PHILOSOPHY 34             BIOETHICS            PROF. D. C. LONG           Page 1

FALL 2001

 

 

TEXTS: (1) Contemporary Issues in BIOETHICS, Wadsworth, fifth edition, edited by Tom L Beauchamp and LeRoy Walters.  A hardcover purple volume.  Abbreviated CIB in the reading list below.  We will be using this text extensively, and numbers following listed reading assignments are page numbers in this text except for the specially marked readings in the supplementary Course Packet.

 

            (2) Custom Publishing Course Packet Cited as READING 1, READING 2, etc.

 

Both items are available at the Student Store Textbook Dept, second floor.

 

 

READING ASSIGNMENTS FOR EACH CLASS PERIOD

 

WED  AUG 22      INTRODUCTION to the course.

 

FRI      AUG 24                Discussion sections: Be sure to attend so that we have everyone in a section.

Read CIB, Chap. 1, pp. 1-10 (top)  Ethical Theory and Bioethics for discussion.  Moral dilemmas, resolution of moral disagreements; relativism;

and morality and law, p. 26

 

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MON  AUG 27      THE MANAGEMENT OF MEDICAL INFORMATION

                    TRUTH TELLING: CIB Ethical Principles, Chap. 1, 18-21: autonomy and beneficence

CIB, Chap. 1, Law, Authority, and Autonomy, 27-29: The Harm Principle and
Paternalism
Chap. 3 The Management of Medical Information,117-118 (to informed consent)

                    D. C. Long, Notes on Collins, "Should Doctors Tell the Truth?" READING 1

                    Thomasma, “Telling the Truth to Patients,” 123-127

                   

WED  AUG 29      CIB, Chap 1 Types of Ethical Theory, 10-13 (read only up to Kantian theories)
                    Long, Notes on Act Utilitarianism, READING 2

                   

FRI   AUG 31                         Discussion sections

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MON  SEPT 3          HOLIDAY: LABOR DAY

 

WED  SEP  5          D. C. Long, Notes on Rule Utilitarianism, READING 3

 

FRI    SEP  7           Discussion sections

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MON  SEP  10          CONFIDENTIALITY AND RULE UTILITARIANISM

                    CIB, The Management of Confidential Information, Chap. 3, 121-123

                "The Hippocratic Oath" 39-40

                American Nurses Association: Code for Nurses (1985), 42-43, sec. 2

                AMA, Council on ethical and judicial affairs, 40-41

                The TARASOFF CASE, 164-68

                   

WED  SEP  12      ETHICAL THEORY: KANT

                CIB, Chap. 1, Kantian Theories, 13-15, esp. second version of Categorical Imperative
D. C. Long, Notes on Deontological Theories: Kant, READING 4

                   

FRI   SEP  14   Discussion sections

 

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MON  SEP 17   AUTONOMY AND INFORMED CONSENT

                    "Canterbury v. Spence" 133-35

                    Katz, “Physicians and Patients: A History of Silence,” 135-38

 

WED  SEP 19   Completion of discussion of informed consent

                    Distribution of study guides for quiz and review

                   
FRI     SEP 21                Discussion sections           QUIZ REVIEW

 

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MON  SEP 24      QUIZ ON THE MATERIAL SO FAR.  BRING BLUEBOOKS.

 

WED  SEP 26          DECISIONS BY COMPETENT ADULTS

          Jehovah's Witnesses: Underwood, READING 5; Wright, READING 6

                    Satz v. Perlmutter, READING 7

 

FRI     SEP 28   Discussion sections

 

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MON  OCT 1          “Confronting Death: Who Chooses, Who Controls?”  A Dialogue between
                    Dax Cowart and Robert Burt, READING 8.

REDEFINING DEATH: D. C. Long, Notes on the Harvard Committee Redefinition of Death, READING 9

                             

WED  OCT 3      DECISIONS CONCERNING PERSONS UNABLE TO
DECIDE FOR THEMSELVES

                    Karen Quinlan, READING 10

 

FRI     OCT  5          Discussion sections

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MON  OCT  8          REMOVING NUTRITION AND HYDRATION

D. C. Long, Notes on the Claire Conroy case, READING 11

May, “Feeding and Hydrating the Permanently Unconscious…” READING 12

Bernat, Gert, Mogielnicki, “Patient Refusal of Hydration and Nutrition,” 332-36

 

WED  OCT  10      THE CRUZAN CASE

CIB, Cruzan v. Director, Missouri Department of Health, 281-86

Gostin, “Life and Death Choices after Cruzan,” 286-88

 

FRI     OCT  12          Discussion sections [First outside paper assigned]

 

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MON  OCT 15  EUTHANASIA: Pro and Con

                    Rachels, "Active and Passive Euthanasia" 290-93 (esp. Smith-Jones case, 292-93)

                    Beauchamp/Childress, “Rachels on Active and Passive Euthanasia,” 294-96                                        D. C. Long, Euthanasia arguments, READING 13.

 

WED  OCT 17          VIDEO : CHOOSING DEATH

         

FRI     OCT 19  FALL RECESS - NO SECTION MEETINGS

         

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MON  OCT 22          PHYSICIAN-ASSISTED SUICIDE

                    Quill, “Death and Dignity: A Case of Individualized Decision Making,” 313-16

US Supreme Court, Vacco v Quill, 322-324.

The Oregon Death with Dignity Act, 317-21 (Actual law permitting assisted suicide)

 

WED  OCT 24          PHYSICIAN-ASSISTED SUICIDE

Thomasma, “When Physicians Choose to Participate in the Death of Their Patients,”
305-12

                   

FRI     OCT 26          Discussion sections

                    FIRST OUTSIDE DISCUSSION PAPER ASSIGNMENT DUE
                     [The instructor will explain the assignment earlier in the term.]

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MON  OCT 29          ABORTION

                    Marquis, “Why Abortion Is Immoral,” 196-202

 

WED  OCT 31          Thomson, "A Defense of Abortion," 202-11

FRI     NOV  2          Discussion sections [Second paper assignment distributed.]

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MON  NOV  5        Brody (on Thomson), 212-18

 

WED  NOV  7          Warren, "On the Moral and Legal Status of Abortion," 222-231

                   

FRI    NOV   9          Discussion sections.

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MON  NOV 12          Majority Opinion in Roe v. Wade (1973), 236-240

                    Brody, 218-21

D. C. Long, Major Stages in Fetal Development READING 14

                   

WED  NOV 14          Roberston, “IVF, Infertility and the Status of Embryos,” 635-45

McGee/Caplan, “The Ethics and Politics of Small Sacrifices in Stem Cell Research,”
READING 15

D. C. Long, READING 16 “Stem Cell Research”

 

FRI     NOV 16          Discussion sections

 

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MON  NOV 19          PRENATAL TESTING

                    CIB, Chap. 8 “The Human Genome Project and Genetic Testing,” 512-15

                    “The Disability Rights Critique of Prenatal Genetic Testing,” READING 17                    

WED  NOV 21          VIDEO: on the ethics of genetic research

                              SECOND OUTSIDE DISCUSSION ASSIGNMENT DUE.
                    [The instructor will explain the assignment at an appropriate point earlier in the term.]

 

FRI     NOV 23          THANKSGIVING     No Section Meetings

 

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MON  NOV 26          GENETIC ENHANCEMENT

Glover, “Questions about Some Uses of Genetic Engineering,” 588 (beginning with
The Positive-Negative Distinction) to 595.

                    Parens, “The Goodness of Fagility: On the Prospect of Genetic Technologies Aimed
                              at the Enhancement of Human Capacities,” 596-601

 

WED  NOV 28          HUMAN EXPERIMENTS

                    The Nuremberg Code, 433

                    Eisenberg, “The Social Imperatives of Medical Research,” 449-56

                    Pence, “The Tuskegee Study,” 463-69

           

 

FRI     NOV 30                Discussion sections

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MON  DEC  3          Freedman, "Equipoise and the Ethics of Clinical Research," 457-62

                    Lurie and Wolfe, “Unethical Trials of Interventions to Reduce Perinatal Transmission

                              of HIV in Developing Countries,” 766-69

                                       

 

WED  DEC 5          CLONING

                    D. C. Long, “What is Cloning?” READING 18

                    NBAC, “Cloning Human Beings: Executive Summary (1997), 676-79

                    Silver, “Cloning, Ethics, and Religion,” 682-85

 

FRI     DEC 7          Discussion sections

 

 

WRITTEN WORK FOR THE SEMESTER

 

1. BLUEBOOK HOUR QUIZ, Monday, Sep. 24  Questions for discussion about issues and cases.  A brief study guide will be provided.  (Counts 20% of grade).

 

2. FIRST OUTSIDE DISCUSSION PAPER. Due Friday, Oct. 26 in discussion section.

          (Counts 20% of grade.)

A written discussion based upon questions assigned earlier by instructor to be prepared outside of class and turned in by class time.   No more than 5 typed, double-spaced pages.  Typed or computer printed, with a minimum of 1" margin for comments.  Fasten the pages together with a staple (best) or paper clip (not loose sheets).  As insurance against loss be sure to keep a copy or draft.  Ample time will be given to prepare your papers, so no late papers accepted without a satisfactory explanation being given to your section leader and the express permission of your section leader.

 

3. SECOND OUTSIDE DISCUSSION PAPER. Due Wednesday, Nov. 21. The requirements for the First Paper apply to this one as well.  (Counts 25% of grade).

 

4. FINAL EXAMINATION.  Friday, Dec. 14, 8:00 AM. This will cover the material of the course, with emphasis on issues that have not been featured in earlier writing assignments.  A study guide will be distributed to help you prepare for the final examination.  The final is required of everyone, including those taking the course Pass/Fail. (Counts 35% of grade.)  BRING BLUEBOOKS.

GROUND RULES

Each student must be assigned to a recitation section.  Regular attendance at lecture and recitation is expected, and can make a difference in our final assessment of your grade for the course.  In lecture the instructor will explain the significance of the overheads included in your course packet and link them to the relevant readings.  The lectures will put the readings into a context designed to make the issues easier to understand and to show how the articles relate to one another.  Because of the large size of the class, group discussion in lecture will necessarily be limited.  Recitation sections offer you an opportunity to discuss the issues and to ask questions.  Participation in the sections meetings is crucial to your getting all you should from the course.  Brief practice quizzes may be given in recitation sections.

 

Each assignment must be completed in timely fashion to pass the course.  This also applies to anyone taking the course Pass/Fail.  If for any reason you cannot meet a deadline for an assignment, please discuss this as soon as possible with Prof. Long or your TA.  Do not expect to make up written work that you have missed earlier in the term in a rush just before the final examination.  It will count as a zero by then, which is less than an F on an assignment.  Pick up work that has been graded so that you know where you stand.  If you have any question about your grade or whether or not you have received credit for work turned in, be sure to check with your assigned teaching assistant.

 

Plan to take the quiz and final at the announced times--not at special times.

Office hours for Prof. Long and his assistants will be announced early in the course.  Take advantage of those times to answer any questions you may have and to get to know the people presenting the course.  We want to be as helpful as possible, but you must also help us to know what your needs and problems are.  All of our offices are in Caldwell Hall.  Prof. Long’s office is 201A on the northeast corner of the second floor of Caldwell Hall.  His office phone is (962-3312).  Email: dlong@email.unc.edu

 

COURSE WEB SITE

 

The course has a Blackboard site on which various announcements, assignments, discussion questions, and opportunities for discussion will be posted.  It is also useful for two-way email communications between instructors and students.  The site can be reached at Blackboard.unc.edu.  On that page you will find a search area.  Type in "Bioethics" and you will find a list with Bioethics Phil034002f01.  Click on that and you will get to our site.  Bookmark it for easier access.

 

HONOR CODE

 

The Honor Code is in effect at all times in the course.  The first time you hand in an assignment you should include the pledge and sign it.  "On my honor, I have neither given nor received unauthorized aid on this assignment."  After that first assignment, you may subsequently write "Honor Pledge" and sign it.  Keep in mind that it means the same thing ethically as the full statement.

All in-class exams and quizzes are to be taken without the assistance of books, notes, or other people.  All written work that you hand in should represent your own best work.  However, you may study with classmates and discuss your paper ideas with them, or with anyone else who might be of help.  That is an appropriate way for you to learn the material and to think about the issues we cover.  It is useful to discuss and try out philosophical ideas with other people in any case.  However, you should give credit for any ideas that are not your own, whether they come from written sources or from others with whom you have spoken.  (Even as unlikely a source as your roommate.) In such cases you get credit for seeing the relevance of the idea and applying it to your discussion.  Quoting sentences or paragraphs from other books and articles or the Web without giving your source is plagiarism, which is not just an honor code violation.  It represents intellectual dishonesty.  It goes without saying that turning in papers copied from other students or from online is academic evil and warrants severe penalties.  You may give citations in the text of your paper rather than in footnotes.  For instance, after a quotation from our text you may put the reference in parenthesis.  Examples:  (CIB, Brody 215) or (READING 4, p. 2.)