Lighthouses of Southern Argentina

Argentina has a lengthy coastline, extending from the warm waters of the Río de la Plata to the edge of the icy Antarctic ocean. This page includes lighthouses of the southernmost part of that coast: southern Patagonia (Santa Cruz Province) and Tierra del Fuego. These two regions are separated by the Strait of Magellan. Tierra del Fuego is divided between Argentina and Chile in such a way that the entire Strait, including its eastern entrance, is in Chile; this leaves a small gap in the Argentine coastline at the Strait entrance.

Active lighthouses in Argentina are owned by the Argentine Navy and managed by the Navy's Servicio de Hidrografía Naval (SHN).

Interest in lighthouses seems to be fairly high in Argentina. In the past, there hasn't been much concern about preservation, since the great majority of the lighthouses are being maintained by the Navy. However, in recent years there has been increasing concern about the preservation of several of the country's most historic lighthouses, especially those in the far south.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. Admiralty numbers are from volume G of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA List numbers are from Publication 110, except for lights of the Beagle Channel, which are from Publication 111. The official Argentine light list, Faros y Señales Marítimas, is not available online.

General Sources
Lista de Faros
Official SHN lighthouse site, with data and small photos.
Faros de Argentina
Index to lighthouse articles and photos in the Spanish Wikipedia.
Lighthouses in Argentina
The ARLHS listing of Argentine lights; the society has photos for most of them.
Faros Argentina
Photos by Carlos María Silvano.
Online List of Lights - Argentina
Photos posted by Alexander Trabas.
Faros Argentina
Photos posted on Flickr.com by Carlos María Silvano.
World of Lighthouses - Argentina
Photos available from Lightphotos.net.
Faros de Santa Cruz
A very useful blog by Ruben Russo on the lighthouses of Santa Cruz Province.
Lighthouses in Argentina
Photos available from Wikimedia.


Cabo Virgenes Light, Strait of Magellan, October 2005
Flickr photo
copyright Paul Cookson; used by permission

Santa Cruz Province (Southern Patagonia) Lighthouses

Deseado Department Lighthouses
* Olivia (2)
Date unknown (station established 1945). Active; focal plane 28 m (92 ft); white flash every 5 s. Approx. 17 m (56 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower carrying a black and white slatted daymark. Small workshed at base of the tower. A photo is available, and Google has a good satellite view. ARLHS has a photo of the original lighthouse, a shorter concrete skeletal tower; it may have been at a different location. Located on the waterfront in Caleta Olivia, on the Golfo San Jorge. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-050; Admiralty G1128; NGA 19864.
Mazarredo
1945. Inactive since 1950. 7 m (23 ft) square pyramidal unpainted concrete skeletal tower. Russo has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located in a remote area on the southwest coast of the Golfo San Jorge. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: unknown. ARLHS ARG-046.
Monte Loayza
1946. Inactive since 1992. 12.5 m (41 ft) square cylindrical concrete skeletal tower with lantern, gallery, and enclosed lower portion. Russo has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. The area surrounding the lighthouse is a nature reserve, the Reserva Natural Monte Loayza. Located in a barren and remote area on the south coast of the Golfo San Jorge, about 135 km (85 mi) northwest of Puerto Deseado. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-048.
* Cabo Blanco
1917. Active; focal plane 67 m (220 ft); five long (1.5 s) white flashes every 40 s. 27 m (88 ft) round red brick tower with lantern and gallery, unpainted; lantern and gallery painted black. Jorge Porchile's photo is at right, Douglas Fernandes has a 2007 photo, Barbara Macia has a 2008 distant view, ARLHS has an aerial view, and Google has a good satellite view. This is a staffed station, with a 1-story station building and several communications towers. The area surrounding the lighthouse is a nature reserve, the Reserva Natural Cabo Blanco. Located on a rocky headland at the end of provincial route 91 about 90 km (55 mi) north of Puerto Deseado; 4WD recommended. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-001; Admiralty G1134; NGA 19912.
Punta Guzmán
1928. Active; focal plane 33 m (108 ft); two white flashes every 12 s. 17 m (56 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower. Tower painted black; slatted daymark painted with an orange triangle. Bing has an indistinct satellite view. Lantern removed by 1971. Located in a remote area about 15 km (10 mi) south of Cabo Blanco. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-039; Admiralty G1136; NGA 19916.
Faro Cabo Blanco
Cabo Blanco Light, Puerto Deseado, June 2011
Panoramio photo
copyright Jorge Porchile; permission requested
* Beauvoir (Puerto Deseado)
1980. Active; focal plane 48 m (157 ft); three white flashes every 10 s. Light mounted in the 28 m (92 ft) tower of the church of Nuestra Señora de la Guardia, the one tall structure on the skyline of Puerto Deseado. ARLHS has a photo, Russo has a photo, another photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. The light is named for the priest José María Beauvoir, who explored the region and studied the native Patagonian cultures and languages between 1881 and 1924. Located in downtown Puerto Deseado. Site and church open; it is not known if the tower is open for climbing. ARLHS ARG-020; Admiralty G1139; NGA 19920.
* Estación (Puerto Deseado Outer Range Front)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); quick-flashing white light. 19 m (62 ft) truncated pyramidal skeletal tower carrying a slatted daymark painted black with an orange vertical stripe. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. Located on the north side of the harbor entrance. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1140; NGA 19924.
* Alonso (Puerto Deseado Outer Range Rear)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 40 m (131 ft); red light, 1 s on, 1 s off. 23 m (75 ft) steel post light; the top of the tower carries daymark panels colored black with an orange vertical stripe. A photo is available, and the shadow of the tower is seen in a Google satellite view. Located on the waterfront 852 m (0.53 mi) west northwest of the front light. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1140.1; NGA 19928.
Isla Pingüino
1903. Active; focal plane 60 m (197 ft); two white flashes, separated by 5 s, every 15 s. 22 m (72 ft) 2-stage round tower, with lantern and gallery, in two sections; the upper half is cast iron the lower half is masonry. Lower half painted white, upper half red with a white horizontal band; lantern painted red. 1-story brick keeper's quarters, abandoned since at least 1983, now in ruins. A photo is at right, Rodrigo Pinedo has a 2009 photo, and Google has a satellite view. This historic lighthouse is in poor condition and is clearly endangered. The island is a nature reserve, the Reserva Provincial Isla Pingüino, protecting a large colony of Magellanic penguins. Located on an island off Cabo Mírador, about 18 km (11 mi) southeast of Puerto Deseado. Accessible only by boat or helicopter. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-010; Admiralty G1152; NGA 19940.
Punta Medanosa
1949. Active; focal plane 29 m (95 ft); two white flashes, separated by 3 s, every 11 s. 12 m (39 ft) square pyramidal concrete skeletal tower, painted white, with black and white slatted daymark. Lantern removed. Miguel Ward has a good photo, Russo has a photo, ARLHS has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. The surrounding area is a nature preserve, the Área de Vida Silvestre Punta Medanosa, known for its colonies of Magellanic penguins. Located on a rocky point off the end of provincial route 85 about 35 miles south of Puerto Deseado. Accessible by 4WD (local guidance recommended). Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-054; Admiralty G1154; NGA 19948.
Faro de la Isla Pingüino
Isla Pingüino Light, April 2008
Panoramio photo copyright El Guanaco Volado
used by permission
Cabo Guardián
1928. Active; focal plane 48 m (157 ft); flash every 7.5 s, alternating red and white. 36 m (118 ft) square pyramidal steel tower with lantern and gallery. Entire lighthouse painted black. A closeup photo is available, Russo has a photo, ARLHS has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. In 1975 a second square pyramidal steel tower was built inside the original tower in order to strengthen the structure. Located on a prominent and steep headland about 160 km (100 mi) southwest of Puerto Deseado. There does not appear to be any road access to the site. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-027; Admiralty G1156; NGA 19952.
Campana (Punta Mercedes)
1928. Active; focal plane 50 m (164 ft); two flashes, white and then red, every 16 s. 26 m (85 ft) square pyramidal steel tower, painted black. Lantern removed? (More information is needed on this site, since the current tower has a modern appearance; it may not be the original). 1-story keeper's quarters, abandoned. ARLHS has a closeup, Russo has a photo, a 2008 photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. Located on Punta Mercedes, a remote headland about 175 km (110 mi) southwest of Puerto Deseado. There is no road access to the site. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-033; Admiralty G1158; NGA 19956.

Magallanes Department (Puerto San Julián Area) Lighthouses
Cabo Dañoso
1947. Active; focal plane 44 m (144 ft); four white flashes, separated by 5 s, every 45 s. 12 m (39 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted with red and white horizontal bands; lantern is red. A 2009 photo is available, and Bing has a good satellite view. Located on the point of the cape about 65 km (40 mi) northeast of Puerto San Julián. There does not appear to be any road access to the site. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-025; Admiralty G1160; NGA 19960.
* Cabo Curioso
1922. Active; focal plane 92 m (302 ft); three long (1.5 s) flashes, separated by 9 s, every 45 s. 23 m (75 ft) square pyramidal concrete skeletal tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with a broad black band in the center; lantern is black. 1-story enclosed workroom in the base of the tower. A photo is at right, Christian Legare has a 2011 closeup photo, a second closeup is available, and Google has a good satellite view. This unusual and historic lighthouse is located about 20 km (13 mi) northeast of Puerto San Julián, marking the entrance to the harbor of the city. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-024; Admiralty G1162; NGA 19964.
* Justicia Alta (Puerto San Julián Fourth Range Rear)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 33 m (108 ft); white or red light, depending on direction, 2.5 s on, 2.5 s off. 21 m (69 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower, mounted on four concrete piles. At the top, the tower carries a slatted daymark painted yellow with a black triangle, point down. A photo is available, and Bing has an indistinct satellite view. This range guides vessels approaching Puerto San Julián through a winding estuary, the Bahía San Julián. Located on the west side of the San Julián estuary on the south side of Puerto San Julián. Site status unknown, but it must be possible to view the tower from nearby. Admiralty G1178.1; NGA 19996.
* Caldera Alta (Puerto San Julián Fifth Range Rear)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 33 m (108 ft); red flash every 3 s. Approx. 16 m (52 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower. Lighthouse painted black. At the top, the tower carries a slatted daymark painted yellow with a black triangle, point down. A 2007 photo is available, and the shadow of the tower is seen in a Google satellite view. This range guides vessels departing Puerto San Julián. Located on a hillside east of the Bahía San Julián, about 7 km (4 mi) northeast of Puerto San Julián. Accessible by 4WD. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1184.1; NGA 20004.
Faro Cabo Curioso
Cabo Curioso Light, April 2012
Flickr photo copyright fitob1; used by permission

Corpen Aike Department (Puerto Santa Cruz Area) Lighthouses
Cabo San Francisco de Paula
1917. Active; focal plane 86 m (282 ft); two white flashes, separated by 6 s, every 15 s. 8.5 m (28 ft) octagonal cylindrical skeletal tower with lantern and gallery; there is a small square equipment room enclosed within the base of the tower. Entire lighthouse painted black. A closeup is available, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the "cape," a barely noticeable bend in the coastline about halfway between Puerto San Julián and Puerto Santa Cruz. There is a road to the light, but the site is quite remote. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-060; Admiralty G1196; NGA 20016.
Puerto Santa Cruz Entrada Baja (Entrance Range Front)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 34 m (112 ft); quick-flashing white light. 26 m (85 ft) square skeletal tower, painted with red and white horizontal bands. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. Located on the south side of the entrance to the Río Santa Cruz. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1210; NGA 20024.
Santa Cruz
1923. Active; focal plane 157 m (515 ft); four white flashes, separated by 5 s, every 60 s. 12 m (39 ft) slender round cylindrical metal (cast iron?) tower with lantern and gallery, rising from the center of a small workroom. Lighthouse painted with black and white horizontal bands. Guy wires steady the tower. Google has a satellite view. Located about 20 km (13 mi) southeast of Puerto Santa Cruz, on the south side of the entrance to the Río Santa Cruz. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-066; Admiralty G1210.1; NGA 20020.

Güer Aike Department Lighthouses
Río Coig
1948. Active; focal plane 78 m (256 ft); two long (1.1 s) white flashes every 25 s. 11 m (36 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted with red and white horizontal bands; lantern is red. Sibling of Faro Cabo Dañoso. A photo by Pipo Lopez is at right, a 2009 photo is available, ARLHS has a photo, and Google has a distant satellite view. Located on the north side of the entrance to the Río Coig, east of Puerto Coig and about 175 km (110 mi) north of Río Gallegos. There does not appear to be any road access to the site. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-035; Admiralty G1222; NGA 20068.
* Cabo Buen Tiempo (Cape Fairweather)
1917. Active; focal plane 113 m (371 ft); four long (1.5 s) white flashes, separated by 5 s, every 45 s. 9 m (29 ft) octagonal cylindrical skeletal tower with lantern and gallery; there is a small square equipment room enclosed within the base of the tower. Entire lighthouse painted black. A 2009 photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. This light has the same design as the Cabo San Francisco de Paula Light (see above). Located on the cape at the end of provincial route 55 on the north side of the entrance to the Río Gallegos. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-022; Admiralty G1226; NGA 20072.
Faro Río Coig
Río Coig Light, Puerto Coig, February 2011
Panoramio photo copyright Pipo Lopez; used by permission
* Cabo Vírgenes
1904. Active; focal plane 69.5 m (228 ft); white flash every 5 s. 26 m (85 ft) hexagonal pyramidal skeletal tower with central cylinder, lantern and gallery; Fresnel lens in use. Lighthouse painted with black and white horizontal bands. Paul Cookson's photo is at the top of this page, Felicitas Molina has a good photo, a 2007 photo is available, and Google has a good satellite view. This historic lighthouse marks the eastern entrance to the Strait of Magellan, along with the Chilean lighthouse at Punta Dungeness (see the Southern Chile page) about 10 km (6 mi) to the southwest. This is an active naval station. Nearby is a penguin sanctuary with a visitor center. As of 2004, the lighthouse was in rather poor condition and there was concern about its preservation. However, it appears in recent photos that the lighthouse has been refurbished and repainted. Located at the end of provincial route 1 about 80 miles (unpaved) south of Río Gallegos. Site status uncertain, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-032; Admiralty G1260; NGA 20152.

Tierra del Fuego Lighthouses

Atlantic Coast Tierra del Fuego Lighthouses
Magallanes
1976. Active; focal plane 53 m (174 ft); three white flashes every 50 s. 13.5 m (44 ft) square skeletal tower with gallery, painted black. The upper portion of the tower is partially enclosed by a slatted daymark. Google has a satellite view. Located 800 m (1/2 mi) southeast of the border between Chile and Argentina south of the Strait of Magellan. Accessible by road (4WD recommended). Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-043; Admiralty G1260.5; NGA 20156.
Punta Páramo (2?)
Date unknown (station established 1924). Active; focal plane 22.5 m (74 ft); white flash every 7.5 s. 17.5 m (57 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with lantern and gallery, painted black. Amateur radio operator LU2XPK has a 2008 photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located near the end of the Península El Páramo, a long sand spit partially enclosing the Bahía de San Sebastián. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-057; Admiralty G1261; NGA 20160.
* San Sebastián
1949. Active; focal plane 60 m (197 ft); three white flashes, separated by 5 s, every 40 s. 11 m (36 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted with blue and yellow spiral bands; lantern painted black. A photo is at right, a distant view is available, and Google has a good satellite view. Located off national route 3 about 25 km (16 mi) east of the town of San Sebastián, marking the southern entrance to the Bahía de San Sebastián. Accessible by road (4WD recommended). Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-013; Admiralty G1262; NGA 20192.
* Cabo Peñas
1916. Active; focal plane 42 m (138 ft); two white flashes, separated by 5 s, every 20 s. 13 m (42 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with lantern and gallery, painted black. Amateur radio operator LU2XPK has a 2008 photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located on a headland about 10 km (6 mi) southeast of Río Grande. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-028; Admiralty G1274; NGA 20256.
Cabo San Pablo (1)
1945. Inactive since 1949. 6 m (20 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery. After being in service only four years, the lighthouse was heavily damaged by the earthquake of 17 December 1949. The quake left the tower leaning at an angle of about 30°. A good closeup photo is available, Juan Fosati also has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. The active light (focal plane 136.5 m (448 ft); two white flashes every 20 s), built in 1966, on a 6 m (20 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with slatted rectangular black and yellow daymark. Located at the end of provincial route A off national route 3 about 80 km (50 mi) southeast of Río Grande. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-031 (old) and ARG-074 (new); Admiralty G1275; NGA 20260.
Faro San Sebastián
San Sebastián Light, Tierra del Fuego
unattributed photo from farosdelmundo.com.ar
Cabo San Diego
1934. Active; focal plane 40 m (131 ft); three white flashes, separated by 3 s, every 32 s. 14 m (43 ft) square cylindrical concrete skeletal tower with lantern. Tower unpainted, lantern painted black. A 2012 photo is available, Eduardo de Bahía has a 2008 photo, and Google has a satellite view. In the photos, the lighthouse appears dilapidated and in need of repairs. This lighthouse marks the extreme southeast corner of Tierra del Fuego and the western entrance to the Strait of Le Maire. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. ARLHS ARG-030; Admiralty G1276; NGA 20264.

Isla de los Estados Lighthouses
Note: The Isla de los Estados (Staten Island) is a mountainous island off the southeastern tip of Tierra del Fuego. The island is about 65 km (40 mi) long and roughly 15 km (9 mi) wide, with a rugged and deeply indented coastline. It is separated from Tierra del Fuego by the 30 km (19 mi) wide Strait of Le Maire. The entire island is set aside as a provincial ecological preserve, and the only settlement is a small naval station staffed by rotating crews. Adventure tours to the island are available from Ushuaia.
Año Nuevo (Isla Observatorio)
1902 (Barbier & Bernard). Active; focal plane 65.5 m (215 ft); three white flashes, separated by 8 s, every 32 s. 23.5 m (77 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern and double gallery, in two sections, the upper half narrower than the lower. Abel Sberna's photo is at right, a view from the sea is available, and Bing has a satellite view. Sibling of Faro Isla Pengüino. Built with British support in connection with Antarctic expeditions, this light station has been declared a national historic monument. The abandoned 1-story building adjacent to the tower formerly housed a meteorological and geophysical observatory. The observatory was staffed continuously from 1902 to 1919, contributing greatly to scientific knowledge of the southern oceans. Endangered: the lighthouse is in poor condition and the other buildings are crumbling. Studies are in progress to determine how best to restore the site. Located on the Isla Observatorio, a small island off the north coast of the Isla de los Estados. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. ARLHS ARG-003; Admiralty G1279; NGA 20268.
San Juan de Salvamento (replica 2)
1998 replica of 1884 lighthouse. Active; focal plane 72.5 m (238 ft); two white flashes, separated by 3 s, every 15 s. 6.5 m (21 ft) octagonal frame keeper's quarters, the light shown through a square window. The building is crowned by a gray metal globe. A 2006 photo is available, ARLHS has a photo, and Google has a good satellite view. Wikipedia has a 2008 photo and an 1898 photo of the original lighthouse. Argentina's oldest lighthouse was replaced by the Faro Año Nuevo in 1902, but not before it played the starring role in the Jules Verne novel Le Phare au Bout du Monde (The Lighthouse at the End of the World). (Scholars believe this novel was actually written by Jules Verne's son Michel Verne.) In 1998, a society of French Jules Verne fans worked with the Argentine Navy to rebuild the historic building. However, the new structure is octagonal; the original was 12-sided, and there are other noticeable differences. The same society built another copy (also octagonal) off the Pointe des Minimes at La Rochelle on France's Charente coast. Remains and artifacts of the original lighthouse are on display at the Museo Maritimo de Ushuaia, along with another (and somewhat more faithful) replica. Located high on a cliff near the northeastern end of the Isla de los Estados, marking the entrance to a sheltered cove that is one of few safe anchorages at the island. Accessible only by boat in famously tumultuous seas. Site and tower closed. ARLHS ARG-002; NGA 20269.
Faro Año Nuevo
Año Nuevo Light, Isla de los Estados, January 2009
Arte y Fotografia Creative Commons photo by Abel Sberna

Beagle Channel Lighthouses

Note: The Beagle Channel (Canal Beagle) is the narrow strait separating the mainland (Isla Grande) of Tierra del Fuego from an archipelago of smaller islands to the south. The channel is named for HMS Beagle, the survey ship that carried Charles Darwin on its round the world expedition in the late 1820s. The strait is about 240 km (150 mi) long and as little as 5 km (3 mi) wide. The eastern half of the channel is the border between Argentina (on the mainland side) and Chile (on the south side); the western half is entirely in Chile. The only two towns are on the eastern half: Ushuaia on the Argentine side and Puerto Williams on Isla Navarino on the Chilean side. These two settlements are the southernmost towns in the world. Adventure cruise ships often visit Ushuaia, making this remote passage familiar to many tourists.
Cabo San Pío
1919. Active; focal plane 55 m (180 ft); two white flashes, separated by 4.5 s, every 16 s. 8 m (26 ft) round brick tower with lantern and gallery, the lower part cylindrical and the upper part conical, painted with red and white horizontal bands. A 2012 photo is available, and Bing has a satellite view. An unusual design; the lighthouse looks like a giant bowling pin. Access to the gallery and lantern is by an exterior ladder. This lighthouse marks the southernmost point of Argentina and the entrance to the Beagle Channel (Canal de Beagle). Islands on the south side of the channel are in Chile. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-065; Admiralty G1292; NGA 110-20304.
Punta Espora
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 16 m (52 ft); white flash every 4 s. 8 m (26 ft) hourglass-shaped fiberglass tower, colored with red and white horizontal bands. A photo is available, and Google has a very distant satellite view. This light marks the southern tip of Isla Gable, a large island that nearly blocks the Beagle Channel. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1311; NGA 111-2684.
Punta San Juan
Active; focal plane 24 m (79 ft); white flash every 8 s. 8 m (26 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower, painted with red and white bands. No photo available, but the tower casts a long shadow downslope in Bing's satellite view. Located on the north side of the Beagle Channel about 16 km (10 mi) east of Ushuaia. ARLHS ARG-086; Admiralty G1319.4; NGA 111-2624.
Islotes les Éclaireurs
1920. Active; focal plane 22.5 m (74 ft); white flash every 10 s. 11 m (36 ft) round brick tower with lantern and gallery, painted red with a broad white horizontal band; lantern is black. Wikimedia has numerous photos including Fabio Bretto's photo at right, Neal Doan has photos, Antonio Diaz has a photo, a 2008 photo is available, and Bing has a satellite view. In fact, this is one of the most photographed of all Argentine lighthouses. Tour operators often call it the End of the World lighthouse (el faro del fin del mundo), although it is the Faro San Juan de Salvamento that earned that nickname (see above). The proper name Islotes les Éclaireurs is French for "Islets of the Scouts." Located in the Beagle Channel marking the approach to Ushuaia, the southernmost permanently inhabited town in the world. Cruises and ecotours often pass or visit this site. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-016; Admiralty G1320; NGA 111-2620.
* Escarpados (Playa Larga)
Active; focal plane 59 m (194 ft); white flash every 10 s. 10 m (33 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower, painted black. The tower carries a slatted daymark painted with black and yellow bands. A closeup photo is available, also a second photo, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on the east side of the entrance to the Bahía Ushuaia. Accessible by a road (provincial route 30) that ends at this site. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ARG-085; Admiralty G1323.6; NGA 111-2616.
Punta Observatorio
Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); white flash every 2 s. 8 m (26 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower, covered with a slatted daymark painted with red and white bands. Google has a satellite view. Located on the south side of the entrance to Ushuaia harbor from the Beagle Channel. Visible easily from cruise ships entering Ushuaia. ARLHS ARG-080; NGA 111-2580.
San Juan de Salvamento (replica 1)
1997 replica of 1884 lighthouse. Inactive. A photo and second photo are available, Wikimedia has Jorge Gobbi's photo, and Google has a satellite view. This replica was built after archeological research at the original site on the Isla de los Estados (see above). It is 12-sided like the original, differing from the 1998 replica built near that site. Located at the Museo Maritime de Ushuaia, on the east end of the town. Site and tower open (admission fee). Owner/site manager: Museo Maritimo de Ushuaia.
[Zeballos (2)]
Active; focal plane 13 m (42 ft); white flash every 4 s. 12 m (39 ft) round cylindrical fiberglass tower, painted red with white bands. Tony Gálvez has a photo, but Google has only a distant satellite view of the area. This light has replaced a similar tower 8 m (26 ft) tall previously listed by NGA. Located on the north side of the Beagle Channel, marking the border between Argentina and Chile. ARLHS ARG-087; Admiralty G1329.5; NGA 111-2570.
Faro Les Éclaireurs
Les Éclaireurs Light, Ushuaia, September 2007
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo
by Calyponte

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Notable faux lighthouses:

Adjoining pages: North: Northern Argentina | East: Falkland Islands | South: Antarctica | West: Southern Chile

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Posted December 2003. Checked and revised September 4, 2013. Lighthouses: 38. Site copyright 2013 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.