Research

 

Different subgroups study the mechanisms and evolutionary histories of enzymes. Our focus is Class I and Class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, because these enzymes accelerate the slowest step required for protein synthesis, and hence were probably among the very first enzymes to appear on earth.

The Carter Lab grew from a foundation in Structural Biology and now uses cutting edge protein design, computational, molecular, and biophysical methods to study both mechanistic and evolutionary aspects of Enzyme Catalysis. A map of how our studies connect is shown below, with links to successively more specialized pages.

BackAbout_US.htmlConformational_stabilities.htmlshapeimage_1_link_0
Recent PublicationsRecent_Publs.htmlRecent_Publs.htmlshapeimage_2_link_0
Conformational_stabilities.html
Differential StabilizationConformational_stabilities.html
Transition-state_stabilization.html
The Conformational CycleMechanistic_enzymology.html
Combinatorial_Mutagenesis.html
Combinatorial MutagenesisCombinatorial_Mutagenesis.html
Mg_Activation.html
Mg2+ ActivationMg_Activation.html
The D1 SwitchThe_D1_Switch.html
Transition-state_stabilization.html
Transition state StabilizationTransition-state_stabilization.htmlTransition-state_stabilization.htmlshapeimage_27_link_0
Rodin_Ohno.html
The Rodin-Ohno HypothesisRodin_Ohno.html
Transition-state_stabilization.html
Experimental UrzymologyExperimental_Urzymology.html
Transition-state_stabilization.html
Ancestral EnzymesAncestral_Enzymes.html
Rodin_Ohno.html
The HisRS UrzymeHisRS_Urzyme.html
The TrpRS UrzymeTrpRS_Urzyme.html