graduate students. We recognize and respond to the universal human need for visual expression, and the necessity of the visual arts and visual communication in contemporary society. The program encourages experimentation, crossing boundaries, and hybrid processes as well as engaging the history and traditions of art. Through directed practice and creative research, faculty work closely with students to stimulate aesthetic and intellectual inquiry, impart portable skills, and motivate self-exploration to help students create outstanding works of art. The studio learning environment promotes curiosity, critical thinking, and creative problem solving—valuable skills for anyone who studies in the discipline.

The program in studio art focuses on fine arts. Students may choose from a range of studio coursework designed to develop both skill acquisition and a personal creative vision. We develop two critical skills: the means of self-expression and techniques for creative thinking. Our responsibility to the studio art major is to develop a sense of professional standards and future career potential. While the undergraduate program focuses on the fine arts, the course of study nonetheless offers a sound foundation for students to move into art education, design fields, and other art-related careers as well as preparation for further study or careers in the fine arts.

Students choosing a studio art major begin with a series of foundation courses that are designed to develop their understanding and application of visual language across a range of media. In these courses students address both skill development and the nature of artistic inquiry. Believing that technique serves the visual idea, we stress the integration of media skill and concept. Conventional issues of artisanship, technique, and skill acquisition are taught as part of a larger concept of art making. The goal is to equip students with a variety of skills and visual strategies that they will be able to apply in meaningful contexts. In the final analysis, we expect students to become technically competent, conceptually independent, critically aware, and dedicated to their passion of art making.

This philosophy encompasses our contextualization in an institution of higher education. We embrace the notion that being an artist today requires an intellectual curiosity and broad base of knowledge that, in turn, informs studio work. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provides limitless resources to the studio artists in our program. The studio program in the Department of Art becomes a site of synthesis of intellectual inquiry and subjective lived experience.

The Department of Art offers two undergraduate degrees in studio art: the bachelor of arts (36 credit hours) and the bachelor of fine arts (60 credit hours). Additionally, a combined studio/art history degree, the bachelor of fine arts with art history emphasis (60 credit hours), has been designed for those wishing to have a depth of study in both programmatic areas in the Department of Art. The studio component of the B.F.A with an art history emphasis parallels the B.A. degree with some exceptions as noted.

In general, courses are numbered to reflect media areas in the last digit. Painting courses end in 2, sculpture 3, drawing 4, photography 5, digital media 6, mixed media 7, printmaking 8. ARTH 151, 152, or any art history survey course is recommended as a first course in art history.

Majoring in Studio Art: Bachelor of Arts

Core Requirements

The B.A. degree is intended to expose undergraduate students to a range of studio art ideas and practices. Students should choose this degree option if they are seeking a general liberal arts education. It is also the most often selected degree option when pursuing a double major. Second majors are frequent with communication studies (media and technology studies and production), journalism (design track), biology, drama (costume and set design), and psychology (art therapy), but any field can be augmented by studying the visual arts. All General Education Foundations, Approaches, Connections, and Supplemental General Education requirements must be satisfied. While the major consists of 36 credit hours, students may earn up to 45 credits in the Department of Art that will count toward graduation. Credits taken in the Department of Art beyond 45 will not count toward overall graduation requirements.

Majoring in Studio Art:
Bachelor of Fine Arts

Core Requirements

The B.F.A. is considered the preprofessional course of study, providing a more in-depth experience of visual concept and practice. Students intending to pursue further study in visual arts disciplines (master of fine arts, design fields, or architecture) should choose this degree option. Students considering the B.F.A. degree are advised to contact the undergraduate advisor for studio art during the first year and no later than the sophomore year. All General Education Foundations, Approaches, and Connections requirements must be satisfied. B.F.A. students should be aware that courses taken in the Department of Art beyond the 60 credits outlined in the major will not count toward graduation.

Majoring in Studio Art: Bachelor of
Fine Arts with Art History Emphasis

Core Requirements

The bachelor of fine arts with art history emphasis degree was established to allow students to pursue concentrated study in both studio art and art history. Essentially, it represents a double major of studio art and art history. Unique to UNC–Chapel Hill, this degree has been well received for students wishing to pursue graduate study in fields that demand knowledge in both history and practice, such as curatorial studies, museum studies, or education. Students pursuing this degree are advised by the director of undergraduate studies for both studio art and art history. Students interested in this degree should contact both advisors no later than the sophomore year.

All General Education Foundations, Approaches, and Connections requirements must be satisfied. B.F.A.–A.H. students should be aware that courses taken in the Department of Art beyond the 60 credits outlined in the major will not count toward graduation.

Studio Art Credit Summary: B.A., B.F.A., B.F.A.–A.H.

 

B.A.

B.F.A.

B.F.A.–A.H.

ARTS 101

3

3

Not
Required

Studio Art Foundation Courses: ARTS 102, 103, and 106

9

9

9

Tier I Studio Art Courses: ARTS 104, 105, 116, 233, or 243

3

6

3

ARTS 300: Studio 15

3

3

0

Tier II Studio Art Courses: ARTS 202, 203, 206, 208, 213, 214, 223, 290, 324, 328, or 358

3

6

3

Tier III Studio Art Courses: ARTS 302, 303, 305, 307, 313, 314, 338, 348, 356, 402, 403, 405, 407, 410, 413, 415, 416, 417, 418, 423, 428, 493, 515, 590, or 636

3

9

3

Studio Art Electives: Any Tier I, II, or III courses or first-year seminar or an internship. Only three credits of honors thesis can count in the B.A. major. B.A. students may include an art history course and ARTS 500. B.F.A. majors can include an additional art history course. B.F.A.–A.H. majors must include studio classes but can count honors thesis credits here.

12

15

12

Art History Courses

 

 

 

B.F.A.: Two art history courses, one must have contemporary focus. B.F.A.–A.H.: Nine art history courses (two art history surveys, plus seven courses numbered from 200 to 699, two of which must be numbered above 400)

X

6

27

ARTS 500: Senior Seminar
(offered spring semester only)

X

3

3

Total Credit Hours

36

60

60

Minoring in Studio Art

Students majoring in another department may elect to pursue a minor in studio art. The minor consists of five courses at different levels. Students minoring in studio art may choose from a broad selection of courses including drawing, painting, ceramics, sculpture, print-making, digital media, special topics, mixed media, and photography. Art history majors may not pursue a studio art minor.

The undergraduate minor in studio art consists of five courses (15 credit hours).

Note: Students MUST have appropriate prerequisites to take upper-level courses. Be sure to check the courses in each level to determine the appropriate courses to take in Tiers I and II. You may have to take an additional course to satisfy these requirements.

Additional Information for Studio Art Majors

Credit by Examination

Students who fulfill the studio art portfolio requirements for the Advanced Placement (AP) examination and earn a score of 4 or 5 will receive credit for ARTS 102, 103, or 104. Students who score a 3 can petition to waive relevant prerequisites via portfolio review, although no course credit will be given (see the undergraduate advisor in studio art). Students earning a score of 6 or higher on the International Baccalaureate (IB) portfolio will be granted three credits for ARTS 104. Students who score a 5 on the IB may petition for a portfolio review to determine if they can exempt ARTS 102 or 104.

Advanced Placement by Portfolio Review

Art majors who have broad experience in visual art may petition to exempt foundation requirements by submitting to a portfolio review. If the review is successful, students do not receive credit for these courses; rather, the credit hours are redistributed to the studio concentration or elective requirement of the major. Portfolio requirements are modeled after the College Board Advanced Placement portfolio guidelines. These guidelines are available from the undergraduate advisor for studio art, the director of undergraduate studies in studio art or on the art majors' Sakai site.

Independent Study

Students may pursue independent study coursework with individual faculty members. Such work may be undertaken only with the permission of the sponsoring faculty member and is appropriate only after the typical sequence of courses has been completed. Students should consult individual faculty members prior to registration to secure permission. New guidelines for independent study require a proposal and a contract to be approved by the director of undergraduate studies before students may enroll. The independent study syllabus and contract are available on the art majors' Sakai site. The syllabus details the steps for securing permission for independent study. Since faculty are limited to supervising only two independent study students each semester, students are strongly advised to contact the faculty member whom they wish to work with early in the registration period for the upcoming semester.

Independent study work requires a minimum of three hours per week per credit hour. For example, a typical three-credit-hour class would require at least nine hours of work per week. Once the semester begins, students must meet with the faculty member initially to confirm goals, review expectations, and establish semester deadlines. Thereafter, students must meet regularly to review work in progress, with a suggested biweekly frequency. Total time spent in direct interaction with the faculty member for the semester must average 45 minutes per week. This may be in the form of face-to-face meetings, blog or email exchanges, or group critiques with other independent study students and their advisors.

Honors in Studio Art

The honors program in studio art is designed to provide senior majors an opportunity to pursue serious and substantial work culminating in a senior honors project. Successful completion of the project qualifies the student to graduate with honors or with highest honors. Studio art majors with a grade point average of 3.3 or above are eligible for consideration. Admission to the studio art honors program is determined by a review of work by a designated faculty committee. For this review students must submit the following materials:

The work must demonstrate a mature capability to perform visual research. These reviews are scheduled each spring, in early April, for rising seniors.

Students who will be studying abroad or are otherwise not in residence during the scheduled review period must make alternate arrangements to submit an application and work samples for honors study. This may be done via a digital portfolio.

Once accepted as a studio art honors candidate, students enroll in the honors courses (ARTS 691H in the fall and ARTS 692H in the spring) through the student services assistant. These credit hours are applied toward the concentration. All studio honors students must exhibit their honors project work in the Honors Exhibition scheduled for the June and John Allcott Gallery or in an approved alternate venue. Specific requirements for the honors project and a schedule of departmental and University deadlines are issued at the time of acceptance into the studio honors program and are available on the studio art majors' Sakai site.

Advising

All studio art majors have a primary academic advisor in Steele Building. Students are strongly encouraged to meet regularly with their advisor and review their Tar Heel Tracker each semester. The department's director of undergraduate studies and undergraduate advisor work with current and prospective majors by appointment.

The studio area also holds general advising sessions prior to registration each semester. Additionally, special informational sessions are held periodically to guide students on awards, study abroad, internships, and research opportunities (especially the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships). These sessions are announced on the art majors listserv and Sakai site, as well as by posters in the Hanes Art Center and Art Lab.

Studio Art Courses and Nonmajors

Studio art courses, especially foundation courses (ARTS 102, 103, and 106) and courses without prerequisites (100-level), are extremely popular. Because foundation courses are required for studio art majors, registration is limited to majors during the first part of the preregistration period. Remaining spaces are made available to nonmajors during the registration period for first-year students. Because the department gives this preference to studio art majors, nonmajors, undeclared students, or continuing study students often find it difficult to enroll in these courses. Individuals seriously considering a studio art major and experiencing such difficulty should see the undergraduate advisor for studio art. We reserve a small number of spaces for such students. Students may be asked to demonstrate a commitment to studio art with some examples of artwork.

ART courses were renumbered under two new subject codes, ARTH (art history courses) and ARTS (studio art courses). The listing of ARTS courses below includes the former ART numbers in brackets.

ARTS (Studio Art Courses)

50 [ART 50] First-Year Seminar: The Artistic Temperament (3). Class examines how to advance and sustain artistic production, focusing not only on being a successful artist, but also on the importance of creativity and hard work in any successful venture.

57 [ART 57] First-Year Seminar: Narrative Sight/Site (3). A mixed media course investigating visual storytelling.

58 [ART 58] First-Year Seminar: Book Art (3). The book as a structural format for expression has a long history in visual arts. We will address aspects of the book that function visually, considering both design and content.

59 [ART 59] First-Year Seminar: Time, A Doorway to Visual Expression (3). This class will study one of the lesser considered, but most intriguing, visual components: the element of time.

75 [ART 75] First-Year Seminar: Stories in Sight: The Narrative Image (3). This class looks at the theory and practice of telling stories through photographs.

78 [ART 78] First-Year Seminar: The Visual Culture of Photography (3). This course will investigate how photography is inextricably entwined in our lives and histories.

82 [ART 82] First-Year Seminar: Please Save This: Exploring Personal Histories through Visual Language (3). This class will investigate the idea of personal histories in visual art. As a studio class, the course will be organized around several art making projects. As a catalyst to our own art making, we will explore the idea of personal history and memory through readings, as well as looking at contemporary artists whose work functions in an autobiographical framework.

89 [ART 89] First-Year Seminar: Special Topics (3). Content varies by semester.

101 [ART 101] Idea and Form (3). This course will explore concepts of making art in both practice and in theory. Driven by foundational theoretical texts that have influenced 20th-century art and culture, the course explores art as content and meaning, and art's relationship to form, everyday life, and visual culture.

102 [ART 102] Core Concepts: Image (3). Studio course investigates concepts and strategies of two-dimensional image making. Introduces design elements of visual language (line, shape, value, texture, color). Considers the cultural codes that accompany visual information and how they combine with organizational structures to determine a variety of effects, influence responses, and inform meaning. Foundation requirement for studio majors.

103 [ART 103] Core Concepts: Space (3). Studio course introduces concepts and strategies of working in three dimensions. Project-based coursework develops understanding of ideation process and creative problem solving. Ideas about sculpture are further expanded by considering works by contemporary artists. Students develop aesthetic sensibility, analytical capacity, and fundamental skills in sculptural media. Foundation requirement for studio majors.

104 [ART 104] Basic Drawing and Composition (3). Working out of an observational tradition, this course provides an introduction to the concepts and techniques of drawing. Paying attention to both representation and interpretation, the course is designed to develop fundamental skills, aesthetic sensibility, analytical capacity, and creative problem solving in two-dimensional media.

105 [ART 105] Basic Photography (3). Focusing on creative digital and analog photography, this course provides an introduction to the concepts and techniques of lens-based media.

106 [ART 106] Core Concepts: Time (3). This foundation course introduces concepts and techniques of temporal art making. Through projects designed to develop an understanding of the creative language unique to digital media, students will learn various software programs and basic digital strategies to realize time-based works of art. Foundation requirement for studio majors.

116 Introduction to Web Media (3). Basic computer skills required. This course investigates the emergence of Web, interactive, and mobile technologies as artistic tools, communication technologies, and cultural phenomena. Students will design and produce interactive Web sites. The course covers principles of Web-based programming and design via HTML and CSS.

202 [ART 202] Painting I (3). Prerequisites, ARTS 102 and 104. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. Introduction to the techniques of two-dimensional thought and process through the application of various painting media.

203 [ART 203] Sculpture I (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 103. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Introduction to the techniques of three-dimensional thought and process through the application of the various sculpture media.

206 [ART 206] Intermediate Electronic Media (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 106. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Continuation of ARTS 106.

208 [ART 208] Print Survey (3). Prerequisites, ARTS 102 and 104. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. Introduction to four basic approaches to printmaking: intaglio, relief, planographic, and stencil processes. Students will explore creative strategies unique to the printed process.

213 [ART 213] Ceramic Sculpture I (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 103. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. An investigation of clay as a sculptural medium; developing technical skills, aesthetic awareness, and historical perspective.

214 [ART 214] Life Drawing I (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 104. Development of proficiency in figure drawing through the use of various drawing and painting materials (study from the model).

223 [ART 223] Life Sculpture (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 103. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Conceptual investigation of the figure and issues of the body through the combined use of various sculptural materials.

233 [ART 233] Wood Sculpture (3). This class examines wood sculpture from both a technical and intuitive perspective. Students are taught woodworking skills and are then encouraged to use these skills to discover their creative potential.

243 [ART 243] Metal Sculpture (3). This class examines metal sculpture from both a technical and intuitive perspective. Students are taught metalworking skills and are then encouraged to use these skills to discover their creative potential.

290 [ART 290] Special Topics in Studio Art (3). Required preparation, any introductory studio art course or permission of the instructor. Selected topics in studio art.

300 [ART 300] Studio 15: Art Majors Seminar (3). Prerequisites, ARTS 101, 102, 103, and 106. Required for studio art majors with at least 15 hours of course work in the major. This class addresses questions of artistic identity and professional development for the art major.

302 [ART 302] Intermediate Painting (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 202. Continuation of ARTS 202.

303 [ART 303] Intermediate Sculpture (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 203. Continuation of ARTS 203.

305 [ART 305] Intermediate Photography (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 105. Continuation of ARTS 105.

307 [ART 307] Mixed Media Seminar (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 103 or 104. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Work produced in this class crosses media boundaries. Students consider the codedness of media and stylistic approaches and how these mediate specific content ideas as determined from specific readings.

313 [ART 313] Intermediate Ceramic Sculpture (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 213. Continuation of ARTS 213.

314 [ART 314] Life Drawing II (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 214. Continuation of ARTS 214.

324 [ART 324] Intermediate Drawing (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 104. Continuation of ARTS 104.

328 [ART 328] Screen Printing (3). Prerequisites, ARTS 102 and 104. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. An intermediate studio course focused on creating stencil-based print images. Students explore a range of technical approaches and will investigate art making concepts specific to screen printing as well as the intersections of screen printing with other two-dimensional art forms.

337 The Aesthetics of Junk (3). From Dada to Art Brut to Mix-tape, this course experiments with assemblage (accumulations of things forming a new whole) and destruction (taking apart and reconfiguring a thing). This course addresses issues of collage as both object and action, playing in the intersection of experimental theatre and design of mass-produced objects.

338 [ART 338] Intaglio and Relief Printmaking (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 208. Continuation of ARTS 208, with emphasis on intaglio and relief.

348 [ART 348] Lithography (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 208. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Lithography is an intermediate printmaking class. The course provides basic technical introduction to stone and plate lithography. Students will investigate artistic strategies to forge visual literacy in print media.

356 [ART 356] Introduction to Digital Photography (3). Exploration of the transition of photography from traditional darkroom processes to digital formats. Includes methods of interpretation, analysis of images, scanning, retouching, color correction, basic composition, and inkjet printing.

358 Letterpress (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 208. This class explores the concepts and craft of letterpress printing. Technical skills include typesetting, linoleum carving, and digital interfaces for making image and text matrices. Projects explore the special relationship of image and word and are designed around specific text/image forms: broadside, poster, portfolio, and book.

368 Intermediate Printmaking (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 208. This course continues an investigation of print techniques and concepts. Projects develop an understanding of print strategies, focusing on the affordances of processes unique to printmaking. This approach positions traditional techniques as a point of departure for seeking an expanded definition of printmaking.

390 [ART 390] Special Topics in Studio Art (3). Required preparation, any intermediate studio art course or permission of the instructor. Selected topics.

402 [ART 402] Advanced Painting (1–6). Prerequisite, ARTS 302. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Continuation of ARTS 302. May be repeated for credit.

403 [ART 403] Advanced Sculpture (1–6). Prerequisite, ARTS 303. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Continuation of ARTS 303. May be repeated for credit.

405 [ART 405] Color Photography (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 105. The class will focus on lectures, readings, technical demonstrations, and visual assignments investigating color photography. Students will be responsible for completing a series of photographic assignments. Emphasis will be placed on intensive final projects.

407 [ART 407] Body Imaging (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 102. Required preparation, one intermediate ARTS class or permission of the instructor. Work is made through close examination and analysis of the human "body." Work may be made using any technical or theoretical approach. Required readings provide a conceptual grounding.

410 [ART 410] Public Art (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 302, 303, or 305. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This studio class explores public art from historical and critical perspective. Students will propose and create works of public art. Opportunities to implement projects will be explored through the Department of Art and other resources.

413 [ART 413] Advanced Ceramic Sculpture (1–6). Prerequisite, ARTS 313. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Continuation of ARTS 313. May be repeated for credit.

415 [ART 415] Conceptual-Experimental Photography (3). An advanced photography course for students interested in contemporary photographic practices, critical theory, art history, and experimental processes: theory and practice, formal and conceptual investigations, and historical and contemporary strategies will all be given equal attention.

416 [ART 416] Video Art (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 106. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. An introduction to the creative and technical processes in producing video art. Students will shoot and edit their own independent video projects. Some class time will be devoted to viewing video art and other media-based work.

417 [ART 417] Advanced Mixed Media Projects (3). Cultural production and practice, theory, and criticism. Pursuit of individual visual projects, formally and conceptually, through theoretical, poetic, art historical, and autobiographical texts, critiques, collaboration, and discussion using all media.

418 [ART 418] Advanced Printmaking (1–6). Prerequisites, ARTS 208 and any two of 328, 338, or 348. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. This course is appropriate for students who have had a minimum of three semesters of prior printmaking experience. Students submit a proposal outlining technical and artistic goals for the semester.

423 [ART 423] Installation (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 303. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This class explores art that encompasses its audience. Conceptual motivations as well as practical realities of dealing with a specific three-dimensional space will be considered.

426 Two-Dimensional Computer Animation (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 106. Familiarity with basic computer skills and drawing required. Explores concepts and techniques of two-dimensional animation, including conceptualization with storyboards, pencil testing and timing animation, animating sequences with Photoshop, experimenting with color and compositing using After Effects. Emphasis placed on developing ideas though experimental practices, combining traditional and digital animation processes.

428 [ART 428] Book Art (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 102. Required preparation, one additional two-dimensional studio course (drawing, photography, or printmaking). Defining the book as a "multiple and sequential picture plane," this course considers a range of traditional approaches and conceptual departures of the book as a format for creative expression.

490 [ART 490] Special Topics in Studio Art (3). Required preparation, any intermediate studio art course or permission of the instructor. Advanced consideration of selected topics in studio art.

493 Studio Art Practicum or Internship (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 300. Recommended for juniors or seniors. Allows studio art majors to pursue unpaid practicums or internships for credit. Examples include working as a studio assistant or working in art-related fields, such as galleries, design firms, architectural firms, and nonprofit arts organizations. Work undertaken must comply with Federal criteria governing unpaid internships.

500 [ART 500] Senior Seminar (3). Restricted to senior studio art majors. This course is the capstone course for the studio art major. Topics covered include issues of professional development, curatorial practice, and presentation of works of art in exhibition. The culminating project is mounting the Senior Exhibition.

515 [ART 515] Advanced Photography (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 305. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. May be repeated for credit.

526 Three-Dimensional Animation (3). Prerequisite, ARTS 106. The primary goals of this class are to introduce three-dimensional computer modeling and animation in Maya. The course covers a broad range of creative applications including special effects, compositing with video, and motion graphics. Students will produce a short three-dimensional animation as their final project.

596 [ART 590] Independent Study in Studio Art (1–9). Permission of the instructor. For students wishing to pursue additional media or thematic study beyond the advanced level. Students register with section numbers designated for faculty. May be repeated for credit.

636 [ART 406] Interactive Media (COMM 636) (3). See COMM 636 for description.

691H [ART 691H] Honors in Studio Art (3). Permission of the instructor. Independent research directed by a faculty member leading to an honors thesis.

692H [ART 692H] Honors in Studio Art (3). Permission of the instructor. Independent research directed by a faculty member leading to an honors thesis.

Special Opportunities in Art

Departmental Involvement

The extracurricular programs in studio art are significant experiences for all studio art students outside of regular class structures. Students have opportunities to see and interact with professional artists and their work through exhibition in the Allcott Galleries, installations of sculptural works in the Alumni Sculpture Garden, artist-in-residence programs, and the Hanes Visiting Artist Lecture Series.

The Undergraduate Art Association (UAA) is a social and professional club aimed at extracurricular experiences in studio art. The Art History Liaisons is the undergraduate art history group. Kappa Pi is the art majors honors society which includes both studio and art history majors. These groups serve as an important link between the majors and the department's administration. The department utilizes these organizations to facilitate communication about matters of interest, including participation in departmental initiatives or other extracurricular opportunities. The UAA and Kappa Pi sponsor several student-initiated events (exhibitions, competitions, speakers, film screenings, social gatherings) throughout the year and may participate in the planning and programming for the John and June Allcott Undergraduate Gallery. The Liaisons group sponsors events of interest to art historians and often serves as a link between the majors and the Student Friends of the Ackland Art Museum. For more information about any of these groups and their activities, contact the current club presidents listed on the Department of Art's Web page or the undergraduate coordinator in art history or studio art.

Internships

Students are encouraged to pursue internships at local, regional, or national arts institutions. Information about internship opportunities is available in the department office. Just as with independent study, students must have internships preapproved and under contract before enrolling for ARTS 493 Studio Art Practicum or Internship.

Study Abroad

Studio art students are encouraged to pursue study abroad opportunities. While there are many opportunities to study art abroad, the Department of Art maintains a special affiliation with the Studio Art Centers International (SACI) in Florence, Italy, and the Glasgow School of Art in Scotland. Students should discuss their study abroad plans with the director of undergraduate studies in studio art to obtain prior approval for courses taken abroad. Basically, courses that have an equivalent in the UNC–Chapel Hill curriculum usually are approved. Courses that fall outside the UNC–Chapel Hill curriculum must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

Undergraduate Awards

Undergraduate Scholarship Awards in Studio Art

A competition each November encourages studio art majors to submit up to four works to be considered for the following scholarships: The Alexander Julian Prize (one award to our best student), the Sharpe Scholarships (multiple awards for students receiving financial aid), George Kachergis Studio Art Scholarships (multiple awards chosen by a student-designated committee), the Anderson Award, and the Penland School of Craft Scholarships (covers expenses for a summer course at the Penland School of Craft). Awards range from a minimum of $500 to $3,000.

Alumni Sculpture Garden Commission

The Department of Art annually commissions new works for the Alumni Sculpture Garden. Exceptional students are nominated by faculty and given the opportunity to propose a substantial project. Most projects are sculptural but can be experimental, temporary perfomative works, projections, or other projects that utilize the Alumni Sculpture Garden spaces around the Hanes Art Center. Students submit a proposal that is evaluated and approved by a faculty-designated panel. Students wishing to be considered for the commission will indicate their interest during the Undergraduate Studio Art Awards Competition. A group of students will be selected and paid an honorarium to develop design proposals at that time.

Undergraduate Research

Opportunities for undergraduate research in the Department of Art exist in several forms. Detailed descriptions and application guidelines are available on the art majors' Sakai site and from the student services representative in the Department of Art office.

Allcott Travel Fellowships support two summer research projects in studio art and/or art history.

The Pearman Fund supports special projects in both art history and studio art. Competitions for art history research funds are held in the fall and the spring. Studio art students may request funds for special projects by submitting a proposal to the director of undergraduate studies in studio art. Awards are generally $500 or less.

The James Boyd Gadson Summer Fellowships in Studio Art award up to $3,000 for studio art research projects. These are specially designated Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF) administered through the UNC Office for Undergraduate Research. SURF applications from studio art majors are automatically considered for the Gadson Fellowships. This fund typically supports at least two awards. Application deadlines (usually in February) are set by the Office for Undergraduate Research. Students interested in pursuing summer research should contact faculty sponsors toward the end of the fall semester.

The Jacquelyn Friedman and Marvin Saltzman Fund in Art provides supplemental monies for painting supplies for students who for economic reasons may be hindered from working to their full potential. Any undergraduate student with need, regardless of major, enrolled in a Department of Art painting class during the fall and/or spring semesters is eligible. Students should see their course instructor for further information.

Facilities

The department possesses outstanding facilities for the teaching of both art history and studio art in the Hanes Art Center. The building houses state-of-the-art facilities for image projection required in art history. Specialized classrooms for art practice include large studios for painting, drawing, and mixed media. A dedicated space is available for installation projects. The John C. Henry Studio is a wonderfully spacious 3,325 square foot laboratory providing ambient work space for a variety of printmaking processes. Studios for photography include both wet (black and white and color) and digital photography and a dedicated shooting studio. The digital laboratories at UNC–Chapel Hill are Mac-based, with the most current software needed for work in photography (including large-scale output), video, and digital/electronic media. Students enrolled in studio art classes have 24-hour access to these laboratories. In addition, the 17,686 square-foot Art Lab, located 1.8 miles north of the Hanes Art Center (108 Airport Drive), houses the department's sculpture facilities.

Department of Art resources also include the Joseph C. Sloane Art Library with its collection of 100,000 volumes, which is supplemented by the University's Academic Affairs Libraries, with holdings of more than six million volumes. The department's Visual Resources Library contains 250,000 slides, 40,000 photographs, and 20,000 digitized images. The University's Ackland Art Museum is located adjacent to the Hanes Art Center. The Ackland's programming regularly augments the educational experience of the University community.

The John and June Allcott Galleries in the Hanes Art Center are the sites for numerous exhibitions throughout the year. The main gallery has an exhibition schedule of 12 to 15 shows each year, including the annual award and graduation shows of undergraduate work as well as work by professional artists, faculty members, and graduate students. The John and June Allcott Undergraduate Gallery is the exhibition space designed especially for work produced or chosen by undergraduate students. The Alumni Sculpture Garden occupies the grounds surrounding the Hanes Art Center. Temporary exhibitions of sculpture are commissioned by the department and are on display for a two-year period. Commissions are awarded annually to undergraduate and graduate students.

UNC–Chapel Hill's location affords easy access to several regional art venues, including the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh, the Green Hill Center in Greensboro, and the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art in Winston-Salem. Additionally, the Center for Documentary Studies, the Nasher Museum at Duke University, and the Weatherspoon Museum at UNC–Greensboro offer expanded opportunities to view art in the immediate area. Several smaller galleries and alternative exhibition spaces in the Triangle region also offer regular opportunities to see contemporary art. In particular, Lump Gallery and the Contemporary Art Museum in Raleigh have hosted exceptional exhibitions. The rich museum and gallery scene in Washington, DC, is about a four-and-a-half-hour drive. Flights to New York are relatively inexpensive from the Raleigh-Durham airport.

Contact Information

Department of Art, CB# 3405, 101 Hanes Art Center, (919) 962-2015. Web site: art.unc.edu.