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School of Information and Library Science

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

INLS 210-096 Evidence-Based Information Practice

Wednesdays 12:30 -3:15

214 Manning Hall

 

Instructor: Joanne Gard Marshall

301 Manning Hall

marshall@ils.unc.edu

(919) 843-7883

 

Collaborating Instructor: Carol Perryman

cp1757@gmail.com

(919)360-7434

 

Office hours: Before or after class or by appointment

 

Class Blackboard site: https://blackboard.unc.edu/

 

Course Description

 

Evidence-based practice (EBP) is being adopted by a variety of professions as a way of identifying and using the best available research evidence for decision making. As such, EBP can be seen as a tool for linking research to practice and promoting innovation. This course will explore the origins of evidence-based practice in general and its current application in library and information science. Students will have an opportunity to explore the state of EBP in a number of fields and to discuss the applicability of the concept to LIS. Based on this exploration, the class participants will critically examine and refine the current framework of evidence-based information practice.

 

Objectives

 

The learning objectives for this class are:

  • To understand the principles of EBP, including its origin, development and application in a variety of professional settings.

  • To be able to apply the techniques of EBP to the practice of library and information science.

  • To explore the ways in which different fields such as medicine, nursing, allied health sciences, public health, social work, nutrition, business, management, public policy, education and others have implemented EBP.

  • To use the knowledge of EBP implementations in different settings to critically examine and refine the emerging model of evidence-based library and information practice (EBLIP).

  • To understand the broader implications of EBP for continuing learning by professionals as well as diffusion of innovation in organizations.

 

Grading

 

  1. 15% class participation, including discussion of weekly readings

  2. 15% completion of assignments in EBLIP Tutorial

  3. 15% annotated bibliography of 10-15 items on EBP in a particular field.          (Due 10/12).

  4. 15% class presentation (Due as scheduled)

  5. 40% term paper on implementation of EBP in a particular field and the potential implications of the approach taken in that field for refining the EBLIP model (Due 12/14)

 

All assignments should be sent electronically to marshall@ils.unc.edu and cp1757@gmail.com.

 

Students are referred to the Graduate School website for explanation of the grading system used for graduate students at UNC.

Students are expected to follow the practices described in the UNC Honor Code.

Document Form and Style

Students should use the rules for the preparation of manuscripts, including the bibliographic style described in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Society (http://www.apastyle.org/). Use of a common bibliographic style will facilitate the preparation of a combined bibliography of EBP implementation in a variety of fields that can be shared with all participants in the course. One tool you may find helpful is the Citation Builder from NC State. 

Textbook and EBLIP Tutorial

The following are both considered textbooks for the course and should be read in their entirety. Exercises included in the EBLIP tutorial should be completed and sent to Carol Perryman.

Booth, A, & Brice, A. (Eds.). (2004). Evidence-based practice for information professionals: A handbook. London: Facet Publishing.

Two copies of this book are on reserve in the SILS library (Z665 .E94 2004).

Perryman, C. (2005). Evidence-based library and information practice tutorial. Chapel Hill, NC: School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina.

The tutorial is included under Course Documents on the INLS 210-096 Blackboard site.

Additional Resources:  Rogers, E. (2003). Diffusion of Innovations. 5th ed. New York: Free Press.

Two copies of this book are located in Davis Library (HM621 .R57 2003).

Course Bibliography

The references included in the course textbook and online tutorial form the bibliography for the course. Additional citations will be shared throughout the course including a combined list of references from the course bibliography assignment.

Schedule of classes (subject to change)

Aug 31

Introductions, class overview, history and development of EBLIP.

Overview of tutorial.

Assignment:  Booth & Brice chapters 1-2, and the introduction and module 1 of the tutorial.

Sept 7

Review of readings from previous week, class discussion.  Overview of module 2 of the tutorial.

Concepts covered: EBM, its development and resources.  

Assignment: Booth & Brice chapters 4-5, and module 2 of the tutorial

Sep 14

Review of readings from previous week, class discussion.  Overview of module 3 of the tutorial.

Concepts covered: EBLIP concepts and issues.

Assignment: Booth & Brice chapters 6 & 13, and module 3 of the tutorial.  Complete the hands-on exercise for module 3.

Sept 21

CLA teleconference (tentative).  Review of readings from previous week, class discussion.  Overview of modules 4 and 5 of the tutorial.

Concepts covered: Barriers to research, hands-on exercise (in class), and critical appraisal of research.

Assignment: Booth & Brice chapters 7-9, and module 4 of the tutorial.

Complete the hands-on exercise for module 5 (the module 4 exercise will be done in class).

Sept 28

Review of readings from previous week, class discussion.  Overview of module 6 of the tutorial.

Concepts covered:  critical appraisal, review of EBLIP concepts to date.

Assignment:

Readings:

·        Booth & Brice chapters 10-11,

·        Review readings for discussion (available full-text via the Bibliography section under Evidence-based Library & Information Practice

o       Bennis & O’Toole, How business schools lost their way (discussion led by Joanne)

o       Pravikoff, Tanner & Pierce, Readiness of nurses for evidence-based practice (discussion led by Carol)

To do:

·        Module 5 Hands-on. 

·        Before class: send the citation (and link, if possible) for an article you’d like to bring for discussion in class.  There are plenty of great possibilities in the bibliography, and they’re already linked to full-text. 

Oct 5

Review of readings from previous week, class discussion. 

Concepts covered: Discussion.  Be prepared to talk about your experiences in 'putting it all together!

Assignment: Booth & Brice chapters 10-11, module 6 of the tutorial.  Complete the tutorial feedback survey.

Oct 12

Reviewing the application of evidence-based practice in other fields: An introduction. Bibliography assignment due.

Isaac – lead discussion on article of choice:
Jull A. Evaluation of studies of assessment and screening tools, and diagnostic tests. Evidence-Based Nursing 2002 5: 68-72. http://ebn.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/5/3/68

Oct 19

Fall Study Break. Class cancelled.

Oct 26

Evidence-based practice in nursing

Martha - lead discussion on article of choice

Nov 2

Professor Mark Fraser, Guest speaker. Evidence-based social work.

See the Class Speakers section of the Bibliography for assigned readings in preparation.

Nov 9

Discussion of conference papers at 4th International Conference on

EBL, Brisbane, Australia.

 

Review of student bibliographies.

Nov 16

Christie Silbajoris, director, www.NChealthinfo.org, Guest speaker.

Evidence-based consumer health information. Joint class with Health

Informatics students from the School of Public Health.

See the Class Speakers section of the Bibliography for assigned readings in preparation.

 

Nov 23

Initial discussions on refining the EBLIP model.

Nov 30

Professor Dee Dee Boyington, Guest speaker. Evidence-based nursing.

See the Class Speakers section of the Bibliography for assigned readings in preparation.

Dec 7

Professor Gerald Gartlehner, Sheps Center for Health Care Research,

Guest speaker. Systematic reviews and evidence-based policy.

See the Class Speakers section of the Bibliography for assigned readings in preparation.

Dec 14

Student presentations and final discussions on refining the EBLIP

Model.  Final paper due.