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Applied Microeconomics Student Workshop

Department of Economics

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Fall 2010

 

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The workshop generally meets for an hour beginning at 12pm on Mondays in Gardner 211.  The meeting time and place may change to accommodate the presenters and their advisors.  All changes will appear on the detailed schedule below.

Brian McManus is organizing the workshop during the 2010-11 academic year.  He will update the schedule below and post papers as they become available.  Contact Professor McManus (mcmanusb@unc.edu) with questions or updates. 

 

x = standard meeting, P = proposal defense, J = job talk practice

Date

M

T

W

T

F

Time & Location

Presenter

Paper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 30

x

 

 

 

 

12:00-1:00 pm in GA 007

Overview and organization

 

September 6

 

 

 

 

 

12:00-1:00 pm in GA 211

No meeting (labor day)

 

September 13

J

 

 

 

 

12:00-1:00 pm in GA 211

Michael Darden

 link

September 20

x

 

 

 

 

12:00-1:00 pm in GA 211

Mana Kanchanachitra

 link

September 27

x

 

 

 

 

3:30-4:30 pm in GA 211

Bert Grider

 link

October 4

x

 

 

 

 

12:00-1:00 pm in GA 211

Jeremy Cook

 link

October 11

x

 

 

 

 

12:00-1:00 pm in GA 211

Nopphol Witvorapong

 link

October 18

x

 

 

 

 

12:00-1:00 pm in GA 211

John Stuart Rabon

 link

October 25

x

 

 

 

 

12:00-1:00 pm in GA 211

Maciej Misztal

 link

November 1

x

 

 

 

 

12:00-1:00 pm in GA 211

Arnie Aldridge

 link

November 8

x

 

 

 

 

12:00-1:00 pm in GA 211

Jianfeng Yao

 link

November 15

x

 

 

 

 

12:00-1:00 pm in GA 211

Ryan Burk

 link

November 22

 

 

 

 

 

12:00-1:00 pm in GA 211

 Open

 

November 29

x

 

 

 

 

12:00-1:00 pm in GA 211

Ken Reddix

 

December 6

 

 

 

 

 

12:00-1:00 pm in GA 211

Open

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The workshop is officially Economics 985 (Dissertation Workshop in Applied Microeconomics).  The workshop hosts three types of presentations:

 

1.       Students may give progress reports on their research.  These are described as “standard meetings” on the schedule above.  The research may be at any stage – early or late – in its development, as long as the hour-long workshop is constructive for both the presenter and the audience.

 

2.       Students may defend their dissertation proposals.  Note that this requires the availability of all faculty members on the student’s committee, which may require re-scheduling the workshop meeting to a different time or day.  It is the proposing student’s responsibility to contact all committee members about their schedules.

 

3.       Students who are going on the job market may practice presenting their job market papers.

 

All enrolled students have the following responsibilities:

 

1.       Students in their fourth year and beyond should present their research at least once per semester.  Third-year students may present during the spring semester.

 

2.       All students should actively participate in the workshop by reading the each presenter’s paper in advance and providing constructive comments during the presentation.  For each presentation, each enrolled student will write a brief document (0.5 - 1 page) providing comments or questions for the presenting student.  These documents are due at the start of the presentation.

 

3.       Three times per semester, each enrolled student will prepare a referee report (~2 pages) for the presenting student, due at the start of the presentation.  The report should include detailed comments on the economic content of the paper to be presented.  Reports also may provide constructive comments on the paper’s style and prose.  Professor McManus will assign students’ refereeing responsibilities.

 

Students preparing for their presentations have the following responsibilities:

 

1.       Presenters should send their papers to Professor McManus four days before their presentations (e.g. Thursday for our usual Monday meetings).

 

2.       Presenters should focus their presentations on the parts of their research where comments are most valuable.  This will vary across presenters but will generally include some combination of the theoretical model, the empirical model, the data, and the estimation approach.  While often interesting, extensive discussions of the research motivation and prior literature often are not the best use of our time.  (Students presenting proposal defenses and practice job talks may need to provide more background information than students doing standard research presentations.)

 

Last edited: September 13, 2010

 

Archives to past semesters: Spring 2010, Fall 2009, Spring 2009, Fall 2008.