Department of Romance Languages and Literatures

roml.unc.edu

LARRY D. KING, Chair

Professors

Martine Antle, Lucia Binotti, Dino S. Cervigni, Fred M. Clark, Frank A. Domínguez, Dominique D. Fisher, Larry D. King, Rosa Perelmuter, Ennio Rao, Monica P. Rector.

Associate Professors

Samuel Amago, Emilio del Valle Escalante, Juan Carlos González-Espitia, Carmen Hsu, Federico Luisetti, Hassan Melehy, Alicia Rivero.

Assistant Professors

Patricia Amaral, Bruno Estigarribia, Oswaldo Estrada, Irene Gómez-Castellano, Ellen Welch.

Master Lecturers

Glynis S. Cowell, Hannelore L. Jarausch.

Senior Lecturers

N. Grace Aaron, Iluminada Amat, Hélène M. de Fays, Nina M. Furry, Luis M. Gómez, Dorothea Heitsch, Hosun Kim, Malgorzata Lee, Julia C. Mack, William C. Maisch, Valérie Pruvost, Richard Vernon.

Lecturers

Michael Brown, Elizabeth Bruno, Ruy Burgos-Lovèce, Cristina Carrasco, Frederico Castelloes, Amy Chambless, Corina Dueñas, Patricia Fuentes, Michelle Gravatt, Kyung Huer, Pedro Huesa, Sangsuk Kim, Anastacia Kohl, Darcy Lear, Josefa Lindquist, Beatriz Lomas-Lozano, Victoria Martin, Anita Melo, Abel Muñoz-Hermosa, Alan Redick, Martha Ruiz-Garcia, Alicia Shade, Martín Sueldo, Kristine Taylor, Jennifer Wooten.

Professors Emeriti

Cesáreo Bandera, Pablo Gil Casado, Angel L. Cilveti, Yves de la Quérière, I.R. Stirling Haig, Antonio Illiano, Anthony G. Lo Ré, Catherine A. Maley, Edward D. Montgomery, James S. Noblitt, José Manuel Polo de Bernabé, Maria A. Salgado, Carol L. Sherman, Frederick W. Vogler.

Introduction

The Department of Romance Languages is a diverse, multicultural, and plurilingual academic unit that engages in research and instruction in French, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, and the historical minority languages of Europe and the Americas. The principal aims of the department are to preserve, increase, and transmit knowledge and understanding of the Romance languages, literatures, and cultures within the global and regional contexts in which they have developed. Our course offerings present a diversity of approaches to the study, production, and appreciation of literary and nonliterary texts. The program offers a wide historical, literary, linguistic, social, and cultural emphasis that, while departing from the millenarian roots of Europe and the Americas, may consider, among other topics, East-West transatlantic and transcontinental discourses that have taken place among and between Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia; or North-South literary and cultural dialogues between Europe and Africa, and within the Americas. For this reason, each of the five major programs and five minors offered in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures complements other majors and minors at UNC–Chapel Hill in such fields of study as linguistics, history, political science, global studies, European studies, communication studies, comparative literature, geography, Arab cultures, and Islamic and Middle Eastern studies.

In our undergraduate programs, students acquire competence in the practice and analysis of the language together with a critical knowledge of the civilization, cultures, and literatures of the peoples who speak these languages today throughout the world. Our faculty promotes interdisciplinary connections and incorporates the study of culture, theory, linguistics, and history across the curriculum. Through coursework that emphasizes rhetoric, composition, and written and oral expression, our majors receive sustained personalized training in critical thinking, rigorous analysis, and close reading.

The study of the Romance languages and cultures has become increasingly important because of the economic and political significance of these languages abroad and in the multicultural society that is the United States. In addition to exciting coursework, students also have the opportunity to live in language houses; participate in language tables, meetings, and clubs; and study abroad through programs that are coordinated with the Study Abroad Office. Undergraduates with proficiency in the Romance languages have found jobs in teaching and research, translation, foreign diplomacy, foreign correspondence, travel agencies, international airlines, import-export work, international corporations, information science, and agencies of the federal government. Foreign language competence is also an asset to those employed in social work, law enforcement, public health, nursing, and medicine.

Programs of Study

The degree offered is the bachelor of arts with a major in Romance languages. Specializations are offered in French and francophone studies, Italian, Portuguese, Hispanic literatures and cultures, and Hispanic linguistics. The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures also offers minors in French, Italian, Portuguese, Hispanic studies, and Spanish for the professions.

Majoring in Romance Languages: Bachelor of Arts

B.A. Major in Romance Languages: Emphasis in French and Francophone Studies

Core Requirements

• FREN 260 or 312 (gateway)

• FREN 300

• Three survey courses: FREN 370, 371, and 372

• Four additional courses, chosen from FREN 280, 285, or any courses 310 or above (excluding FREN 401, 402, and 692H)

We offer a strong emphasis on European and francophone studies as well as the Languages across the Curriculum Program (LAC), which allows students to participate in one-hour, one-credit discussion sections in French on a wide array of courses across the College of Arts and Sciences.

B.A. Major in Romance Languages: Emphasis in Italian

Core Requirements

• ITAL 300

• Seven courses chosen from among the following: ITAL 310, 330, 331, 333, 335, 340, 343, 345, 370, 382, 390, 398, 511, 512, or 526

A prerequisite for entering the program is knowledge of the Italian language demonstrated by successfully completing ITAL 204 Intermediate Italian II, or ITAL 402 Intermediate Accelerated Italian, or the equivalent. With the approval of the undergraduate advisor for Italian, students majoring in Romance languages with an emphasis in Italian may count up to nine hours in related areas in such departments, programs, and curricula as classics, art, music, cultural studies, and women’s studies.

B.A. Major in Romance Languages: Emphasis in Portuguese

Core Requirements

• Eight courses chosen from among the following: PORT 310, 323, 382, 385, 388, 390, 398, 501, 502, 503, 504, 526, or 535

With the approval of the undergraduate advisor for Portuguese, students majoring in Romance languages with an emphasis in Portuguese may count up to nine hours in related areas in such departments, programs, and curricula as history, art, music, cultural studies, and women’s and gender studies.

The program in Portuguese combines the study of the language, culture, and literatures of Brazil and Portugal. Emphasis is placed on the language as it is currently spoken and its historical development. Students study the literatures of Brazil and Portugal in terms of their historical development and analyze specific texts from different genres and literary periods. Students interested in Portuguese should consult the Portuguese language advisor.

Because few entering students have completed coursework in Portuguese prior to enrollment in the University, it is essential that interested students start the language as early as the first year. Completion of PORT 204 is considered a prerequisite for the major in Romance languages with an emphasis in Portuguese.

B.A. Major in Romance Languages: Emphasis in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures

Core Requirements

• SPAN 260 (gateway) or SPAN 262 (for heritage speakers)

• SPAN 300 or 326

• SPAN 330, 331, 335, 340, 344, or 345

• SPAN 350, 369, 375, 376, 377, 678, or 682

• Two courses chosen from SPAN 371, 372, and 373

• One additional literature course, which can be either the survey course not chosen from among SPAN 371, 372, and 373 or any literature course from the list below (preferably but not necessarily in the area of the survey courses not chosen)

• Two courses chosen from the following courses or from any of the previous lists: SPAN 348, 361, 362, 380, 381, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386, 387, 389, 394, 395, 397, 398, 414, 415, 613, 614, 617, 620, 625, 635, 650

B.A. Major in Romance Languages: Emphasis in Hispanic Linguistics

Core Requirements

• SPAN 260 (gateway) or SPAN 262 (for heritage speakers)

• SPAN 300 or 326

• SPAN 376 and 377

• Two courses chosen from SPAN 375, 397, 678, 679, 680, 682, one of which must be from the 600-level courses

• SPAN 414, 416, or PORT 401

• Two additional courses chosen from PORT 402; SPAN 330, 331, 340, 344, 345, 350, 361, 362, 369, 371, 372, 373, 415, 416

The major in Romance languages with an emphasis in Hispanic literatures and cultures and in Hispanic linguistics provides opportunities to study the languages, literatures, and cultures of Spain and Spanish America. Prospective majors should complete the foreign language requirement by the end of their sophomore year. LING 101 is highly recommended preparation for the emphasis in Hispanic linguistics. Students who plan to teach in public schools should see the School of Education for information on teacher certification.

Dual Bachelor’s–Master’s Degree Program

The dual bachelor’s–master’s program in Romance Languages and Literatures has two subplans: 1) French and Francophone Studies and 2) Franco-Arab studies. This program allows students to complete both the B.A. and M.A. degrees in five years or less and provides an opportunity to gain a thorough proficiency in the French language as well as a broad knowledge in one of the two subplan areas. The program is designed to prepare students for careers in a variety of fields, including academia, international development, international business, diplomacy, law, journalism, publishing, social work, and public health. The M.A. gives graduates a unique advantage when entering the job market or applying for doctoral studies in French or another field.

As part of their studies, students are encouraged to spend time abroad. The Study Abroad Office offers a variety of programs and internships, so that students can strengthen their language skills and develop ties for their future careers.

Undergraduate students at UNC–Chapel Hill interested in the dual B.A.–M.A. program should speak to the undergraduate advisor in French, Dr. Martine Antle, no later than the beginning of their third semester in order to plan their program of study and be sure that they will be able to meet the requirements.

Minoring in French

• FREN 300

• Four additional FREN courses numbered above 275, excluding 308, 401, 402, 601, 602

Students unable to undertake a full eight-course French program may register for the French minor. This option also is available to students in some professional schools.

Minoring in Italian

• ITAL 300

• Four additional ITAL courses numbered between 300 and 699, excluding 401, 402, 691H, and 692H

Minoring in Portuguese

• PORT 310

• Four additional PORT courses numbered between 300 and 699, excluding 401, 402, 691H, and 692H

Minoring in Hispanic Studies

The minor in Hispanic studies is designed for those who wish to continue their study of Spanish language and acquire a more in-depth knowledge of Spanish and/or Spanish American literature, culture, or linguistics. Through the selection of courses students may choose to concentrate on a single region of the Hispanic world (Spain or Spanish America), a specific content area (literature, culture, or linguistics), or elect a combination of regions and/or content areas.

Core Requirements

• SPAN 300 or 326

• Three courses numbered SPAN 330 or above, excluding SPAN 401, 402, and 601

• One allied course on the Hispanic world (see section below)

Additional Requirements

• SPAN 250, 255, or 260

Minoring in Spanish for the Professions (approval required)

The minor in Spanish for the professions is designed for students who anticipate careers in which they will need to interact with Hispanic communities in the United States or abroad and who wish to continue the study of Spanish language and culture for specific professional purposes: business, medical and other health professions, journalism and mass communication, or law and other legal professions. The profession-specific course for this option for the minor includes experiential learning through fieldwork and/or public service.

• SPAN 265

• One profession-specific course from SPAN 320, 321, 322, 323, or 327

• SPAN 329

• One allied course on the Hispanic world (see section below)

Allied Courses on the Hispanic World

Students will complement their courses in Spanish with one Hispanic-world course from the list of allied courses for the minors in Hispanic studies and Spanish for the professions. The allied course should be taken in a department other than Romance Languages and Literatures, although a Spanish course cross-listed with another department would be acceptable. It could also be a course offered for the Languages across the Curriculum (LAC) Program or a course taken abroad in a university department other than Spanish language and literature. For the minor in Spanish for the professions students who plan to use Spanish professionally in the United States are strongly encouraged to choose a course related to the Hispanic community in the United States.

AAAD 260, 278, 284; ANTH 142 (LAC recitation in Spanish will carry one additional credit for SPAN 308), 232, 360; ANTH/FOLK 130; ARTH 157, 277; DRAM 486, 488; ENGL 265, 364, 666; GEOG 259, 457, 458; HIST 142, 143 (LAC recitation in Spanish will carry one additional credit for SPAN 308), 241, 242, 278, 292, 528, 532; HIST/WMST 280; JOMC 443; LTAM 101, 396 (with approval of the undergraduate Spanish advisor); MUSC 147; PLCY 349; POLI 231, 238 (LAC recitation in Spanish will carry one additional credit for SPAN 308), 434, 435; RELI 245; SOCI 453

Other courses with Hispanic content may also count with the approval of the undergraduate advisor for Spanish.

Honors

The departmental honors program is open to any qualified major with a cumulative grade point average of 3.2 or higher and a 3.5 or higher in their major courses. Eligible honors candidates will formulate a topic and select an appropriate faculty member to supervise the writing of an honors thesis. Specific coursework for the major with honors consists of enrollment in a special topics course in the language of the major emphasis (FREN, ITAL, PORT, or SPAN 691H Research for Advanced Students) in the fall semester of the senior year, and 692H Honors Thesis in the spring semester. (FREN, ITAL, PORT, SPAN 398 Undergraduate Seminar may be substituted for the research course if the subject of the seminar is central to the research project chosen.) In the 692H course the thesis will be completed and the student examined by the supervisor and two additional faculty members, to be agreed upon by the student and supervisor. The director of honors, in consultation with the examiners, will recommend that the student who has defended the thesis graduate with honors, highest honors, or with course credit. Courses numbered 691H or 398 may count toward the eight courses for the major, but 692H may not. Students who intend to graduate in December should adjust the scheduling of these courses in order to allow for completion of the honors project in December. Students meeting the required grade point averages should contact the undergraduate advisor for their language (see Advising, below). For detailed information on the B.A. with honors, see roml.unc.edu/undergraduate-programs/ba-with-honors.

Advising

All majors and minors can find their primary academic advisor in Dey Hall. Students are strongly encouraged to meet regularly with their advisor and review their Tar Heel Tracker each semester. Each of the department’s language advisors will meet with current and prospective majors by appointment (see contact information below). Departmental academic advising is particularly important for those majors who are considering going on to graduate school. Further information on courses, undergraduate research opportunities, the honors program, careers, and graduate schools may be obtained from the department’s Web site: roml.unc.edu.

Advising for the Major with an Emphasis in French

Dr. Martine Antle, Undergraduate Advisor, Dey 225, (919) 962-0464, mcantle@email.unc.edu (questions about literature courses from FREN 260 up and the French major).

Dr. Hannelore Jarausch, Director of French Language Instruction, Dey 223, (919) 962-0111, hljaraus@email.unc.edu (questions about French language courses up to FREN 255).

For questions about transfer course equivalents for French students at the level of FREN 300 and below please see Dr. Jarausch. Inquiries relating to study abroad at Montpellier (i.e., course equivalents, etc.) should be directed to Dr. Martine Antle. Please contact the Study Abroad Office for all other programs and internships in France.

Advising for the Major with an Emphasis in Italian

Dr. Amy Chambless, Undergraduate Advisor, Dey 214, (919) 843-2042; achamble@email.unc.edu.

Advising for the Major with an Emphasis in Portuguese

Dr. Monica Rector, Undergraduate Advisor, Dey 236, rector@email.unc.edu.

Advising for the Major with an Emphasis in Spanish

Dr. Gosia Lee, Undergraduate Advisor for Hispanic Literatures and Cultures, Dey 337, (919) 843-2058, gosialee@email.unc.edu.

Dr. Bruno Estigarribia, Undergraduate Advisor for Hispanic Linguistics, Dey 332, estigarr@email.unc.edu.

Dr. Patricia Amaral, Undergraduate Advisor for Hispanic Linguistics, Dey 320, pamaral@email.unc.edu.

Dr. Glynis Cowell, Director of Spanish Language Instruction, Dey 220, (919) 962-0156, gscowell@email.unc.edu.

Special Opportunities in Romance Languages

Out-of-Class Language Experience

Students may enrich their cultural and language experience by applying to the Spanish House, a section of Carmichael residence hall. Equipped with a lounge and a kitchen, each house has space for eight male and 16 female students. Students make an effort to speak only Spanish while in residence.

Departmental Involvement

Students also find opportunities to speak Spanish and meet native Spanish speakers in an informal weekly Tertulia. Additional activities such as lectures, receptions, and films are organized by the department and student organizations such as CHispA (Carolina Hispanic Association). Numerous volunteer opportunities using Spanish are available in the local community through CHispA, Campus Y, UNC Hospitals, and other organizations.

For further opportunities to speak French, students are encouraged to participate in the weekly meeting of the Table Française and become members of the French club, les Francophiles. Departmental lectures and film series are also offered.

Students wishing to speak Italian may participate in a weekly conversation table, La Tavola Italiana. Departmental lectures and film series are also offered.

Students who wish to practice Portuguese can meet weekly for the “bate-papo” (chat).

Study Abroad

The Study Abroad Office sponsors several yearlong, semester-long, and summer programs appropriate for students of the Romance languages and has special arrangements with the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures for the UNC in Montpellier, UNC in Seville, and Florence programs. Students from UNC–Chapel Hill and from other institutions may earn up to 30 semester hours of undergraduate credit in these programs, which are open to qualified undergraduates regardless of academic major. Students may satisfy up to 50 percent of their major coursework abroad.

Inquiries concerning any of these programs should be addressed to the Study Abroad Office, CB# 3130, FedEx Global Education Center, (919) 962-7002.

Undergraduate Awards

French: Students have the opportunity to be inducted into Pi Delta Phi, the national French honor society. Those with outstanding records in French are recommended as candidates for the Jacques Hardré Award, which is given to the best graduating senior in French; it includes a cash award.

Italian: Students are nominated for membership in Gamma Kappa Alpha, the Italian honor society, by undergraduate instructors. The society recognizes “outstanding scholastic performance in the fields of Italian language and literature” and encourages students “to acquire a greater interest in, and a deeper understanding of, Italian culture.” The Kimberly Kyser Award for Excellence in Italian is awarded to the most outstanding student in Italian and includes a cash prize.

Portuguese: Each year the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures awards the Camões Prize to the outstanding student in Portuguese during that year. The prize carries a monetary award made possible by a donation from the Gulbenkian Foundation.

Spanish: Students have the opportunity to be inducted into Sigma Delta Pi, the national Spanish honor society. Those with outstanding records in Spanish are recommended as candidates for the Stoudemire Award, which is given to the best graduating senior in Spanish and includes a cash prize.

Facilities

Students taking courses in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures have outstanding support for their work through the Language Resource Center (LRC), housed on the ground floor of Dey Hall. The LRC provides resources and services for language teaching and learning, including audio and video materials; smart classrooms with PCs and projection equipment; listening, viewing, and recording facilities; and online databases for language learning.

Graduate School and Career Opportunities

The master of arts in teaching degree is intended for students who wish to teach at the secondary level. M.A. and Ph.D. programs in Romance languages are almost exclusively oriented toward literary studies, and the undergraduate student should prepare accordingly. A reading knowledge of Latin is sometimes required, as is at least one other Romance language (generally Italian or Spanish). Useful allied disciplines are English, history, classics, philosophy, linguistics, and art history. A double major with one of these fields is often desirable. Faculty members can advise students on choices of graduate schools. Ratings of programs are published from time to time and are available through the department.

For students seeking careers in international business and law, journalism, publishing, social work, and the health professions, a second major or minor in a language is desirable. This also applies to students who wish to work in a field that makes knowledge of French, Italian, Portuguese, or Spanish desirable, such as history, art, Latin American studies, or global studies.

Contact Information

The undergraduate advisors for French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish may be contacted at CB# 3170, 238 Dey Hall, (919) 962-2062. Web site: roml.unc.edu.

CATA

401 Elementary Catalan (3). Introduction to Catalan language and culture. Designed for students who already have proficiency in another foreign language.

402 Intermediate Catalan (3). Continuation of CATA 401 with more emphasis on reading authentic texts.

FREN

101 Elementary French I (3). Introduces the essential elements of French structure and vocabulary and aspects of French and francophone culture. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.

102 Elementary French II (3). Prerequisite, FREN 101. Continues the study of essential elements of French structure, vocabulary, and aspects of French and francophone culture. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.

105 French for High Beginners (4). Accelerated course that covers FREN 101 and 102 for students with previous study of French. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.

111 Intensive Elementary French (6). Permission of the instructor. Covers the material of the FREN 101 and 102 sequence in a single semester.

203 Intermediate French I (3). Prerequisite, FREN 102, 105, 111, or 401. Develops language skills for communication. Review of elementary French with increasing emphasis on reading and writing in the context of contemporary French and francophone culture.

204 Intermediate French II (3). Prerequisite, FREN 203. Continued development of language skills for communication through reading and discussion of literary and cultural texts. Emphasis on accurate grammar in written and oral expression.

212 Intensive Intermediate French (6). Prerequisite, FREN 102, 105, or 401. A continuation of FREN 111; covers the material of FREN 203 and 204 in one semester.

250 Language through Culture and Literature (3). Prerequisite, FREN 204, 212, or 402. Emphasis on further development and refinement of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, including a review of grammar. Study of literary and cultural texts.

255 Conversation I (3). Prerequisite, FREN 204, 212, or 402. Introductory conversation for building oral proficiency while increasing awareness of French culture. Emphasis on vocabulary and grammatical accuracy; writing activities support speaking.

260 Introduction to French Literature (3). Prerequisite, FREN 204, 212, or 402. Skills for further literary studies through French poetry, theater, and prose from Renaissance to the present. Lectures, discussions, and written assignments.

280 French and Francophone Literature in Translation: Representations of the Americas (3). Texts in translation and subtitled films from the Renaissance through the present day that involve representations of the Americas from French and francophone perspectives.

285 Sex, Philosophy, and Politics: Revolutions in French Literature, 1721–1834 (3). Exploration of questions related to sex and gender during the French Revolution and their reflection in literature, philosophy, and art.

300 French Composition and Grammar Review (3). Prerequisite, FREN 204, 212, or 402. Recommended preparation, FREN 250, 255, or 260. Intensive grammar review and composition to improve accuracy and develop writing skills, using process and task-oriented approaches.

308 LAC Recitation (1). Prerequisite, FREN 204 or 402. Coregistration in a specified LAC course required. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Promotes foreign language proficiency across the curriculum. May not count toward the major or minor in French.

310 Conversation and Composition II (3). Prerequisite, FREN 250, 255, or 260. Intermediate conversation to expand speaking skills through vocabulary building, discussion of selected texts, and activities that produce conversation. Ongoing development of writing skills.

311 Conversation and Composition II (3). Prerequisite, FREN 255, 260, or 312. This course is designed to help students improve the quality of their French oral and written expression as an integral part of their immersion experience in France. The expansion of active vocabulary is a primary objective of the course. Open only to students in Montpellier, France.

312 French University Methodology through Literature (3). Prerequisite, FREN 204, 212, or 402. Open only to students in Montpellier, France. Introduction to French literature through the study of a selection of representative texts. Prepares students for the academics required at a French university. Students will also gain knowledge and experience of the intellectual culture and educational organization of France.

320 Business French (3). Prerequisite, FREN 250, 255, or 260. Practice of vocabulary and discourse strategies pertinent to business-related activity in French. Readings and discussions emphasize cultural awareness for interaction in cross-cultural settings.

330 French Civilization I (3). Prerequisite, FREN 300. A study of important aspects of French civilization (descriptive geography and cultural, social, political, and art history highlights) from its beginning to Louis XIV.

331 French Civilization II (3). Prerequisite, FREN 300. A study of important aspects of French civilization (cultural, social, political, and art history highlights) from the eve of the French Revolution to the present time.

332H Cultural Identities in European Cinema (CMPL 332H, EURO 332H) (3). Prerequisite, FREN 260 or 312. Focuses on the construction of cultural identities in French films within a European context from the 1980s until today.

350 Advanced Oral and Written French (3). Prerequisite, FREN 300. Oral communication and composition on contemporary topics in French and francophone cultures. Study of cultural texts, articles from the French press, and video documents.

370 Survey of French Literature I (3). Prerequisites, FREN 260 or 312, and 300. A survey of major authors and the genres they represent in French literature of the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

371 Survey of French Literature II (3). Prerequisites, FREN 260 or 312, and 300. A survey of major authors and the genres they represent in French literature of the 17th and 18th centuries.

372 Survey of French Literature III (3). Prerequisites, FREN 260 or 312, and 300. A survey of major authors and the genres they represent in French literature of the 19th and 20th centuries.

373 French New Wave Cinema (3). Critical viewing of films of the major directors of the French New Wave of the 1950s through the 1970s, including Jean-Luc Godard, François Truffaut, and Eric Rohmer. Examination of earlier films that inform these directors. The impact of the New Wave on global cinema.

375 Francophone Studies (3). Prerequisites, FREN 260 or 312, and 300. Readings in francophone literatures from literary and cultural perspectives. Areas of study may vary (African, Canadian, European, etc.).

376 Identity and Nationhood in Québécois Literature (3). The evolution of identity and nationhood in Québécois literature from the 1960s to the present. Includes the study of francophone literature of immigration in Québec.

377 The Evolution of Frenchness since WWII (3). Prerequisite, FREN 300. How wars, women’s movements, immigration, and globalization have influenced the notion of Frenchness.

378 The Role of France in Europe Today (3). Prerequisite, FREN 300. Interdisciplinary studies of France’s role in the construction of European identity.

379 Special Topics in French and Francophone Studies (3). Possible topics include cinema, transnational francophone literatures, gender studies. In English.

380 French and Francophone Drama (3). Prerequisites, FREN 300 and 370, 371, or 372. French-language theater. Specific topics to be announced in advance by the instructor.

381 French and Francophone Poetry (3). Prerequisites, FREN 300 and 370, 371, or 372. Specific topics to be announced in advance by the instructor.

382 French and Francophone Prose (3). Prerequisites, FREN 300 and 370, 371, or 372. Specific selections announced in advance by the instructor.

383 Franco-Asian Encounters (3). Examines the cultural encounters between France and Vietnam and China, the sociohistorical context of French colonialism in Vietnam, and the literary and cultural production to which it gave rise.

387 Paris/Versailles: The Court and the City in the 17th Century (3). Prerequisites, FREN 300 and 370, 371, or 372. Seventeenth-century Paris and Versailles serve as the basis for considering the construction of cultural centers and peripheries; the role of style, taste, and etiquette in the fabrication of social identities; the theatricality of life at court and in the city; and the relationship between political power and aesthetics.

388 History of French Cinema (3). Study of French cinema from 1895 through the present, including early French film, silent cinema, surrealism, poetic realism, the New Wave, and recent work. Concepts and vocabulary for film criticism.

395 Research for Advanced French Students (1–3). Prerequisite, FREN 300. Required preparation, two major-level courses or permission of the instructor. Research project on topic agreed upon by the student and faculty member. Includes bibliographic work and research approaches.

398 Undergraduate Seminar in French (3). Prerequisite, FREN 300. Required preparation, two major-level courses. Topic to be announced at registration (consult with French undergraduate advisor).

401 Beginning Accelerated French (3). For students with proven competence in another foreign language. Covers first-year material in one semester; emphasis on speaking and grammar. May not be used to satisfy the Foundations foreign language requirement.

402 Intermediate Accelerated French (3). Prerequisite, FREN 102, 105, 111, or 401. Covers second-year material in one semester. Develops skills, with increasing emphasis on reading and writing. Prepares for more advanced courses.

403 Advanced Composition (3). Prerequisite, FREN 300. Review of advanced grammar. Exercises in translation from English into French of literary and critical materials. Free composition and training in the use of stylistic devices.

451 Orientalist Fantasies and Discourses on the Other (ASIA 451) (3). See ASIA 451 for description.

452 Muslim Women in France and the United States (3). This class will follow Muslim women’s experiences and changing roles in France and the United States from the 1970s through today.

500 Research Methods in French and European Studies (3). Provides training in research methodology either for a B.A. honors or M.A. thesis topic related to contemporary European studies. Students will learn to conceptualize an original research project and to identify and assess the current intellectual debates in their chosen areas of research.

504 Cultural Wars: French/United States Perspectives (3). This course examines the limits of universalism in today’s “multicultural” France and how the European Union will affect French universalism and French resistance to identity politics.

505 African Francophone Cinema (3). Prerequisite, FREN 300. Study of the production of films from francophone sub-Saharan and North African communities.

564 History of the French Language (LING 564) (3). Prerequisite, FREN 300. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. The phonology, morphology, and syntax of French are traced from the Latin foundation to the present. Lectures, readings, discussions, and textual analysis.

565 French Phonetics and Phonology (LING 565) (3). Prerequisite, FREN 300. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. The study of sounds as system in modern standard French. Lecture, discussion, laboratory practice in practical phonetics according to individual needs.

566 Structure of Modern French (LING 566) (3). Prerequisite, FREN 300. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Introduction to phonology, morphology, and syntax of modern standard French. Application of modern linguistic theory to the teaching of French.

594 Writing the Mediterranean (3). Explores early modern literary representations of the Mediterranean as a space of cross-cultural encounter, exchange, rivalry, and negotiation.

601 French for Reading (3). French language for reading. For students with no background in French or those needing a review of grammatical structures and vocabulary in preparation for the reading knowledge exam for graduate degrees (FLPA).

611 French Novelists of the 20th Century (3). Evolution of the novel in France up to the nineties.

613 20th-Century Literature (3). Studies of a single author, a literary movement, or an aesthetic movement from the avant-garde to postmodernism.

615 Readings in Francophone Literature (3). Evolution of francophone literature from a literary and cultural perspective (Maghreb, Africa, Caribbean Islands, and Canada).

616 Readings in Cultural Studies (3). An examination of national and transnational identity within European culture and recent economic and ethnologic changes in Western Europe and France.

661 Studies in French Renaissance (3). Interdisciplinary seminar on a cultural topic or a theme through readings in literary and nonliterary texts.

662 Poetry of the French Renaissance (3). Major currents in French Renaissance poetry: the Rhétoriqueurs, the break with the Middle Ages, Italian influences, the formation of the French Renaissance sonnet, poetry and gender, poetry and politics, the Pléïade. Clément Marot, Maurice Scève, Louise Labé, Olivier de Magny, Pierre de Ronsard, Joachim Du Bellay. Taught in French.

670 Studies in 17th-Century French Literature (3). Prerequisites, FREN 300, and 371, 372, or 373. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. In-depth study of a particular aspect of 17th-century literature and culture. Possible topics are the court and its elsewhere, Frenchness and foreignness in the 17th century, theater and theatricality, enchantment and disenchantment.

683 18th-Century Prose (3). Intensive study of a major 18th-century writer.

685 Libertinism (3). In-depth study of the genealogy of the concept of libertinage as a philosophical discourse and aesthetic manifestation.

687 Diaspora and Transculturalism in Québécois Literature (3). Evolution of identity and nationhood in Québécois literature from the 1960s to the present, including the study of the literature of immigration (diasporic or littrature migrante).

691H Honors Thesis in French (3). Required of students reading for honors. Preparation of an essay under the direction of a member of the faculty. Topic to be approved by thesis director in consultation with honors advisor.

692H Honors Thesis in French (3). Restricted to senior honors candidates. Second semester of senior honors thesis. Thesis preparation under the direction of a departmental faculty member.

ITAL

101 Elementary Italian I (3). Introduces the essential elements of Italian structure and vocabulary and aspects of Italian culture. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed in that order.

102 Elementary Italian II (3). Prerequisite, ITAL 101. Continues study of essential elements of Italian structures, vocabulary, and aspects of Italian culture. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed in that order.

203 Intermediate Italian I (3). Prerequisite, ITAL 102 or 401. Develops language skills for communication. Reviews and expands grammar of elementary Italian with increasing emphasis on reading and writing in the context of Italian culture.

204 Intermediate Italian II (3). Prerequisite, ITAL 203. Continued development of language skills for oral and written communication through reading and discussion of literature and expository texts. Further study of grammar.

240 Dante in English Translation (3). A reading of Dante’s Divine Comedy.

241 Italian Renaissance Literature in Translation (3). A study of the major authors of the Italian Renaissance, with special attention to Petrarch, Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Castiglione, Ariosto, and Tasso.

242 Modern Italian Literature in Translation (3). A study of the major prose writers of modern Italian literature, with special attention given to Manzoni, Verga, Pirandello, Svevo, Moravia, Lampedusa, and other contemporary novelists.

300 Communicating in Italian: Media, Culture, and Society (3). Prerequisite, ITAL 204 or 402. Intensive grammar review and composition designed to improve accuracy and develop writing skills, using process and task-oriented approaches.

308 LAC Recitation (1). Prerequisite, ITAL 203. Coregistration in a specified LAC course required. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A recitation section for selected courses that promote the use of foreign language proficiency across the curriculum (LAC). May not count toward the major or minor in Italian.

310 Italian Conversation (3). Prerequisite, ITAL 204 or 402. Designed to expand speaking skills through vocabulary building, discussion of selected texts, and activities that produce conversation. Ongoing development of writing skills.

330 Italian Civilization I (3). Prerequisite, ITAL 204 or 402. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Study of the importance of Italian civilization from its beginnings to the present. Areas examined include history, art history, music, and literature.

331 Italian Civilization II (3). Prerequisite, ITAL 204 or 402. A multidisciplinary examination of postunification Italian culture conducted in Italian. The course will trace out recurrent themes by examining texts from various media: film, literature, music, television, journalism, and architecture.

333 Italian Film and Culture (3). Analysis of films from World War II to the present. Lectures and discussion in English. Films in Italian with English subtitles. Readings in Italian for majors, in translation for nonmajors.

335 Themes in Italian Film (3). Themes in Italian cinema: literary adaptation, neorealism, a single auteur or period, representations of fascism, the city, the country, industrialization, social space, north/south difference, regionalism, gender, and sexuality.

340 Italian America in Literature and Film (3). Explores the images of Italian Americans in literature and film, from representations of Italian immigrant otherness to attempts at identity construction, differentiation, and assimilation by Italian American authors and filmmakers.

343 Italian Culture Today: Modern Italy as a Nation 1860 to Present (3). This course offers a cultural approach to the study of Italian culture in the 20th century, examining material across disciplines: literature, visual arts, music, history, architecture.

345 Italian Women Writers (3). Introduces students to Italian women writers whose works explore how historical realities such as fascism, resistance, migration, immigration, and changing institutions of work and family have affected women.

357 Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio in English (3). Introduces students to the world of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio, situated within the context of medieval and early modern Europe.

370 Survey of Italian Literature I (3). Prerequisite, ITAL 204 or 402. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A survey of Italian literature from its origins through the 16th century.

371 Survey of Italian Literature II (3). Prerequisite, ITAL 204 or 402. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A survey of Italian literature from the 17th century to the present.

382 The Modern Italian Novel (3). Prerequisite, ITAL 204 or 402. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A representative sampling of the genre from Pirandello to the present.

390 Special Topics or Readings in Italian Literature (3). Independent study on a selected topic in Italian literature and culture agreed upon by the student and a member of the faculty.

395 Research for Advanced Students (1–3). Prerequisite, ITAL 300. Required preparation, two major-level courses or permission of the instructor. A tutorial for advanced students in Italian on a topic agreed upon by the student and a member of the faculty.

398 Undergraduate Seminar in Italian (3). A seminar on a previously announced subject.

401 Beginning Accelerated Italian (3). For students with special aptitude and interest in developing Italian language skills. Covers first-year material in one semester. Emphasis in the first semester is on grammar. May not be used to satisfy the Foundations foreign language requirement.

402 Intermediate Accelerated Italian (3). Prerequisite, ITAL 102 or 401. Covers second-year material in one semester. Develops skills, with increasing emphasis on reading and writing. Prepares students for more advanced courses.

503 Advanced Composition for Graduate Students (3). Review of advanced grammar. Composition on a variety of topics designed to enhance writing proficiency in Italian. Training in the use of stylistic devices.

511 Survey of Italian Literature and Culture I (to 1600) (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. The survey is based on anthologies, with particular attention to authors and texts included in the current departmental reading lists.

512 Survey of Italian Literature and Culture II (1600 to present) (3). Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. See ITAL 511 for description.

526 History of the Italian Language (3). Prerequisite, ITAL 204 or 402. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. The evolution of the Italian language from vulgar Latin. Substratum theory and the development of the various dialects. Codification of the literary standard during the Renaissance. “Questione della lingua.”

691H Honors Thesis (3). Required of students reading for honors. Preparation of an essay under direction of a member of the faculty. Topics to be approved by thesis director in consultation with honors advisor.

692H Honors Thesis in Italian (3). Restricted to senior honors candidates. Second semester of senior honors thesis. Thesis preparation under the direction of a departmental faculty member.

PORT

101 Elementary Portuguese I (3). Introduces the essential elements of Portuguese structure and vocabulary and aspects of Brazilian and Portuguese culture. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed in that order.

102 Elementary Portuguese II (3). Prerequisite, PORT 101. Continues study of essential elements of Portuguese structure, vocabulary, and aspects of Brazilian and Portuguese culture. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed in that order.

111 Intensive Elementary Portuguese (6). Covers the material of the PORT 101 and 102 sequence in a single semester.

203 Intermediate Portuguese I (3). Prerequisite, PORT 102, 111, or 401. Further development of language with emphasis on speaking, writing, and a review of grammar. Includes advanced Portuguese structures, cultural and literary texts.

204 Intermediate Portuguese II (3). Prerequisite, PORT 203. Continued development of language skills for communication. Further study of grammar.

212 Intensive Intermediate Portuguese (6). Prerequisite, PORT 102, 111, or 401. A continuation of PORT 111; covers the material of PORT 203 and 204 in one semester.

270 Modern Brazilian Literature in English Translation (3). This course is devoted to the study of Brazilian culture through representative works of 19th- and 20th-century literature.

275 Portuguese and Brazilian Fiction in Translation (3). The study of selected literary works by major writers from Portugal, Brazil, and the former Portuguese colonies in Africa.

310 Intensive Oral Communication in Portuguese (3). Prerequisite, PORT 204 or 402. Development of speaking skills through discussion of media, popular music, and selected texts.

323 Cultures of Brazil, Portugal, and Portuguese Africa (3). Prerequisite, PORT 204 or 402. Emphasizes the learning of Portuguese through cultural context. Language, society, and miscegenation will be approached through texts and films. Focus on important aspects of religion, festivities, and popular music from the Portuguese-speaking countries of three continents.

382 Women Writers: Brazil and Beyond (3). Trajectory of women writers of the Portuguese-speaking world, with main focus on texts of the 20th and 21st century. Analysis of works within a social-historical and literary context.

385 Lusophone Africa in Literature: Discovery to the Present (3). History of Luso-African literature with special attention to writers such as Mia Couto, Guilherme de Melo, Paula de Chiziane, and José Eduardo. Taught in English; available for credit for major/minor in Portuguese if readings and written work are done in Portuguese.

387 Brazilian Religious Movements through Film and Literature (3). Literary and cinematic representations of Candomblé, Sebastianism, Positivism, and Spiritism from late-19th through the 20th century. Focus on the penetration these forms of religiosity into mainstream Brazilian culture. Taught in English; credit for Portuguese major/minor if readings and work done in Portuguese.

388 Portuguese, Brazilian, and African Identity in Film (3). Study of the literary and cultural film production of the Portuguese-speaking world on three continents. Films in Portuguese with English subtitles.

390 Special Topics or Readings in Portuguese (3). Independent study on a selected topic in Luso-Brazilian literature and culture agreed upon by the student and a member of the faculty.

395 Research for Advanced Students (1–3). Prerequisite, PORT 300. Required preparation, two major-level courses or permission of the instructor. A tutorial for advanced students in Portuguese on a topic agreed upon by the student and a member of the faculty.

398 Undergraduate Seminar in Portuguese (3). A seminar on a previously announced subject.

401 Accelerated Brazilian Portuguese I (3). For students who have fulfilled their foreign language requirement with another language. Covers first-year material in one semester. Introduction to spoken Portuguese with literary and cultural readings. May not be used to satisfy the Foundations foreign language requirement.

402 Accelerated Brazilian Portuguese II (3). Prerequisite, PORT 102, 111, or 401. Covers second-year material in one semester. Further study of spoken Portuguese with literary and cultural readings. May not be used to satisfy the Foundations foreign language requirement.

501 Survey of Portuguese Literature I (3). Prerequisite, PORT 204 or 402. An introduction to Portuguese literature from its origins through the 18th century.

502 Survey of Portuguese Literature II (3). Prerequisite, PORT 204 or 402. A survey of Portuguese literature of the 19th and 20th centuries.

503 Survey of Brazilian Literature I (3). Prerequisite, PORT 204 or 402. A survey of Brazilian literature of the colonial period and 19th century.

504 Survey of Brazilian Literature II (3). Prerequisite, PORT 204 or 402. Study of major writers of 20th-century Brazilian literature.

526 History of the Portuguese Language (3). Prerequisite, PORT 402. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Survey of the history of Portuguese with stress on the characteristics of Brazilian Portuguese and the factors underlying them.

530 Varieties of Portuguese (3). Introduction to the linguistic analysis of Portuguese. Basic linguistic comparison of Portuguese dialects at different levels of linguistic structure. Emphasis on theoretical background in understanding language variation as a property of natural languages.

535 Brazilian Drama (3). Prerequisite, PORT 402. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A study of representative Brazilian plays of the 20th century with a review of the development of the theater in Brazil.

691H Honors Thesis (3). Required of all students reading for honors. Preparation of an essay under the direction of a faculty member. Topic to be approved by thesis director in consultation with honors advisor.

692H Honors Thesis in Portuguese (3). Restricted to senior honors candidates. Second semester of senior honors thesis. Thesis preparation under the direction of a departmental faculty member.

ROML

50 First-Year Seminar: The Art and Science of Language: Orality and Literacy in the Information Age (3). Students examine the expressive use of language in oral and written texts. Particular emphasis is placed on the contribution of the cognitive sciences to an understanding of how humans communicate.

51 First-Year Seminar: National and Cultural Identities in the Romance Areas (3). Explores the development of national identities in the Romance world, focusing on conscious and unconscious attitudes toward language that helped fashion the four major Romance languages.

52 First-Year Seminar: The Value of Language in Identity: Hispanics in the United States (3). This course explores the cultural challenges for Spanish-speaking immigrants in the United States, particularly the importance of language in culture and identity.

53 First-Year Seminar: Oral Histories of Our Local Hispanic Community (3). Introduces students to procedures for gathering, transcribing, and analyzing oral histories and to issues related to the growing Hispanic population at both the national and local levels.

54 First-Year Seminar: Issues in Francophone Literature (3). Studies such issues as national identities and national memory; the impact of colonization, postcolonialism, and globalization; conflicts between tradition and modernity; and the place of women in history.

55 First-Year Seminar: Writing with an Accent: Latino Literature and Culture (3). A study of the literary production of Hispanics living in the United States. Examines works by Chicano, Puerto Rican, Nuyorican, Dominican, and Cuban American writers.

56 First-Year Seminar: Italians in Search of Harmony (3). This course explores the concept of harmony in selected Italian writers from Dante to contemporary film directors.

57 First-Year Seminar: Nature in Latin American Literature: Ecology, Gender, and Other Issues (3). Using translated masterpieces, the course explores such topics as indigenous ecology and Native Americans’ survival, race, development and the destruction of the environment, gender roles, and nature as female.

58 First-Year Seminar: Writing a Woman’s Life (3). Explores narratives by which women expect and are expected to live. Participants read stories by women who have lived the usual life and then rewritten it and stories written by women trying to compose their lives in new narratives as they reflect upon ones their culture holds out to them.

59 First-Year Seminar: Courts and Courtly Culture in 16th- and 17th-Century Spain (3). How did literature, visual arts, clothing, food, gifts, buildings, theater, and etiquettes make up the court culture of early modern Spain? This course will engage students in discussions about the making of the fascinating court world. It addresses how monarchs and courtiers lived and how literature and other cultural forms represented them.

60 First-Year Seminar: Spanish and Entrepreneurship: Language, Culture, and North Carolina Communities (3). Students study Spanish language and Latino cultures through the lens of social entrepreneurship, a process of opportunity recognition, resource gathering, and value creation that brings sustainability to a social mission.

61 First-Year Seminar: Language in Autism and Developmental Disorders (3). In the United States, 17 percent of children have a developmental disability. How do they learn and use language to communicate, socialize, and achieve goals? How do we improve their language skills? This course examines these and other questions and helps students understand and carry out research with special populations.

62 First-Year Seminar: What Happened to Latin? (3). Analysis of how Latin transformed the linguistic configuration of the world and its lasting impact on culture and science. No previous knowledge of Latin or of any Romance language necessary to enroll.

89 First-Year Seminar: Special Topics (3). Special topics course. Content will vary by each semester.

229 Literature in the Romance Languages (3). An introduction to literature in the Romance languages. All readings in English translation. Focus and readings will vary.

280 Social Theory and Cultural Diversity (3). Introduction to basic paradigms of thinking about cultural difference (race, gender, nationality, religion, etc.), shaping how we act, think, and imagine as members of diverse cultures.

500 Research Methods in Romance Languages and European Studies (3). Provides training in research methodology either for a B.A. with honors or M.A. thesis. Students will learn to conceptualize an original research project and to identify and assess the current intellectual debates in their chosen areas of research.

600 Master’s Workshop on Theory (3). This graduate seminar consists of a series of in-depth studies of several major contemporary approaches to literary theory. Designed primarily as an elective for master’s candidates in Romance languages, this course aims to prepare students for advanced literature and literary theory courses.

650 The Politics of Remembering: Memory, History, and Power in 20th-Century Europe (3). Interdisciplinary, comparative, and multimedia approach to the question of memory and history in 20th-century Europe. Explores individual memory, collective memory, and commemoration. Survey of interdisciplinary approaches to the field and an examination of historical sites through the narratives of mental illness, fiction, memoir, testimonial literature, photography, and film.

660 Film and Culture in Brazil and Spanish America (3). Critical examination of 20th-century Latin American cultural history in Brazil and Spanish-speaking countries, including Mexico, Cuba, El Salvador, Peru, Colombia, and Argentina. Course is framed between late 19th-century modernization and the contemporary discussion on globalization.

698 Seminar in Romance Languages: Capstone Course (3).

SPAN

100 Elementary Spanish Review (3). Online course that includes essentials of elementary Spanish. Designed for students with previous study who place into first-semester Spanish. Upon successful completion students will enroll in SPAN 102.

101 Elementary Spanish I (3). Introduces the essential elements of Spanish structure and vocabulary and cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed.

102 Elementary Spanish II (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 100 or 101. Continues the study of the essential elements of Spanish structure, vocabulary, and the cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.

105 Spanish for High Beginners (4). Accelerated course that covers SPAN 101 and 102 for students with previous study of Spanish. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.

111 Intensive Elementary Spanish (6). Permission of the instructor. Covers the material of the SPAN 101 and 102 sequence in a single semester.

203 Intermediate Spanish I (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 102, 104, 105, 111, or 401. Develops language skills for communication. Review of elementary Spanish. Expands awareness of the Spanish-speaking world through readings and discussion of representative texts.

204 Intermediate Spanish II (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 203. Continued development of language skills for communication. Considers finer points of linguistic structure. Expands awareness of Spanish culture through reading, inquiry, and class discussion.

212 Intensive Intermediate Spanish (6). Prerequisite, SPAN 102, 104, 105, or 401. A continuation of SPAN 111; covers the material of SPAN 203–204 in one semester.

250 Language through Culture and Literature (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 204, 212, or 402. Emphasis on further development and refinement of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills, including review of grammar. Study of cultural and literary texts.

255 Conversation I (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 204, 212, or 402. Introductory conversation. Builds oral proficiency and awareness of Hispanic culture. Emphasizes vocabulary and grammatical accuracy; writing activities support speaking. Not open to native speakers.

260 Introduction to Spanish and Spanish American Literature (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 204, 212, or 402. Develops skills for further literary studies while increasing Spanish language proficiency and providing different world views through literature. Native speakers need permission of the instructor.

262 Introduction to Spanish and Spanish American Literature for Heritage Learners (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 204. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Develops skills for further literary studies. Open only to heritage learners.

265 Spanish Language and Culture for the Professions (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 204. All-skills course geared toward the language of various professions including business, journalism/mass communications, medicine, law. Emphasizes cultural knowledge to enhance professional work in the United States Hispanic community. Open only to students in the minor in Spanish for the professions.

266 Spanish Conversation for Heritage Learners (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 204. Spanish conversation for native speakers. Develops vocabulary and standard grammar skills, supports research in the history and lives of Hispanics in the United States. First in two-course sequence with SPAN 326.

270 Contemporary Spanish American Prose Fiction in Translation (3). Narrative works of Borges, Cortázar, García Márquez, and other contemporary Spanish American writers.

275 Masterpieces of Spanish Literature in Translation (3). Representative Spanish authors from the Middle Ages to the present.

280 Cervantes in English Translation (3). Study and discussion of Don Quijote with consideration of the Exemplary Novels and the background of Renaissance prose.

292 Spanish Peer Tutoring (3). Permission of the program director based on oral proficiency interview. Students must have advanced proficiency in Spanish. Students learn and implement fundamentals of foreign language instruction as peer tutors for elementary Spanish courses. Students may take course twice for credit. May not count toward the major or minor in Spanish.

293 Spanish Service Learning (1). Permission of the instructor. Service-learning component for students enrolled in Spanish language courses. May not count toward the major or minor in Spanish.

294 Online Grammar Review (1). This Pass/Fail one-credit hour course is designed for students who have successfully completed SPAN 204 (or its equivalent) and have been informed by their instructor that they would benefit from additional review of grammar. SPAN 294 can be taken in conjunction with other fifth-semester courses.

300 Spanish Composition and Grammar Review (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 250, 255, or 260. Intensive grammar review and composition designed to improve accuracy and develop writing skills, using process and task-oriented approaches.

308 LAC Recitation (1). Prerequisite, SPAN 204. Coregistration in a specified LAC course required. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A recitation section for LAC courses. May not count toward the major or minor in Spanish.

310 Conversation II (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 250, 255, or 260. Expands speaking skills through vocabulary building, discussion of texts, and conversation. Ongoing development of writing skills. Not open to native speakers.

320 Spanish for Business (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 265. All-skills course with review of grammar and extensive writing and speaking practice. Vocabulary, readings, and activities geared toward the language of business professions in the context of the United States Hispanic community.

321 Spanish for the Medical Professions (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 265. All-skills course with review of grammar, extensive writing and speaking practice. Vocabulary, readings, and activities geared toward the language of health care professions in the context of the United States Hispanic community. Open only to students in the minor in Spanish for the professions.

322 Spanish for Journalism and Mass Communications (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 265. All-skills course with review of grammar and extensive writing and speaking. Vocabulary, readings, activities geared toward the language of journalism and mass communications within the context of the Hispanic community. Open only to students in the minor in Spanish for the professions.

323 Spanish for the Legal Professions (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 265. All-skills course with review of grammar and extensive writing and speaking. Vocabulary, readings, and activities geared toward the language of legal professions within the context of the Hispanic community. Open only to students in the minor in Spanish for the professions.

326 Spanish Grammar and Composition for Heritage Speakers (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 255 or 266. Study of language and society from the perspective of Spanish speakers in the United States, focusing on vocabulary building through situational practice, review of basic grammar, and practice in reading and writing.

327 Venture Creation in the Spanish-Speaking World (3). Prerequisite, ECON 325 or SPAN 265. All-skills course with a review of grammar and extensive writing and speaking practice. Vocabulary, readings, and activities geared toward the language of business, business planning, and entrepreneurship in the context of the United States Hispanic community.

329 Spanish for Professional and Community Engagement (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 320, 321, 322, 323, or 327. Seventh-semester capstone course applying skills in Spanish language and cultures to professional and community contexts. Assignments include professional documents, community service work and projects, and a research project. Open only to students in the minor in Spanish for the professions.

330 Cultural History of the Hispanic World (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 300 or 326. History and cultures of the Hispanic world from the beginnings to the mid-16th century. Explores the peculiarities that give each of the regions of Spain and Spanish America its distinctive character, as well as the elements that have shaped their societies and cultural traditions during the periods studied.

331 Cultural History of the Hispanic World II (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 300 or 326. History and cultures of Spain and Spanish America from the 16th century to the beginnings of the 20th century. Explores the distinctive character of regions of Spain and Spanish America, as well as the elements that have shaped their societies and cultural traditions during the periods studied.

335 United States Hispanic Community (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 300. The immigration experience of the United States Hispanic community. Increases students’ cultural sensitivity through cultural simulations and other activities. Open only to students in the minor in Spanish for the professions.

340 Cultures of Contemporary Spain (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 300 or 326. Recent trends in thought, art, film, music, and social practices. Highlights regions such as Galicia, the Basque country, Catalonia, and Andalusia. Topics include nationalism, ethnicity, gender, migration, and popular culture.

344 Contemporary Latin America: Mexico, Central America, and the Andean Region (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 300, 320, 321, 322, 323, or 326. Recent trends in thought, art, film, music, social practices, etc. Topics may include colonialism, race, ethnicity, modernization, ecology, religion, gender, and popular culture.

345 Contemporary Latin America: The Caribbean and the Southern Cone (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 300 or 326. Recent trends in thought, art, film, music, social practices, etc. Topics include colonialism, race, ethnicity, modernization, ecology, religion, gender, and popular culture.

348 Mesoamerica through Its Literature (3). Literature of the Mayas, Aztecs, and their neighbors from the pre-Columbian period to the present. Historical, cultural, and religious information with discussions of the complexity and variation of intercultural ways of life. A comparative approach includes the aesthetic similarities, differences, and rhetorical strategies employed by indigenous writers.

350 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 300 or 326. Refines speaking skills through discussion of contemporary topics of the Spanish-speaking world using current periodicals, literature, etc. Includes significant writing component, review of grammar.

361 Hispanic Film and Culture (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 300, 326, 340, 344, or 345. Study of contemporary cultural, historical, and aesthetic issues through narrative film, documentary, and other media from Latin America and Spain.

362 The Quest for Identity in Contemporary Spain (EURO 362) (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 330 or 340. This course studies the multifaceted identity of contemporary Spain through the analysis of representative films and literary works

369 Introduction to Translation (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 300 or 326. Theory and practice of translation through a dual approach of conceptual readings and classroom discussion and workshops in interdisciplinary fields. Emphasizes cultural role of the translator as mediator.

371 Survey of Spanish Literature to 1700 (3). Prerequisites, SPAN 260, and 300 or 326. The literature of Spain through 1700. Representative authors of Spanish literature from the medieval, Renaissance, and Golden Age.

372 Survey of Spanish Literature since 1700 (3). Prerequisites, SPAN 260, and 300 or 326. Main trends and movements in modern Spanish literature. Designed to familiarize students with methods of literary analysis and literary history. Readings and classes are in Spanish.

373 Survey of Spanish American Literature (3). Prerequisites, SPAN 260, and 300 or 326. The literature of Spanish America from pre-Colombian times to the present. Representative authors and texts from various literary movements will be studied in their sociohistorical contexts.

375 Spanish of the United States (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 300 or 326. Study of the Spanish found today in the United States, its history and characteristics, and the socioeconomic repercussions of its presence in contact with English.

376 Phonetics and Phonology (LING 376) (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 300 or 326. Introduction to the description of sound systems with a focus on Spanish. Includes the study of the historical development of Spanish and its areal and social variation in Spain, Latin America, and the United States.

377 Grammatical Structure of Spanish (LING 377) (3). Prerequisites, SPAN 300 or 326, and 376. Introduction to the linguistic study of meaning, grammatical form, and dialectal and sociolinguistic variation, with a particular focus on modern Spanish and the languages of Spain and Latin America.

378 Afro-Hispanic Language Contacts (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 376 or 377. Introduction to the study of Spanish in contact with African languages in the Iberian Peninsula and Latin America since the beginning of the slave trade. Linguistic analysis of literary texts from a variety of eras will assess how contact with the African diaspora has had a permanent impact on contemporary Spanish.

380 Masterpieces of Spanish Drama (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 371, 372, or 373. Spanish-language theater. Specific topics to be announced in advance by the instructor.

381 Masterpieces of Spanish and Spanish American Poetry (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 371, 372, or 373. Specific topics to be announced in advance by the instructor.

382 Masterpieces of Spanish Prose (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 371, 372, or 373. Selected works of prose from the Spanish canon organized by topic or theme.

383 Medieval Spanish Literature (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 371. A survey of lyric poetry, drama, prose, and genres peculiar to the literature before 1500.

384 Spanish Literature of the Renaissance (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 371. A survey of poetry, drama, and prose of the 16th century.

385 Contemporary Spanish American Prose Fiction (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 371, 372, or 373. A study of the cultural, political, and aesthetic dimensions of the novels and short stories of selected contemporary Spanish American writers such as Borges, Cortázar, García Márquez, Puig, etc.

386 Contemporary Central American Literatures and Cultures (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 371, 372, or 373. The course will explore the most prominent authors of Central America (Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and the United States) since the 1950s. Critical analysis of their poetry, short stories, novels, testimonial narratives, and films.

387 Eroticism and Its Metaphors in Contemporary Latin American Literature (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 373. Literary manifestations of love, sexuality, and eroticism as social and political metaphors of contemporary Latin America. Selections from Sor Juana, Agustini, Darío, López Velarde, and Neruda with more emphasis on 20th-century works by writers like Donoso, Vargas Llosa, García Márquez, Poniatowska, Rivera Garza, and Montero.

388 Narratives of the Mexican Revolution (3). Prerequisites, SPAN 260 and 373. Analysis of historical and literary writing, cinematic productions, and popular corridos produced in response to the Mexican Revolution. In addition to exposure to significant milestones in the development of Mexican literature, students will strengthen their Spanish reading ability and sharpen critical skills.

389 Outside Cuba: Diasporic Literature and Culture (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 373. An overview of the literary and cultural production (essays, novels, short stories, plays, music, film) of Cubans living in the diaspora after the Cuban revolution.

394 Creative Writing in Spanish (3). Prerequisites, SPAN 300 or 326, and 371, 372, or 373. Workshop designed to develop critical communication skills through student short-story writing in Spanish, with an introduction to influential texts on the craft of writing by authors such as Horacio Quiroga, Julio Garmendia, Felisberto Hernández, Augusto Roa Bastos, Juan Bosch, Jorge Luis Borges, and Julio Cortázar.

395 Research for Advanced Students (1–3). Prerequisite, SPAN 300. Required preparation, two major-level courses or permission of the instructor. Research project for advanced students on a topic agreed upon by the student and faculty member.

397 Undergraduate Seminar in Language and Linguistics (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 376 or 377. Seminar on a previously announced topic.

398 Undergraduate Seminar in Literature and Culture (3). Prerequisites, SPAN 371, 372, or 373. Two of the prerequisite courses, or equivalent, are required. A seminar on a previously announced subject.

401 Beginning Accelerated Spanish (3). Required preparation, proven competence in another foreign language. Covers first-year material in one semester. Emphasis on speaking and grammar. May not be used to satisfy the Foundations foreign language requirement.

402 Intermediate Accelerated Spanish (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 102, 105, 111, or 401. Covers second-year material in one semester. Continued development of all skills. Spanish 402 prepares students for more advanced courses.

403 Advanced Composition (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 300 or 326. Review of advanced grammar. Compositions on a variety of topics designed to enhance writing proficiency in Spanish. Training in the use of stylistic devices.

404 Elementary Spanish for Health Professionals (3). Distance course requiring access to the Internet. Focuses on communication within the context of Latino/a immigrant culture in health care settings.

405 Intermediate Spanish for Health Care Professionals (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 102 or 404. Distance course requiring access to the Internet. Focuses on improving communication within the context of Latino/a immigrant culture in health care settings. This course is equivalent to SPAN 203 (Intermediate Spanish I) and therefore fulfills the foreign language requirement.

414 Languages of Spain I (3). Study of the language and culture of one of the languages of Spain other than Spanish. Selection will vary according to term: Catalan, Euskera (Basque), Galician.

415 Languages of Spain II (3). Continuation of the study of the language and culture of one of the languages of Spain other than Spanish. Selection will vary according to term: Catalan, Euskera, Galician.

416 Languages of the Americas I (3). Study of the language and culture of one of the languages of Spanish America other than Spanish. Selection will vary according to term: Mayan, Nahuatl, Quechua, Guarani.

417 Languages of the Americas II (3). Continuation of the study of the language and culture of one of the languages of Spanish America other than Spanish. Selection will vary according to term: Mayan, Nahuatl, Quechua, Guarani.

601 Spanish for Reading (3). For students with no background in Spanish or those needing a review of grammatical structures and vocabulary in preparation for the reading knowledge exam for graduate students (FLPA).

613 Colonial and 19th-Century Spanish American Literature (3). Prerequisites, SPAN 371 or 372, and 373. Advanced survey of literary works from 16th- through 19th-century Spanish America, with emphasis on their rhetorical foundations and historical, political, and aesthetic connections.

614 Modernist and Contemporary Spanish American Literature (3). Prerequisites, SPAN 371, and 372 or 373. Advanced survey of Spanish American works from the 1880s through the present, with emphasis on their rhetorical foundations and historical, cultural, political, and aesthetic connections.

617 Cervantes and the Quijote (3). Prerequisites, SPAN 371, and 372 or 373. Close reading of Cervantes’ Quijote and selected Novelas ejemplares, with consideration of the background of Renaissance prose (romance of chivalry, pastoral, and sentimental novel) in relation to 16th-century historiography.

620 Women in Hispanic Literature (WMST 620) (3). Prerequisites, SPAN 371 or 372, and 373. The image of woman in 16th- and 17th-century Hispanic literature. A study of texts by Spanish and Spanish American authors. Readings in Spanish or in English translation. Lectures in English.

625 Indigenous Literatures and Cultures of the Américas (3). Panoramic view of indigenous literatures in the Américas through a study of a variety of indigenous textual production including chronicles, manifestos, novels, testimonial narratives, short stories, poetry, artistic production, and film.

630 Literature and the Visual Arts in Spain (3). Study of the literature of the Iberian Peninsula and developments in the visual arts from the Middle Ages to the early 20th century.

635 Modern Spanish Drama (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 370, 371, or 373. A study of plays by principal Spanish dramatists of the 20th century.

650 The Spanish Comedia of the Golden Age (3). A comprehensive study of the Golden Age Spanish theater from its Renaissance beginnings through the 17th century.

677 Spanish Syntax (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 377. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Why do we say in Spanish “me gusta” (“to me pleases”) for “I like it”? Syntax studies how words associate in larger structures. This class provides the tools to understand the forms of different varieties of Spanish.

678 Cultural and Linguistic History of the Spanish Language (LING 309) (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 300 or 326. The formation of the Spanish language and its cultures from Latin origins. Special attention to expansion of the Spanish Americas and the situation of Spanish today.

679 Spanish Pragmatics (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 377. This course is an introduction to the study of meaning and language use, with a focus on Spanish. Includes discussion of the classical texts in the field as well as analysis of a variety of data (corpora, fieldwork, and experimental materials).

680 First- and Second-Language Acquisition of Spanish (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 377. Why and how do children learn language so easily, and why is it so difficult for adults to learn a second language? This course examines these and related questions in the light of current theories of first- and second-language acquisition, with a focus on Spanish.

682 Spanish Sociolinguistics (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 376, 377, or 378. Interdisciplinary approach to studying the Spanish language as a social and cultural phenomenon. Explores the relationship between language and culture, communicative competence and pragmatics, social and linguistic factors in language variation and change, attitudes toward language and language choice, linguistic prejudice and language myths, and language and identity.

691H Honors Thesis (3). Required of students reading for honors. Preparation of an essay under the direction of a faculty member. Topic to be approved by thesis director in consultation with honors advisor.

692H Honors Thesis in Spanish (3). Restricted to senior honors candidates. Second semester of senior honors thesis. Thesis preparation under the direction of a departmental faculty member.