Art 31-- History of Western European Art 
From Prehistory to Early Renaissance

Fall 1998
121 Hanes Art Center
Monday, Wednesday, Fridays (occasional) and sections
12-12:50 p.m.

Items Found On This Page :
Texts Course Context Course Components Discussion Forum
Exams Study Aids Museum Paper Honor Code
Department Info Local Museums Syllabus Calendar and Lecture Guide

Director: Dr. Dorothy Verkerk
108 Hanes Art Center
Phone: 962-0729
Office Hours: Wednesday 1-2:30 p.m. and by appointment.
dverkerk@email.unc.edu

Teaching Assistants:

TA Office: 103 Hanes Art Center

Texts Course Context Course Components Discussion Forum
Exams Study Aids Museum Paper Honor Code
Department Info Local Museums Syllabus Calendar and Lecture Guide

Calendar and Lecture Guide


The Calendar posts the lectures for the week and links to the Lecture Guide that gives the specific material covered in each lecture. This guide lists each work of art, architecture, and specialized vocabulary discussed in lecture. This Calendar is a useful resource since you may access it at any time from your computer. It is STRONGLY recommended that you print out the Lecture Guide for each time the class is in session (go to the page, click on the print icon located on the Navigational Toolbar). The Lecture Guide will be displayed for a short period of time prior to each lecture.

Texts

Required Texts:
  1. Marilyn Stokstad, Art History, Vol. 1, Prentice Hall, 1995

  2. Acquaint yourself with this textbook before you begin the course. The Introduction, Starter Kit and Use Notes will be invaluable to getting a good start on the course. In the back of the book is a Glossary and a Bibliography for those who want to read further.
  3. Miranda Green, Celtic Art: Symbols and Imagery, Sterling, 1997

  4. This is a comprehensive survey of Celtic Art which is not adequately covered in Stokstad's textbook
Useful Books
Texts Course Context Course Components Discussion Forum
Exams Study Aids Museum Paper Honor Code
Department Info Local Museums Syllabus Calendar and Lecture Guide

Course Context

 

Art 31 is the first semester of a two-semester general introduction to the history of western European art, its ancestry and its heritage. It is designed for the beginning student, and assumes no previous experience in art or art history. Students are encouraged to take Art 31 in preparation for Art 32 (high Renaissance to the present).

In addition to introducing you to many of the major surviving monuments of painting, sculpture and architecture  from ca. 2500 B.C. to ca. 1500 A.D., Art 31 will teach you fundamental skills of visual analysis and provide you with the vocabulary and concepts for discussing works of art orally and in writing. No less important, the enormous geographical range and long time-span covered by the course provide a unique opportunity for investigating the relation between works of art and the varied cultures in which they were produced. In addition to learning about creative thinking and skills, understanding human cultural diversity is a major goal of this course, as it is of your liberal arts education.
 


Texts Course Context Course Components Discussion Forum
Exams Study Aids Museum Paper Honor Code
Department Info Local Museums Syllabus Calendar and Lecture Guide

Course Components

The course consists of slide lectures, readings, and section meetings. The section meetings are mandatory (attendance is taken regularly). Reproductions of every key work of art discussed in the lectures are found either in your textbook or posted on the photo-study board in the hallway of the Hanes Art Center. This web page will also offer you links (click on the highlighted words) to those works of art and architecture posted on the Internet. Readings from your textbook should provide basic information to supplement the class lectures, but do not expect the textbook to duplicate the approaches and explanations offered by your instructors, who are specialists in the fields they cover. Please note that the examinations focus on the material presented in the lectures and discussed in section.

RECITATION SECTION :Discussion sections are integral to the structure of Art 31. They are keyed to the lecture-themes and provide you with an opportunity to discuss works of art and their historical context. If you cannot attend your given section for some reason, you should try and attend another section that week (giving the T.A. your name and regular section time). The section grade is based on your informed participation in both discussions and written exercises given over the course of the semester. If you have any difficulty with the course material, do not hesitate to ask your T.A. about it.

Recitation Sections are limited to 18 students, and meet at the following times:

31-601 :        Wednesday :         1:00 - 1:50 :             Rm. 117
31-602 :        Wednesday :         4:00 - 4:50 :             Rm. 117
31-603 :        Thursday :             4:30 - 5:20 :             Rm. 116
31-604 :        Friday :                 9:00 - 9:50 :             Rm. 116
31-605 :        Friday :                 10:00 - 10:50 :         Rm. 116
31-606 :        Friday :                 11:00 - 11:50 :         Rm. 116
31-607 :        Friday :                 1:00 - 1:50 :            Rm. 116
31-608 :        Friday :                 2:00 - 2:50 :              Rm. 118
 

Discussion Forum


Discussion Forum
The discussion forum is designed for extra credit in Art 31. Each week a different topic will be introduced. Participation in the discussion forum will require some internet use. We strongly encourage all students to participate in the forum since it provides an interactive, and informal, vehicle for airing ideas, expressing opinions, and sharing knowledge among your peers. Some of the students participating in the discussion forum are taking this course on-line, or what is commonly called "distance learning." Your input is a valuable means of communicating with these students.


Texts Course Context Course Components Discussion Forum
Exams Study Aids Museum Paper Honor Code
Department Info Local Museums Syllabus Calendar and Lecture Guide

EXAMS

The quizzes and final exam cover work discussed in lecture and recitation. Quizzess will generally contain some combination of the following:
  1. Slide identification. For every work or monument, you are expected to include:
  2. Definitions. You are expected to provide a short definition for, and an example of, terms that have been discussed in class lectures or sections. If you are unclear about the meanings of terms, you should ask your T.A. and consult the glossary at the back of Stokstad, and/or other books mentioned at the beginning of the syllabus.
  3. Slide Comparisons. Two slides are shown, and you are asked to answer a question that involves comparing or contrasting them. In such comparisons, it is important to address specific qualities or features of the works of art, and use them as evidence to support more general conclusions.
  4. Unknowns. You will be asked to discuss a work of art or architecture which you have not seen in lecture or in recitation. Based on the knowledge you have acquired, you will discuss the medium, the subject, the style, and the possible function of the "unknown" work of art.
Make-up quizzes and exams will be given only if a student has a written excuse from a medical or university authority for missing the regularly scheduled examination. All unexcused examination absences will be counted as a zero grade. Make-up quizzes and exams will be in the form of a written paper (5 pages for each quiz, 15 pages for the final exam).


Texts Course Context Course Components Discussion Forum
Exams Study Aids Museum Paper Honor Code
Department Info Local Museums Syllabus Calendar and Lecture Guide

Study Aids

TEXT-BOOK:
Note that it is up to you to relate the course lectures to the appropriate chapters in Stokstad and Green. If you are not sure about how to do this please ask your T.A., or the course director. You will learn to use a variety of terms that have special importance for art historians. Many of these are historical ("city-state," "Pharaoh"); many of them identify materials and technical procedures ("fresco painting," "modeling," "casting") many identify familiar artistic conventions or elements used in works of art ("perspective," "pediment"); some are borrowed from plane or solid geometry ("perpendicular," "ratio," "hemisphere").* If the glossary in Stokstad or the other recommended books do not list a term you are not familiar with, be sure to ask your T.A. about it.

*We recommend that you brush up on concepts of elementary geometry (plane and solid). They are important for a grasp of basic artistic approaches to architecture, sculpture and painting.

PHOTO-STUDY BOARDS:
To earn an "A" in this course, you must develop an accurate recall of the most important works discussed in class and in your recitations. The photos on display in the hallway of the Hanes Art Center are very useful for refreshing your memory about the art you have been studying. This resource is shared by the whole class. It is a violation of the Honor Code to tamper with or remove the photos, which are property of the State of North Carolina.

INTERNET WEB SITES:
Many of the works of art and architecture discussed in lecture or recitation can be viewed on web sites. These art web sites are highlighted in the Syllabus, providing you with a direct link to the site.


Texts Course Context Course Components Discussion Forum
Exams Study Aids Museum Paper Honor Code
Department Info Local Museums Syllabus Calendar and Lecture Guide

MUSEUM PAPER

 

Due Date: Papers will be collected on October 12, 1998 at the beginning of the lecture. Your TA will read and suggest revisions to your paper. Your revised and edited paper will be resubmitted on December 2, 1998. ANTICIPATE problems. Late papers will be graded down a half grade for each day it is late (i.e. A becomes an A-).
Mechanics: Your paper should be 4-5 pages in length. It must be typed on 8.5 x 11-inch paper and double spaced. Use 1" margins and 10 to 12 pt. font size.
Hints: Use your spell-checker and the Grammatik program (if your software has it).
The Writing Center is available to help you with your paper and is a valuable resource for you throughout your academic career at UNC. The consultants are graduate students who have received extensive training in the teaching of writing. Call 962-7710 for an appointment or just drop in. You can also e-mail your writing questions and learn more about the Writing Center by visiting their web site. Grammar hotline: 962-7710.
Click here for paper assignment.


Texts Course Context Course Components Discussion Forum
Exams Study Aids Museum Paper Honor Code
Department Info Local Museums Syllabus Calendar and Lecture Guide

Honor code reminder:

"It shall be the responsibility of every student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to obey and support the enforcement of the Honor Code, which prohibits lying, cheating, or stealing when these actions involve academic processes or University students or academic personnel acting in an official capacity." An especially serious Honor Code violation is plagiarism. If you are uncertain about this, please talk to the course instructor and T.A. See also the UNC-CH student guide titled "Plagiarism."


Texts Course Context Course Components Discussion Forum
Exams Study Aids Museum Paper Honor Code
Department Info Local Museums Syllabus Calendar and Lecture Guide

Art Department Information:


Local Museums:

And not so local museums... And some Virtual Museums...
Texts Course Context Course Components Discussion Forum
Exams Study Aids Museum Paper Honor Code
Department Info Local Museums Syllabus Calendar and Lecture Guide

Syllabus

* Fridays will be devoted to quizzes and museum visits (TBA).

Introduction:
    --Aug. 19
Readings: Stokstad, pp. 16-33

Prehistory:
    --Aug. 24, 26
Readings: Stokstad, pp. 36-59

Constructing Eternity: Egyptian Art and Architecture
    --Aug. 31, Sept. 2
    --Sept. 4 **QUIZ**
Readings: Stokstad, pp. 92-125 Temples, Palaces and Citadels:
Ancient Near Eastern and Aegean Art

    --Sept. 9, 14
Readings: Stokstad, pp. 62-89; 128-149 Gods, Heroes, Mortals: Greek Art and Architecture
    --Sept. 16, 21
    --Sept. 18 **QUIZ**
Readings: Stokstad, pp. 152-197 Ethos and Pathos: Late Classical/Hellenistic
Legacies: Etruscan & the Formation of Roman Republican Art and Architecture

    --Sept. 23, 28
Readings: Stokstad, pp. 197-223 An Alternative Vision: Celtic Art and Cultures
    --Sept. 30, Oct. 5
    --Oct. 2 **QUIZ**
Readings: Green, pp.9-143. Space, the Final Frontier: Roman Art and Architecture
    --Oct. 7, 12
Readings: Stokstad, pp.233-280
    --Oct. 14 Fall Recess

Assimilation and Transformation: Late Antique Art and Architecture
    --Oct. 19, 21
    --Oct. 23 **QUIZ**
Readings: Stokstad, pp. 280-308

The Glory of Byzantium
    --Oct. 26, 28
Readings: Stokstad, pp. 308-335 Diversity and Synthesis: Barbarian, Carolingian and Ottonian Art and Architecture
    --Nov. 2, 4
   --Nov. 6 **QUIZ**
Readings: Stokstad, pp.480--505; Green, pp. 145-167. Pilgrim and Crusaders: Romanesque Art and Architecture
    --Nov. 9, 11, 16
Readings: Stokstad, pp. 508-543 Gothic Visions
    --Nov. 18, 23, 30
Readings: Stokstad, pp. 546-590
    --Nov. 25 Thanksgiving Break

Competitions and Citizenship: Art of the Italian City States
    --Dec. 1, 3
Readings: Stokstad, pp. 590-608

**FINAL EXAM: Dec. 9, 1998 --4:00 P.M.--**

Texts Course Context Course Components Discussion Forum
Exams Study Aids Museum Paper Honor Code
Department Info Local Museums Syllabus Calendar and Lecture Guide

curious people have accessed this page to date. 
This page created by kb in May of 1997.