Amelia Howard Munson

? - 1972

Author & Librarian


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Amelia Munson
Amelia Howard Munson  was an influential figure in the development of library service for young adults.  Before entering the library profession she worked as a High School English teacher.  While teaching she came in contact with Mabel Williams who convinced her to try a career in librarianship.   Amelia Munson began working at the New York Public Library  (NYPL) in 1924.  During her first ten years at NYPL, she worked with those young adults that were not being served through traditional channels.  Specifically, she was responsible for organizing the work with Continuation and Vocational Schools.  At that time, vocational schools did not have libraries of their own.  Her programs were vital since they helped address a need in the young adult community that was not being met by any other program or service.   In 1934, Margaret Scoggin took over the library work with vocational schools and Amelia Munson became the Superintendent of Work with Young People.   Throughout her career, she taught library courses at Columbia University; thus influencing the development of the next generation of librarians.  She also influenced library students across the country with the widely used textbook she developed called An Ample Field.  She retired from the NYPL in 1958 after 34 years of service.  She died on January 21, 1972, in her home in New York City.

Selected Works
  • Poetry for High Schools, H. W. Wilson Company, 1938
  • An Ample Field, American Library Association, 1950
  • Poems of William Blake, Thomas Y. Crowell Company, 1964
Bibliography
  • Amelia Howard Munson. (1972, April). Top of the News, 28 (3), 234.
  • Evory, A. (Ed.). (1978). Munson, Amelia H. Contemporary Authors (Vol. 33-36, p. 589). Detroit, MI: Gale Research Company.
  • Munson, A. (1949, May). My twenty-five years in the New York public library. Canadian Library Assocition Bulletin, 5 (6), 199-200.
  • Riley, L. (1949, May). Amelia Munson. Canadian Library Assocition Bulletin, 5 (6), 198-199.

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Last Modified: May 6, 2002