Department of Exercise and Sport Science

exss.unc.edu

209 Fetzer Hall, CB# 8700; (919) 962-2021

DARIN A. PADUA, Chair

Introduction

Exercise and sport science examines the physics, physiology, and psychology of sport and exercise, the recognition and treatment of athletic injuries, and the administration of athletics. The general major provides foundational courses in exercise science. The athletic training program within the Department of Exercise and Sport Science can prepare students to work as a certified athletic trainer for high school, college, or professional sports teams. Students interested in sport administration can build a foundation in the management of sport. Sport administration career options include almost anything related to amateur, interscholastic, or professional sports. The fitness professional program is designed to prepare students for careers in a variety of health-related fields, including but not limited to entry-level positions in the health-fitness industry; personal training of amateur, professional, and recreational athletes; exercise therapy for a range of clinical conditions; or graduate study in exercise physiology. Other career options for majors include strength-conditioning coach for an athletic team; exercise research within the athletic, medical, or pharmaceutical industries; or fitness club entrepreneur. By choosing additional courses, students can apply to schools of physical therapy, occupational therapy, public health, nursing, or medicine.

The overall mission of the Department of Exercise and Sport Science is to discover and promote knowledge of human movement to improve quality of life.

Exercise and Sport Science

Major, B.A.–General

Core Requirements

Additional Requirements

A minimum of 18 hours in the nine required courses for the major must be completed with a grade of C or better (not a C average). A maximum of 45 hours of EXSS courses may be applied toward the B.A. degree.

Exercise and Sport Science Major, B.A.–Athletic Training

Students seeking the major in exercise and sport science–athletic training (EXSS–AT) must complete the following departmental requirements in addition to required General Education courses:

Core Requirements

Additional Requirements

The undergraduate athletic training program is nationally accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). Students can become involved in athletic training at UNC–Chapel Hill as early as their first year, when they are assigned observational hours in Stallings Evans Sports Medicine Center. Students gain exposure to injury evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation while working under the supervision of certified athletic trainers. Students who wish to continue with athletic training as a career path should apply to the program during the fall semester of their sophomore year. Applications are due October 15.

Prerequisites include 1) a minimum of 50 observational hours, 2) successful completion (B grade minimum) of EXSS 175 Human Anatomy and 288 Emergency Care of Injuries and Illness by the end of the fall semester of the sophomore year, and 3) a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75.

Interested students should attend an organizational meeting held on the first Tuesday of every semester at 7:00 p.m. in Room 106 Fetzer Hall. For more information, interested students can access the athletic training Web site at exss.unc.edu/undergraduate-program/ba-in-exss/athletic-training or contact Dr. Meredith Petschauer at (919) 962-1110, mbusby@email.unc.edu.

Exercise and Sport Science

Major, B.A.–Fitness Professional

Students seeking the major in exercise and sport science–fitness professional (EXSS–FP) must complete the following departmental requirements in addition to required General Education courses:

Core Requirements

Additional Requirements

The goal of the fitness professional program is to prepare students to assume roles as leaders in the fitness field and the area of fitness research. The blend of theoretical coursework and practical experience will assist the student in preparing for career opportunities and national fitness certifications.

Suggested Course Sequencing

EXSS 220, 273, 288, and 385 may be taken at any point in the major. Other required EXSS courses have prerequisites due to the building-block nature of the academic material.

First Year

Second Year

Third Year

Fourth Year

Interested students should attend the organizational meeting held approximately two to four weeks before spring and fall registration begins. The exact date/time/place will be posted in Fetzer Hall and online. For more information, interested students can also access the fitness professional Web site at exss.unc.edu/undergraduate-program/ba-in-exss/fitness-professional or contact Mr. Alain Aguilar at alaguila@email.unc.edu.

Exercise and Sport Science Major, B.A.–Sport Administration

Students seeking the major in exercise and sport science–sport administration (EXSS–SA) must complete the following requirements in addition to required General Education courses:

Core Requirements

Additional Requirements

Suggested Course Sequencing

Second Year

Third Year

Fourth Year

For more information, please contact Dr. Erianne Weight at eweight@email.unc.edu.

Coaching Education Minor

The minor in coaching education is by approval only and consists of five courses, distributed as follows:

*EXSS 288 requires EXSS 175 as a prerequisite. By approval from the department, students may replace EXSS 288 with an additional course from list four. Please see the department for details and eligibility.

For more information and to obtain an application, please contact Dr. Sherry Salyer at salyer@email.unc.edu.

Exercise and Sport Science Minor

The minor consists of five courses.

Core Requirements

Additional Requirements

Recreation Administration Minor

The minor consists of five required courses: EXSS 221; RECR 311, 420, 430, and 475.

Advising

All majors and minors have a primary academic advisor in Steele Building. Students are strongly encouraged to meet regularly with their advisor and review their Tar Heel Tracker each semester. In the Department of Exercise and Sport Science five faculty members serve as advisors with weekly office hours (see "Contact Information" below and on the Web site). The department communicates via a listserv, Facebook posts, tweets, blog posts, classroom "advising" visits, building bulletin boards/video boards, and the departmental Web site. Departmental academic advising is particularly important for those majors who are considering graduate school. Further information on courses, undergraduate research opportunities, the honors program, careers, and graduate schools may be obtained from the department's Web site.

Special Opportunities in Exercise and Sport Science

Honors in Exercise and Sport Science

The senior honors program provides exercise and sport science majors the opportunity to pursue an independent, two-semester research project. A student must have an overall grade point average of 3.3 or above prior to acceptance into the departmental honors program and must maintain an overall average of 3.3 or above to remain in the program. Students complete EXSS 693H and 694H. Honors study involves the completion of a substantial piece of original research and the formal oral presentation of the results. Those successfully completing the program are awarded their degree with either honors or highest honors. Previous senior honors thesis topics and more information can be found on the EXSS department Web page. Please contact Dr. Meredith Petschauer at (919) 962-1110, mbusby@email.unc.edu, if you are interested.

Departmental Involvement

In addition to its academic offerings, the department houses the campus recreation program. Students may also affiliate with the Carolina Fitness Professionals Club, Carolina Sports Business Club, and the Student Athletic Trainers Association. The "Get Real and Heel" program, offering exercise and recreation therapy services to women with breast cancer, and the "Sport Concussion Research" program provide opportunities for qualified students to volunteer and gain valuable research experience.

Experiential Education

EXSS 51, 207, 323, 393, 493, 593, 693H, 694H, and RECR 420 satisfy the experiential education requirement.

Laboratory Teaching Internships and Assistantships

Athletic training students work with UNC–Chapel Hill sports teams and local high schools. The fitness professional students serve a practicum with local fitness organizations.

Study Abroad

The Department of Exercise and Sport Science currently offers summer study abroad programs in Montevideo, Uruguay, and Beijing, China. Refer to the department's Web site for more information. For other study abroad experiences the department will gladly work with its majors to determine appropriate credit.

Undergraduate Awards

The Patrick F. Earey Award, named in honor of a longtime faculty member, is given annually to the outstanding senior major in the department. The award signifies exemplary leadership, academic achievement, and extracurricular involvement by a senior exercise and sport science major.

The Ronald W. Hyatt Scholarship, named in honor of the late Dr. Hyatt, one of Carolina's "priceless gems" and a faculty member in the department, is a merit-based scholarship awarded annually to an outstanding full-time undergraduate exercise and sport science major with junior status.

The EXSS Scholar Athlete Award is a merit-based award recognizing outstanding scholarship of a senior student athlete majoring in exercise and sport science.

Undergraduate Research

Students are encouraged to explore research interests by completing independent research studies and senior honors theses. For a few highly motivated and dedicated individuals, working with faculty on faculty research projects is possible.

Facilities

In addition to classroom space and physical activity area, Fetzer Hall houses several well-equipped research and teaching laboratories:

  1. The Applied Physiology Laboratory is fully equipped to measure metabolism, body composition, and aerobic fitness. Additionally, it houses a chemistry laboratory to study the biochemistry of exercise.

  2. The Cadaver Anatomy Laboratory is designed to teach cadaver dissection in order to gain a greater knowledge about how the human body works in an athletic environment.

  3. The Exercise Science Teaching Laboratory was specifically designed for teaching exercise science laboratory experiences as well as clinical exercise testing experiences.

  4. The Sports Medicine Research Laboratory, equipped with the latest equipment to investigate athletic injuries related to the biomechanics and kinesiology of movement, offers as its primary research focus the prevention and treatment of athletic-related injuries.

  5. The Neuromuscular Control Laboratory is designed for the investigation of neuromuscular and biomechanical factors associated with musculoskeletal/orthopedic injury and disease, including joint stability, muscle mechanics, neuromuscular control, motion analysis, and postural stability.

  6. The CPR laboratory is a teaching laboratory for CPR and first aid skills. The laboratory is equipped with mannequins, AED trainers, and first aid equipment.

  7. The Exercise Oncology Laboratory is equipped with the latest technology for the assessment of cardiorespiratory and pulmonary function, body composition, cognitive function, electrocardiogram monitoring capability, and evaluation of heart rate coherence and heart rate variability in oncology patients.

  8. Through its clinical and research initiatives, the Matthew Gfeller Sport-Related Traumatic Brain Injury Research Center demonstrates its commitment to providing the highest level of care for athletes of all ages suffering from sport-related brain injuries, and to assisting parents, coaches, and medical professionals in managing these athletes.

  9. The Athletic Training Teaching Laboratory is designed for students to practice evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation skills. It is equipped with treatment tables, evaluation tools, rehabilitation supplies such as foam rollers, exercises balls, and taping supplies.

Graduate School and Career Opportunities

Many undergraduate exercise and sport science majors are preparing for graduate work in related areas: exercise physiology, physical therapy, sports medicine, nutrition, athletic training, sports administration/management, etc. They will be well-prepared for master's and doctoral programs at major universities. Numerous opportunities exist for graduate assistantships in these areas at UNC–Chapel Hill and other large universities. Numerous career opportunities exist in a variety of fields directly related to sport and exercise. Some graduates go directly into health/fitness/sport-related employment. Others attend professional schools or pursue advanced academic degrees.

Faculty

Professors

Kevin M. Guskiewicz, Anthony C. Hackney, Bonita L. Marks, Joseph B. Myers, Darin A. Padua, William E. Prentice.

Associate Professors

Claudio L. Battaglini, J. Troy Blackburn, Diane G. Groff, Barbara J. Osborne, Edgar W. Shields Jr.

Assistant Professors

Coyte G. Cooper, Erik Hanson, Kristen L. Kucera, Jason P. Mihalik, Brian G. Pietrosimone, Nels Popp, Johna Register-Mihalik, Eric D. Ryan, Abbie E. Smith-Ryan, Erianne A. Weight.

Adjunct Professors

John Anderson, Robert C. Cantu, Michael T. Gross, Timothy N. Taft, Bing Yu.

Adjunct Associate Professors

Michael D. Lewek, Vicki Mercer, Prudence Plummer, Deborah Thorpe.

Adjunct Assistant Professors

Elizabeth G. Hedgpeth, Daniel N. Hooker.

Teaching Professor

Sherry L. Salyer.

Senior Lecturer

Meredith A. Petschauer.

Lecturers

Alain J. Aguilar, Rebecca L. Battaglini, Robert Malekoff, Debra C. Murray, Deborah J. Southall, Deborah L. Stroman.

Professors Emeriti

M. Deborah Bialeschki, John E. Billing, Robert G. McMurray, Frederick O. Mueller, Francis Pleasants Jr.

Contact Information

Professor Sherry Salyer, Director of Undergraduate Studies, CB# 8700, 211 Fetzer Hall, (919) 962-6947, salyer@email.unc.edu. Web site: exss.unc.edu.

Courses

EXSS–Exercise and Sport Science

EXSS 50 First-Year Seminar: Discrimination and Sport (3). This course will examine the American ethos by looking at those who have been discriminated against in sport because of race, gender, sexual orientation, or disability.

EXSS 51 First-Year Seminar: Entrepreneurship in Human Performance and Sport (3). This course will provide students an introduction to the practical entrepreneurial business tools for starting a new business (or for use in an existing organization) in the human performance and/or sport industry.

EXSS 141 Personal Health (3). Elective, open to all students. This course examines basic wellness concepts in the areas of physical fitness, nutrition, disease prevention, mental health, drug abuse, and human sexuality. Emphasis is on the individual's responsibility for his/her own health.

EXSS 175 Human Anatomy (3). The study of the structure of the human body with special emphasis on the musculoskeletal, articular, and nervous systems. Prosected cadaver materials are utilized to study the skeletal muscles and body viscera.

EXSS 180 Physical Activity in Contemporary Society (3). An examination of the role of physical activity/inactivity on the health and well-being of American society.

EXSS 181 Sport Psychology (3). A comprehensive introduction to psychological and sociological factors that relate to sport involvement and performance. Issues include psychological aspects of elite athletes, motivation and performance, intervention and performance enhancement, anxiety and skill performance, racial and gender discrimination in sport, and violence in sport.

EXSS 191 Theory and Practice of Modern Dance Technique–Elementary-Level Elective. (3). Prerequisite, PHYA 224. An intensive study of modern dance technique and philosophy, focusing on the physical principles of movement and their choreographic application. One hour seminar and four and one-half hours laboratory.

EXSS 205 Analysis of Sport Skills I (3). A professional preparation course in the skills, knowledge, safety, and teaching progressions of basketball, track and field, and softball/baseball.

EXSS 206 Analysis of Sport Skills II (3). A professional preparation course in the skills, knowledge, safety, and teaching progressions of soccer, tennis, and volleyball.

EXSS 207 Coaching Principles (3). A professional preparation course for teaching and coaching. Includes basic instruction in coaching education and principles, pedagogy for coaching, conditioning for athletes, and team building.

EXSS 208 Health and Physical Education in the Elementary School (3). This course deals with methods and materials of health and physical education in school levels kindergarten through sixth grade. Required of elementary education majors. Does not count toward physical education major.

EXSS 210 Physical Education for the Elementary School–Kindergarten through Sixth Grade (3). This course deals with methods and materials of physical education in school levels kindergarten through the sixth grade.

EXSS 211 Adapted Physical Education (3). A study of problems related to body mechanics and the needs of the physically handicapped student.

EXSS 220 Fitness Management (3). Students develop a working knowledge of theories, principles, and operating procedures involved in managing programs, staff, and facilities in the health/fitness industry, including management, marketing, operations, legal aspects.

EXSS 221 Introduction to Sport and Recreation Administration (3). In this course, students are introduced to the policies and problems of organizing and administering sport, recreation and physical education programs in public and private settings.

EXSS 223 International Sport Management (3). Because sport cuts across all international boundaries, students must understand the global implications of the sport industry. This course introduces students to the organization, governance, business activities, and intercultural issues in international sport.

EXSS 224 Sport Sales and Revenue Production Seminar (3). This course will analyze and produce skills essential to the revenue production and sales process commonly found in the sport business. In this class students will develop an understanding and appreciation for the sales and revenue-production process related to a sport franchise and/or organization.

EXSS 260 Women in Sports (WMST 163) (3). A broad based perspective of women's participation in sport including history of participation, physiological differences, and socio-cultural influences including work, politics, family, economics, and gender roles and identity.

EXSS 265 Fundamentals of Athletic Training (3). Prerequisites, EXSS 175 and 288. Permission of the instructor. This course is designed to introduce the undergraduate athletic training student to the athletic training profession and to provide the basic knowledge and skills necessary to recognize, evaluate, and treat injuries to the head and face, cervical spine, thoracic region, abdominal/urogenital region, and extremities.

EXSS 273 Research in Exercise and Sport Science (3). Prerequisite, MATH 110. An introduction to research in the fields of physical education, exercise, and sport science with emphasis on understanding and application of research findings.

EXSS 275L Human Anatomy Laboratory (1). Required preparation, a grade of B or better in EXSS 175. EXSS 275L is a basic human anatomy laboratory course designed to accompany EXSS 175. For students endeavoring to major in the allied health professions.

EXSS 276 Human Physiology (3). Prerequisite, EXSS 175. Instructor may approve equivalents for prerequisite. A lecture course in elementary physiology, covering the various systems of the body.

EXSS 288 Emergency Care of Athletic Injuries and Illnesses (3). Pre- or corequisite, EXSS 175. Theory and practice of basic first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and the acute care of athletic injuries.

EXSS 290 Special Topics in EXSS (3).

EXSS 291 Theory and Practice of Modern Dance Technique–Intermediate-Level Elective. (3). Prerequisite, EXSS 191. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. An intensive study of modern dance technique and philosophy, focusing on the physical principles of movement and their choreographic application. One hour seminar and four and one-half hours laboratory.

EXSS 322 Fundamentals of Sport Marketing (3). Prerequisite, EXSS 221. This course is designed to introduce students to marketing within the sport industry, including the unique aspects of the sport product and sport consumer markets.

EXSS 323 Sport Facility and Event Management (3). Prerequisite, EXSS 221. This course is designed to develop practical competencies necessary for effectively managing sport facilities and events while providing students with experiential learning opportunities inside and outside the classroom.

EXSS 324 Finance and Economics of Sport (3). Prerequisite, ECON 101. Recommended preparation, EXSS 221. This course provides an understanding of the financial and economic growth of sport, economic theory applied to the sport industry, and the basic principles and methods of sound fiscal control.

EXSS 326 Legal Aspects of Sport (3). Recommended preparation, EXSS 221. This course provides a foundation in general legal concepts and familiarizes students with those areas they are most likely to encounter as managers in the sports and fitness industry.

EXSS 328 Sport Business Venture (3). This course will provide students an introduction to practical entrepreneurial business tools for starting a new business (or for use in an existing organization) in the sport industry.

EXSS 350 Essentials of Corrective Exercise Training (3). Prerequisites, EXSS 175, 275L, and 276. This course provides students with knowledge and experience in designing corrective exercise programs. Students will learn to assess posture, movement quality, range of motion, and strength. Students will also learn to correct abnormalities exercises for various body parts. Knowledge will be gained via lecture and laboratory activities.

EXSS 360 Sports Nutrition (3). Prerequisite, EXSS 276 or NUTR 240. The role of nutrition in maximizing physical performance, promoting health, and controlling body weight. Includes individual nutritional assessments.

EXSS 366 Evaluation of Athletic Injuries (3). Prerequisites, EXSS 175, 265, and 288. This is an advanced athletic training course, designed to provide the athletic training student with knowledge and skills necessary to recognize and evaluate athletic injuries of the spine and extremities.

EXSS 367 Therapeutic Modalities (3). Prerequisites, EXSS 175, 265, 288, and 366. This is an advanced athletic training course, designed to provide the athletic training student with knowledge and skills necessary for treating injuries.

EXSS 368 Therapeutic Exercise and Rehabilitation (3). Prerequisites, EXSS 175, 265, 288, 366, and 367. This is an advanced athletic training course, designed to provide the athletic training student with knowledge and skills necessary for rehabilitating injuries.

EXSS 369 Athletic Training Seminar (3). Prerequisites, EXSS 175 and 288. A presentation of the historical and current perspectives of athletic training, including techniques for organizing and administering athletic training programs.

EXSS 370 General Medicine in Athletic Training (3). Prerequisites, EXSS 175, 265, 288, and 276. Advanced course focusing on understanding instrumentation used in assessing internal injury related to sport. Pharmacology, drug testing, psychosocial interventions, and selected emergency procedures pertaining to athletic injury are also presented.

EXSS 376 Physiological Basis of Human Performance (3). Prerequisites, EXSS 175, 276, and MATH 110. Instructor may approve equivalents for EXSS prerequisites. Students must take laboratory section along with class. The application of physiological principles to sport and physical activity. Both immediate and chronic adaptations to exercise are studied. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week.

EXSS 380 Neuromuscular Control and Learning (3). Prerequisite, EXSS 175. Instructor may approve equivalents for prerequisite. Provides introduction to neuromuscular factors controlling movement and acquisition of motor skills. Promotes application of neuromuscular control and motor learning principles to teaching of motor skills with application to rehabilitation and fields such as athletic training, physical therapy, and coaching.

EXSS 385 Biomechanics of Sport (3). Prerequisites, EXSS 175 and MATH 110. Instructor may approve equivalents for prerequisites. The study and analysis of human movement including fundamental aspects of the musculoskeletal and articular systems. Principles of biomechanics, including application to neuromuscular fitness activities, aerodynamics in sport, hydrodynamics, rotary motion, throw-like and push-like patterns, and analysis of projectiles.

EXSS 393 Athletic Training Clinical (1). Prerequisites, EXSS 175, 265, and 288. This field experience offers implementation of theories and practices of athletic training and sports medicine under the supervision of a certified athletic trainer.

EXSS 395 Undergraduate Research Course (1–3). Permission of the instructor. Majors only. Overall 3.0 grade point average required. Laboratory/research study addressing exercise and sport science questions. Requires final written report. Repeatable for six total credits.

EXSS 396 Independent Studies in Exercise and Sport Science Elective (1–3). Required preparation, any two EXSS courses with grades of B or better. Permission of the instructor. Individually designed in-depth study in an area of interest within exercise and sport science. Available to both majors and nonmajors under the supervision of selected EXSS faculty members.

EXSS 408 Theory and Application of Strength Training and Conditioning for Fitness Professionals (3). Prerequisites, EXSS 175 and 276. Instructor may approve equivalents for prerequisites. This is an intermediate- to upper-level course designed to provide students with theoretical and practical knowledge of the physiological, biomechanical, functional, and administrative aspects of designing and supervising conditioning programs for various populations.

EXSS 410L Exercise Testing (3). Prerequisites, EXSS 175, 276, and 376. This is an exercise testing laboratory course for hands-on training of methods and protocols for screening, evaluating, and prescribing exercise.

EXSS 412 Exercise Prescription (3). Prerequisites, EXSS 175, 276, and 376. Introductory course in the theoretical basis of exercise prescription, enabling students to develop safe and effective exercise programs for healthy and at-risk populations.

EXSS 475 Functional Anatomy (3). Prerequisites, EXSS 175, 276, and 385. This course provides an in-depth exploration of joint mechanics. It exposes students to motions of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine as well as the extremities, and relates these concepts to movement of the body during specific activities.

EXSS 478 Sports Performance Training (3). Prerequisites, EXSS 175 and 276. An upper-level course designed to provide students who have a fitness background with the theoretical and practical knowledge related to the Performance Enhancement Specialization for athletes of all ages.

EXSS 479 Performance Enhancement Specialization for Health Professionals (1). Prerequisites, EXSS 175, 276, 366, and 368. An upper-level course designed to provide students who have a health profession background with the theoretical and practical knowledge related to the Performance Enhancement Specialization for athletes.

EXSS 493 Field Experience in Sport Administration (1–3). Prerequisites, EXSS 221 and at least two of the following: 322, 323, 324, 326. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. This field experience offers implementation of theory and the practical application of sport administration in a sport organization worksite, under the direct supervision of a business professional.

EXSS 576 Exercise Endocrinology (3). Prerequisites, EXSS 175, 276, and 376. Advanced course examining the responses of the endocrine system to exercise and the adaptations that occur with exercise training. Provides the fundamentals necessary for exercise science and allied health science students to understand the integral role that the endocrine system plays in exercise.

EXSS 580 Neuromechanics of Human Movement (3). Prerequisites, EXSS 175, 380, and 385. This course explores interactions between the nervous and musculoskeletal systems via integration of concepts from neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, anatomy, neuromuscular control, and biomechanics. Topics include muscle mechanics, sensorimotor function, joint stability, movement disorders, neurocognition, and neuroplasticity following injury and disease. Course meetings involve both lecture and laboratory content.

EXSS 593 Practicum in Physical Fitness and Wellness (1–2). Prerequisites, EXSS 220, 385, 408, 410L, and 412. Recommended preparation, EXSS 360–site dependent. Current CPR certification and student liability insurance is required. Introductory practical experience to enable student to apply knowledge and skills in a worksite under direct supervision of certified professionals.

EXSS 693H Senior Honors Thesis (3). Prerequisite, EXSS 273. Required preparation, a cumulative grade point average meeting the University standard and permission of the department. Directed independent research under the supervision of a faculty advisor who teaches in the exercise and sport science curriculum.

EXSS 694H Senior Honors Thesis (3). Prerequisite, EXSS 273. Required preparation, a cumulative grade point average meeting the University standard and permission of the department. Preparation of an honors thesis and an oral examination on the thesis.

RECR–Recreation and Leisure Studies

RECR 50 First-Year Seminar (3). The seminar is designed to enable first-year students to work closely with senior professors in classes that enroll 20 students or fewer. See the directory of classes for specific offerings.

RECR 310 Women, Work, and Leisure (WMST 310) (3). Implications of the relationship between women and leisure from a lifestyle perspective and an analysis of the changing role of women and changing leisure concepts from a feminist perspective.

RECR 311 Recreation and Leisure in Society (3). An introduction to leisure studies and its various elements developed from historical, philosophical, and theoretical perspectives with a focus on the meanings of leisure in individual and community life.

RECR 370 Recreation Services across the Lifespan (3). An analysis of the issues that affect recreation programming for persons across the lifespan. Constraints associated with age, economics, and disabling conditions will be explored.

RECR 390 Selected Issues Seminar (1–12). Current issues, techniques, and research of a topical short-term nature are the focus of these seminars.

RECR 396 Independent Studies in RECR (1–12). Individual readings, research, and/or field study of a recreation issue, problem, service system, or activity pattern. The course may take the form of an independent study or seminar depending upon students' interests and enrollment.

RECR 420 Program Planning in Recreation Services (3). This experiential course covers the concepts and skills used in program planning. Students apply their program planning skills to real-life situations and implement a recreation program for a community agency.

RECR 430 Introduction to Leadership and Group Dynamics (3). An analysis of the techniques, methods, and motives of group and community leaders. Special attention is focused upon the roles of organizational structure, personnel policies, and in-service training programs.

RECR 440 Outdoor Recreation and Environmental Issues (3). A survey course taught from a psychosocial perspective addressing the roles of public and private agencies in meeting increased demand for outdoor recreation. Emphasizes the implications of environmental awareness on outdoor recreation.

RECR 470 Recreation and Leisure across the Lifespan (3). An analysis of aspects that affect recreation and leisure behavior from birth to death, with a focus on issues associated with race, class, gender, sexual identity, and disabling conditions.

RECR 475 Disability, Culture, and Therapeutic Recreation (3). An examination of disability from a cultural perspective with the application of theoretical and scientific knowledge to provide recreation interventions that facilitate participation in life by individuals with disabilities.

RECR 676 Clinical Skills in Therapeutic Recreation (3). Development of helping skills for the practice of therapeutic recreation emphasizing rationale, techniques, and role responsibilities of therapeutic recreation in the area of leisure education. A 20-hour practicum is required.

RECR 677 Disabling Conditions and the Practice of Therapeutic Recreation (3). Prerequisites, RECR 475 and 676. Instruction in the relationship between various disabling conditions and the practice of therapeutic recreation. A 24-hour practicum is required.

RECR 691H Honors in RECR (3). Special studies for undergraduates. Intensive study on a particular topic under the supervision of a qualified member of the staff. For RECR majors, with special permission of the faculty members involved and the director of undergraduate studies.

RECR 692H Honors in RECR (3). Honors project in recreation. The completion of a special project, approved by the department, by a student who has been designated a candidate for undergraduate honors. The second of a two-course honors sequence.

LFIT–Lifetime Fitness

Students must successfully complete one lifetime fitness course (an LFIT course numbered 102 through 190) during their first year of study. One lifetime fitness course is a graduation requirement for all students at UNC–Chapel Hill (post-2006 curriculum). Effective in fall 2011, a student may enroll in only one LFIT course and may count only one, one-credit LFIT course toward graduation at Carolina. These courses combine practice in a sport or physical activity with general instruction in lifelong health.

LFIT 102 Lifetime Fitness: Adapted Physical Activity (1). Assignments to this class are made for students with special needs in physical activities focusing primarily on acute and chronic physical limitations. Activities are assigned commensurate with interests and abilities. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 103 Lifetime Fitness: Aerobics (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. The activity portion of the course includes various forms of aerobics. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 104 Lifetime Fitness: Exercise and Conditioning (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. Activities will promote cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, and flexibility. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 105 Lifetime Fitness: Indoor Sports (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. Activity portion of the course includes basketball, volleyball, and indoor soccer. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 106 Lifetime Fitness: Beginning Jogging (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. The activity portion of the course promotes cardiovascular fitness through jogging. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 107 Lifetime Fitness: Intermediate Jogging (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. Activity portion for students who can complete 30 minutes of jogging. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 108 Lifetime Fitness: Outdoor Sports (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. Activity portion of course includes ultimate frisbee, flag football, and soccer. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 109 Lifetime Fitness: Racquet Sports (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. The activity portion of the course includes badminton, tennis, and racquetball. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 110 Lifetime Fitness: Beginning Swimming (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. The activity portion of the course includes swimming skills for beginners. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 111 Lifetime Fitness: Swim Conditioning (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. The activity portion of the course promotes cardiovascular fitness through swimming. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 112 Lifetime Fitness: Walking (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. The activity portion of the course promotes cardiovascular fitness through walking. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 113 Lifetime Fitness: Weight Training (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. The activity portion includes basic techniques of weight training. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 114 Lifetime Fitness: Yoga and Pilates (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. The activity portion includes basic instruction in both yoga and pilates. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 115 Lifetime Fitness: Cycle Fitness (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. The activity portion includes basic instruction in cycle fitness. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 118 Lifetime Fitness: Flag Football (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. The activity portion of the course includes basic instruction in flag football. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 129 Lifetime Fitness: Downhill Skiing and Snowboarding (1). An introduction to fitness and wellness that includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. The activity portion includes basic conditioning and instruction in both downhill skiing and snowboarding, including five days in Boone, NC. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 130 Lifetime Fitness: Soccer (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. The activity portion will provide soccer instruction and game play. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 138 Lifetime Fitness: Tennis (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. The activity portion of the course includes basic instruction in tennis. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 140 Lifetime Fitness: Ultimate Frisbee (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. The activity portion of the course includes basic instruction in ultimate frisbee. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 145 Lifetime Fitness: Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. The activity portion of the course includes basic instruction in Brazilian jiu jitsu. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 146 Lifetime Fitness: Sand Volleyball (1). This course is an introduction to fitness and wellness, and includes developing personal fitness programs and instruction in physical activity. The activity portion of the course includes basic instruction in sand volleyball. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

LFIT 190 Special Topics in Lifetime Fitness (1). This course is designed to cover the study and practice of special topics directed by an authority in the field. Subject matter will vary per instructor and topic. Students can enroll in only one LFIT course during their career at Carolina.

PHYA–Physical Activity

PHYA 201 Adapted Physical Activity (1). Assignments to this class are made for students with special needs in physical education focusing primarily on acute and chronic physical limitations. Activities are assigned commensurate with interests and abilities. Students are required to present an exercise prescription from a physician including prescribed activities and limitations.

PHYA 202 Beginning Aerobics (1). Provides a cardiovascular fitness program incorporating physiologically safe dance and exercise movements to music. It develops strength, flexibility, and improved cardiorespiratory efficiency.

PHYA 203 Aerobic Circuit Training (1). Challenges students to achieve higher levels of overall fitness in a cardiovascular program that combines stations of muscular strength with endurance while incorporating a wide variety of equipment. Students are expected to be able to participate in a minimum of 20 minutes of aerobic exercise.

PHYA 205 Archery (1). Designed to teach the beginning student proper techniques of target shooting with a bow and arrow, this course deals with history, terminology, safety, and equipment selection. Shooting techniques included are the stance, nocking, drawing, anchoring, aiming, releasing, and following through. The use of the bowsight and target scoring are presented.

PHYA 206 Badminton (1). The course includes an orientation to the history and rules of the game, terminology, and equipment. Basic skills and techniques include the proper grip, stance, footwork, forehand and backhand clears, long and short serves, net shots, around-the-head shot, and the smash. Presents basic single and double game strategies.

PHYA 208 Beginning Ballet (1). The technique and vocabulary of classical ballet are presented. Exercises at the barre are followed by practice and combinations in the center.

PHYA 209 Beginning Basic Training (1). Beginning physical fitness program based on the model used by the United States Army Physical Fitness Academy and designed to improve aerobic and anaerobic strength, endurance, and overall physical fitness.

PHYA 210 Beginning Bowling (1). Presents terminology of the game, various grips and stances, the delivery approach, release, and follow through. Pick up spare leaves, releasing straight, hook, and back-up balls, reading the lanes, and handicapping are also included. Rules and scoring as well as tournament bowling are learned.

PHYA 211 Cycling (1). The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the history and skill of cycling. The course will focus on maintenance of the bicycle, fitness acquired through the use of cycling, and the skills of climbing, descending, cornering, and balance.

PHYA 212 Introduction to Dance Technique (1). This course is an introduction to the positions, exercises, and steps common to ballet, jazz, and modern dance. It is designed for students with no previous dance experience and is a prerequisite for PHYA 208, 220, and 224.

PHYA 213 Exercise and Conditioning (1). Covers activities that promote cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, and flexibility. The course content includes fitness evaluation, stretching, weight training, aerobic exercise, jogging, and circuit training. Individual exercise programs are developed.

PHYA 214 Beginning Fencing (1). Introduces students to the history, rules, and terminology of the sport of fencing. It traces the development of ancient and modern weapons; presents warm-up, stretching, and conditioning exercises that are specific to the sport; and covers grip, basic positions, and footwork. Individual and team competitions are conducted in the course.

PHYA 216 Beginning Golf (1). Stresses swing motion and the basic fundamentals. Techniques of the full swing and the short game are presented. Rules and etiquette are covered. Students who shoot 115 or less for 18 holes are not eligible for this beginner course.

PHYA 217 Beginning Tumbling and Gymnastics (1). Through proper progression, students are exposed to compulsory routines on several pieces of gymnastic apparatus–including the balance beam, parallel bars, pommel horse, rings, horizontal bar–and strength, flexibility, and gross motor coordination. Emphasis is placed on safe spotting techniques and safety awareness.

PHYA 219 Beginning Horseback Riding (1). Introduces students to tacking, grooming, and riding the basic gaits of walk, trot, and canter. An additional fee is required; this course is taught off campus.

PHYA 220 Beginning Jazz Dance (1). Prerequisite, PHYA 212. Students will explore the roots of the jazz style through rhythm, principles of isolation and opposition, shape and energy through center work, stretches, movement across the floor, and simple routines. Previous ballet training is highly recommended.

PHYA 221 Beginning Jogging (1). The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to develop cardiovascular fitness through a popular activity. Selection of proper clothing and equipment, the physiological effects of a jogging program, care and prevention of common injuries, and the mechanics of jogging are presented.

PHYA 222 Karate (1). This course offers an introduction to the basics of one of many martial art styles. Emphasis is on traditional forms, basic movements, philosophy, discipline, and proper class conduct. Students will learn various stances and forms.

PHYA 223 Lifeguard Training (1). Required preparation, ability to swim 500 yards continuously and retrieve a 10-pound object from a depth of seven feet. This course will prepare individuals to effectively assume the duties and responsibilities of lifeguards at swimming pools and at protected (nonsurf) open water beaches.

PHYA 224 Beginning Modern Dance (1). Students will explore the principles of movement that define modern dance, gaining some understanding of the use of weight, the shape of the body in space, an awareness of timing and energy, and individual creative potential.

PHYA 225 Beginning Racquetball (1). The course introduces the beginner to basic skills, including forehand and backhand drives, grips, footwork, and serves. Safety considerations as well as rules and terminology are covered. Basic strategy is presented involving the return of service, use of ceiling, rear wall, pass, and kill shots.

PHYA 227 Scuba (1). Required preparation, strong swimming skills. This course prepares students for participation in recreational diving: both skin diving and scuba. Lectures cover physiology of diving, first aid, and decompression. It can lead to certification if students attend open water training dives conducted at the semester's end. An additional fee is required.

PHYA 228 Self-Defense (1). This course introduces the basics of self-defense techniques and will instruct the student by incorporating a three-dimensional educational approach. The student will develop skill, knowledge and self-confidence as related to self-defense.

PHYA 229 Downhill Skiing (1). This course is conducted in Boone, North Carolina, for five days over the winter break. It includes orientation to proper equipment selection, the use of lifts and tows, and the basic fundamentals, such as parallel turns, edging concepts, and rhythm. An additional fee is required.

PHYA 230 Beginning Soccer (1). Basic soccer skills are presented including dribbling, shooting, passing, heading, trapping, and tackling. Position play and strategies for basic offense and defense are learned as well as rules and terminology. Conditioning is achieved through drills and game play.

PHYA 231 Beginning Social Dance (1). The basic step patterns of popular social dances, such as fox trot, waltz, cha-cha, swing or shag, hustle, tango, and others are taught. Confidence in the ability to lead or to follow is developed. Social enjoyment of dance is emphasized.

PHYA 233 Beginning Squash (1). Basic shots are learned including forehand and backhand drives, corners, reverse corners, volleys, drop shots, and serves. Rules, terminology, and basic strategies are presented. Appreciation of squash as a game for fitness and fun is developed.

PHYA 235 Beginning-Level Swimming (1). The course consists of swimming skills for students with limited water experience. These skills include water adjustment, floating, kicking, front crawl stroke, rhythmic breathing, and elementary backstroke. Emphasis is on efficient movement through the water. Basic water safety procedures are included.

PHYA 236 Swim Conditioning (1). This course is designed to promote cardiovascular fitness through swimming. Conditioning and the refinement of stroke techniques will be stressed through stroke practice and workout routines. Topics will include stroke mechanisms of the four competitive strokes, starts, turns, interval, sprint, and long distance training.

PHYA 238 Tennis (1). Basic skills are learned including forehand and backhand groundstrokes, the volley, and the serve. Rules, terminology, and basic game strategy will be taught. Through play, an increased level of fitness and skill will be gained to promote participation in tennis throughout life.

PHYA 239 Triathlon Training (1). The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the sport of triathlons integrating the discipline of running, cycling, and swimming. The course is physically challenging and provides information on transitions and maintenance of equipment, as well as setting up a training program.

PHYA 240 Ultimate Frisbee (1). Teaches the knowledge, skills, and rules of ultimate frisbee in order to develop a lasting interest in lifetime participation and to increase the student's level of physical fitness.

PHYA 241 Beginning Volleyball (1). Basic skills are taught including the forearm pass, the overhead pass, setting, spiking, blocking, dinking, and serving. Rules and terminology are included. Basic offensive and defensive strategy is learned.

PHYA 242 Water Safety Instructor (1). This course will train students to teach American Red Cross progressive swimming and water safety courses. Course content includes analysis of stroke mechanics, review of water safety skills, and investigation of teaching methodology. Students need to be proficient in front crawl, back crawl, elementary backstroke, breaststroke, and sidestroke.

PHYA 243 Beginning Weight Training (1). Basic techniques and knowledge of variable resistance and free weight systems are taught. Fitness evaluation and individual workout programs are included. Development of muscular strength and endurance is stressed. Physiological principles of fitness and their relationships to weight training are also emphasized.

PHYA 245 Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (1). This course will combine instruction in, and practice of, a sport or physical activity that can be sustained in later life, together with instruction in lifelong health.

PHYA 246 Sand Volleyball (1). Students will gain skills necessary to develop a lasting interest in sand volleyball and to increase the student's level of physical fitness. Students will also learn the rules of the sport and how it differs from indoor volleyball.

PHYA 290 Special Topics (1). This course is designed to cover the study and practice of special topics directed by an authority in the field. Subject matter will vary per instructor and topic.

PHYA 302 Intermediate Aerobics (1). Challenges students to achieve higher levels of cardiovascular, flexibility, and strength fitness through dance and exercise movements to music. Students are expected to be able to participate in a minimum of 20 minutes of aerobic activities.

PHYA 308 Intermediate Ballet (1). For the dancer with a solid understanding of the basics of ballet and several years' dance training. It emphasizes more sophisticated steps in longer combinations.

PHYA 310 Intermediate Bowling (1). Focuses on refinement of the experienced student's delivery mechanics including the approach, release, and follow through. Maximum quality practice time is emphasized. Alternative approaches and releases are presented and several types of tournaments are conducted.

PHYA 314 Intermediate Fencing (1). A review of the footwork and bladework covered in the beginning. Emphasis in this course is on individual and paired exercises rather than on large group lessons. An introduction to officiating is also covered in conjunction with greater competitive opportunities.

PHYA 316 Intermediate Golf (1). Builds on and refines the basic fundamentals of the swing motion. Ball flight control is introduced with more in-depth swing analysis. Students who shoot 85 to 115 for 18 holes are eligible for this course.

PHYA 317 Intermediate Tumbling and Gymnastics (1). The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to learn more difficult gymnastics skills and to incorporate them in a fluid routine. Added emphasis is placed on muscular strength and flexibility. Safe spotting techniques, particularly for more advanced skills, are stressed throughout the course.

PHYA 319 Intermediate Horseback Riding (1). Students are introduced to jumping; emphasis is placed on learning more balance and control in the three basic gaits. Dressage is introduced. An additional fee is required; this course is taught off campus.

PHYA 320 Intermediate Jazz Dance (1). Students will explore the jazz style in greater complexity plus gain understanding of jazz music as it relates to jazz dance. It includes center work, complex movement phrases across floor, adagio, and routines using large movement vocabulary. At least two years of dance and familiarity with jazz style are recommended.

PHYA 321 Intermediate Jogging (1). Introduces students to the cardiovascular and overall fitness benefits of running. Students will learn how running can be a lifetime activity when approached sensibly and effectively. Students are expected to be able to run three miles in under 30 minutes prior to registering for this course.

PHYA 324 Intermediate Modern Dance (1). Students will work to develop greater technical skill and continue a more advanced exploration of modern dance principles of effort-shape through center work and phrases of greater length and complexity in the center and across the floor. At least two years of modern dance training are recommended.

PHYA 325 Intermediate Racquetball (1). Students will review beginning skills. Aspects of competition will be covered, including match preparation, officiating a match, and tournament play. Specific practice will involve shot selection and placement and back wall play.

PHYA 330 Intermediate Soccer (1). Basic skills are reviewed and refined. Dead ball situations are studied, especially corner kicks and direct and indirect free kicks. Different systems of play are introduced and evaluated. Positional play is stressed in the development of advanced defensive and offensive tactics.

PHYA 335 Intermediate Swimming (1). Techniques for crawl, sidestroke, elementary backstroke, back crawl, and breaststroke are covered. Basic water rescue skills are presented including first aid procedures. Physical fitness is promoted through swimming.

PHYA 338 Intermediate Tennis (1). Increased proficiency in four basic skills will be developed. New shots taught include the overhead, the drop, the lob, and spin serve. Strategy for singles and doubles play will be stressed. Emphasis is on increased pace and ball placement.

PHYA 341 Intermediate Volleyball (1). Students improve execution of basic skills through practice. Stresses safe execution of dives and rolls. Teaches various offensive strategies and defensive alignments. Emphasizes team play.

PHYA 343 Intermediate Weight Training (1). Emphasizes the development of individualized muscular strength and endurance programs following instruction in the physiological principles and techniques of weight training. Students should have beginning weight training skills, techniques, and knowledge prior to enrolling in this class.

PHYA 402 Leading Group Fitness Activities (1). All aspects of leading group fitness activities will be explored and applied, including components of an aerobic exercise class, modifications for individual needs and special populations, health screening, fitness testing.

PHYA 408 Advanced Ballet (1). For the dancer with substantial background in ballet. Speed, endurance, multiple turns, beats, and complicated combinations are emphasized.

PHYA 409 Advanced Basic Training (1). Advanced fitness program based on the model used by the United States Army Physical Fitness Academy to further improve aerobic and anaerobic fitness. Builds on conditioning level obtained in PHYA 209.

PHYA 414 Advanced Fencing (1). A review of the footwork and bladework covered in the intermediate course; pair exercises and individual lessons dealing with both technique and tactics. Emphasis in this course is on individual and paired exercises rather than on large group lessons. Officiating is also covered in conjunction with greater competitive opportunities.

PHYA 416 Advanced Golf (1). Required preparation, a 15 or less handicap. Comprising this course are the ability to score, the analysis of strategy and shot production, and improvement of self-awareness and coping strategies.

PHYA 419 Advanced Horseback Riding (1). Provides more technical flatwork at the walk, trot, and canter, as well as jumping. Coursework will be primarily jumping. An additional fee is required; this course is taught off campus.

PHYA 424 Advanced Modern Dance (1). This course is designed for the dancer with a solid understanding of the principles underlying modern dance and several years of dance training. It focuses on longer and more complicated phases of movements.

PHYA 427 Advanced Open Water Scuba Diving (1). Prerequisite, PHYA 227. Nationally recognized scuba certification may substitute for prerequisite. The course will follow the PADI Advanced Open water course curriculum which contains five specialty dives focusing on deep, night, peak performance buoyancy, underwater navigation, and underwater naturalist.

PHYA 438 Advanced Tennis (1). Individual skill improvement in all shots with pace and accuracy of shots is stressed. Advanced strategies for singles and doubles play are learned. Analysis of opponent's strengths and weaknesses and physical fitness are stressed through drills and games.