Academic Procedures

Regulations and Requirements
Policy on Awarding of Undergraduate Degrees and Transcript Notations
Registration
Academic Level (Class Standing)
Registration Priority
Cancellation of Enrollment
Auditing Courses
Changes in Fall and Spring Semester Schedules
Policies and Guidelines for a Cooperative Learning Environment
Class Attendance Policy
Policy Statement on Gender Inclusive Language
Policies on Prohibited Harassment and Nondiscrimination
Improper Relationships between Students and Employees
Final Examinations
Academic Course Load
Fifty Percent Tuition Surcharge
Grading System
Permanent Letter Grades
Temporary Grades (IN and AB) and FA Grades
Repeating Course Enrollments
Grade Appeals
Pass/D+/D/Fail Option
Academic Eligibility
Distance-Learning Courses via the Friday Center for Continuing Education
Nontraditional Readmission
Withdrawal
Graduation
Transcripts of Record
Interinstitutional Registration
Veterans Educational Benefits
Loan Deferments and Certification

Regulations and Requirements

Students are responsible for observing the procedures, regulations, and requirements of the University as they are set forth here and in other official University publications. This section describes many of the requirements and regulations that apply to undergraduates, but it is not a complete list of all such regulations and requirements. Unless otherwise stated, the regulations described in this section will govern the academic progress of students from their first year in the General College through their final semester in the College of Arts and Sciences or one of the undergraduate professional schools. The staff of the University will gladly provide students with detailed information concerning their academic program or academic problems, but this does not relieve any student of individual responsibility for meeting the University's requirements and observing University regulations.

Policy on Awarding of Undergraduate Degrees and Transcript Notations

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will award only one bachelor's degree to a student, regardless of a possible second-major declaration, and will not admit or award a degree to a student who has already earned a bachelor's degree through another school of the University or at another college. Undergraduates in the professional schools in the Divisions of Academic Affairs and Health Affairs may earn a second major (not a second degree) in the College of Arts and Sciences or another professional school, but the first major must be in the professional school. Exception: a student may earn a second bachelor's degree in one of several health profession schools of the University after receiving a bachelor's degree if the student is admitted to the professional school.

Students pursuing two major fields of study for the bachelor of arts or bachelor of science degree earn only one degree and receive only one diploma. Both the diploma and the official transcript will indicate the degree and the two majors.

Students completing the requirements for both a bachelor of science degree and a bachelor of arts degree earn only the bachelor of science degree and receive only that diploma. Students completing the requirements for both a bachelor of arts degree and a bachelor of fine arts or bachelor of music degree earn only the bachelor of fine arts or bachelor of music degree and receive only that diploma. Note that these students must complete General Education requirements pertinent to the bachelor of arts as well as all requirements for the bachelor of fine arts or bachelor of music degree. Both the diploma and the official transcript will indicate the degree (with its major) and the second major.

Related Policies

Under no circumstances can a second undergraduate degree be awarded in Academic Affairs after one has been earned in Health Affairs. In the rare instance that an undergraduate student completes the requirements for an undergraduate degree and a graduate degree at the same time, the two degrees cannot be awarded at the same graduation. The undergraduate degree must be awarded first, and the graduate degree awarded at a subsequent degree award date.

Students who apply to graduate on a given degree award date, but who must complete requirements (such as courses with grades of IN or AB) after that degree award date, must reapply to graduate on a degree award date that follows the actual completion of requirements. Coursework taken after the degree award date cannot be used to change a degree already awarded, or to complete retroactively a degree, or to add retroactively an additional major or minor.

Adjustments may be made to a transcript only for one year following the date of graduation. Grade appeals, for instance, can be initiated after graduation. Courses with temporary grades not affecting graduation (AB or IN) can be completed after the date of graduation and the grade point average changed accordingly; however, the student's status at the time of graduation is not affected. Graduation with distinction, for instance, is based only on the grade point average at the date of graduation and may not be awarded retroactively. Students who neglect to declare a second major or a minor at the time of graduation may request that the dean's office verify that the requirements had been satisfied at the time of graduation. In such cases, indication of the second major or minor can be added to the transcript within one year after the graduation date.

Registration

General Policies

UNC–Chapel Hill students use the ConnectCarolina Student Center to register for courses. Students should refer to the Registration Guide on the Office of the University Registrar's Web site at registrar.unc.edu/registration/registration-guide for instructions regarding registration.

Students who register during the billing period must pay tuition and fees, or give notice of anticipated aid, to the Office of Student Accounts and University Receivables by the published tuition and fees due date or their schedule will be cancelled and all their classes dropped before the beginning of classes. Students who register after the billing period must pay estimated tuition and fees or give notice of anticipated aid before they can register for that semester. Students who register after the date designated for official registration must pay an additional fee of $20.00 for late registration. If the delay results from circumstances clearly beyond the student's control, an appeal may be made in writing to the registrar. The appeal must show sufficient justification for the delay and has to be approved by the dean of the school in which the student is enrolled.

North Carolina law requires that no person shall attend a college or university in North Carolina without presenting a certificate of immunization to the college or university on or before the first day of matriculation. This certificate indicates that the student has received immunizations required by law. New students at UNC–Chapel Hill must provide the director of Campus Health Services with an immunization record certified by a physician. Students who fail to present the required certificate of immunization within 30 days of enrollment will be withdrawn from the University. Their enrollment will not be reinstated until they have provided a certificate of immunization to Campus Health Services.

Registration for credit for any course at the start of the semester is limited to the first five days of classes unless a late registration is approved by the course instructor and the student's dean or academic advisor. Any student who has not registered for courses after the primary billing date will be restricted from accessing the registration system for that term and will be required to submit a prepayment. For more information, please see "Course Schedule Changes" below.

Registration Advising for First-Year Students and Sophomores

All first-year students and sophomores are assigned a primary academic advisor in the Academic Advising Program (Steele Building) in the College of Arts and Sciences but may see any advisor as appropriate. Advisors' names and office locations are posted on the Web at advising.unc.edu. First-year students must meet with an advisor for registration advising at least once during their first year and complete an online module in order to be cleared to register for their third semester on campus. All students are strongly encouraged to review their Tar Heel Tracker each semester and before visiting an advisor to ensure that they update themselves on degree requirements and remain on track to graduate.

Advisors will answer students' questions and review their tentative course selections to help students achieve appropriate academic progress. In subsequent semesters, students are encouraged to discuss academic progress with their academic advisor. Students should follow instructions received from the Office of the University Registrar, which may be accessed by logging on to ConnectCarolina.

Registration Advising for Juniors and Seniors

Juniors and seniors receive academic advising during registration periods according to the directives set out by their college/professional school and major.

The department or curriculum in which the student's primary major is housed determines the procedures juniors and seniors must follow for registration. In some cases, the student must meet with a faculty advisor in the department or curriculium of the primary major before being able to register each semester. These advisors answer questions specific to the major and about graduate and career opportunities in the field.

Students admitted to a professional school will receive advising and assistance on all academic matters from an advisor in their school.

Academic Level (Class Standing)

All students who begin their undergraduate careers at UNC–Chapel Hill are considered first-year students for the first and second semesters. In their third semester and thereafter, a student's classification (sophomore, junior, senior) is determined by the cumulative number of credit hours earned:

Registration Priority

A student's first available date for registration (registration priority) is based on the number of semesters completed.

By policy of the Faculty Council (Resolution 2007–3), the University limits students to eight semesters of full-time study. To help ensure graduation within the eight-semester limit, students' registration priority will be based on the number of semesters completed; the more semesters students have completed, the higher their registration priority.

Terms in residence are tallied in three ways:

  1. UNC–Chapel Hill full-time enrollment

    Regardless of the number of credit hours, any fall or spring semester of enrollment in UNC–Chapel Hill courses (including UNC–Chapel Hill study abroad courses, but excluding Carolina Courses Online) counts as one semester of full-time study, unless the student is enrolled as a part-time student through Part-Time Classroom Studies. (Summer sessions at UNC–Chapel Hill do not count as semesters.)

  2. UNC–Chapel Hill part-time enrollment

    Each full multiple of 15 cumulative credit hours earned at UNC–Chapel Hill in fall or spring terms (not summer terms) counts as one semester of full-time study for any student enrolled as a part-time student through Part-Time Classroom Studies.

  3. Transfer credits awarded for courses taken at other colleges

    Each full multiple of 15 cumulative transfer-credit hours counts as one semester of full-time study. Excluded from this calculation are transfer hours awarded for courses taken either concurrent with high school or during any summer term after the student has matriculated at UNC–Chapel Hill.

    Any term in which a student is enrolled exclusively in online courses does not count as a semester of full-time study. Students may refer further questions to the Academic Advising Program (if the student is in the College of Arts and Sciences), or their respective dean's office.

Cancellation of Enrollment

A cancellation is, in effect, the same as not having a registration at all. No entry is made on the student's permanent record, and no tuition and fees are charged. A registration cancellation will be processed for any student who has a "hold" on the tuition and fees due date for each term, and students will be notified. A cancellation will be processed if a student is not cleared financially; is not academically eligible to continue in school; or shows a cashier's hold, Office of Undergraduate Admissions hold, dean's office hold, or Campus Health Services cancellation hold. In some cases, a student may need to cancel his or her registration for personal reasons. Students may either come by the Office of the University Registrar or call or email to request a registration cancellation. For a cancellation after classes begin, however, students must process the cancellation through their dean's office.

Administrative Changes to Course Registration

Students have the responsibility to maintain the accuracy of their course schedule. A department or curriculum in the College of Arts and Sciences has the option to drop a course from a student's registration if the student fails to attend both of the first two class meetings (or the first class meeting if the course meets only once each week). The appropriate dean's office will be responsible for informing departments of students who cannot attend the first two class meetings because of illness or other reasons approved by a dean. Students should never presume that an instructor or department/curriculum will systematically drop classes from the student's schedule. However, if such an action is taken by a department/curriculum, the registration openings resulting from these drops will be offered to other students seeking enrollment in the courses during the official add period (first five days of classes) or thereafter, as determined by the instructor of the class or by the department, curriculum, or school.

Departments/curricula can drop students' courses using the computerized registration system prior to the last day to reduce a course load for financial credit. To effect such a drop after that date, a student must submit a completed registration/drop/add form first to the student's dean's office for approval and then to the Office of the University Registrar. Students who have applied for graduation and who have requested an academic underload must have that request approved to receive financial credit for reducing their course load.

Auditing Courses

To audit a class, registered students and persons not registered must obtain a registration/drop/add form from the teaching department offering the class. Permission from the class instructor and the department chair is required and should be indicated on the form with a written signature. This procedure applies to fall, spring, and both summer terms.

Requests to audit a class may be submitted only after the end of the official registration period (last day for students to add a class or late register) when it has been determined that there is still space available in the class. This date can be found on the University Registrar's Calendar for the specific term.

Auditing classes is permitted only in lecture-based courses and never in courses that include laboratories or performances. Auditing is not permitted in courses that focus on the development of written or oral communication skills or that rely heavily on class participation. Auditing is not permitted in independent studies courses, internships, special topics, directed readings, or similar courses. Auditing is also not permitted in classes that are offered primarily online. Students may not audit courses offered through the Friday Center for Continuing Education (Part-Time Classroom Studies, Carolina Courses Online, Self-Paced Courses, or tutorial programs) or courses preparing students for credit by examination.

Students auditing a course do not write papers, take quizzes or examinations, or request review of their work, and do not participate in class discussions unless otherwise directed by the course instructor. Students who audit a course may not subsequently receive course credit for that course. For more information on the University's policy on auditing, see registrar.unc.edu/academic-services/policies-procedures/university-policy-memorandums/upm-9-auditing-courses.

Students officially registered for other classes in the same term may audit a class without paying a fee. Persons not registered for classes must pay a $20.00 fee per class to the Office of Student Accounts and University Receivables, then bring the permission and receipt to the Office of the University Registrar to complete the process. Payments will only be accepted after the end of the official registration period.

If requested, a copy of the registration transaction will be given to the student to provide to the class instructor at the beginning of the term.

Changes in Fall and Spring Semester Schedules

Continuous Course Enrollment:
Foundations English Composition and Foreign Language Requirements

Effective in fall 2012, students admitted as first-year or as transfer students are required to complete ENGL 105/105I (ENGL 100 and 105/105I, if applicable) during their first year, and they must maintain continuous enrollment in Foundations foreign language courses until they have completed this requirement. Students are not permitted to drop ENGL 100, ENGL 105/105I, or foreign language levels 1 through 3 being used to fulfill the Foundations requirement at any time during the semester, unless approved by a dean in the Academic Advising Program. Such approval will be for exceptional circumstances only. Students should not stop attending English composition and rhetoric and Foundation foreign language classes without speaking with a dean in the Academic Advising Program.

Course Schedule Changes

Insofar as possible, changes in course registration schedules should be made during the first five days of classes. During this time, students may add courses using the online registration system. After the first five days of classes, if students wish to register or make additions to their schedule, they must obtain a registration/drop/add form from their academic advisor, the concerned department, or their professional school and must obtain the signatures of both their instructor and their school dean (or dean's designee). For students in the General College and the College of Arts and Sciences, only the associate dean for advising (or dean's designee) has this authority. After the final day to add classes on the Web, deans (or deans' designees) will approve only those registrations or course additions that have first been approved by the instructor.

Course Schedule Changes during Weeks One and Two

During the first two weeks of classes, students may drop a course using the online registration system, but they are responsible for ensuring that their schedules do not fall below the minimum 12 academic hours required for full-time registration.

Course Schedule Changes during Weeks Three through Eight

After the second week of classes, students should not stop attending any class or completing assignments unless and until their academic advisor or dean officially approves dropping the course from the student's schedule. After the second and before the end of the eighth week of classes, students who wish to drop a course must obtain a registration/drop/add form from their academic advisor, the concerned department, or their school and must obtain their dean's signature (or deans' designees) on the form. If permission is granted, the registration/drop/add form is submitted to the Office of the University Registrar on the student's behalf. When a course is dropped between the second and eighth week of classes, a grade of WC (withdrawal by choice) shall be recorded and used internally for tracking and reporting purposes. For external purposes, the WC grade is equivalent to the W grade. Once declared, a WC grade cannot be rescinded except when a student withdraws from an entire semester due to extenuating circumstances. All first-year, first-time students entering the University in fall 2014 or thereafter are allowed to accumulate no more than 16 hours of WC grades during their undergraduate career.

All students who entered the University as degree-seeking students prior to fall 2014, along with sophomore and junior transfer students who enter in fall 2014, are still subject to the previous drop-add procedure. Details on the previous policy can be found on the University Registrar's Web site at registrar.unc.edu/registration/registration-policies/drop-add-procedures.

Course Schedule Changes after the Eighth Week of Classes:
The Appeal Process

After the eighth week of classes, students must petition to drop courses through the dean's office of the school in which they are enrolled. For students in the General College and the College of Arts and Sciences, the associate dean for advising (or designee) has this authority.

To drop a course after the eighth week of classes, students must complete and submit an appeal to the appeals committee of their college or school. In the General College and the College of Arts and Sciences, an appeals committee meets weekly. Possible legitimate reasons for requesting a course drop after the eighth week of classes include serious illness, personal or family problems, financial problems requiring employment after the start of the semester, or other serious problems that prevent students from meeting their academic responsibilities.

Students must first discuss their reasons for requesting a late course drop with an academic advisor or their academic dean. The advisor or dean provides the student with a standard form that explains the process for an appeal. The appeal must include a statement from the student, an evaluation of performance and class attendance from the course instructor, and any pertinent documentation that provides compelling support for the appeal. The student must submit the completed form to the office of the associate dean for advising in the Academic Advising Program of the College of Arts and Sciences and General College. Submission of an appeal does not ensure that the request will be granted, and students must continue to attend classes and complete all assignments until informed of the committee's decision. If a course drop is approved, the registration/drop/add form is processed through the Office of the University Registrar.

Students enrolled in professional schools should acquaint themselves with the appropriate appeals procedures in their schools.

The notation of W (withdrawn) is entered in the grade column of academic transcripts if students are permitted by their school to drop a course after the eighth week of classes or proportional equivalent for summer terms and other nonstandard enrollment periods. This notation is automatically entered unless the student's academic dean specifies otherwise.

Policies and Guidelines for a Cooperative Learning Environment

Teaching and learning occur simultaneously through a partnership between instructor and student. Instructors share knowledge, experience, and ideas with their students. Students process these thoughts, generate new ones, and share them with their teachers and classmates. In most cases, students and instructors communicate clearly and effectively. However, misunderstandings do occur. In an attempt to foster a positive academic environment, the Faculty Council, upon recommendation of the Educational Policy Committee, establishes the following policies and guidelines.

The Faculty Council resolves:

Part I. Policies

Section 1.

The Faculty Council recognizes and affirms the following policies. This recognition is not to be interpreted as precluding modification of any policy by the appropriate authority.

Copies of these policies can be obtained from the Office of the Dean of Students. They contain information about how to file a grievance. A grievance based on incidents that occurred more than six months before the complaint was filed will not be considered.

Part II. Guidelines

Section 2.

The Faculty Council endorses the following guidelines for the faculty-student relationship. This endorsement shall not be construed as faculty legislation, is not intended to establish a contractual undertaking by the University or any individual, and shall not constitute the basis for civil action in a court or a claim in any administrative or judicial body of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Evaluated assignments should be returned to the students within a reasonable amount of time. Since part of the purpose of such assignments is to provide feedback, students should be given time to assess and to learn from their mistakes. Ideally, such assessment would take place while the relevant topics are still fresh in their minds.

Extra credit, if offered, should be announced publicly and made available to the entire class.

Students should understand that they are members of a community of scholars, and membership in such a community is not a passive activity. To be full participants in the educational community and to maximize the educational value of a class, preclass preparation is necessary. Proper class preparation involves obtaining course materials as they are needed and completing assignments as they are due. Full participation in a class requires regular attendance, arriving on time and remaining until class conclusion, and active involvement in the work of the class.

Students should also consider the extent of their own involvement in a class in assessing the educational value of the class.

Class Attendance Policy

Regular class attendance is a student obligation, and a student is responsible for all the work, including tests and written work, of all class meetings. No right or privilege exists that permits a student to be absent from any class meetings except for excused absences for authorized University activities (see below) or religious observances required by the student's faith. If a student misses three consecutive class meetings, or misses more classes than the course instructor deems advisable, the course instructor may report the facts to the student's academic dean.

Excused Absences for Religious Reasons

Students are authorized up to two excused absences each academic year for religious observances required by their faith. Students who wish to request more than two excused absences in an academic year for religious observances required by their faith will need to contact their course instructors and request the additional absence, which will only be granted with the course instructor's permission. Primary holy days for religious observance are noted on a Web-based interfaith calendar site at www.interfaithcalendar.org.

Students are responsible for providing a written notice for an excused absence for a religious observance two weeks in advance of the date requested or as soon as possible if the date occurs within the first two weeks of the semester. This policy also applies to students who have an excused absence for a religious observance during the summer.

Students must be given the opportunity to make up tests and other work missed due to an excused absence for a religious observance. Make-up tests may entail an alternative examination, or other accommodation which allows the student not to be penalized for an excused absence for a religious observance.

Other Absences

Only course instructors excuse absences from class for valid reasons (illness or family emergency, religious observance, etc.). A student should present his or her explanation for any absences in writing to the course instructor in advance if the reason for the absence could be foreseen, or as soon as possible thereafter if the reason for the absence could not be foreseen.

A student may appeal a course instructor's denial of a request that an absence be excused if the request to be excused from class and the reasons for the request are presented to the course instructor in writing within the time limits above. The appeal is to be made to the course instructor's immediate academic supervisor.

Students who are members of regularly organized and authorized University activities and who may be out of town taking part in some scheduled event are to be excused during the approved period of absence. Notification of such an absence must be sent by the responsible University official to the course instructor before the date(s) of the scheduled absence.

Policy Statement on Gender Inclusive Language

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is committed to providing an inclusive and welcoming environment for all members of our community. Consistent with that commitment, gender inclusive terms (chair; first-year student; upper-level student, etc.) should be used on University documents, Web sites, and policies. A guidance handout (Gender-Sensitive Language) may be found on the UNC Writing Center Web site at writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/gender-sensitive-language.

Policies on Prohibited Harassment and Nondiscrimination

For the Policy on Prohibited Harassment, Including Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination (www.unc.edu/campus/policies/harassanddiscrim.pdf), and the Policy Statement on Nondiscrimination (www.unc.edu/campus/policies/nondiscrim.pdf), please see page two of this bulletin.

Improper Relationships between Students and Employees

On March 15, 1996, The University of North Carolina Board of Governors adopted a systemwide policy that prohibits amorous or sexual relationships between faculty or staff employees and 1) students they evaluate or supervise by virtue of their teaching, research, administrative, or other employment responsibility and 2) students who are minors below the age of 18. The policy also states that faculty or staff employees may not supervise or evaluate students to whom they are related by blood, law, or marriage. For the full guidelines based on the board's policy, please see hr.unc.edu/policies-procedures-guidelines/spa-employee-policies/employee-relations.

Final Examinations

Undergraduate courses taught on campus must include a final assessment (i.e., final examination) unless the provost grants an exception. A traditional final examination is written, is administered at a predetermined time as specified in the official final examination schedule, and takes place at a designated location.

The final examination schedule, announced prior to the beginning of the semester, sets the time for each examination. Once having been established, the schedule cannot be changed. Examinations must be held at the time shown on the schedule. No special preparation quizzes may be given during the last five days of classes (last two days of classes for summer school) before the beginning of the final examination period. No examination may start later than 7:00 p.m. Final examinations for a full course should ordinarily cover a minimum of two hours and should not exceed a period of three hours. Only examinations requiring an exceptional portion of practical work should be longer than three hours.

Only the provost can grant exceptions to the scheduled time and location of a traditional examination, after review and approval by the appropriate department head and the dean. No examination (except for laboratory sections) may be held at a time other than that specified in the general schedule except with the advance approval of the provost.

A course instructor may, due to highly unusual circumstances, petition for a change in the examination schedule. The instructor must submit the request in writing to his or her chair no later than the last day of late registration for that term, and it must be cleared by the chair and the appropriate dean before consideration by the provost. If the petition is approved, the course instructor assumes responsibility for making special arrangements to give the examination to any student who has a schedule conflict as a result of the change.

Chairs (i.e., heads of instructional units) must give permission for faculty members to use nontraditional examinations, such as a portfolio of a semester's work, final project, or a take-home examination. The chair should submit to the appropriate dean an annual summary of the exceptions that were granted. For multidisciplinary and cotaught courses, permission to give a nontraditional examination must be granted solely by the chair of the instructional unit in which the course is based. Even when faculty members have permission to administer nontraditonal final examinations, the scheduled examination period must be utilized.

All regular final examinations must be held in Chapel Hill. Students who are absent from an examination receive a course grade of AB (absent), which is equivalent to F (zero quality points), or FA (absent and failing regardless of performance on the final examination). When students are unable, for reasons clearly beyond their control, to take a final examination at the scheduled time, they can be excused only by the director of Campus Health Services (who can authorize the registrar to issue an "official permit to take final examination") or their academic dean (who can issue an "examination excuse"). An absence may be excused for severe health problems leading to the student's placement on the Infirmary List, for serious personal or family problems, for religious observances required by the student's faith, or for a scheduling conflict involving multiple examinations. In cases of illness, personal or family emergency, or religious observance, additional documentation may be required by the dean.

For any University undergraduate courses offered entirely online or via other distance modalities, exams will be offered and must be completed during the scheduled final examination period, but requirements concerning the time of day and place of the exam will be appropriate to the course's mode of delivery. Self-paced courses are exempt from both the time and place requirements of the exam policy and the requirement that exams be held during the scheduled final examination period.

Students may be excused for a final exam for religious observances required by their faith. Primary holy days for religious observances are noted on a Web-based interfaith calendar site: www.interfaithcalendar.org. Students must be given the opportunity to make up final exams missed due to an excused absence for a religious observance. Students are responsible for providing the course instructor and the dean a written request for an excused absence from a final exam for a religious observance no later than the last day of classes.

Campus Health Services. Students who are seriously ill during the time of their final examination(s) (including complications related to pregnancy) should consult Campus Health Services or Counseling and Psychological Services about having their names entered on the Infirmary List. In some cases, outpatient treatment can also result in a student's name being entered on the Infirmary List. Students on the Infirmary List may obtain an official permit from the Office of the University Registrar to take the final examination to remove a grade of AB. They must make arrangements with their course instructor to take the final examination and provide the instructor with their official permit. If students are treated at Campus Health Services or Counseling and Psychological Services but do not appear on the Infirmary List, they should see the dean of their college as soon as possible.

Academic Dean. If students know in advance that they must miss one or more final examinations because of illness, religious observance, or other serious problems, they should notify in writing both the course instructor and the dean of the school in which they are enrolled no later than the last day of classes. If this is not possible, they should see their dean as soon after the fact as possible. For students in the College of Arts and Sciences, only the associate dean for advising (or designee) is authorized to issue examination excuses for reasons other than three exams in 24 hours or two exams at the same time. For other students, only the dean of the school in which the student is enrolled has that authority. The dean may require documentation of a student's religious observance, illness, or problems.

Assuming that a student did not take a final examination for one of the reasons previously cited, the dean will issue an official examination excuse, which the student must present to the course instructor when arrangements are made for a suitable time to take the final examination.

A student who has three final examinations scheduled by the Office of the University Registrar within a 24-hour period or two scheduled at the same time may request his or her dean (or designee) for permission to have one of the scheduled examinations rescheduled. In the event that one of the scheduled examinations is a common final examination for a multiple-section course, that examination is the one to be rescheduled.

Students who have secured an examination excuse or an official permit and who transmit the document to the instructor or the instructor's chair or dean must be granted permission to take the exam at an alternate time, although students will need to arrange a mutually convenient time with the instructor. Except when the provost has provided an exception in writing, the exam will be taken at a time subsequent to the regularly scheduled exam, though no later than the end of the following semester.

The final examination in any course may be taken only by regularly enrolled members of the class whose registration has been certified and by students certified to be eligible to take a special examination in that course. The certifying authority is the Office of the University Registrar.

Each student is required to sign a full and explicit Honor Code pledge certifying that he or she has neither given nor received aid during the examination.

Academic Course Load

Fall and Spring Semesters

To meet the minimum graduation requirement of 120 academic hours within the eight-semester limit, students should average 15 hours each semester. However, four-hour foreign language courses and four-hour laboratory science courses often account for course loads of 16 to 18 hours. Students may not enroll in more than 18 academic hours unless they have earned a 3.000 grade point average in the preceding regular semester and have a cumulative 2.500 grade point average. Exceptions require the approval of the student's dean. With approval of their dean, seniors meeting graduation requirements during their final semester in residence may enroll in up to 21 academic hours if they have a cumulative and preceding semester grade point average of 2.000.

The minimum course load for a single semester is 12 academic hours. Students may not go below the 12-academic-hour minimum without permission of their dean. All students should discuss semester enrollment of fewer than 15 academic hours with their advisor because such enrollments may affect academic eligibility and the ability to complete all degree requirements in the required eight semesters. PHYA courses are not considered academic hours and will not count toward the 12-hour minimum enrollment.

The approved maximum course load for students in a part-time program is eight credit hours in a fall, spring, or summer term.

Summer School

The summer term begins with the first day of Maymester and continues through the last day of the Summer Session II. Administered by Summer School, summer courses are offered in two sessions (Summer Session I and Summer Session II), with a Maymester period overlapping the first three weeks of Summer Session I. For UNC–Chapel Hill students, credit hours and grades count the same as in fall or spring terms. For visiting students, transfer of grades or credit is determined by their home institution.

The typical full course load is two courses, usually six credit hours. However, students may enroll in up to eight credit hours each in Summer Session I and in Summer Session II to allow for a four-credit course or an extra one-credit laboratory or physical activity course. Students with a 2.000 cumulative grade point average may enroll in a maximum of nine hours during a summer session with the approval of their dean. It is recommended that, if students enroll in a Maymester course, they not enroll in a second Maymester or Summer Session I class.

Carolina Courses Online

There are limits on the number of online courses that may be taken in a term and how they may apply to degree requirements. For full details, see the section "Distance-Learning Courses via the Friday Center for Continuing Education."

Fifty Percent Tuition Surcharge

Undergraduate students seeking a baccalaureate degree at UNC–Chapel Hill are subject to a 50 percent tuition surcharge in some circumstances, as required by Section 9.10 (b), G.S. 116–143.7 (a). No surcharge will be imposed on any student who exceeds the degree credit hour limits within the equivalent of four academic years of regular term enrollment, or within five years of regular term enrollment in a degree program officially designated by the Board of Governors as a five-year program. For detailed information, please see the Web site for the Office of the University Registrar at registrar.unc.edu/registration/registration-guide/fifty-percent-tuition-surcharge.

Students Subject to the Surcharge

The surcharge should be imposed for students who exceed eight or more terms in residence on all counted credit hours in excess of the threshold defined below for each of the following three categories of undergraduates:

  1. For students earning a first baccalaureate degree in a program that requires no more than 128 credit hours, the surcharge shall be applied to all counted credit hours in excess of 140.

  2. For students earning a first baccalaureate degree in a Board-approved program that requires more than 128 counted credit hours, the surcharge shall be applied to all credit hours that exceed 110 percent of the credit hours required for the degree. Such programs include those that have been officially designated by the Board of Governors as five-year programs, as well as those involving double majors or dual bachelor's/master's degrees.

  3. For students earning a baccalaureate degree other than their first, the surcharge shall be applied to all counted credit hours that exceed 110 percent of the minimum additional credit hours needed to earn the additional baccalaureate degree.

Counted Credit Hours

The undergraduate credit hours to be counted for this purpose include 1) all regular session degree-creditable courses taken at UNC–Chapel Hill, including repeated courses, failed courses, and all courses with a grade of W (withdrawn); and 2) all transfer credit hours accepted by UNC–Chapel Hill. The following credit hours shall be excluded from the calculation: 1) those earned through summer sessions at UNC–Chapel Hill or another UNC institution; 2) those earned through the College Board's Advanced Placement (AP) and College Level Examination Program (CLEP) or similar programs; 3) those earned through institutional advanced placement, course validation, or any similar procedure for awarding course credit; and 4) those earned through Carolina Courses Online and extension courses offered by the Friday Center for Continuing Education.

Grading System

Permanent Letter Grades

A letter-grade and plus/minus system for evaluating academic performance is employed for all undergraduates. Each letter grade corresponds to a number of grade points. Each letter-graded course receives a numerical value of quality points (quality points equal grade points times semester credit hours per course) to use in determining a student's average (per credit hour) in a particular term and to find a student's cumulative grade point average (per credit hour).

A = 4.0

A- = 3.7

B+ = 3.3

B = 3.0

B- = 2.7

C+ = 2.3

C = 2.0

C- = 1.7

D+ = 1.3

D = 1.0

F = 0.0

To determine the grade point average for a term, first determine the total quality points earned in the term by multiplying the number of grade points awarded for each course by the course's assigned number of semester credit hours and adding the resulting quality points earned for each course in the term. Then divide the total quality points earned in the term by the number of semester credit hours attempted (for letter grades) in the term.

Example

Course

Grade

Grade
Points

x

Credit
Hours

=

Quality
Points

Course A

C+

2.3

x

3.0

=

6.90

Course B

B-

2.7

x

3.0

=

8.10

Course C

B

3.0

x

4.0

=

12.00

Course D

C-

1.7

x

3.0

=

5.10

Course E

A-

3.7

x

1.0

=

3.70

Course F

F

0.0

x

1.0

=

0.00

Course G

A

4.0

x

3.0

=

12.00

Total quality points earned:

47.80

Total graded hours:

18.0

Term grade point average:

47.80 ÷ 18.0 = 2.656

Permanent grades are defined as follows:

A Mastery of course content at the highest level of attainment that can reasonably be expected of students at a given stage of development. The A grade states clearly that the student has shown such outstanding promise in the aspect of the discipline under study that he/she may be strongly encouraged to continue.

B Strong performance demonstrating a high level of attainment for a student at a given stage of development. The B grade states that the student has shown solid promise in the aspect of the discipline under study.

C A totally acceptable performance demonstrating an adequate level of attainment for a student at a given stage of development. The C grade states that while not yet showing any unusual promise, the student may continue to study in the discipline with reasonable hope of intellectual development.

D A marginal performance in the required exercises demonstrating a minimal passing level of attainment for a student at a given stage of development. The D grade states that the student has given no evidence of prospective growth in the discipline; an accumulation of D grades should be taken to mean that the student would be well advised not to continue in the academic field.

F For whatever reasons, an unacceptable performance. The F grade indicates that the student's performance in the required exercises has revealed almost no understanding of the course content. A grade of F should warrant questioning whether the student may suitably register for further study in the discipline before remedial work is undertaken.

Grades earned and semester hours attempted at other institutions are not included in the calculation of the University grade point average.

Plus/minus grades earned prior to the 1978 fall semester are not assigned a particular numerical quality point value; the value of the basic letter grade A, B, C, or D alone is used in computing a grade point average.

Records of progress are kept by this institution on all students. Students have two primary methods to gain access to term grades:

Temporary Grades (IN and AB) and FA Grades

Any student who ceases to attend a class without officially being dropped may receive a temporary grade of AB or IN or a permanent grade of FA.

Students who do not complete all requirements in a course by the end of the semester, but who could pass the course if they did, receive a temporary grade of IN (incomplete) or AB (absent from the final exam) in place of a permanent letter grade. Grades of IN and AB carry the value of an F grade (zero quality points) and are used in the computation of semester and cumulative grade point averages. Students who do not complete the course requirements within a specified period of time are assigned permanent F* grades on their academic transcripts by the Office of the University Registrar.

The instructor must report the grade of AB for any student who did not take the final examination and who, by taking the final examination, could pass the course. This AB grade carries the value of an F in computing the student's cumulative and semester grade point average, and later converts to an F* unless the student arranges to take the final examination before the last class day of the next scheduled semester (fall or spring). If the student cannot pass the course regardless of a final examination performance, the instructor must report the grade FA. The grade of FA (cannot pass the class) is a permanent failing grade. A grade of F may be assigned instead of a temporary grade or a grade of FA when a final examination is not required in the course.

The grade IN may only be assigned by an instructor to a student who took the final examination in a course but did not complete some other course requirement (including signing the honor pledge) and who, by virtue of completing that missing work, might pass the course. An IN carries the value of an F (zero quality points) in computing a student's cumulative and semester grade point average. Unless removed within eight weeks of the beginning of the regularly scheduled semester (fall or spring) following its assignment, an IN converts to an F*.

When submitting an AB or IN, an instructor must enter the grade on the instructor's grade roster and must also complete a temporary grade assignment form supplied by the Office of the University Registrar and available online at registrar.sites.unc.edu/files/2012/03/CCM3_031444.pdf. The purpose of this form is to establish a record of what arrangements, if any, have been made between the student and instructor to clear the AB or IN.

Absence from a final examination may be officially excused only by the student's dean or the director of Campus Health Services or Counseling and Psychological Services. Please see "Final Examinations" for information about final examination excuses.

Important Rules and Procedures Pertaining to AB and IN Grades

The decision to report an IN grade is solely the responsibility of the course instructor; however, a student may present proper justification for the instructor's consideration.

Temporary grades should be cleared by completing the work outstanding, preferably no later than the start of the following semester. The deadline for clearing a temporary grade of AB is the last class day of the next regularly scheduled semester (fall or spring) after the AB grade is awarded. A temporary grade of IN must be cleared within the first eight weeks of the regularly scheduled semester (fall or spring) after the IN grade is awarded.

If students intend to remove IN or excused AB grades, they should not officially enroll in the course(s) during the next semester or summer session. If recommended by the course instructor, a student may attend by officially auditing a part of that instructor's section of the course or another instructor's section of the same course in which the temporary grade was awarded.

If a student enrolls in a course in which a temporary grade has been previously received, the second enrollment is taken as evidence that the student could not or is not permitted to remove the temporary grade. This results in replacing the temporary grade by F* after the deadline for removing the temporary grade. The grade earned during the second enrollment is also reported on the student's academic transcript and is used along with the F* grade in the computation of a cumulative grade point average.

Other Grades and Notations

A notation of BE (By-Examination) is entered in the grade column of academic transcripts if students are awarded credit for a course as a result of evaluation by departmental, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, or SAT II Subject Test examinations. BE credit confers credit hours and can be used to fulfill General Education requirements. For first-time, first-year students entering UNC–Chapel Hill in fall 2009 or thereafter, no more than two courses (six to eight credit hours) of BE credit can be applied to a major and no more than one course (three to four credit hours) of BE credit can be applied to a minor in the College of Arts and Sciences. BE credit may not be used to satisfy the requirement that students earn at least 12 or 18 hours of C or better grades in courses making up the minor or major respectively.

A notation of NG (no grade) is not used by individual instructors but rather is assigned by the Office of the University Registrar when a permanent grade is pending a judicial review by the Honor Court.

A notation of PL (placement) is entered in the grade column of academic transcripts if students are awarded exemption for a course as a result of an evaluation that would ordinarily place them in a succeeding course. PL does not confer credit hours.

There are some courses for which only a grade of PS (pass) or F (fail) can be awarded. For all other courses, a grade of PS (pass) indicates a grade of C- or better in a course taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. The rules governing the use of the Pass/D+/D/Fail option are presented later in this section.

A grade of SP (satisfactory progress) may be used in the first course of a departmental undergraduate honors program. The honors program runs through two semesters, and a final grade is not reported until completion of the second course. When the final grade is reported, the previously assigned SP grade must be changed to the appropriate permanent letter grade by an official grade change form. Credit hours are awarded for the first honors course only after a letter grade replaces the SP grade. An SP grade is not computed in the grade point average.

A notation of W (withdrawn) is entered in the grade column of academic transcripts if students are permitted by their school to drop a course after the eighth week of classes or proportional equivalent for summer terms and other nonstandard enrollment periods. This notation is automatically entered unless the student's academic dean specifies otherwise.

When a course is dropped between the second and eighth week of classes, a grade of WC (withdrawal by choice) shall be recorded and used internally for tracking and reporting purposes. For external purposes, the WC grade is equivalent to the W grade. Once declared, a WC grade cannot be rescinded except when a student withdraws from an entire semester due to extenuating circumstances.

A blank space or a grade of NR (not reported) is shown in the grade column when the instructor has not submitted the official grade for the student.

Repeating Course Enrollments

Students who have received passing grades in courses may not enroll in the same courses at a later time without the approval of their academic dean. If a student proceeds with such an enrollment without securing permission, the course and any grade received beyond the initial enrollment may be administratively removed from the student's academic transcript.

A second enrollment in a course for which a student has received a grade less than C through a previous enrollment at the University will be approved by an academic dean at the request of the student if any of the following apply:

In some circumstances, permission may be granted to repeat a specific course regardless of the grade earned during the initial enrollment.

If a student is permitted to repeat a course in which a passing grade previously has been earned, only the credit from the course with the highest grade (or if the grades are the same, the latter attempt) will be counted toward the fulfillment of the University's minimum graduation requirement of 120 academic hours. The grades of both courses, however, will be computed in the student's cumulative grade point average.

For the purposes of receiving financial aid, hours for repeated courses will only be considered a part of the total upon which awards are based if 1) the student is repeating a course previously failed, or 2) the course is the first repeat of a prior course in which a passing grade was received.

Certain University courses (e.g., applied music, special studies, undergraduate research, etc.) may be taken more than once for credit and are so designated in the ConnectCarolina course catalog. A particular physical education activity (PHYA) course may be taken more than once, so long as a different level of the same course (beginning, intermediate, and advanced) is taken during each separate enrollment. PHYA courses numbered above 200 do not award credit hours, but the grade is factored into the cumulative grade point average.

Students may enroll in no more than one lifetime fitness (LFIT) course, and only one LFIT course will count toward graduation.

Grades Earned at Other Institutions

With the exception of courses taken via interinstitutional registration (see "Interinstitutional Registration"), grades earned and semester hours attempted at other institutions are not included in the computation of a grade point average at the University. A grade point average earned at another university may not be used to restore academic eligibility; however, academic hours earned at another university may be used to restore academic eligibility if the student is lacking only credit hours and has a satisfactory grade point average. Special rules regarding transfer courses apply; see "Transfer of Credit" and "Academic Eligibility."

Grade Appeals

The grades of H, HP, P, LP, L, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, PS, F, FA, F*, and numerical grades in the Law School are considered permanent grades. Once reported, the instructor's grade report may not be changed except under certain conditions. For a grade change to be considered, it must be based upon one or more of the following grounds and upon allegation that the ground or grounds cited influenced the grade assignment to the student's detriment:

Students should present the appeal in writing to the dean of their school (for students in the College of Arts and Sciences, this is the associate dean for advising). The dean will refer the appeal to the administrative board of his/her school, which will meet to consider whether the student has offered sufficient grounds for referring the appeal to the chair of the department concerned. If the administrative board determines that further review by the academic department is appropriate, the department chair will then appoint a committee to consider the appeal and will make a recommendation to the administrative board based on the committee's findings. The administrative board will make the final decision, and no change of grade will be made except as a result of the decision by the board. The chair will report such decision to change the grade to the Office of the University Registrar.

Pass/D+/D/Fail Option

The Pass/D+/D/Fail option provides students an opportunity to enroll in an additional course (beyond the usual load of five academic courses) or to reduce their concerns about competing with prospective majors in a course in which they have considerable interest. Students who declare a course on the Pass/D+/D/Fail option will receive the grade of PS (pass) when a letter grade of A through C- is recorded on the official grade roster, a D+ or D when a letter grade of D+ or D is recorded, or an F when the course is failed. For the purpose of computing a grade point average, a PS grade does not count as hours attempted; therefore, a PS grade does not affect a student's grade point average. However, grades of D+, D, or F under the Pass/D+/D/Fail option count as hours attempted and are treated in the same manner as D+, D, and F grades earned in any other course.

Course content and requirements are the same for Pass/D+/D/Fail registrants as for regular registrants. The minimum performance for a PS grade is equivalent to the minimum performance for the letter grade of C-.

Regulations Governing the Pass/D+/D/Fail Option

The following regulations govern the use of the Pass/D+/D/Fail option:

A. Students must take at least nine academic hours for regular letter-grade credit in the semester in which other hours are declared Pass/D+/D/Fail.

B. No more than four credit hours (e.g., one three-hour academic course and a physical education activity course) may be taken on the Pass/D+/D/Fail grading system during a single semester.

C. A maximum of 16 hours of Pass/D+/D/Fail credit may be taken in a student's undergraduate career.

D. Not to be counted in the limits specified in B and C above are up to seven hours taken in courses for which ONLY PS or F grades are assigned.

E. The following courses may not be declared Pass/D+/D/Fail:

Note: Prerequisites to courses specifically required for the major or minor may be taken Pass/D+/D/Fail unless a specific grade is required in the prerequisite course.

Pass/D+/D/Fail Declaration Procedure

To declare a course on the Pass/D+/D/Fail grading system, a student must complete the Pass/D+/D/Fail course declaration form. It is obtained from the academic advisor or dean's office. Students should discuss the advisability of taking a course on the Pass/D+/D/Fail grading system with their advisor before committing themselves to a formal declaration.

The period for making Pass/D+/D/Fail declarations begins on the fifth day of classes of each semester and concludes at the end of the eighth week of classes. Pass/D+/D/Fail declaration forms may not be submitted after the eighth week of classes.

Academic Eligibility

The University expects all students to study and perform at the best of their abilities. The "Student Success Standards" listed below do not suggest acceptable academic performance, but rather minimum levels. Students failing to meet these standards are not making good use of their educational opportunities.

Effective May 13, 2014, all undergraduate students are subject to the same student success standards, as defined below, regardless of when they began college.

Note: The student success standards are subject to change with approval by Faculty Council.

Student Success Standards (Eligibility)

The student success standards guide undergraduates to maintain enrollment eligibility and to stay on track to college degree completion. At the end of each term, undergraduates earn an academic status that determines their eligibility to continue enrollment in a subsequent fall or spring semester at UNC–Chapel Hill.

Academic status is determined through three student success standards:

  1. Cumulative Grade Point Average. The University monitors each student's grade point average every term. After the first full-time term at UNC–Chapel Hill, all full-time undergraduates must maintain a 2.000 cumulative UNC–Chapel Hill grade point average. Students enrolled via Part-time Classroom Studies must maintain a 2.000 cumulative UNC–Chapel Hill grade point average after having attempted nine or more credit hours.

  2. Academic Semester Credit Hours. Full-time undergraduates must have the following number of academic semester credit hours passed:

  3. Ratio of Attempted-to-Completed Semester Credit Hours. Undergraduates must earn a passing grade in at least two-thirds of attempted semester credit hours each term. (By-Examination and placement credits are excluded from this calculation.)

Attempted Semester
Credit Hours*

Credit hours that must be
completed with a passing grade

1

1

2

2

3

2

4

3

5

4

6

4

7

5

8

6

9

6

10

7

11

8

12

8

13

9

14

10

15

10

16

11

17

12

18

12

19

13

20

14

21

14

*as of census date (approximately 10 days into the semester)

Students who meet each of the three standards will have an academic status of Eligible–In Good Academic Standing and will be eligible to enroll in classroom courses in the following fall or spring semester.

Students who fall short of any of the three standards will have an academic status of Eligible–On Academic Probation if they passed at least nine academic credit hours (excluding By-Examination or placement credits) in the most recently enrolled fall or spring semester and they were not already on probation in that most recent semester. Students who are Eligible–On Academic Probation are entitled to enroll in classroom courses in a fall or spring term.

Students who fall short of any of the three standards at the end of an enrolled fall semester will have an academic status of Ineligible if they did not pass at least nine academic credit hours (excluding By-Examination and placement credits) in that fall semester or if they

were on academic probation in that fall semester. Students may not enroll in classroom courses in a spring or fall semester. However, they may seek to regain eligibility, as discussed in the section "Restoration of Academic Eligibility."

Students who fall short of any of the three standards at the end of an enrolled spring semester will have an academic status of Ineligible–Pending if they did not pass at least nine academic credit hours (excluding By-Examination and placement credits) in that spring semester or if they were on academic probation in that spring semester. The status of Ineligible–Pending will change to Ineligible if good academic standing is not restored before the beginning of that year's fall semester.

Students who fall short of any of the three standards at the end of an enrolled Summer Session I will have an academic status of Ineligible–Pending if they did not pass at least nine academic credit hours (excluding By-Examination and placement credits) in the most recently enrolled spring or fall semester or if they were on academic probation in the most recently enrolled spring or fall semester. The status of Ineligible–Pending will change to Ineligible if good academic standing is not restored before the beginning of that year's fall semester.

Students who fall short of any of the three standards at the end of an enrolled Summer Session II will have an academic status of Ineligible if they did not pass at least nine academic credit hours (excluding By-Examination and placement credits) in the most recently enrolled spring or fall semester or if they were on academic probation in the most recently enrolled spring or fall semester.

Students with an academic status of Ineligible cannot enroll in classroom courses in fall or spring semesters.

Students with an academic status of Ineligible or Ineligible–Pending may enroll in summer school.

Appeals

Students may, under extraordinary circumstances, present an appeal in writing to the dean of their school (for students in the College of Arts and Sciences, this is the associate dean for advising). The dean will refer the appeal to the administrative board for his/her school.

Calculation of Transferred Semesters Based on the Number of Transferred Credit Hours

Several academic procedures, including the determination of academic eligibility, depend on the tally of semesters that students have completed. A student is allowed a maximum of eight fall or spring semesters of full-time enrollment at the University; therefore, when credit hours are transferred, a calculation must be made as to the number of semesters the student is regarded as having used up. This calculation is based on the number of credit hours accepted by UNC–Chapel Hill for transfer, not on the number of semesters in which the student was enrolled at other colleges. Excluded from this calculation are transfer hours awarded for courses taken concurrent with high school.

Students are regarded as having used up one semester for every full multiple of 15.0 semester credit hours accepted for transfer. When credits are transferred from a college that operates on the quarter-term system, one quarter-term credit hour equals two-thirds of a semester credit hour.

See "Transfer Candidates" in the "Undergraduate Admissions" section of the Bulletin for additional information.

The same formula is applied to credit hours that a student earns while enrolled in a part-time program of study at UNC–Chapel Hill, with 90 hours regarded as six semesters and 105 hours regarded as seven semesters. Note: Hours earned in any UNC–Chapel Hill summer term are not included in this formula.

The formula also applies to transfer credit hours awarded for any courses taken at other institutions during a fall or spring semester (but not during summer terms) after a student matriculates at UNC–Chapel Hill.

Academic Eligibility Standards for Students Enrolled in Part-Time Programs of Study

Unique academic eligibility standards apply to students pursuing part-time enrollment. For details, consult the Part-Time Classroom Studies program.

Once they have attempted nine or more credit hours in UNC–Chapel Hill courses, students enrolled in a part-time program of study (administered by the Friday Center for Continuing Education) must maintain a minimum cumulative UNC–Chapel Hill grade point average of 2.000 in order to remain Eligible–In Good Standing.

Students who earn 15 or more semester credit hours for courses taken in fall or spring terms while enrolled in a part-time program of study will be regarded as having used up one or more of the eight full-time fall and spring semesters in which degree-seeking students are allowed to enroll.

Restoration of Academic Eligibility

Certain procedures are required of students who wish to restore their academic eligibility. Information can be obtained from the student's academic advisor or dean. Students can locate information regarding their academic eligibility status in the ConnectCarolina Student Center online and should check their eligibility at the end of each term. Students failing to meet the minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.000 may attempt to restore or retain their academic eligibility by the following means:

Students satisfying the minimum cumulative UNC–Chapel Hill grade point average of 2.000, but failing to satisfy the requirement for cumulative semester hours passed, may use one or more of the above procedures in attempting to retain or restore academic eligibility. To satisfy the requirement for cumulative hours passed, students also may use semester hours of approved transfer credit from another institution. Students wishing to use transfer credit for this purpose should obtain approval from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions and their academic dean or advisor before enrolling in these courses. Not all courses are acceptable for transfer credit. To receive credit hours for a course taken at another institution, a student must earn a grade of C- or better in the course; however, grades earned at another institution are not included in a student's UNC–Chapel Hill grade point average.

In addition, students should understand the following regulations concerning restoration of academic eligibility:

Summer School

Being Eligible–In Good Standing is not required for UNC–Chapel Hill students to enroll in Maymester, Summer Session I, or Summer Session II. Students whose academic standing is Eligible–On Academic Probation, Ineligible, or Ineligible–Pending are strongly encouraged to attend summer school to restore their good academic standing.

Students not regularly enrolled in courses on campus during a spring semester must apply for readmission in order to attend the University's summer session of that same year. For more information, visit admissions.unc.edu/apply/readmission-2 and see the "Undergraduate Admissions" section in the front matter of the Undergraduate Bulletin.

Summer sessions do not count toward the eight-semester limit for the undergraduate degree.

Distance-Learning Courses

A revised policy governing the use of distance-learning courses becomes effective July 1, 2014. The regulations apply to all new and continuing full-time and part-time degree-seeking students, and they refer to Carolina Courses Online (CCO), Summer School, Semester Online, and other for-credit UNC–Chapel Hill courses offered completely via similar modalities. The regulations do not apply to coursework taken prior to matriculation as degree-seeking students.

The following policies apply to distance-learning courses:

  1. The maximum number of credit hours, all of which must be designated UNC–Chapel Hill or Semester Online, that can be counted toward an undergraduate degree in the College of Arts and Sciences is 24. There can be no exceptions to this upper limit.

  2. First-semester, first-year students may not enroll in for-credit online courses unless unusual circumstances prevail, nor may first-year students take an online course in the summer prior to matriculation.

  3. Full-time undergraduate students may enroll in a maximum of one for-credit online course (currently CCO or Semester Online) per regular semester (after the first semester, if they are a first-year student) and a maximum of two for-credit online courses per summer.

  4. Degree-seeking students who are not enrolled may take a maximum of two for-credit online courses in a regular semester or summer.

  5. No more than two for-credit online courses in any one department, curriculum, or professional school may count toward a major or minor in the College of Arts and Sciences.

  6. Self-Paced courses cannot count toward a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences, other than in exceptional circumstances.

  7. It is the responsibility of the Senior Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education, in consultation with the Associate Dean and Director of the Academic Advising Program, to determine whether students in unusual circumstances warrant an exception to these policies.

Carolina Courses Online

Carolina Courses Online is a distance-education program that offers courses over the Internet. Class attendance is not required, but courses follow the semester schedule. The courses are administered through the Friday Center for Continuing Education. To enroll, contact the Friday Center at (919) 962-1134 or visit its Web page at fridaycenter.unc.edu. Certain restrictions may apply. Students should consult the dean's office of their school for details.

Removing AB or IN Grades

For information about completing courses with grades of AB (absent from the final examination) or IN (incomplete), see the grading system information above, immediately preceding this section on academic eligibility.

Readmission Standards

After their first enrollment at UNC–Chapel Hill, students who withdraw from or do not enroll in one or more fall or spring semesters must apply for readmission in order to return to courses on the UNC–Chapel Hill campus in a subsequent fall, spring, or summer term.

To be readmitted to a fall or spring semester, a student must have a 2.000 cumulative UNC–Chapel Hill grade point average and the following cumulative number of academic semester credit hours passed:

If a student who earned the status of Eligible–On Academic Probation (by passing nine hours in the preceding semester) either withdraws from or does not enroll in that probationary semester, the student may employ that probationary status, if needed, when next applying for readmission to a fall or spring semester. By contrast, probationary status granted by an appeals committee is valid only for the specific term for which it is granted.

Nontraditional Readmission

The University's policy for traditional readmission as an undergraduate requires former students to fulfill certain minimum requirements. These requirements include a specified cumulative grade point average and number of academic hours passed based on their total number of semesters in residence. However, the University recognizes that individuals can gain personal and intellectual maturity over time. In such cases, the University may choose to evaluate applicants for readmission on the basis of their current academic promise rather than their earlier academic performance.

Under this policy, the University will review applicants who have not been enrolled full time in a formal educational program for at least five years and who, by their special life experiences, might be considered nontraditional applicants. Readmission to the General College or the College of Arts and Sciences under this policy requires the approval of the associate dean for advising or the appeals committee of the college. Readmission to a professional school under this policy requires the approval of the professional school to which the student is seeking readmission.

Advising and degree-granting bodies within the University will monitor the performances of all individuals admitted under this policy. This monitoring will provide up-to-date guidance and counseling and ensure that each person readmitted fulfills the requirements for continued enrollment as specified in the letter from the student's dean's office. Students who fail to meet these requirements and who lose their academic eligibility must then meet traditional readmission requirements before they will be permitted to continue their enrollment at the University. A nontraditional readmission to the University is granted only once.

Withdrawal

Students withdrawing from the University should submit an official withdrawal request through their ConnectCarolina Student Center to start the process (see sections on medical and academic withdrawal below) before the end of classes during a semester or summer session. Students considering withdrawal should contact their dean's office, Campus Health Services, or Counseling and Psychological Services for additional information. Official withdrawal from the University is required if a student wishes to drop all classes after a semester begins.  An official withdrawal may facilitate readmission in a future term. Leaving the University without completing the official withdrawal process results in the assignment of an IN or AB course grade that are computed as an F grade in establishing grade point averages and academic eligibility. Students who do not withdraw officially will be responsible for the tuition and fee payments associated with the course(s) in which they are enrolled.

Medical Withdrawal

If a student decides to withdraw for reasons of illness, either physical or psychological, the student should contact Campus Health Services or Counseling and Psychological Services, whether the treatment was received there or elsewhere. If a medical withdrawal is authorized, the official withdrawal will be handled through the Office of the Director of Campus Health Services or Counseling and Psychological Services. A medical withdrawal is effected without grades and without a semester in residence.

Administrative Withdrawal

A student who is withdrawn for disciplinary purposes must comply with the specific requirements or conditions outlined by the adjudicating body (e.g., Honor Court, Emergency Evaluation and Action Committee, etc.) prior to readmission. Unless specified by the adjudicating body, the term(s) in which disciplinary suspension is active shall not be calculated in the four academic year degree credit hour equivalency. Preclearance from the adjudicating body may be required in certain cases.

Academic Withdrawal from All Courses

If a student decides to withdraw for reasons other than health related, or if a withdrawal cannot be authorized through Campus Health Services or Counseling and Psychological Services, the student should submit an official withdrawal request through their ConnectCarolina Student Center. Grades are required from instructors only after the drop deadline. In determining an undergraduate student's eligibility for readmission the following conditions apply:

Retroactive Withdrawal

Students may request a retroactive withdrawal from a semester or summer session under extraordinary circumstances. Such requests must be made in writing to the appeals committee of the college or school in which the student is currently enrolled. The decision of that appeals committee is final. If the retroactive withdrawal is approved, the effective date of this action is always the last day of classes in the term or session. No refunds are ever provided when a retroactive withdrawal from a semester or summer session is approved.

Graduation

To qualify for an undergraduate degree, a student must successfully complete at least 120 academic semester hours (requirements are higher than this minimum in some bachelor of science degree curricula) and must have a 2.000 average on all work attempted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

A minimum of 45 academic credit hours must be earned from UNC–Chapel Hill courses, and at least 24 of the last 30 academic credit hours applied to the degree requirements must be earned from UNC–Chapel Hill courses. These may include credits from study abroad programs sponsored by the University, up to 24 credit hours earned through Carolina Courses Online, and in exceptional circumstances as approved by the dean's office, Self-Paced Courses offered by UNC-Chapel Hill. For more information about degree requirements, see the "Academic Affairs" section of this bulletin.

Beginning with the first day of registration for the term for which students expect to graduate, they should file an application for graduation online in ConnectCarolina or in person in the office of the dean. For students in the College of Arts and Sciences, this is the office of the Academic Advising Program. A student who has not filed an application for graduation on or before the announced deadlines for fall or spring graduation will not be included in the graduation program.

Students must pay tuition, fees, and other obligations owed the University before receiving a diploma.

Graduation Requirements and Tar Heel Tracker

For students in the College of Arts and Sciences, total graduation requirements are determined by advisors in the Academic Advising Program (Steele Building) in conjunction with ConnectCarolina's Tar Heel Tracker degree-audit system. For students admitted to a professional school (education, journalism, nursing, information and library science, public health, business, dentistry), total graduation requirements are determined by advisors in their school in conjunction with ConnectCarolina's Tar Heel Tracker.

Degrees with Distinction

To graduate with distinction or with highest distinction, a student must have an overall grade point average of at least 3.500 or 3.800 respectively and must have completed at least 45 academic hours at UNC–Chapel Hill. The grade point average is based on the grades received and recorded by the Office of the University Registrar as of the degree award date. No changes are permitted to the awards after that date.

Transcripts of Record

A statement of official academic record includes all significant recorded information concerning the student's admission, classification, and scholarship. No partial or incomplete scholastic record will be given.

The student's transcript notes his or her academic eligibility status. A statement of honorable dismissal will not be granted to students whose conduct and character would not entitle them to remain enrolled at the University or whose transcripts contain a notation of any probation, suspension, or other temporary restriction imposed for unsatisfactory conduct and still in force when the statement is made.

The University does not release an official transcript unless tuition, fees, and other obligations due the University have been paid. Students have several methods by which they may obtain a transcript from the Office of the University Registrar: online, in person, or in writing. These methods require the student's signature, either physical or digital, before the Office of the University Registrar can release the transcript. Students may inspect their academic records at the Office of the University Registrar, Student and Academic Services Building North. For more information on how to request a transcript see registrar.unc.edu/academic-services/transcripts-certifications/transcript-services.

Interinstitutional Registration

A student regularly enrolled in a degree program at the University may enroll by interinstitutional registration for a course at Duke University, North Carolina Central University, North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, or the University of North Carolina at Greensboro under the following conditions:

Additional information, procedural instructions, and forms are available at the Office of the University Registrar at registrar.unc.edu/registration/special-enrollments/inter-institutional-programs.

Veterans Educational Benefits

Students who expect to use their veterans' educational benefits must contact the Veterans Services Assistant in the Office of the University Registrar, located in the Student and Academic Services Building North. Students must maintain satisfactory academic progress to be eligible for VA educational benefits. Students who are not Eligible–In Good Standing at the end of the term will not be eligible for veteran's educational benefits in subsequent terms until they regain Eligible–In Good Standing. For further information, please visit registrar.unc.edu/academic-services/veteran-affairs, or call (919) 962-9864.

Loan Deferments and Certification/Verification of Enrollment Status

The Office of the University Registrar provides confirmation of student enrollment data to financial institutions, organizations, or agencies requiring proof of registration. Students can order an enrollment certification online through their ConnectCarolina Student Center. For additional information about ordering a certification online, please go to registrar.unc.edu/academic-services/transcripts-certifications/enrollment-certification or call (919) 962-3954.