Gillings School of Global Public Health

www.sph.unc.edu

BARBARA K. RIMER, Dr.P.H., Dean

Anna Maria Siega-Riz, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Academic Programs

Charletta Sims Evans, M.Ed., Assistant Dean for Student Affairs

Four departments in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health offer undergraduate degrees: biostatistics, environmental sciences and engineering, health policy and management, and nutrition. Lists of faculty members in those departments are included here, along with information about undergraduate majors.

Introduction

The UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health provides exceptional teaching, conducts ground-breaking research, and delivers dedicated service to people across North Carolina, throughout the United States and around the world. Ranked the top public school of public health by U.S. News and World Report for 2012 and second among all public health schools, the school’s mission is to improve public health, promote individual well-being, and eliminate health disparities.

The school, accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health, and located in close proximity to UNC–Chapel Hill’s schools of medicine, nursing, dentistry, and pharmacy, offers undergraduate and graduate programs on campus, and through our state-of-the-art online-education programs. The Michael Hooker Research Center and our many renovated laboratories and classrooms provide an environment highly conducive to learning about public health and discovering new ways to improve and promote health worldwide.

Beyond campus, we teach, conduct research, and serve communities across our state and nation and around the world. Our Office of Global Health organizes the school’s global health activities. The school’s service and outreach arm, the North Carolina Institute for Public Health, brings public health scholarship and practice communities together. Research and Innovation Solutions (www.sph.unc.edu/accelerate) enables us to anticipate new public health challenges, quickly find solutions, and accelerate the delivery of best practices to improve people’s lives.

To learn more about the public health field, visit www.whatispublichealth.org. The site, developed by the Association of Schools of Public Health, defines public health, describes its impact on our lives, and introduces a variety of public health careers.

Programs of Study

The undergraduate degree offered is the bachelor of science in public health (B.S.P.H.). Four majors are available to undergraduate students: biostatistics, environmental health sciences, health policy and management, and nutrition. Each of these combines features of a broad-based education with concentrated study in a specific public health discipline. The programs prepare individuals for preprofessional positions in health-related fields and provide a firm base for graduate study. Students are permitted to pursue two majors in the school. Students are subject to the requirements in place when they are admitted to the Gillings School of Global Public Health; consequently, requirements described in this bulletin particularly apply to students admitted to the school during the 2013–2014 academic year.

Admission to the School

Students who wish to obtain the B.S.P.H. degree typically spend two years in the General College of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (or in an equivalent core program of academic study elsewhere) and two subsequent years under the administration of the Gillings School of Global Public Health. Enrollment in the B.S.P.H. degree programs is limited. Typically a student is selected in the latter half of the sophomore year and admitted on a competitive basis. The minimum recommended grade point average for admission to biostatistics, environmental health sciences, health policy and management, and nutrition is 3.0.

For current UNC–Chapel Hill students, the B.S.P.H. application is available online at app.applyyourself.com/AYApplicantLogin/fl_ApplicantLogin.asp?id=unc-ch.

Transfer students must apply through the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at admissions.unc.edu/Apply/Transfer_Students/default.html.

Requirements Common to All Undergraduate Majors in the Gillings School of Global Public Health

The last 30 hours of degree credit must be taken in residence in Chapel Hill. The Gillings School of Global Public Health requires that students earn a C (not C-) or better in prerequisite, core public health, and department-required courses. The Department of Nutrition requires at least a B- in BIOL 252, CHEM 102, CHEM 261, and NUTR 240.

At the end of the sophomore year, students are expected to have earned approximately 60 semester hours of credit. These must include all Foundations and Approaches requirements and at least five Connections requirements, including global issues, experiential education, and U.S. diversity. One of the two physical and life science Approaches courses must be BIOL 101/101L.

The junior/senior total of approximately 60 semester hours includes BIOS 600 (BIOS 500H for biostatistics students), ENVR 600*, EPID 600, HBEH 600, HPM 600* and for most departments, a minimum of three electives (seven credit hours) outside the school.

The specific requirements of the four majors are outlined below.

*Environmental sciences and engineering majors and health policy and management majors, see details under department-specific requirements.


DEPARTMENT OF BIOSTATISTICS

www.med.unc.edu/ahs/clinical

MICHAEL R. KOSOROK, Chair

Jianwen Cai, Vice Chair

Professors

Jianwen Cai, Jason P. Fine, Amy H. Herring, Joseph G. Ibrahim, William D. Kalsbeek, Alan Karr, Gary G. Koch, Michael R. Kosorok, Danyu Lin, James Marron, Andrew Nobel, Pranab K. Sen, Richard Smith, Chirayath M. Suchindran, Kinh-Nhue Truong, Fred Wright, Haibo Zhou, Hongtu Zhu, Fei Zou.

Associate Professors

Lloyd J. Edwards, Michael G. Hudgens, Anastasia Ivanova, Yufeng Liu, Bahjat F. Qaqish.

Assistant Professors

Yun Li, Wei Sun, Michael Wu.

Research Professors

Shrikant I. Bangdiwala, Richard E. Bilsborrow, Robert M. Hamer, John S. Preisser Jr., Paul W. Stewart.

Professor of the Practice

Sonia M. Davis.

Research Associate Professors

David J. Couper, Rosalie Dominik, Ethan Lange.

Research Assistant Professors

Eric Bair, J.L. Crandell, Denise Esserman, Pei-Fe Kuan, Fang-Cheng Lin, Todd A. Schwartz, Daniela Sotres-Alvarez, Lisa M. Wruck.

Adjunct Professors

David B. Dunson, Herman E. Mitchell, Robert L. Obenchain, Shyamal Peddada, Ibrahim A. Salama, Clarice R. Weinberg.

Adjunct Associate Professors

Haitao Chu, Matthew R. Nelson, Maura E. Stokes.

Adjunct Assistant Professors

Jacqueline Johnson, Karen Kesler, Jean Orelien, William Valdar, Mark Weaver.

Clinical Assistant Professor

Jane Monaco.

Research Instructor

Katherine J. Roggenkamp.

Professors Emeriti

Lloyd E. Chambless, Clarence E. Davis, James E. Grizzle, Ronald W. Helms, Lawrence L. Kupper, Keith E. Muller, Dana E. Quade, Michael J. Symons, Craig D. Turnbull.

Majoring in Biostatistics: Bachelor of Science in Public Health

Core Requirements

• Public health core courses: ENVR 600, EPID 600, HBEH 600, and HPM 600

• BIOS 500H, 511, 545, 550, 664, 668, and 691

Additional Requirements

• BIOL 101/101L; COMP 110 or 116; and MATH 231, 232, and 233 are required before matriculation into the program

• BIOL 201 or 202 (which have prerequisites, BIOL 101 and CHEM 101 or 102)

• MATH 381, 521 or 528, and 547

• Three electives outside the Gillings School of Global Public Health

Biostatistics is a discipline concerned with the improvement of human health through the application and advancement of statistical science. The undergraduate major in biostatistics prepares students to apply quantitative skills to a variety of health-related issues, including clinical trials, environmental studies, population studies, and studies involving patterns of disease, disability, and death. The curriculum consists of a strong mathematical background; advanced coursework in statistical applications, theory, and computing; and an understanding of the public health sciences.

The Department of Biostatistics in the Gillings School of Global Public Health was the first undergraduate program in the country to offer an undergraduate degree in biostatistics. The degree provides an excellent foundation for continued studies (primarily graduate school in biostatistics or medical school) and a strong foundation for employment in the health care industry for a small number of highly qualified students.

Honors in Biostatistics

The Department of Biostatistics has an honors program in which undergraduate seniors can pursue individualized study and undertake a special project. The program is intended for undergraduates to show their potential talent to do research and is not designed to award academic achievement. Students who have a grade point average of 3.2 or higher are eligible to participate in honors research and write an honors thesis. Faculty member readiness to guide the students in their honors work governs the final selection of those allowed to enter the program. Students completing an honors program must register for BIOS 693H and BIOS 694H.

Advising

The program director will serve as the academic advisor for all biostatistics undergraduates. Undergraduate students are encouraged to meet regularly with the program director and review their Tar Heel Tracker each semester. In addition, they can also visit the Office of Student Services. The program director and the student services office staff work with current and prospective majors by appointment (see “Contact Information” below). Departmental academic advising is particularly important for those majors who are considering going on to graduate school. Further information on courses, undergraduate research opportunities, the honors program, careers, and graduate schools may be obtained from the department’s Web site.

Special Opportunities in the Department of Biostatistics

Experiential Education

The required course, BIOS 664 Sample Survey Methodology, fulfills the General Education experiential education requirement. In addition, students are required to take BIOS 691 Field Observations in Biostatistics during the fall semester of the senior year. This course consists of an orientation to and observation of six or more major nonacademic institutions in North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park area that employ biostatisticians, including pharmaceutical companies, contract research organizations, nonprofit companies, and government agencies. BIOS 691 does not fulfill the General Education experiential education requirement.

Laboratory Teaching Internships and Assistantships

Students are encouraged to investigate part-time employment during the academic year and full-time employment during the summer after their junior year with members of our faculty and their collaborators on current research and service projects.

Study Abroad

Students are encouraged to participate in the University’s study abroad programs before matriculating to the B.S.P.H. in biostatistics program or in the summers. Identification of a study abroad program early in the student’s career is necessary for course planning purposes.

Undergraduate Awards

The Theta Chapter of Delta Omega honors up to 10 percent of the department’s graduates with an award of excellence. Awards are presented in the spring as part of the biostatistics awards ceremony.

Undergraduate Research

Students are encouraged to consider doing senior honors research and should consult individual faculty members for opportunities. However, some students choose to take advantage of the myriad part-time employment opportunities with our faculty members on their research and service projects or opportunities within nearby Research Triangle Park.

Facilities

The Department of Biostatistics has a student library, a student study room, and computer facilities for its students.

Graduate School and Career Opportunities

In recent years the majority of biostatistics students have chosen to attend medical school or graduate school in biostatistics (or other closely related fields) following graduation. Approximately 30 percent of recent graduates have entered medical school immediately following graduation, and another third have entered graduate school, the majority of those in biostatistics programs. Previous graduates who chose to seek employment have taken positions in the pharmaceutical industry, contract research organizations, and medical settings. Traditionally, career opportunities have been excellent for skilled biostatisticians.

Contact Information

Dr. Jane Monaco, Program Director, CB# 7429, 3107D McGavran-Greenberg Hall, (919) 966-7250.

Department of Biostatistics, Office of Student Services, CB# 7429, 3103 McGavran-Greenberg Hall, (919) 966-7262. Web site: www.sph.unc.edu/bios.

BIOS

392 Undergraduate Internship (1–3). Academic credit for approved internship experience.

396 Readings in Biostatistics (1–12). Directed readings or laboratory study. May be taken more than once. Two to six laboratory hours a week.

500H Introduction to Biostatistics (3). Prerequisites, MATH 231 and 232; corequisite, BIOS 511. Access to SAS, Excel required. Permission of instructor for nonmajors. Introductory course in probability, data analysis, and statistical inference designed for BSPH biostatistics students. Topics include sampling, descriptive statistics, probability, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, chi-square distribution, two-way tables, power, sample size, ANOVA, nonparametric tests, correlation, regression, survival analysis.

511 Introduction to Statistical Computing and Data Management (4). Required preparation, previous or concurrent course in applied statistics. Permission of instructor for nonmajors. Introduction to use of computers to process and analyze data, concepts and techniques of research data management, and use of statistical programming packages and interpretation. Focus is on use of SAS for data management and reporting.

540 Problems in Biostatistics (1–21). Arrangements to be made with the faculty in each case. A course for students of public health who wish to make a study of some special problem in the statistics of the life sciences and public health.

543 Biostatistical Seminar for Clinical and Translational Investigators (1). Prerequisites, BIOS 541 and 542. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. This seminar provides clinical and translational researchers who have basic quantitative training in biostatistics with a more in-depth understanding of selected topics and introduces them to more advanced methods. Pass/Fail only.

545 Principles of Experimental Analysis (3). Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. Required preparation, basic familiarity with statistical software (preferably SAS able to do multiple linear regression) and introductory biostatistics, such as BIOS 600. Continuation of BIOS 600. Analysis of experimental and observational data, including multiple regression and analysis of variance and covariance.

550 Basic Elements of Probability and Statistical Inference I (GNET 636) (4). Required preparation, two semesters of calculus (such as MATH 231, 232). Fundamentals of probability; discrete and continuous distributions; functions of random variables; descriptive statistics; fundamentals of statistical inference, including estimation and hypothesis testing.

551 Basic Elements of Probability and Statistical Inference II (3). Prerequisite, BIOS 550. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Required preparation, basic familiarity with statistical software (preferably SAS able to do multiple linear regression) or permission of the instructor. The theory and application of multiple linear regression and related analysis of variance including logistic regression and Poisson regression.

600 Principles of Statistical Inference (3). Required preparation, knowledge of basic descriptive statistics. Major topics include elementary probability theory, probability distributions, estimation, tests of hypotheses, chi-squared procedures, regression, and correlation.

610 Biostatistics for Laboratory Scientists (3). Required preparation, elementary calculus. This course introduces the basic concepts and methods of statistics, focusing on applications in the experimental biological sciences.

613 Data Management in Clinical and Public Health Research (3). Familiarity with basic health research designs (For example, BIOS 664 or 668, EPID 726 or 733, MHCH 713, INLS 780) or permission of the instructor required. This course introduces theoretical and practical aspects of data management architecture, processes and applications in clinical and public health research.

660 Probability and Statistical Inference I (3). Required preparation, three semesters of calculus (such as MATH 231, 232, 233). Introduction to probability; discrete and continuous random variables; expectation theory; bivariate and multivariate distribution theory; regression and correlation; linear functions of random variables; theory of sampling; introduction to estimation and hypothesis testing.

661 Probability and Statistical Inference II (3). Prerequisite, BIOS 660. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Distribution of functions of random variables; Helmert transformation theory; central limit theorem and other asymptotic theory; estimation theory; maximum likelihood methods; hypothesis testing; power; Neyman-Pearson Theorem, likelihood ratio, score, and Wald tests; noncentral distributions.

662 Intermediate Statistical Methods (4). Pre- or corequisites, BIOS 511 and 550. Principles of study design, descriptive statistics, sampling from finite and infinite populations, inferences about location and scale. Both distribution-free and parametric approaches are considered. Gaussian, binomial, and Poisson models, one-way and two-way contingency tables.

663 Intermediate Linear Models (4). Required preparation, BIOS 662. Matrix-based treatment of regression, one-way and two-way ANOVA, and ANCOVA, emphasizing the general linear model and hypothesis, as well as diagnostics and model building. Reviews matrix algebra. Includes statistical power for linear models and binary response regression methods.

664 Sample Survey Methodology (STOR 358) (4). Prerequisite, BIOS 550. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Fundamental principles and methods of sampling populations, with emphasis on simple, random, stratified, and cluster sampling. Sample weights, nonsampling error, and analysis of data from complex designs are covered. Practical experience through participation in the design, execution, and analysis of a sampling project.

665 Analysis of Categorical Data (3). Prerequisites, BIOS 545, 550, and 662. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. Introduction to the analysis of categorized data: rates, ratios, and proportions; relative risk and odds ratio; Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel procedure; survivorship and life table methods; linear models for categorical data. Applications in demography, epidemiology, and medicine.

666 Applied Multivariate Analysis (3). Prerequisite, BIOS 663. Application of multivariate techniques, with emphasis on the use of computer programs. Multivariate analysis of variance, multivariate multiple regression, weighted least squares, principal component analysis, canonical correlation, and related techniques.

667 Applied Longitudinal Data Analysis (3). Analysis of variance and multiple linear regression course at the level of BIOS 545 or 663 required. Familiarity with matrix algebra recommended. Univariate and multivariate repeated measures ANOVA, GLM for longitudinal data, linear mixed models. Estimation and inference, maximum and restricted maximum likelihood, fixed and random effects.

668 Design of Public Health Studies (3). Prerequisites, BIOS 545 and 550. Statistical concepts in basic public health study designs: cross-sectional, case-control, prospective, and experimental (including clinical trials). Validity, measurement of response, sample size determination, matching and random allocation methods.

670 Demographic Techniques I (3). Source and interpretation of demographic data; rates and ratios, standardization, complete and abridged life tables; estimation and projection of fertility, mortality, migration, and population composition.

680 Introductory Survivorship Analysis (3). Prerequisite, BIOS 661. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Introduction to concepts and techniques used in the analysis of time to event data, including censoring, hazard rates, estimation of survival curves, regression techniques, applications to clinical trials.

691 Field Observations in Biostatistics (1). Field visits to, and evaluation of, major nonacademic biostatistical programs in the Research Triangle area. Field fee: $25.

693H Honors Research in Biostatistics (3). Directed research. Written and oral reports required.

694H Honors Research in Biostatistics (3). Directed research. Written and oral reports required.


DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING

MICHAEL AITKEN, Chair

Professors

Michael D. Aitken, Louise M. Ball, James P. Bartram, Gregory W. Characklis, Michael R. Flynn, Avram Gold, William G. Gray, Cass T. Miller, Leena Nylander-French, Ivan I. Rusyn, Mark D. Sobsey, James A. Swenberg, Dale Whittington.

Associate Professors

Marc L. Serre, William Vizuete, Howard S. Weinberg, Stephen C. Whalen.

Assistant Professors

Orlando Coronell, Rose M. Cory, Rebecca C. Fry, Jacqueline MacDonald Gibson, Jill R. Stewart, Jason Surratt, J. Jason West.

Professor of the Practice

Peter J. Kolsky.

Lecturer

Courtney Woods.

Joint Professors

Richard N.L. Andrews, John M. Bane, Richard A. Luettich Jr., Christopher S. Martens, David McNelis, Rachel T. Noble, Hans W. Paerl, Paul B. Watkins.

Joint Associate Professor

Ilona Jaspers.

Research Associate Professor

Jun Nakamura.

Research Assistant Professors

Wanda Bodnar, Jun Li, Kenneth Sexton, David R. Singleton.

Adjunct Professors

Tar-Ching Aw, Francis Binkowski, Linda S. Birnbaum, Daniel L. Costa, David DeMarini, John M. Dement, Alfred Eisner, David S. Ensor, Shabbir Gheewala, M. Ian Gilmour, Chong Kim, David Peden, Joseph Pinto, Joachim Pleil, James Samet, Woodhall Stopford.

Adjunct Associate Professors

Sarav Arunchalam, Gaylen R. Brubaker, David Dix, H. Kenneth Hudnell, R. Wayne Litaker, Michael Madden, Michael F. Piehler, Terrence K. Pierson, Thomas B. Starr, Miroslav Styblo.

Adjunct Assistant Professors

Bruce Cohen, Jacky Rosati, Roger Sit, Russell W. Wiener.

Adjunct Lecturer

Raymond Hackney.

Professors Emeriti

Russell F. Christman, Douglas J. Crawford-Brown, Francis A. DiGiano, Donald L. Fox, Donald E. Francisco, William H. Glaze, Robert L. Harris, Harvey E. Jeffries, J. Donald Johnson, Richard M. Kamens, Donald L. Lauria, David H. Moreau, Frederic K. Pfaender, Morris A. Shiffman, Philip C. Singer, Charles M. Weiss, Donald Willhoit.

Majoring in Environmental Health Sciences: Bachelor of Science in Public Health

The undergraduate major in environmental health sciences is designed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the environmental factors that impact human health; the physical, chemical, and biological processes that underlie the impact of human activity on the environment and human health; methods used to assess the impact of human activity on the environment and human health; and science-based solutions for environmental problems. Students may choose to emphasize either human health or environmental protection. Admission into the program requires satisfactory completion of coursework in biology, chemistry, and mathematics. Recent graduates have entered graduate programs in environmental science, microbiology, marine science, applied mathematics, and environmental engineering. Students who pursued employment after completing the B.S.P.H. degree are working in environmental advocacy organizations, environmental consulting firms, industry, and investment banking firms.

Core Requirements

• Public health core courses: BIOS 600, EPID 600, HBEH 600 and HPM 600

• ENVR 230 and 430

• ENVR 698 (to be taken in the senior year) or 593 (with approval)

• Environmental health electives: All students must complete four advanced (400-level or above) courses within the department or in environmental health-related departments on campus.

All students must complete each of the courses above during the junior and senior years. They provide an overview of the principles of environmental science and their application to environmental problems. Environmental health sciences majors are not required to take ENVR 600. ENVR 430 meets the Gillings School of Global Public Health requirement for majors.

Additional Requirements

• BIOL 101/101L, 201, and 202

• CHEM 101/101L, 102/102L, and 261

• COMP 116 or BIOL 202H or BIOL/MATH 452 or GEOG 595

• MATH 231 or 241, and MATH 232 or 283.

• PHYS 104 or 116*, 105 or 117* (* = preferred)

• Additional required courses for the human health protection emphasis: BIOL 205, CHEM 262/262L and 430

Honors in Environmental Health Sciences

Students who have a grade point average of 3.3 or higher are eligible to participate in honors research and to write an honors thesis.

Advising

The program director will serve as the academic advisor for all environmental health sciences undergraduates. Undergraduate students are encouraged to meet regularly with the program director and review their Tar Heel Tracker each semester. In addition, they can also visit the Office of Student Affairs if they have questions about their general education requirements. The program director and the Office of Student Services staff work with current and prospective majors by appointment (see “Contact Information” below). Departmental academic advising is particularly important for those majors who are considering going on to graduate school. Further information on courses, undergraduate research opportunities, the honors program, careers, and graduate schools may be obtained from the department’s Web site.

Special Opportunities in Environmental Health Sciences

Study Abroad

There are several opportunities for pursuing environmental study abroad, both through the department and through the UNC Study Abroad Office (studyabroad.unc.edu/studyabroad.cfm).

Undergraduate Research

Many undergraduate students participate in the research programs of the department. Students are encouraged to consult individual faculty members for opportunities to participate in such research. In addition, the department has information concerning fellowships and internships, some of which are combined with research opportunities in laboratories or field settings.

Facilities

The Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering houses research laboratories located in Rosenau Hall, McGavran-Greenberg Hall, Michael Hooker Research Center, the Baity Building, and off-campus research facilities. These laboratories are involved in important research in water quality; biogeochemistry; atmospheric chemistry and air pollution; effects of environmental chemicals on DNA tissues and organisms; environmental and public health microbiology; and occupational health and safety.

The department also offers labs for modeling and computational analysis of environmental systems, such as atmospheric circulation and air quality models, ground and surface water flow and transport models, fluid flow and contaminant transport models for indoor air environments, exposure analysis and health effects, risk assessment, and environmental epidemiology.

More detailed information about the individual laboratories and centers can be found at www.sph.unc.edu/envr.

Graduate School and Career Opportunities

While undergraduate education prepares students for citizenship in ways that go beyond professional concerns, the program in environmental health sciences also provides skills needed for employment and graduate study. Students ending their studies at the undergraduate level gain skills necessary to work in positions such as risk analysts in consulting firms and regulatory agencies; research assistants in local, state, and national environmental and environmental health departments; and scientific advisors to environmental organizations. The degree also prepares students for graduate study in the environmental sciences, environmental health sciences, environmental studies, toxicology, and professional disciplines such as medicine, environmental law, and public health.

Undergraduate students with appropriate science backgrounds have the opportunity to pursue a dual bachelor’s–master’s degree. This program allows students to complete a master’s degree in the department within one additional year of study beyond receipt of the bachelor’s degree. Interested students should read the program description and requirements carefully; they can be found online at www.sph.unc.edu/images/stories/academic_programs/ese/documents/plus_one_masters_oct01.11.pdf.

Students have opportunities to explore possibilities for employment through the rich network of connections among the department, University, and numerous environmental organizations in the Research Triangle Park area, which is home to the highest concentration of environmental health sciences groups in the nation.

Contact Information

Dr. Louise Ball, Program Director, CB# 7431, 158 Rosenau Hall, (919) 966-7911.

Student Services Manager, Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, CB# 7431, 162A Rosenau Hall, (919) 966-3844. Web site: www.sph.unc.edu/ese.

ENVR

100 Environmental Protection (3).

190 Selected Topics in Undergraduate Studies (1–3). Permission of the instructor. Current topics of interest in environmental science and their application to understanding environmental issues are directed towards undergraduates. Topics and instructors will change. One to three lecture hours per week.

230 Environmental Health Issues (3). Examines key events that have shaped our understanding of the impacts of environmental agents on human health and uses them to introduce basic concepts in environmental health.

231 Environmental Health Projects (3).

295 Undergraduate Research (3). Directed readings or laboratory study. Written reports are required. May be taken more than once for credit. Six to nine hours per week.

296 Reading in Environmental Sciences and Engineering (1–9).

300 Analysis and Solution of Environmental Problems (3). Interdisciplinary, team-based analyses of environmental phenomena are performed and applied to problems of the selection of effective environmental strategies. Students may select from a wide range of examples and venues. Three lecture hours a week.

312 Risk-Based International Environmental Decisions (ENST 312) (3). See ENST 312 for description.

400 Seminar Series (1). Presents the results of ongoing research projects in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering. Topics and presenters are selected from among the departmental graduate students and faculty.

401 Unifying Concepts (3). Unifying concepts of environmental systems, including conservation principles, modeling, economics, and policy with applications from throughout natural, engineered, human systems. Interfaces among scientific, engineering, and policy aspects of the field.

402 Problem-Based Learning (2). Permission of the instructor. A problem common to the field of environmental science will be studied in detail through the use of small groups of students from the various disciplinary areas in the department.

403 Environmental Chemistry Processes (ENST 403) (3). Required preparation, a background in chemistry and mathematics, including ordinary differential equations. Chemical processes occurring in natural and engineered systems: chemical cycles; transport and transformation processes of chemicals in air, water, and multimedia environments; chemical dynamics; thermodynamics; structure/activity relationships.

411 Laboratory Techniques and Field Measurements (3). Students learn laboratory, field, and analytical skills. Provides a solid introduction to experimental research in environmental sciences and engineering. Students are provided with applications in limnology, aquatic chemistry, and industrial hygiene.

412 Ecological Microbiology (3). Required preparation, one course in general microbiology. A description of microbial populations and communities, the environmental processes they influence, and how they can be controlled to the benefit of humankind.

413 Limnology (3). Required preparation, introductory biology, chemistry, and physics. Basic aspects of freshwater ecosystem function. Emphasis on trophic level interactions and integration of physical, chemical, and biological principles for a holistic view of lake ecosystem dynamics.

415 Biogeochemical Processes (ENST 450, GEOL 450, MASC 450) (4). See ENST 450 for description.

416 Aerosol Physics and Chemistry (4). Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. Physical and chemical principles underlying behavior of particles suspended in air. Topics include rectilinear and curvilinear motion of the particles in a force field, diffusion, evaporation, and condensation, electrical and optical properties, and particle coagulation. Three lecture hours a week and two laboratory sessions.

417 Oceanography (BIOL 350, GEOL 403, MASC 401) (3). See MASC 401 for description.

419 Chemical Equilibria in Natural Waters (3). Principles and applications of chemical equilibria to natural waters. Acid-base, solubility, complex formation, and redox reactions are discussed. This course uses a problem-solving approach to illustrate chemical speciation and environmental implications. Three lecture hours per week.

421 Environmental Health Microbiology (3). Required preparation, introductory course in microbiology or permission of the instructor. Presentation of the microbes of public health importance in water, food, and air, including their detection, occurrence, transport, and survival in the environment; epidemiology and risks from environmental exposure. Two lecture and two laboratory hours per week.

422 Air and Industrial Hygiene (3). Problem definition, sources of information, health effects, legislative framework, and control methods for chemical, physical, and biological hazards. Recognition, evaluation, and remediation of hazards associated with community and industrial environments. Three lecture hours per week.

423 Industrial Toxicology (PHNU 423) (3). See PHNU 423 for description.

430 Health Effects of Environmental Agents (3). Required preparation, basic biology, chemistry through organic, calculus. Permission of the instructor for students lacking this preparation. Interactions of environmental agents (chemicals, infectious organisms, radiation) with biological systems including humans, with attention to routes of entry, distribution, metabolism, elimination, and mechanisms of adverse effects. Three lecture hours per week.

431 Techniques in Environmental Health Sciences (2). Required preparation, basic biology, chemistry through organic, math through calculus; permission of the instructor for students lacking this preparation. A practical introduction to the measurement of biological end-points, emphasizing adverse effects of environmental agents, using laboratory and field techniques. Two laboratory hours per week.

432 Occupational Safety and Ergonomics (PHNU 786, PUBH 786) (3). Fundamentals of occupational safety and ergonomics with emphasis on legislation and organization of industrial safety and ergonomic programs, including hazard recognition, analysis, control, and motivational factors pertaining to industrial accident and cumulative trauma disorder prevention.

433 Health Hazards of Industrial Operation (3). Prerequisite, ENVR 422. An introduction to the health hazards associated with the various unit operations of industry. Field trips to local industries planned.

434 Theory and Practice of Exposure Evaluation (3). Prerequisite, ENVR 416. Methodology and philosophy of evaluating exposures to air contaminants in the workplace. Course is divided into lectures, case-study analyses, and a hands-on term project. Three lecture hours per week.

442 Biochemical Toxicology (BIOC 442, TOXC 442) (3). Prerequisite, CHEM 430. Required preparation, one course in biochemistry. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. Biochemical actions of toxicants and assessment of cellular damage by biochemical measurements. Three lecture hours per week.

449 Ecology of Wetlands (MASC 449) (4). Required preparation, one year of biology, one year of chemistry, one semester of ecology, and permission of the instructor. An introduction to the functioning of freshwater and estuarine marsh and swamp ecosystems, with emphasis on systems of the southeastern United States.

450 Principles and Applications of Environmental Engineering (3). Principles that govern the behavior of contaminants in air and water. Application of these principles to engineered processes that control air and water quality. Three lecture hours per week.

451 Elements of Chemical Reactor Engineering (3). Required preparation, elementary differential equations course such as MATH 524. Focuses on chemical reaction rates and reaction mechanisms. Covers mole balances, rate laws, chemical kinetics, and reactor design. Principles are applied to any environmental system where chemical transformations must be described. Three lecture hours per week.

452 Fluid Dynamics (GEOL 560, MASC 560, PHYS 660) (3). See MASC 560 for description.

453 Groundwater Hydrology (3). Required preparation, math through differential equations and some familiarity with fluid mechanics. Conservation principles for mass, momentum, and energy developed and applied to groundwater systems. Scope includes the movement of water, gas, and organic liquid phases, the transport and reaction of contaminants. Three lecture hours per week.

461 Environmental Systems Modeling (ENST 415, GEOL 415, MASC 415) (3). See ENST 415 for description.

462 Geostatistics for Spatial/Temporal Environmental Phenomena (3). Required preparation, statistics. Stochastic analysis of space–time environmental phenomena. Random field modeling of physical laws. Geostatistical estimation and simulation. Natural heterogeneity. Stochastic PDE of groundwater flow and solute transport.

463 Random Field Modeling of Physical Processes (3). Recommended preparation, calculus through differential equations is desirable. Science of the probable. Random fields. Physical significance and methodological theses. Spatial and spatiotemporal variability. Ordinary and generalized fields of natural processes. Transport-type models. Bayesian/Maximum maximum entropy estimation. Three lecture hours per week.

468 Advanced Functions of Temporal GIS (ENST 468) (3). Overview of geographical information systems (GIS) using the Arc GIS software, and introduction to advanced geostatistical functions for temporal GIS describing environmental and health phenomena distributed across space and time. Application to the spatiotemporal mapping of environmental water quality.

470 Environmental Risk Assessment (ENST 470) (3). Required preparation, one course in probability and statistics. Use of mathematical models and computer simulation tools to estimate the human health impacts of exposure to environmental pollutants. Three lecture hours per week.

471 Global Water Sanitation and Hygiene (3). Required preparation, coursework in chemistry, biology, epidemiology and statistics including infectious and toxic hazards, disease causation and environmental transmission. Graduate and advanced undergraduates. Interventions and health impacts of water, sanitation and hygiene (WaSH), including those on different populations and applications in different settings. Three lecture and recitation hours per week.

472 Quantitative Risk Assessment in Environmental Health Microbiology (3). Recommended preparation, microbiology, epidemiology, and infectious diseases. Survey of alternative approaches, frameworks, and decision-making tools for quantitative risk assessment of microbial pathogens that infect humans and cause disease by the exposure routes of water, food, air, and other vehicles.

480 Marine Systems Modeling (GEOL 480, MASC 480) (1–3). See MASC 480 for description.

505 Chemical Oceanography (GEOL 505, MASC 505) (4). See MASC 505 for description.

514 Measurement of NOx, O3, and Volatile Organic Compounds (3). This course is intended to develop a student’s ability to operate the primary instruments for measuring these important pollutants, collect and process samples where necessary, record data, and process instrument data into final air concentration data.

520 Biological Oceanography (BIOL 657, MASC 504) (4). See MASC 504 for description.

522 Environmental Change and Human Health (ENST 522) (3). See ENST 522 for description.

552 Organic Geochemistry (GEOL 552, MASC 552) (3). See MASC 552 for description.

570 Methods of Environmental Decision Analysis (3). Required preparation, one course in probability and statistics. Use of quantitative tools for balancing conflicting priorities (such as costs versus human health protection) and evaluating uncertainties when making environmental decisions.

585 American Environmental Policy (ENST 585, PLAN 585, PLCY 585) (3). Intensive introduction to environmental management and policy, including environmental and health risks, policy institutions, processes, and instruments, policy analysis, and major elements of American environmental policy. Lectures and case studies. Three lecture hours per week.

593 Undergraduate Practicum in Environmental Health Sciences (1–3). A practical experience in a setting relevant to environmental health.

600 Environmental Health (3). This course examines the relationship between environmental quality, human health and welfare, with particular attention to contamination in human environment; physical, biological, and social factors; trade-offs regarding prevention and remediation measures. Satisfies core School of Public Health requirement. Three lecture hours per week.

601 Epidemiology for Environmental Scientists (3). An introduction to relevant epidemiologic concepts that inform environmental science research. Learning objectives include discussing basic epidemiologic concepts and measures of disease occurrence in populations, explaining epidemiological study designs for studying associations between risk factors or exposures in populations, evaluating epidemiologic evidence, and comprehending basic ethical principles.

630 Systems Biology in Environmental Health (3). Required preparation, one year of biology. Environmental systems biology examines how environmental stressors influence the components of a biological system, and how the interactions between these components result in changes in the function and behavior of that system.

640 Environmental Exposure Assessment (3). Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. The course material introduces the general concepts of assessing environmental exposures to chemicals in human populations. This includes the design of ecologic and personal monitoring studies, the techniques and equipment used for sampling and analysis, and interpretation of data.

661 Scientific Computation I (MATH 661) (3). See MATH 661 for description.

662 Scientific Computation II (COMP 662, MATH 662) (3). See MATH 662 for description.

666 Numerical Methods (3). Prerequisites, COMP 116 and MATH 383. Numerical methods for solving problems arising in sciences and engineering. Solution of linear equations using direct and iterative approaches, solution of nonlinear systems of algebraic equations, solution of ordinary differential equations including single and multistep methods, and methods for stiff systems of ODEs and collocation methods for linear and nonlinear PDEs.

668 Methods of Applied Mathematics I (MATH 668) (3). See MATH 668 for description.

669 Methods of Applied Mathematics II (MATH 669) (3). See MATH 669 for description.

671 Environmental Physics I (3). Prerequisite, ENVR 461. A first graduate-level course in physical principles relevant to environmental systems. Topics include dimensional analysis, tensor calculus, conservation of mass and momentum. Applications are considered from natural and engineered systems and across all relevant media. Focus is on the development of mechanistic representation of environmental systems.

672 Environmental Physics II (3). Prerequisite, ENVR 671. Second part of a graduate-level sequence in physical principles relevant to environmental systems. Topics include turbulence, conservation of energy, multiscale methods, and thermodynamics. Applications are considered from natural and engineered systems and across all relevant media. Focus is on development of mechanistic representation of environmental systems.

675 Air Pollution, Chemistry, and Physics (3). This class is designed for graduate students planning for research in air pollution, emphasizing chemical kinetics and engineering approaches to problem solving in addition to atmospheric structure, meteorology, and modeling. We address problems of stratospheric and tropospheric ozone, particulate matter, and acid rain. We emphasize quantitative problem solving in homework.

685 Water and Sanitation Planning and Policy in Developing Countries (PLAN 685) (3). See PLAN 685 for description.

686 Policy Instruments for Environmental Management (ENST 686, PLAN 686, PLCY 686) (3). See PLCY 686 for description.

691H Honors Research (3). Permission of the instructor. Directed readings or laboratory study of a selected topic. A written report is required in the form of an honors thesis (ENVR 692H).

692H Honors Thesis (3). Students complete honors research projects.

695 Undergraduate Research (1–3). Directed readings or laboratory study. Written reports are required. May be taken more than once for credit. Three to nine hours per week.

698 Capstone: Analysis and Solution of Environmental Decisions (ENST 698) (3). See ENST 698 for description.


DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH POLICY AND MANAGEMENT

PEGGY LEATT, Chair

Laurel A. Files, Associate Chair

Professors

Peggye Dilworth-Anderson, Marisa E. Domino, Peggy Leatt, Jessica Lee, Joseph Morrissey, Jonathan Oberlander, George Pink (Distinguished), Thomas C. Ricketts, R. Gary Rozier, Sally C. Stearns, Morris Weinberger (Distinguished), Bryan Weiner, William N. Zelman.

Associate Professors

Andrea Biddle, Laurel A. Files, Bruce J. Fried, Kristin Reiter, Rebecca Wells.

Assistant Professors

William Carpenter, Mark Holmes, Kristen Hassmiller Lich, Christopher M. Shea, Harsha Thirumurthy, Stephanie Wheeler.

Research Professors

Edward Baker Jr., Sheila Leatherman.

Research Associate Professor

Bryce Reeve.

Research Assistant Professor

Stacie Dusetzina.

Professor of the Practice

Leah Devlin, Sandra Greene.

Research Associate

Leslie Zeldin.

Adjunct Professors

Stuart Altman, William K. Atkinson II, Dan Beauchamp, Deborah Bender, Hayden Bosworth, Fred T. Brown Jr., Young Moon Chae, Fred Cox, Margaret Dardess, Edward Dauer, John Figueroa, Steven Garfinkel, Robert Greczyn, Paul Halverson, Wayne Holden, Donald Holzworth, Lily Kelly-Radford, Joan Krause, Barbara Mark, Edward Norton, John O’Donnell, Carmen Odom, Krista Perreira, Richard Saver, Betsy Sleath, Jeffrey Swanson, Judith Tintinalli, James Veney, Wendee Wechsberg, Jane Weintraub.

Adjunct Associate Professors

Amy Abernethy, Mary A. Beck, Paul Brown, Patricia Deverka, Nancy Henley, Shoou-Yih Daniel Lee, Matthew Maciejewski, Patricia Mac Taggart, Michael Markowitz, Michael O’Malley, Janet Porter, Arjun Rajaratnam, Jaya Rayo, Steven J. Sloate, Hugh Waters.

Adjunct Assistant Professors

Oscar Aylor, Diane Bloom, Margaret Cannon, Carolyn Carpenter, Dorothy Cilenti, Charles Coleman, J. Michael Collins, Kathleen Dalton, Young Kyung Do, Susan Hogue, Frederick K. Homan, Margo Huesch, George Jackson, Melissa Kaluzny, Michel Landry, Aarom McKethan, Felicia Mebane, Benjamin Meier, L. Douglas Melton, Gary Nestler, David Potenziani, Andrea Radford, Stuart Rennie, Richard Scoville, Ashley Skinner, Karen Stitzenberg, Kathleen Thomas, Debbie Travers, Karl Umble, Gary West, Christopher Woods.

Adjunct Instructors

Margaret Cannon, Dawn Carter, Nelson Couch, Robert Crawford, Donna Dinkin, Randall Egsegian, Franklin Farmer, Peggy Glenn, Eric Griffin, John Grinnell, Kay Grinnell, Douglas A. Johnston, Lawrence K. Mandelkehr, Donald Markle, Drake Maynard, Anne McGeorge, Paul Morlock, Gary Palmer, Michael Patterson, Robert Patterson, William Pilkington, Eugene Pinder, Patricia Pozella, Ericka Rentz, Harry Reynolds, Lucy Savitz, Fred Sexton, Robert Stevens, David Sweat, Franklin Walker, Cameron Wolfe.

Clinical Professors

Thomas Bacon, Edward F. Brooks, Pam Silberman.

Clinical Associate Professors

Dean Harris, Suzanne Havala Hobbs, John Paul.

Clinical Assistant Professors

James V. Porto Jr., Jeffrey Simms, Margaret Thomas, John Waters.

Clinical Instructor

Melanie Studer.

Lecturers

William Gentry, Jay Levy, Danielle Remmy, Sanford West.

Professors Emeriti

Sagar Jain, Arnold Kaluzny, Kerry Kilpatrick.

Majoring in Health Policy and Management: Bachelor of Science in Public Health

Core Requirements

• Public health core courses: BIOS 600, ENVR 600, EPID 600, and HBEH 600

• ECON 310 or 410 (may be taken prior to junior year)

• HPM 310, 320, 330, 340, 341, 350, 351, 352, 393 (requires a $400.00 field training fee), and 697

Additional Requirements: (prerequisites for admission to the B.S.P.H. program in health policy and management)

• BIOL 101/101L

• ECON 101

• STOR 155

• One of the following financial or managerial accounting courses: BUSI 51, 100, 101, 105, 106, 107 or 108

• One of the following courses (or credit by examination): MATH 130, 152, 231, 232, 233; STOR 112, 113

• Six credit hours outside the Department of Health Policy and Management

The bachelor of science in public health (B.S.P.H.) with a major in health policy and management is intended for students who plan to seek careers in a variety of health organizations. The mission of the B.S.P.H. program is to develop responsible graduates who have the necessary knowledge, skills, and values to pursue successful careers in health services systems in the United States and abroad. The curriculum emphasizes an understanding of the organization of health care services; legal, ethical, and policy issues; and the effective management of human, financial, and health information resources. The internship experience, placed between the junior and senior years, provides students an opportunity to apply new skills, anticipate learning needs, and clarify personal career goals.

The program aims to prepare students for both entry-level positions and for advanced degree programs. Graduates of the program obtain positions in a variety of health organizations, such as hospitals, medical group practices, government agencies, research institutes, public health departments and consulting firms, to name a few. Graduates also have been successful in their pursuit of advanced degrees in a broad range of fields, including public health, accounting, law, medicine, dentistry, and business administration.

Honors in Health Policy and Management

The department offers an honors program. Students who have at least a 3.3 grade point average at the completion of their junior year are invited to participate in the two-semester honors program in their senior year. HPM 691H is offered as a seminar in the fall semester. HPM 692H is offered as an independent study in the spring semester. Students defend their proposals in the fall and their theses in the spring.

Advising

All majors have a primary academic advisor in the department. Undergraduate students are encouraged to meet regularly with their advisor and review their Tar Heel Tracker each semester. In addition, they can also visit the Office of Student Services. Advisors, the program director, and the Office of Student Services staff work with current and prospective majors by appointment (see “Contact Information” below). Departmental academic advising is particularly important for those majors who are considering going on to graduate school. Further information on courses, undergraduate research opportunities, the honors program, careers, and graduate schools may be obtained from the department’s Web site.

Special Opportunities in Health Policy and Management

School and Departmental Involvement

Opportunities exist for involvement in such student organizations as the Healthcare Executives Student Association, UNC’s Healthcare Improvement Group, the Student Global Health Committee, GlobeMed, the NC-HCAP Health Careers Club, and the School’s Student Government. In addition, students have volunteered to help with the management of Student Health Action Coalition (SHAC), a student-run health care clinic. Finally, students are invited to join the HPM Undergraduate Student Advisory Committee. This committee helps plan and coordinate professional development workshops and social events and promotes the program across campus.

Experiential Education

Each student in the department is required to complete a 12-week, field-based practicum or internship during the summer between junior and senior years. In addition, some health policy and management courses provide the opportunity for students to work on projects involving organizations in the community.

Study Abroad

Students are encouraged to study abroad prior to entering the health policy and management major in the junior year. While in the program, students may complete their 12-week internship in a country other than the United States.

Undergraduate Awards

The department presents awards for undergraduate students at an annual Awards Day in late spring.

Undergraduate Research

Students with research interests may seek opportunities to work with faculty on research projects. In addition, those who meet eligibility requirements may pursue honors thesis research.

Graduate School and Career Opportunities

See program description above.

Contact Information

Melanie Studer, Program Director, CB# 7411, 116 Rosenau Hall, (919) 966-6961.

Jackie Siler Coleman, Student Services/Assistant Registrar, Department of Health Policy and Management, CB# 7411, 120 Rosenau Hall, (919) 966-4609. Web site: www.sph.unc.edu/hpm.

HPM

220 Writing for Health Administrators (3). Focuses on communication skills development, with an emphasis on clarity, conciseness, and effectiveness of writing memoranda, reports, proposals, letters.

230 Management of Human Resources (3). Introduction to the field of human resource management in health organizations in the United States. Detailed treatment of selected topics with a view to help develop operational skills.

249 Clinical Informatics for Outcomes Management (3). Explores the practical role of clinical informatics skills and tools in health care organizational performance improvement and how this role is currently evolving in hospitals, group practices, and provider organizations.

310 Introduction to Law and Ethics in Health Management (3). Prerequisite, HPM 350. An introduction to health law and ethics for health administration undergraduate seniors.

320 Introduction to Strategic Planning and Marketing (3). This course will provide students with a working knowledge of the various forms of health care consulting, including internal consulting. Students will enhance their analytical, presentation, teamwork, and project management skills.

330 Introduction to Organization Leadership, Management, and Behavior (3). Using team-based service learning, the course develops skills in leading teams, organizations, and community and global health initiatives. Topics such as leadership, quality improvement, organizational structure, conflict management, and human resources are addressed.

340 Foundations of Health Care Financial Management (3). Prerequisite, BUSI 100. Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. Basic methods and techniques in financial management of health care programs, including financial statement analysis, cost determination and allocation, pricing of services, and budgeting.

341 Information Systems, Technology, and Tools (3). The purpose of this course is to enhance students’ understanding of information systems and technology in health care, specifically focusing on the limitations of such technology. Students will be introduced to MS Excel and MS Access and shown how tools within these programs can help to mitigate some of the limitations.

350 Introduction to Health Services Systems (3). Restricted to HPM B.S.P.H. students. An introduction to the current organization, financing, emerging trends, practices, and issues in the delivery of health services.

351 Policy Issues in Health Services Delivery (2). Restricted to HPM B.S.P.H. students. This seminar addresses current health services delivery concerns from policy perspectives. Guest speakers, debates, and development of issue papers are used to explore implications for access and quality of health care.

352 Introduction to Health Services Systems II (3). HPM 352, in conjunction with HPM 350, provides an overview of the U.S. health services system, including such topics as quality of care and managed care. The course also introduces students to careers in the field of health policy and management and helps students develop necessary communication skills.

360 Health Systems around the World: Understanding England’s National Health Service (1). Participants in this one-week experiential short course explore the structures, policies, challenges, and future directions of England’s National Health Service and compare this model with the United States. Class time is balanced with time in the field visiting London-area health facilities and historical sites and meeting with area experts.

380 Database Design for Health Care Applications (3). Hands-on introduction to the design and implementation of relational databases to manage and analyze health care data (using Microsoft Access). Includes design of fully automated databases as well as the use of Access as an analysis tool in conjunction with Microsoft Excel.

393 Field Training in Health Policy and Management (2). Restricted to HPM B.S.P.H. students. Required of all B.S.P.H. students in HPM. The first six weeks of a supervised 12-week administrative internship in a health care organization.

396 Readings in Health Policy and Management (1–3). Permission of the instructor. For undergraduates enrolled in the department’s bachelor’s degree program. Directed readings or research; written reports are required.

420 Community and Public Health Security: Disasters, Terrorism, and Emergency Management (3). Permission of the instructor. This course examines systems for emergency management at federal, state, and local levels. The roles of emergency management, health services, and public health in disaster management are examined. Offered to students in CPDM program only.

421 Community and Public Health Disasters: Agents of Action and Public Health Hazards (3). Permission of the instructor. This course covers biological, chemical, nuclear, and environmental agents that threaten public health. Offered to students in CPDM program only.

422 Emergency Management I (3). Permission of the instructor. Introduction of analytical tools to assess, evaluate, map, and investigate disasters (including biological outbreaks). These tools will be used to improve planning for disaster management. Offered to students in CPDM program only.

423 Emergency Management II (3). Permission of the instructor. Explores issues of preparedness, response, recovery, mitigation, and research in disaster management. Students will participate in the development of a plan and a simulation to evaluate the plan. Offered to students in CPDM program only.

435 Marketing for Not-for-Profit Organizations (3). Permission of the instructor. Application of basic principles of marketing and marketing decision models to problems in health care and other not-for-profit organizations.

440 Introduction to Management Information Systems in Health Care (3). Conceptual and practical aspects in the analysis, development, and utilization of computer-based information and control systems with emphasis on application to the health care environment.

466 Competition, Regulation, and Insurance (3). Examines alternative approaches to containing health care costs adapted by public and private payers.

470 Statistical Methods for Health Policy and Management (3). Introduction of linear model approach to analysis of data in health care settings. Topics include probability distributions, estimation tests of hypotheses, methods in multiple regression, and analysis of variance and covariance.

472 Program Evaluation (3). Concepts and methods of the program evaluation paradigm as applied in health administration.

496 Readings in Health Policy and Management (1–3). Directed readings or research. Written reports are required.

510 Global Perspectives on Ethical Issues in Health Policy and Management (3). This course will address the ethical issues of health policy and management, with particular attention to the global perspectives on these issues. These global perspectives are both comparative and transnational.

522 Aging, Family, and Long-Term Care: Cultural, Ethnic, and Racial Issues (3). Current issues pertaining to the health and well-being of older Americans, and how such issues influence family dynamics and choices about long-term care. Critical topics on chronic illness, family and community caregiving, ethnicity/culture, and socioeconomic status will be covered in the course.

531 Physician Practice Management (3). Permission of the instructor. Restricted to seniors. Course targets students interested in a health care career. Topics include structure of group practices, governance/ownership, risk management, malpractice, physician compensation, operational and financial management.

532 Health Care Consulting (3). This course will provide students with a working knowledge of the various forms of health care consulting, including internal consulting. Students will enhance their analytical, presentation, teamwork, and project management skills.

550 Medical Journalism (HBEH 660, JOMC 560) (3). See JOMC 560 for description.

551 Medical Reporting for the Electronic Media (HBEH 561, JOMC 561) (3). See JOMC 561 for description.

552 Science Documentary (HBEH 562, JOMC 562) (3). See JOMC 562 for description.

560 Media and Health Policy (3). Introduces students to news media organizations and their role in health policy development. Students will learn how to evaluate media content and strategies and to communicate effectively via mass media.

564 Health Care in the United States: Administrative and Policy Issues (3). Restricted to HPM majors. An overview of key health services issues including quality, access, financing, insurance, ethics, and delivery systems plus an introduction to health care policy and politics.

600 Introduction to Health Policy and Management (2). Permission of the instructor. Restricted to seniors. Does not qualify as a core course or elective for HPM undergraduate majors. Provides an overview of the United States health system, emphasizing role of policy development and administrative decision making through case examples.

601 Issues in Health Care (1). Lectures on current topics in health care.

602 Concurrent Practice (1–3). Permission of the program director. Supervised activities in an approved health organization, to include one or more specific projects, approved by HPM faculty member and directed by an approved preceptor/mentor in the organization.

605 Practice Application Journaling I (0.5). This course is the first of six field-based journal practica in which students monitor their learning processes, identify where knowledge and skills learned in courses are helpful and relevant to areas of their professional responsibility, and apply that knowledge and those skills to actual work situations.

606 Practice Application Journaling II (0.5). Prerequisite, HPM 605. This course is the second of six field-based journal practica in which students monitor their learning processes, identify where knowledge and skills learned in courses are helpful and relevant to areas of their professional responsibility, and apply that knowledge and those skills to actual work situations.

607 Practice Application Journaling III (0.5). This course is the third of six field-based journal practica in which students monitor their learning processes, identify where knowledge and skills learned in courses are helpful and relevant to areas of their professional responsibility, and apply that knowledge and those skills to actual work situations.

608 Practice Application Journaling IV (0.5). This course is the fourth of six field-based journal practica in which students monitor their learning processes, identify where knowledge and skills learned in courses are helpful and relevant to areas of their professional responsibility, and apply that knowledge and those skills to actual work situations.

609 Practice Application Journaling V (0.5). This course is the fifth of six field-based journal practica in which students monitor their learning processes, identify where knowledge and skills learned in courses are helpful and relevant to areas of their professional responsibility, and apply that knowledge and those skills to actual work situations.

610 Practice Application Journaling VI (0.5). This course is the sixth and final of six field-based journal practica in which students monitor their learning processes, identify where knowledge and skills learned in courses are helpful and relevant to areas of their professional responsibility, and apply that knowledge and those skills to actual work situations.

611 Public Health Concepts in a Systems Context (3). This course develops systems reasoning in health policy and management students through the application of systems techniques and systems thinking to core public health concepts in health policy and management, environmental health, epidemiology, and health behavior.

634 Public Health Issues in Community Preparedness and Disaster Management (PWAD 634) (3). Examines conventional public health constructs of community preparedness and disaster management. Includes a review of traditional and emerging literature. Emphasizes conceptual development and application of adaptive leadership strategies.

652 Economic Evaluation of Health Care Technology (DPOP 802) (3). Focus is on determination of costs and benefits associated with alternative resource allocation schemes. Crucial economic concepts (e.g., utility valuation of health states and marginal analysis) are presented.

653 Pharmacoeconomics (DPOP 801) (3). See DPOP 801 for description.

660 International and Comparative Health Systems (3). Methods of comparing health systems, examinations of related national health systems, and analysis of related high prevalence health issues.

664 Globalization and Health (MHCH 664) (3). Globalization—its economic, environmental, political, technological, institutional, and sociocultural dimensions—historically and currently contributes to beneficial and adverse effects on population, community, and family and individual health.

670 Systems Simulation for Health Services (3). Course will prepare students to simulate health services using the MedModel simulation software. Basic concepts of discrete event simulation.

690 Special Topics in Health Policy and Management (0.5–3). Special topics course for health policy and management undergraduate students.

691H Honors Research (3). Required preparation, overall grade point average of 3.2 by end of junior year in all UNC–Chapel Hill courses. Readings and seminars for undergraduates showing potential and talent for research. Students will design an independent research project, write a proposal, and complete an IRB application as partial completion of an honors thesis.

692H Independent Honors Research (3). Prerequisite, HPM 691H. Permission of the instructor. Students collect data, analyze and report findings, and make recommendations to complete an honor thesis and present findings in presentation/poster format.

697 BSPH Capstone (3). The capstone course is an “integrative exercise” for BSPH students prior to graduation. It is intended to simulate the integration of various disciplines—finance, human resources, ethics, policy, operations, and information technology—into a comprehensive and practical framework. Students work with healthcare organizations to solve financial or operational problems.


DEPARTMENT OF NUTRITION

JUNE STEVENS, Chair

Professors

Linda S. Adair, Alice Ammerman, Melinda Beck, Margaret Bentley, Cynthia Bulik, Stephen G. Chaney, Rosalind A. Coleman, Anthony Hackney, Mark Koruda, Kay Lund, Leslie Lytyle, Nobuyo Maeda, Elizabeth Mayer-Davis, Daniel Pomp, Barry M. Popkin, Anna Maria Siega-Riz, June Stevens, James Swenberg, Dianne S. Ward, Steven H. Zeisel.

Associate Professors

Ramon Bataller, Myles Faith, Penny Gordon-Larsen, Miroslav Styblo, Andrew Swick, Deborah Tate.

Assistant Professors

Liza Makowski Hayes, Michelle Mendez, Mihai Niculescu.

Clinical Associate Professor

Suzanne Havala Hobbs.

Clinical Assistant Professors

Amanda Holliday, Janice Sommers.

Research Professors

Martin Kohlmeier, Philip May.

Research Associate Professor

Wenhong Cao.

Research Assistant Professors

Patrick Bradshaw, Karen Corbin, Zuzana Drobna, Shufa Du, Kiyah Duffey, Teimitope Erinosho, Leslie Fischer, Valerie Flax, Derek Hales, Archana Lamichhane, Mihai Mehedint, Katie Meyer, Shu Wen Ng, Carmen Samuel-Hodge, Patricia Sheridan, Meghan Slining, Kimberly Truesdale, Shucha Zhang.

Adjunct Professors

John Anderson, Bernard Gutin, Robert G. McMurray, Susan Sumner.

Adjunct Associate Professors

Temitope Keku, Boyd Switzer, Melicia Whitt-Glover.

Adjunct Assistant Professors

Judith Borja, Melissa Daniels, Sheila Fleischhacker, Juhaeri Juhaeri, Amy Ries, Suzanna Young.

Adjunct Instructor

Angelo Mojica, Susan Wyler.

Professors Emeriti

Janice M. Dodds, Joseph Chike Edozien, MaryAnn C. Farthing, Pamela S. Haines, Mildred Kaufman.

Majoring in Nutrition: Bachelor of Science in Public Health

The bachelor of science in public health (B.S.P.H.) program in nutrition introduces the undergraduate student to the science of nutrition in health and disease and to social and behavioral aspects of eating in the context of public and individual health. The Department of Nutrition is one of the top-ranked nutrition departments in the country. The curriculum offers a range of courses on the nutritional and epidemiological aspects of human diseases. Students who graduate with a B.S.P.H. degree in nutrition have the necessary prerequisites for applying to schools of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and veterinary medicine, as well as other graduate programs in nutrition and to participate in nutrition research projects or explore other related areas of interest.

Prerequisite Courses Required for Admission

• BIOL 101/101L and 252

• CHEM 101/101L, 102/102L, and 261

• MATH 130, and 231 or 241

• NUTR 240

Courses in mathematics not completed during the first two years may be taken during the junior year.

Core Courses

• Public policy core courses: BIOS 600, ENVR 600, EPID 600, HBEH 600, and HPM 600

• NUTR 295 (four semesters), 400, 600, 611, 615, and 620

Additional Requirements

• BIOL 202

• CHEM 241/241L and 262/262L

• PHYS 104 or 116

• PHYS 105 or 117

Honors in Nutrition

The Department of Nutrition provides an opportunity for honors study for qualified students. To be eligible for admission to the honors program, students must have, at minimum, a cumulative grade point average of 3.2 at the end of the semester preceding the semester in which the student intends to begin honors work. Students register for nine to 12 credit hours in acceptable research, readings, and/or NUTR 692H, the nutrition honors course.

Advising

All majors have a primary academic advisor in the department. Undergraduate students are encouraged to meet regularly with their advisor and review their Tar Heel Tracker each semester. In addition, they can visit the Office of Student Services. Advisors, the program director and the Office of Student Services staff work with current and prospective majors by appointment (see “Contact Information” below). Departmental academic advising is particularly important for those majors who are considering going on to graduate school. Further information on courses, undergraduate research opportunities, the honors program, careers, and graduate schools may be obtained from the department’s Web site.

Special Opportunities in Nutrition

Departmental Involvement

The Nutrition Coalition (studentorgs.unc.edu/nc) is an organization of students enrolled in one of the department’s four degree programs. The coalition meets several times each semester to address student concerns and to plan service and social activities. Open to the entire University, the coalition strives to broaden the scope of understanding of the various fields and environments in which nutrition is making advances. “A is for Apple” is a student-led, volunteer organization aimed at teaching basic nutrition principles to local elementary school students. Career development workshops are available each year to provide guidance for students applying to graduate and medical schools.

Experiential Education

Three courses in nutrition include experiential components (NUTR 245 and 295). However, NUTR 295, available only to nutrition majors, fulfills the General Education experiential education requirement.

Undergraduate Awards

Nutrition honors research students may apply for the Honors Undergraduate Research Awards. The application is available on the Honors Carolina Web site (honorscarolina.unc.edu). Students also may be considered for any of the following awards: Chancellor’s Awards for Excellence in Student Activities and Leadership, The Order of the Golden Fleece, The Order of the Grail–Valkyries, The Order of the Old Well, Frank Porter Graham Honor Society, Phi Beta Kappa, and the Joseph Edozien Outstanding Undergraduate Award in Nutrition.

Undergraduate Research

To enhance students’ general education and help them decide whether a research career is something they might pursue, all B.S.P.H. nutrition students are required to complete nutrition research, either as part of the honors thesis or as independent research.

Contact Information

Mirek Styblo, Program Director, CB# 7461, 2302 Michael Hooker Research Center, (919) 966-5721.

Student Services Manager, Department of Nutrition, CB# 7461, 260 Rosenau Hall, (919) 966-7212. Web site: www.sph.unc.edu/nutr/degrees.

NUTR

240 Introduction to Human Nutrition (3). Prerequisites, BIOL 101/101L and CHEM 102/102L. Relationships of human nutrition to health and disease. Integration of biology, chemistry, and social sciences as related to human function. Nutrient composition of foods and safety of the food supply.

245 Sustainable Local Food Systems: Intersection of Local Foods and Public Health (3). Examines the intersection of local foods and public health with respect to nutrition and environmental, economic, and community issues. Students explore impacts and potential solutions of the increasingly industrialized and centralized food system, while assisting community partners to increase opportunities for farmers, local food marketers, distributors, and entrepreneurs.

295 Undergraduate Research Experience in Nutrition (3). Permission of the instructor. For undergraduates enrolled in the department’s baccalaureate degree program. Directed readings or laboratory study on a selected topic. May be taken more than once for credit.

400 Introduction to Nutritional Biochemistry (3). Prerequisites, BIOL 101, CHEM 101 and 102, and NUTR 240. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. Function of the human body focusing on nutrient interaction. Review of structure and function of cells and organs. For advanced undergraduates and graduate students needing to enhance background prior to NUTR 600.

600 Human Metabolism: Macronutrients (3). Prerequisite, NUTR 400. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Cell biochemistry and physiology emphasizing integration of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids in whole-body metabolism; regulation of energy expenditure, food intake, metabolic adaptations, and gene expression; and macronutrient-related diseases (atherosclerosis, obesity).

611 Nutrition of Children and Mothers (MHCH 611) (3). Prerequisite, NUTR 400. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Biologic bases for nutrient requirements and dietary recommendations as they vary throughout the life cycle. Covers the nutritional needs of women during childbearing years, infants, children, and adolescents.

615 Nutrition in the Elderly (1). Prerequisite, NUTR 400. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Special dietary and nutritional needs and conditions of the elderly. Includes overview of biology and demography of aging, discussion of nutritional requirements, and assessment of the elderly as well as nutrition in health and various disease states of the elderly.

620 Human Metabolism: Micronutrients (3). Prerequisites, NUTR 400 and 600. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. Cell biochemistry and physiology emphasizing metabolism of vitamins and minerals including antioxidant protection, immune function, nutrient control of gene expression, and disease states induced by deficiencies (e.g., iron-deficient anemia).

630 Nutrition Assessment and Counseling Skills (3). Prerequisite, NUTR 240. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Functions of a nutritionist working with individuals, emphasizing interviewing, assessment, nutrition care planning, counseling, and service documentation in prevention and therapeutic situations. Practice in the use of current dietary analysis software programs and development of educational materials included.

640 Medical Nutrition Therapy I: Chronic Disease Management (3). Prerequisite, NUTR 630. Course designed to examine the rationale and implementation of diet therapy and nutrition support in the prevention or treatment of chronic disease.

642 Medical Nutrition Therapy II: Acute Disease Management (3). Prerequisite, NUTR 640. Course designed to examine the rationale and implementation of diet therapy and nutrition support in the prevention or treatment of acute diseases.

644 Medical Nutrition Therapy Case Seminar (1). Prerequisite, NUTR 642. Course designed to introduce the student to clinical nutrition practice. Students learn case-based medical nutrition therapy, professional interdisciplinary communication and documentation skills.

650 Food Science, Production and Meal Preparation (2). Prerequisite, NUTR 400. Introduction to foods, food composition and properties; factors affecting selection, handling, and prep of foods; food safety; basic food industry knowledge; meal planning. NUTR 650 laboratory required.

650L Food Science, Production and Meal Preparation Laboratory (1). Concurrent with NUTR 650. This is the laboratory that accompanies NUTR 650. This laboratory applies the basic concepts of meal preparation, food production, and food science. Laboratory fee required. Three laboratory hours per week.

660 Food Service Systems Management (2). Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. Basic concepts of institutional food service systems management applied to small and medium-sized health care facilities in the community.

660L Food Service Systems Management Experience (1). Corequisite, NUTR 660. This is a food service management practicum that applies the basic concepts of institutional food service systems. Two laboratory hours per week.

692H Honors Research in Nutrition (3). Permission of the instructor. Directed readings or laboratory study of a selected topic. Requires a written proposal to be submitted to and approved by the B.S.P.H. Committee and faculty research director. A written report is required. May be taken more than once for credit. Six laboratory hours per week.

695 Nutrition Research (1–9). Permission of the instructor. Individual arrangements with faculty for bachelor and master students to participate in ongoing research.

696 Readings in Nutrition (1–9). Permission of the instructor. Reading and tutorial guidance in special areas of nutrition.