Lighthouses of Northern Argentina

Argentina has a lengthy coastline, extending from the warm waters of the Río de la Plata to the edge of the icy Antarctic ocean. The northern part of the coast, in Buenos Aires province, is mostly low and sandy, with dangerous shoals offshore. This coast required construction of very tall lighthouses, including several that rank with the tallest in the world. Further south, the Patagonian coast is higher and the lighthouses are shorter.

This page includes lighthouses of northern Argentina, including the northern part of Patagonia; it covers the provinces of Entre Ríos, Buenos Aires, Río Negro, and Chubut. Lighthouses farther south, in Santa Cruz Province and Tierra del Fuego, are listed on the Southern Argentina page.

Active lighthouses in Argentina are owned by the Argentine Navy and managed by the Navy's Servicio de Hidrografía Naval (SHN). The Spanish word for a lighthouse is faro; smaller lighthouses are often called balizas (beacons).

Interest in lighthouses seems to be fairly high in Argentina. In the past, there hasn't been much concern about preservation, since the great majority of the lighthouses are being maintained by the Navy. However, in recent years there has been increasing concern about the preservation of several of the country's most historic lighthouses, especially those in the far south.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. Admiralty numbers are from volume G of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA List numbers are from Publication 110. The official Argentine light list, Faros y Señales Marítimas, is not available online.

General Sources
Lista de Faros
Official SHN lighthouse site, with data and small photos.
Faros Argentinos
Photos and historical notes.
Faros de Argentina
Index to lighthouse articles and photos in the Spanish Wikipedia.
Lighthouses in Argentina
The ARLHS listing of Argentine lights; the society has photos for most of them.
Online List of Lights - Argentina
Photos posted by Alexander Trabas.
Lighthouses in Argentina
Photos available from Wikimedia.
Faros Argentina
Photos posted on Flickr.com by Carlos María Silvano.
World of Lighthouses - Argentina
Photos available from Lightphotos.net.
Leuchttürme Südamerikas auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard views posted by Klaus Huelse.

Faro San Antonio
Cabo San Antonio Light, San Clemente del Tuyu, August 2009
Flickr photo copyright Carlos María Silvano
used by permission

Entre Ríos Province Lighthouse

Río Uruguay Lighthouse
* Stella Maris (2)
1949 (station established 1908). Active; focal plane about 14 m (46 ft); red light. 12 m (40 ft) monument: the light is displayed from a post behind a statue of Stella Maris, patron saint of sailors, post and statue being atop a square cylindrical masonry tower. A good photo is available, Matias Caceres has a 2008 photo, and Google has a satellite view. This light replaced a cast iron lighthouse. Located at the end of a detached breakwater at the northern entrance to the harbor of Concepción del Uruguay, a city about 280 km (175 mi) north of Buenos Aires. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: unknown. ARLHS ARG-077.

Buenos Aires Province Lighthouses

Upper Río de la Plata Lighthouses
* Martín García (1)
1897. Inactive since 1938. 13 m (42 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery attached to a 3-story keeper's quarters/military barracks. The lighthouse was replaced by a semaphore tower in 1938; the semaphore tower still stands nearby. Alejandro Tumanoff has a photo, ARLHS also has a photo, and Google has an indistinct satellite view. Isla Martín García is located in the mouth of the Uruguay River close to the Uruguayan shore. Argentine administration of the island was disputed for many years by Uruguay; a 1973 agreement left it in Argentine sovereignty as a nature preserve. (Previously the island had been used as a prison for out-of-power politicians.) Located near the south end of the island. Tours of the island are available from Buenos Aires. Site open, tower presumably closed. Owner: Provincia de Buenos Aires. Site manager: Departamento de Áreas Protegidas. ARLHS ARG-045.
* Martín García (2?)
Date unknown (station established 1938). Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); two yellow flashes every 10 s. 10 m (33 ft) square skeletal tower with gallery, painted yellow. Trabas has Capt. Ted Hinrich's photo, and the shadow of the light is seen in Google's satellite view. Located at the end of the island's pier. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G0791; NGA 19292.
Piedra Diamante
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 18 m (59 ft); two long white flashes every 6 s. 18 m (59 ft) round tapered concrete tower with lantern, painted yellow. Trabas has Capt. Theo Hinrichs's photo (also seen at right). This light is close to the coast of Uruguay, but is maintained by Argentina. (A note is needed here. Under a 1973 treaty, this lighthouse stands in "shared waters," where Argentina and Uruguay share jurisdiction. The treaty provides that both countries may build and maintain navigational aids in shared waters. Argentina maintains navigational aids in this area, very close to the coast of Uruguay, because the shipping channel leads to Argentine ports on the Río Uruguay and Río Paraná. Uruguay owns the economic rights to the seabed under the lighthouse, and if future sedimentation should bring the shoal to the surface the resulting island would be Uruguayan territory. Because of the ambiguous geographical context, the Directory lists this lighthouse both under Uruguay and under Northern Argentina.) Located on the Barra de San Pedro, a shoal in the Río de la Plata about 8 km (5 mi) north northwest of Isla de Farallón, Uruguay. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G0789; NGA 19284.

Lower Río de la Plata Lighthouses
#Buenos Aires Outer Breakwater South End (1)
Date unknown. Replaced around 2011. This was a 13 m (43 ft) tapered square skeletal tower, painted red. Capt. Peter Mosselberger has a photo, and Google has a satellite view of the location. Sometime around 2011 the breakwater was rebuilt in this area and the skeletal tower was replaced by a post; Trabas has a photo of the new light (focal plane 14 m (46 ft); two red flashes every 8 s). Located at the southeastern end of the long outer breakwater that protects the modern harbor of Buenos Aires. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Admiralty G0828; NGA 19384.
Faro de San Pedro
Piedra Diamante Light, Río de la Plata, November 2009
photo copyright Capt. Theo Hinrichs; used by permission
* Buenos Aires (Edificio Malecón)
1999. Active; focal plane 90 m (295 ft); white flash every 3 s. 60 m (197 ft) office building topped by a tall mast. Laura Oviedo has a photo, another photo is available, Trabas has Capt. Peter Mosselberger's photo of the mast, and Google has a satellite view. Located in the Puerto Madero neighborhood on the southeast side of downtown Buenos Aires. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G0846.
Atalaya (1)
1930. Inactive since 1980. 17 m (56 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with a black and white slatted daymark. Lantern removed. The active light (focal plane 19.5 m (64 ft); white flash every 6 s) is nearby on a 31 m (102 ft) triangular Argentine Navy communications tower. Lightphotos.net has a photo, ARLHS has a photo, the amateur radio club Grupo de San Miguel has a photo of themselves partway up the tower, and Google has a satellite view. The older light now stands on an estate owned by the Yacht Club Atalaya. Located at Atalaya, on the south bank of the Río de la Plata about 8 km (5 mi) north of Magdalena. Site status uncertain. Owner/site manager: Yacht Club Atalaya. ARLHS ARG-076; Admiralty G0896; NGA 19316.
* Punta Piedras (2)
1983 (station established 1917). Active; focal plane 45 m (148 ft); white flash every 9 s. 31 m (102 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with gallery, painted white. The tower also carries a slatted daymark painted with red and white horizontal bands. Trabas has Silvano's photo, 2009 photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. The original lighthouse was destroyed by a storm in 1975. Located at Punta Piedras, the southern entrance to the Río de la Plata. Accessible off the coastal highway (route 11) at a ranch called "El Faro." Site status unknown, but the tower should be visible from the highway. ARLHS ARG-058; Admiralty G0900; NGA 19403.
Pontón (light and pilot ship) Recalada
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 23 m (75 ft); 2 white flashes every 12 s. Steel lightship and pilot ship; light displayed from atop one of the masts. Hull painted red with white lettering "Recalada"; superstructure painted white, stack orange. Trabas has a photo by Capt. Peter Mosselberger. The ship is anchored in the very broad entrance to the Río de la Plata, marking the beginning of the long Punta Indio Channel leading to Buenos Aires, about 140 km (85 miles) away. Ships arriving from overseas take on pilots here. Note: recalada means "landfall." Accessible only by boat. ARLHS ARG-070; Admiralty G0812; NGA 19308.
Torre Oyarvide
Date unknown. Active; focal plane about 11 m (36 ft); white flash every 10 s. 11 m (36 ft) light on a mast mounted on a 1-story building on a platform supported by piles. Trabas also has Capt. Peter Mosselberger's photo. Located about 1.4 km (0.8 mi) southwest of the Recalada. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G0814.

La Costa Partido (Mar del Tuyú Area) Lighthouses
* Cabo San Antonio
1892 (Barbier, Bernard & Turenne). Active; focal plane 63 m (207 ft); one long white flash (1.4 s) every 17 s. 58 m (190 ft) triangular pyramidal "tripod" tower with central cylinder, lantern and gallery . Lighthouse painted with horizontal black and white bands; lantern and watch room painted black. Silvano's photo is at the top of this page, Nicolás Lope de Barrios has a photo, a 2007 photo and a 2008 closeup are available, Huelse has a historic postcard view in which the tower is painted red and white, and Google has a satellite view. The light station is staffed. This is a very rare example of a French lighthouse design. The lighthouse has had an exciting life. A tornado in 1917 broke one leg of the tower, and in 1986 a fire destroyed the keeper's quarters and damaged the lighthouse. It was repaired within six months. An elevator has been installed beside the central cylinder for easy access to the light. A local restaurant has posted information on the area and lighthouse. Located about 8 km (5 mi) north of San Clemente del Tuyú on the southern cape of the Bahía Samborombón. Accessible by road; parking provided. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-011; Admiralty G0904; NGA 19420.
* Mar del Tuyú
1987. Active (privately maintained); focal plane 25 m (82 ft); quick-flashing red light. 5 m (16 ft) post mounted on the roof of a 6-story building. ARLHS has a photo of the light tower, and Google satellite view probably shows the location. This light is said to be the first privately-installed light in the country. Located on the coastal road in the seaside resort of Mar del Tuyú, about halfway between Cabo San Antonio and Punta Médanos. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS ARG-073.
** Punta Médanos
1893 (Barbier, Bernard & Turenne). Active; focal plane 68 m (223 ft); five long (1.5 s) white flashes, separated by 3.5 s, every 40 s. 59 m (194 ft) triangular pyramidal "tripod" tower with central cylinder, lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted with red and white horizontal bands. The light station is staffed. Ariel Fontana's photo is at right, Javier Suden has a view from the beach, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. A 2003 photo (no longer online) showed the lighthouse black with rust, but a 2007 photo shows it freshly repainted in red and white. Like its sibling at Cabo San Antonio, this lighthouse was prefabricated in France and assembled onsite in 1892-93. The lighthouse marks the easternmost point of Argentina, a dangerous coast noted for its shipwrecks. Although the tower is not open for climbing, there are historical displays in the base. Located off route 11 halfway between Mar de Ajó and Pinamar. Site and tower base open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-008; Admiralty G0908; NGA 19424.
Faro Punta Médanos
Punta Médanos Light, Pinamar, August 2009
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Ariel Fontana

Villa Gesell Partido Lighthouse
** Querandí (2)
1922 (station established 1916). Active; focal plane 65 m (213 ft); five white flashes, separated by 3 s, every 26 s. 54 m (177 ft) round concrete tower with lantern and double gallery, painted with black and white horizontal bands; lantern is black. The light station is staffed. The area around the lighthouse was set aside in 1996 as the Reserva Natural Faro Querandí. Trabas has Silvano's photo, a fine portfolio of photos by Federico Pizzi is available, Raul Antonio Alvarez has a 2007 closeup, there's a view from the beach, and the tower pokes through the trees in a Google satellite view. Located atop a forested dune complex about 15 km (10 mi) south of the Mar Azul beach resort; accessible by 4WD vehicles on the beach. Site open, tower open but no schedule is available. ARLHS ARG-007; Admiralty G0910; NGA 19428.

Mar Chiquita Partido Lighthouse
* Mar Chiquita (4)
2010 (station established 1915). Active; focal plane 21 m (69 ft); two white flashes every 15 s. 19 m (62 ft) triangular cylindrical skeletal tower. The tower also carries a slatted daymark. This light replaced a concrete skeletal tower deactivated in 2008. Maximiliano Urquiaga has a 2006 photo of the earlier light, and ARLHS has a photo dated 2009. However, that lighthouse must have been demolished, because it can't be found in a Google satellite view. The original light, a post light, was 2.5 km (1.5 mi) northeast. It was replaced in 1931 by a wooden skeletal tower on the present location. Located just off the beach in the small seaside resort of Mar de Cobo, just south of Mar Chiquita and about 20 km (12.5 mi) north of Mar del Plata. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-044; Admiralty G0912; ex-NGA 19432.

Mar del Plata Lighthouses
* Cabo Corrientes (Mar del Plata)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 75 m (246 ft); white flash every 10 s. 57.5 m (189 ft) high-rise building with the light mounted on a terrace near the top. Carlos Codesido has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. The city of Mar del Plata is a fishing port and Argentina's largest seaside resort. Located on a promontory on the north side of Mar del Plata. Site open. Admiralty G0915; NGA 19436.
** Punta Mogotes
1891 (Barbier, Bernard & Turenne). Active; focal plane 55 m (180 ft); white flash every 10 s. 35 m (116 ft) round strongly conical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on a circular 1-story base and painted with red and white horizontal bands. The light station is staffed. A photo is at right, Trabas has Silvano's photo, Juan Cito has a 2008 photo, Hernan Eugenio has a 2009 photo, and Google has a good satellite view. Rodrigo Alejandro Sanz has posted a historic photo in which the lighthouse is painted in an unusual black and white pattern simulating stone blocks, and Huelse has a historic postcard view also showing this pattern. The surrounding Parque del Faro includes the original fog signal building and a small maritime museum. Punta Mogotes is a prominent headland where (for southbound vessels) the trend of the coast shifts from southwest almost to west. Located about 8 km (5 mi) south of Cabo Corrientes in Mar del Plata. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-0005; Admiralty G0913; NGA 19472.
Faro de Punta Mogotes
Punta Mogotes Light, January 2009
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Isha

General Alvarado Partido (Miramar) Lighthouses
* Miramar
1988. Active; focal plane 78 m (256 ft); white flash every 5 s. 1.5 m (5 ft) round concrete tower atop the 21-story Playa Club building. Trabas has Silvano's photo, another photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the Avenida Costanera in the center of the beach resort city of Miramar. Site and tower closed. ARLHS ARG-047; Admiralty G0922; NGA 19475.
* Punta Hermengo
1929. Inactive since 1988. 15 m (49 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower, formerly with lantern and gallery. The lantern has been removed; only the steel framework of the tower survives. The original Fresnel lens is on display at the Museo Municipal Punta Hermengo. ARLHS has a photo, a 2003 photo is available, and the shadow of the tower can be seen in Google's satellite view. The lighthouse was replaced by the Miramar Light. Located on the point, at the entrance to the municipal nursery on the southwest side of Miramar, about 2 km (1.25 mi) south of the Miramar Light. Site apparently open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: City of Miramar (?). ARLHS ARG-075.

Necochea Partido Lighthouse
*** Quequén
1921 (Dyckerhoff y Widmann S.A.). Active; focal plane 63 m (207 ft); two white flashes every 15 s. 34 m (112 ft) round concrete tower with lantern and double gallery, painted black with a broad white band in the center. The light station is staffed. Silvano's photo is at right, Esteban Maringolo has a good photo and a distant view, a 2008 photo is available, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. Located about 1.5 km (1 mi) north of the mouth of the Río Quequén, just outside Quequén, the seaport of the city of Necochea. Site open, tower open for tours daily. ARLHS ARG-004; Admiralty G0926; NGA 19480.

Tres Arroyos Partido Lighthouse
*** Claromecó
1922 (Dyckerhoff y Widmann S.A.). Active; focal plane 70 m (230 ft); three white flashes (in a 2+1 pattern) every 30 s. 54 m (177 ft) round concrete tower with lantern and gallery painted with black and white horizontal bands. The light station is staffed. Trabas has Silvano's photo, Rubén Pinella has a good photo, Cecilia Elizabeth Pizzuto has a 2006 photo, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse is adjacent to a popular seaside spa, the Balneario Claromecó. The skeleton of a large whale that washed up nearby is displayed in the base of the tower. Located on the coast about halfway between Necochea and Bahía Blanca. Site open, tower usually open in the afternoons daily. ARLHS ARG-014; Admiralty G0942; NGA 19536.
Faro Quequén
Quequén Light, Necochea, August 2009
Flickr photo copyright Carlos María Silvano; used by permission

Bahía Blanca Area Lighthouses
*** Recalada a Bahía Blanca (Bahía Blanca Landfall, Monte Hermoso)
1906. Active; focal plane 75 m (246 ft); white flash every 9 s. 67 m (220 ft) octagonal pyramidal cast iron tower with central cylinder, lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted with red and white horizontal bands. The light station is staffed. Sofia Larrea's photo is at right, Trabas has Silvano's photo, Wikimedia has several photos, and Google has a satellite view. Prefabricated in France by the same company that built the Eiffel Tower, this soaring lighthouse is the tallest in the country, the tallest in the Southern Hemisphere, and among the tallest in the world. The word recalada means landfall in Spanish. Located on the coastal road about 7 km (4.5 mi) east of the resort of Monte Hermoso, marking the entrance to the Bahía Blanca in southern Buenos Aires province. Site open, tower reported open to guided tours. ARLHS ARG-009; Admiralty G0986; NGA 19540.
Chica (Baliza Chica)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 16.5 m (54 ft); white light, 2 s on, 8 s off. 15.5 m (51 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower; the light is shown from a short mast. A closeup photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. This light guides vessels approaching Puerto Belgrano, the home port of the Argentine Navy. The photo caption suggests that the light is on the Argentine Marines training base. Located on the north bank of the Bahía Blanca estuary about 16 km (10 mi) southeast of Puerto Belgrano and 50 km (30 mi) southeast of Bahía Blanca. Site status unknown. ARLHS ARG-083; Admiralty G0993; NGA 19552.
El Rincón
1925 (Dyckerhoff y Widmann S.A.). Active; focal plane 64 m (210 ft); three white flashes (in a 2+1 pattern) every 40 s. 62 m (203 ft) round tapered concrete tower with lantern and double gallery, painted with black and white horizontal bands. Sergio Ruben Zerega has a photo, there's a photo of the lighthouse in action, and Google has a satellite view. The light station is staffed. One of the tallest concrete lighthouses in the world, this light serves as a southern landfall light for the seaports of Bahía Blanca. Located about 30 miles northeast of Pedro Luro on the Península Verde, a 40 km (25-mi) long peninsula about 50 km (30 mi) south of the entrance to the Bahía Blanca estuary. There does not appear to be any public access to this site, but the lighthouse can be viewed from a distance. Site and tower closed. ARLHS ARG-036; Admiralty G1020; NGA 19580.
Segunda Barranca
1914 (César Caccia). Active; focal plane 38.5 m (126 ft); three white flashes every 22 s. 34 m (111 ft) hexagonal pyramidal skeletal tower with central cylinder, lantern and gallery painted with black and white horizontal bands. Bivalve Fresnel lens in use. The light station is staffed. Maria Belén has a view from the beach, and the shadow of the tower is seen in a Google satellite view. Sergio Monetti has a photo of amateur radio operators on the gallery of the lighthouse. Located on a sandy coast about 75 km (45 mi) east of Carmen de Patagones, the southernmost city of Buenos Aires province. There does not appear to be any public road access to this site. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-067; Admiralty G1024; NGA 19584.

Bahía Blanca Landfall Light, November 2007
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Sofia Larrea

Río Negro Province Lighthouses

Adolfo Alsina Department (Viedma Area) Lighthouses
* Río Negro ("Faro de la Boca")
1887. Active; focal plane 43.5 m (143 ft); two white flashes every 20 s. 16.5 m (54 ft) round cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery rising from the center of a hexagonal 1-story brick keeper's quarters. Entire lighthouse painted white. A photo by Florencia Guedes is at right, Eliseo Carlos Martín has a great closeup photo, Trabas has Silvano's photo, Erik Schepers has another closeup photo, Wikimedia has a photo of the station, and Google has a satellite view. The light station is staffed. This is Argentina's oldest surviving lighthouse and the first one to be built on the coast of Patagonia. The area is known locally as La Boca (the mouth), referring to the mouth of the Río Negro. Located on the west side of the mouth of the Río Negro, adjacent to the El Cóndor resort; accessible via provincial route 1 from Viedma. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-012; Admiralty G1028; NGA 19588.
* Belén (?)
1928. Inactive since 1992. 14 m (46 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with black and white slatted daymark. Lantern removed. The survival of this tower is uncertain: ARLHS has a photo, but nothing is seen in Bing's satellite view. Located on the Península Belén, at the northern entrance to the Golfo San Matías, about 110 km (70 mi) west of Viedma. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: unknown. ex-Admiralty G1030; ARLHS ARG-069.

San Antonio Department Lighthouses
* San Matías
1924. Active; focal plane 42 m (138 ft); two white flashes every 11 s. 16 m (52 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with black and white slatted daymark. The lantern was removed in 1974, and the light is displayed from a platform at the top of the tower. Trabas has Silvano's photo, another photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse is built atop an artificial dune: a large conical mound. The surrounding area is a nature preserve, the Área Natural Protegida Bahía de San Antonio. Located off National Route 3 on the northeast side of the Golfo San Matías, perhaps 30 km (20 mi) east of San Antonio Oeste. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-064; Admiralty G1031; NGA 19596.

Río Negro Light, Viedma, January 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Florencia Guedes
* Pedro Garcia Range Rear
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 39 m (128 ft); green flash every 3 s. 24 m (79 ft) round water tank, painted with vertical black and white stripes. Trabas has Silvano's photo, and Google has a satellite view. The range guides vessels arriving at San Antonio Oeste. Located on a peninsula sheltering the harbor. Accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1035; NGA 19601.
* Banco Reparo Range Rear
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 41 m (135 ft); red flash every 3 s. 24 m (79 ft) square cylindrical skeletal tower. The front of the tower has a daymark of black and white bars. Trabas has Silvano's photo, and Google has a satellite view. The range guides vessels arriving at San Antonio Oeste. Located on a peninsula about 5 km (3 mi) southeast of San Antonio Oeste. Accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1037; NGA 19608.
* Camino (Cangrejal Inner Range Rear)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 24.5 m (80 ft); red flash every 4 s. 23 m (75 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower carrying a slatted daymarak painted white with red bars in the center. Trabas has Silvano's photo, and Google has a satellite view. This is an entrance range for San Antonio Oeste. The front light is on a smaller skeletal tower. Located just off highway 3 on the north side of the Bahía San Antonio. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1042.1; NGA 19616.
* Las Grutas
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 71 m (233 ft); white light, 1 s on, 1 s off. 30 m (98 ft) round cylindrical water tank. No photo available, but Google has a good satellite view. Located in Las Grutas, a beach resort town about 15 km (9 mi) south of San Antonio Oeste. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1045; NGA 19626.

Chubut Province Lighthouses

Biedma Department Lighthouses
Note: The Península Valdes is an elliptical near-island about 100 km (60 mi) from north to south and 75 km (46 mi) east to west, connected to the mainland by a narrow isthmus. The Golfo San José is north of the isthmus and the Golfo Nuevo is to the south. The peninsula is mostly deserted except for a few sheep ranches; most of it is protected as a nature reserve. Puerto Madryn, at the head of the Golfo Nuevo, is the administrative center of Biedma department and the only town of any size in the area.
Punta Tehuelche
1949. Active; focal plane 35 m (116 ft); three white flashes every 20 s. 12 m (39 ft) square pyramidal concrete skeletal tower with lantern and a 1-story enclosed concrete workroom in the base. An SHN photo is at right, another closeup photo and a second closeup are available, and Google has a satellite view. Located on a promontory projecting into the Golfo San José on the north side of the Istmo Ameghino, the narrow neck of land connecting the Península Valdes to the mainland. Accessible only by boat; there is no road access to this site. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-059; Admiralty G1048.8; NGA 19636.
Punta Buenos Aires
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 38 m (125 ft); white flash every 3 s. 6 m (20 ft) square tower rising from a 1-story square equipment building. Lighthouse painted in an unusual red and white checkerboard pattern. José Pavoni has a photo and a more distant view, and Google has an indistinct satellite view. Located on a promontory near the tip of the Península Buenos Aires, the long peninsula enclosing the northeast side of the Golfo San José. Accessible by 4WD. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-093; Admiralty G1048; NGA 19634.
Almirante Brown (2)
1968. Active; focal plane 76.5 m (251 ft); two white flashes, separated by 4 s, every 16 s. 5 m (17 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower, painted white with a daymark of red horizontal bars and a red "bull's-eye." Light displayed from a small lantern on a short mast. ARLHS has a closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view. A wooden tower built here in 1945 collapsed in 1948. Located on the northern coast of the Península Buenos Aires, about 13 km (8 mi) east of Punta Buenos Aires and the entrance to the Golfo San José. Accessible only by boat or helicopter; there is no road access to this site. Site and tower closed. ARLHS ARG-018; Admiralty G1049; NGA 19640.
* Punta Norte
1925. Active; focal plane 62.5 m (205 ft); white flash every 10 s. 16.5 m (54 ft) slender round cylindrical metal (cast iron?) tower with lantern, rising from the center of a small workroom. Lighthouse painted with black and white horizontal bands. Guy wires have been added to steady this weatherbeaten and rather fragile-looking tower. Probably endangered. ARLHS has a photo, Fabio Dornelles has a 2007 photo, another photo shows the lighthouse in silhouette, Trabas has Salvino's distant view, and Google has a satellite view. As an experiment, the light was powered by the wind from 1982 to 1990; it is now solar powered. The area is well known for its wildlife, especially elephant seals. Located at the northernmost point of the Península Valdes marking the southern entrance to the Golfo San Matías. Accessible at the end of provincial route 3, 75 km (47 mi) northeast of Puerto Pirámides. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-056; Admiralty G1050; NGA 19652.
Faro Tehuelche
Punta Tehuelche Light
Servicio de Hidrografía Naval photo
* [Punta Bajos (2)]
2001 (station established 1927). Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); white flash every 3 s. Approx. 25 m (82 ft) triangular cylindrical skeletal mast. ARLHS has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. The original lighthouse here was a 28 m (92 ft) cast iron tower. Located beside the coastal road on the east coast of the peninsula, midway between the Punta Norte and Punta Delgada lighthouses. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-051; Admiralty G1052; NGA 19656.
**** Punta Delgada
1905. Active; focal plane 71 m (234 ft); three white flashes in a 2+1 pattern every 25 s. 14 m (46 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted brick red; lantern painted black. Fresnel lens in use. The light station is staffed. A photo is at right, Stefano Paradisi has a 2008 photo, a 2007 closeup photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. The development of ecotourism on the Península Valdes has made this one of the best known lighthouses in Argentina (or in South America, for that matter). The buildings of the light station include a hotel and restaurant. The surrounding area has one of the world's largest elephant seal colonies as well as many other kinds of wildlife. Located at the southeastern tip of the Península Valdes, about 65 km (40 mi) southeast of Puerto Pirámides on provincial route 2. Site open, tower open for tours. Site manager: Faro Punta Delgada. ARLHS ARG-015; Admiralty G1054; NGA 19660.
Morro Nuevo
1918. Active; focal plane 118 m (387 ft); white flash every 5s. 12 m (39 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower painted brown with a red and white slatted daymark. Lantern removed. The tower is inconspicuous in a Google satellite view. The lighthouse was converted to wind power in 1982, but the experiment failed; it was converted to solar power in 1984. Located atop a high headland at the southernmost point of the Península Valdes, marking the northern entrance to the Golfo Nuevo. There is no road access to this site. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-049; Admiralty G1058; NGA 19664.
* Punta Flecha (Puerto Madryn)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 42 m (138 ft); white flash every 9 s. 13 m (43 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower, with two sides covered with a slatted daymark painted red with one white vertical stripe. Trabas has Salvino's closeup photo, another photo is available, Jorge Gobbi also has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. This light probably replaced the Golfo Nuevo lighthouse (next entry). Located atop a steep headland just off highway 42 about 15 km (9 mi) northeast of Puerto Madryn. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-089; Admiralty G1064; NGA 19696.

Punta Delgada Light, March 2005
anonymous Wikimedia public domain photo
* Golfo Nuevo
1916. Inactive since about 1990. 14.5 m (48 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern and gallery painted red. Federico Trevisan has a good photo, ARLHS has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Public protests saved this lighthouse in 1990, when the Navy announced it would remove this tower. The lighthouse is a traditional symbol of the city of Puerto Madryn. Located in an industrial area just north of the city. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Municipalidad de Puerto Madryn. ARLHS ARG-038.
* Ecocentro de Puerto Madryn
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 25 m (82 ft); white flash every 3 s. 13 m (43 ft) octagonal tower attached to a 1-story ecological center; the light is perched atop the pyramidal roof of the tower. The building is white. A photo and a closeup are available, and Google has a satellite view. Located on a headland on the south side of Puerto Madryn. Site and building open. Owner/site manager: Ecocentro Mar Patagonia. Admiralty G1065; NGA 19690.
* Acantilado (Puerto Madryn)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 57 m (187 ft); white flash every 6 s. 13 m (43 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower; two sides of the tower are covered with a slatted daymark painted red with one white horizontal band. Trabas has Salvino's photo, another photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the east side of a promontory about 8 km (5 mi) southeast of Puerto Madryn. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-088; Admiralty G1066; NGA 19688.

Rawson Department Lighthouses
Punta Conscriptos (2)
1986 (station established 1929). Active; focal plane 97 m (318 ft); white flash every 7 s, except every third flash omitted. 10 m (33 ft) square broadly pyramidal skeletal tower, painted black. Trabas has Salvino's photo, and ARLHS has a photo, but only the small equipment shelter is clearly visible in a Google satellite view. Located atop a steep cliff about 800 m (1/2 mi) south of Punta Conscriptos, a promontory about 30 km (19 mi) southeast of Puerto Madryn. Site open but probably difficult to reach, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-052; Admiralty G1072; NGA 19684.
* Punta Ninfas (2)
1971 (station established 1916). Active; focal plane 90 m (295 ft); two white flashes every 20 s. 12 m (39 ft) round fiberglass tower, painted with black and yellow horizontal bands. No lantern. Guy wires steady the tower. One of Salvino's photos is at right, Trabas has another of Salvino's photos, Fabien Dany has a 2007 photo, a 2008 closeup is available, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the point marking the southern entrance to the Golfo Nuevo, at the end of provincial route 5 about 50 km (30 mi) east of Puerto Madryn. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-055; Admiralty G1074; NGA 19668.
* Chubut (Río Chubut, Punta del Faro)
1933. Active; focal plane 36.5 m (120 ft); white flash every 9 s. 11.5 m (38 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower, painted black, with black and white slatted daymark. Lantern removed 1985. Trabas has Salvino's photo, ARLHS has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located on a headland about 10 km (6 mi) south of Puerto Rawson on the coastal road to Playa Santa Isabel. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-034; Admiralty G1076; NGA 19728.

Florentino Ameghino Department Lighthouses
Punta Lobos
1948. Active; focal plane 145 m (477 ft); two white flashes, separated by 5 s, every 15 s. 11 m (36 ft) round concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted with narrow horizontal red and white bands; lantern and gallery are red. Google has a satellite view. Sibling of Faro Cabo Dañoso (see below). This lighthouse stands in a barren area with no road access. Located high on a prominent headland about 65 km (40 mi) south of Rawson. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-053; Admiralty G1080; NGA 19740.
Faro Punta Ninfas
Punta Ninfas Light, Puerto Madryn, April 2011
Flickr photo copyright Carlos María Silvano; used by permission
Cabo Raso
1925. Active; focal plane 54 m (177 ft); three white flashes, separated by 7 s, every 40 s. 23 m (75 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower with slatted daymark; entire lighthouse painted white. Guy wires steady the tower. Trabas has Silvano's photo, another photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. The tower has an unusual profile; it appears that at some time the tower height was raised by replacing the lantern with a second skeletal tower mounted on the original gallery. More information is needed on this. Located on the cape about 100 km (65 mi) south of Rawson. Accessible by a dirt road. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-029; Admiralty G1084; NGA 19744.
San José (Cabo San José) (2)
1974 (station established 1917). Active; focal plane 84 m (276 ft); flash every 5 s, white or red depending on direction. 16.5 m (54 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower, painted black with one yellow horizontal band. Google has a good satellite view. The original lighthouse was an octagonal cast iron skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. Located atop a prominent cape about 18 km (11 mi) south of Cabo Raso and 40 km (25 mi) northeast of Camerones. There is no road access to this site. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-063; Admiralty G1086; NGA 19748.
* Bahía San Gregorio
1968. Active; focal plane 172 m (564 ft); white flash every 5.2 s. 9 m (30 ft) square cylindrical concrete block tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted yellow with a broad black "V" on each face, making a zigzag pattern around the building. An SHN photo is at right, Trabas has Silvano's distant view, and Google has a good satellite view. This lighthouse replaced the Isla Leones Light. Located about 13 miles south of Camerones on the heights of the Cabo Dos Bahías, the northern entrance to the Golfo San Jorge. There is no road access to this rugged area. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-062; Admiralty G1089.4; NGA 19764.
Isla Leones
1917. Inactive since 1968. 12.5 m (41 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery centered atop 1-story octagonal concrete block keeper's quarters. ARLHS has a closeup photo, and Google has an excellent satellite view of the station. Isla Leones lies off the Cabo Dos Bahías; the light was abandoned due to the difficulties of landing men and supplies on the island. The lighthouse is clearly endangered and likely to fall into ruin. Accessible only by boat or helicopter. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-071.

Escalante Department Lighthouses
Cabo Aristizábal (2)
1977 (station established 1917). Active; focal plane 46 m (151 ft); white flash every 5 s. 16 m (52 ft) square skeletal tower, painted black; there is a second skeletal tower inside, presumably to provde extra support. The upper half of the tower is at least partially enclosed by a slatted daymark painted with red and white chevrons. A 2008 photo is available, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on a prominent and rugged cape about 8 km (5 mi) south of Bahía Bustamante. Accessible only by boat or helicopter. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-023; Admiralty G1097; NGA 19788.
* Cabo San Jorge
1925. Active; focal plane 78 m (256 ft); four white flashes, separated by 5 s, every 32 s. 27 m (89 ft) square brick tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern and gallery painted black. A 2008 photo is available, Néstor Galina has a sunset photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. Located about 13 km (8 mi) north of Comodoro Rivadavia, the southernmost city of Chubut. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-006; Admiralty G1104; NGA 19792.
Faro de San Gregorio
Bahía San Gregorio Light, Camerones
Servicio de Hidrografía Naval photo

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Notable faux lighthouses:

  • Iguazu, a well known observation tower and faux lighthouse, at the famous Iguazu Falls on Argentina's border with Brazil.
  • Palacio Barolo, a historic office building in Buenos Aires, is crowned by a lantern reported to contain a powerful light. As far as I know, this building has never been regarded as an aid to navigation.

Adjoining pages: North: Uruguay | South: Southern Argentina

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Posted 2003. Checked and revised August 27, 2013. Lighthouses: 51, lightships: 1. Site copyright 2013 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.