Lighthouses of Canada: British Columbia

The rugged and intricate coastline of British Columbia has about 40 surviving lighthouses. Unlike the situation in eastern and central Canada, a fair fraction of these light stations are still staffed: Ron Ammundsen, the principal keeper at Quatsino Light, lists 27 staffed light stations in the province. Some of these stations represent the only federal presence in remote and roadless areas of the coast. There was an uproar in 2010-11 when the government proposed destaffing all the stations to save money; eventually the destaffing plan was dropped.

Only a handful of British Columbia lighthouses are accessible by highway; most of them are built on islands or rocky headlands far from the nearest road. But on the BC coast, most transportation is by water anyway. The extensive route network of BC Ferries interconnects the coast and many of the lighthouses can be seen from one ferry or another. Several lighthouses are landmarks along the Inside Passage, used by popular cruise ships sailing to Alaska from Vancouver or Seattle.

Aids to navigation in Canada are maintained by the Canadian Coast Guard. In 2008, Parliament passed the Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act to designate and protect historic lighthouses. In 2010, the Coast Guard declared the great majority of lighthouses to be surplus, and there is fear that this may lead to the disposal and possible destruction of many lighthouses.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. CCG numbers are from the Pacific Coast volume of the List of Lights, Buoys, and Fog Signals of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. Admiralty numbers are from volume G of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA numbers are from Publication 111.

General Sources
Lighthouses of British Columbia
A comprehensive site maintained by Ron Ammundsen, formerly the assistant keeper at Bonilla Island Light and now the principal keeper at Quatsino Light.
Lighthouses of British Columbia, Canada
Photos and travel directions for the more accessible lighthouses, posted by Kraig Anderson.
Online List of Lights - Canada Pacific Coast
Photos by various photographers posted by Alexander Trabas.
Lighthouses in British Columbia
Photos by various photographers available from Wikimedia.
Lighthouses of British Columbia
Wonderful photos by Mike Mitchell.
World of Lighthouses - Pacific Coast of Canada
Photos by various photographers available from Lightphotos.net.
Lighthouses in British Columbia, Canada
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
Leuchttürme Kanadas auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard views posted by Klaus Huelse.

Point Atkinson Light
Point Atkinson Light, West Vancouver, May 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo
by Tyler Ingram

Interior British Columbia Lighthouse

Kootenay Lake Lighthouse
** Pilot Bay
1904. Inactive since 1993. Approx. 7.5 m (25 ft) square pyramidal frame tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim. A 2007 photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. The abandoned lighthouse was transferred to BC Parks in 2002, and the Friends of West Kootenay Parks Society worked to restore the tower. Located at the end of a peninsula jutting into the lake south of Kootenay Bay; accessible from the end of Pilot Bay Road (off BC 3A) by a short hike. Site open; tower and lantern room open when volunteers are present (inquire locally); gallery closed. Owner: BC Parks (Pilot Bay Provincial Park); site manager: Friends of West Kootenay Parks Society. ARLHS CAN-628.

Vancouver Area Lighthouses

Greater Vancouver Lighthouses
Note: Vancouver, the largest city and principal port of western Canada, is built on the Burrard Peninsula with Burrard Inlet (the city's harbor) to the north and the Fraser River (the province's longest river) to the south. The metropolitan area extends across the Fraser southward to the U.S. border.
Roberts Head
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); white flash every 4 s. 9 m (30 ft) octagonal concrete tower mounted on a small platform supported by piles. Lighthouse painted white with narrow red horizontal bands. Neal Doan has a closeup photo. Located in the Strait of Georgia about 2 km (1.3 mi) southwest of the Sand Heads lighthouse. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. CCG 0309, Admiralty G5400, NGA 13112.
Sand Heads (4)
2002 (station established 1884). Active; focal plane 13 m (43 ft); green flash every 5 s. 7.5 m (25 ft) round cylindrical tower with two adjoining 1-story equipment shelters, mounted on a rectangular platform supported by piles. Entire lighthouse is white. Neal Doan has a good photo of the present light, and Bing has a satellite view. Lighthouse Explorer has a Coast Guard photo of the second (1956) light station. At some point the light was moved to the small, green-topped tower seen in Mitchell's photo. The history of this station is complex. A lightship was posted here in 1865. The first lighthouse, a wood tower on a screwpile foundation, was deactivated in 1905 due to changes in the channel; lightships served once again until 1956. Located at the end of a long breakwater sheltering the north side of the entrance to the Fraser River. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CAN-446; CCG 0311, Admiralty G5401, NGA 13116.
#U.S. Lightship 76 (WAL-504) Relief (?)
1904. Decommissioned 1960 and probably scuttled in 2013. 39.5 m (129.5 ft) steel lightship, originally 2-masted but now modified from its original appearance. Hull painted black, superstructure white. The U.S. Coast Guard has the history of the ship, and a blogger has a portfolio of photos taken inside the ship. Built by Burlee Drydock Co. of New York, the ship made the long voyage around Cape Horn and served its entire career as the relief lightship for the U.S. Pacific coast. After plans to make it a museum ship at Seattle fell through, the ship was renamed Claire Anne and served as a coastal freighter. Later it also worked as a fishing boat in Alaska. Kent Staudinger was the manager and part owner of the vessel from 1980. In 2003 Rick Bennett of the USCG Lightship Sailors Association rediscovered the ship, now called the Maudi Morgan, stripped of its original masts and working as a fishing boat based near Vancouver. As of 2005, the ship was reported in poor condition, barely seaworthy. In 2007 the ship was sold, and in August 2008 it was towed up the Fraser River to Mission, about 50 km (30 mi) east of Vancouver. The current owner, Michael Montgomery, hoped to be able to restore the vessel, but this proved to be impractical. In 2013 the owner's son told the Lightship Sailors Association the ship would probably be scuttled, and this has probably occurred. It was moored at the end of McLean Street, on the north side of the Fraser off the Lougheed Highway (BC 7); Bing has a satellite view. However, Google's current satellite view does not show the vessel at this location. Owner/site manager: private.
* Brockton Point (2)
1915 (William P. Anderson) (station established 1890). Inactive since 2008; a decorative light may be displayed. 10.5 m (35 ft) square tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on an arched base that allows walkers on the seawall to walk under the tower. Tower painted white with one horizontal red band; lantern painted red, arched base black. The keeper's house was demolished in the late 1950s. Stew Merkel's photo is at right, Wikimedia has photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a closeup street view and a satellite view. This readily accessible lighthouse, located in the middle of British Columbia's largest city, is probably the best known and most photographed lighthouse in the province. In 2009, the federal government provided $2 million for a complete restoration of the lighthouse. Located on the point on the south side of Vancouver Harbour east of the Lion's Gate Bridge (BC 99) and about 2.5 km (1.5 mi) east of Prospect Point Light. It's a pleasant walk of 5 km (3 mi) along the seawall from this lighthouse to Prospect Point and back. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation (Stanley Park). ARLHS CAN-060; ex-CCG 0402, ex-Admiralty G5447, ex-NGA 13004.
Prospect Point Light
Brockton Point Light, Vancouver, May 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Stew Merkel
* Prospect Point (2)
1948 (station established 1898). Active; focal plane 11.5 m (38 ft); red light, 1 s on, 1 s off. 8 m (27 ft) strongly tapered square tower on a 1-story square workroom. No lantern. Lighthouse painted white with a single red horizontal band. Imran Ali has a good closeup, Trabas has a photo by Klaus Kern, and Google has a closeup street view, but overhanging trees block Google's satellite view. Located on the point on the south side of Vancouver Harbour a short distance west of the Lion's Gate Bridge (BC 99). Accessible by walking the seawall from parking areas in Stanley Park. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation (Stanley Park). ARLHS CAN-1308; CCG 0392, Admiralty G5434, NGA 12988.
Point Atkinson (2)
1912 (William P. Anderson) (station established 1875). Active; focal plane 33 m (108 ft); two white flashes every 5 s. 18 m (60 ft) octagonal concrete tower with 6 ribs, lantern and gallery. Tower painted white; lantern, gallery, and watch room painted red. Tyler Ingram's photo appears at the top of this page, Andrea Wren has a good photo, Trabas has a photo by Klaus Kern, Wikimedia has several photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. Huelse also has a postcard view of the 1875 lighthouse, and a web site in VirtualMusuem.ca traces the history of the station. For U.S. television viewers, this is the lighthouse featured in the mystery series Harper's Island in 2008-09. The lighthouse marks the north side of the entrance to Vancouver Harbour. In 2008, the West Vancouver Historical Society applied for a provincial grant to study restoration of the station. By 2013 there was grave concern about its deteriorating condition, as the district and federal governments debated its future. The original light station reservation is now a municipal park; an 800 m (1/2 mi) hiking trail (steep on the return) leads to a good vantage point for viewing the lighthouse. The park entrance is on Beach Drive off Marine Drive in West Vancouver. Site and tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: District of West Vancouver (Lighthouse Park). ARLHS CAN-387; CCG 0386, Admiralty G5426, NGA 12972.

Sunshine Coast Lighthouse
Merry Island (2)
About 1966 (station established 1902). Active; focal plane 18 m (60 ft); white flash every 15 s. 12 m (40 ft) square cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story fog signal building. Lighthouse painted white with a red maple-leaf emblem on each face; lantern and gallery painted red. Staffed light station with a 2-story red-roofed keeper's house and other buildings. Ammundsen has a closeup photo by Mike Mitchell, a distant view is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Except for the light station, the island is privately owned. Located on the southeastern end of the island about 5 km (3 mi) south of the town of Halfmoon Bay on the mainland side of the Strait. Accessible only by boat; should be visible distantly from Welcome Beach, off BC 101 south of Halfmoon Bay. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-314; CCG 0449, Admiralty G5510, NGA 12776.
Prospect Point Light
Prospect Point Light, Vancouver, August 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.M. Hanchey

Vancouver Island Lighthouses

Note: Vancouver Island is the largest island of western North America, 460 km (290 mi) long and as much as 80 km (50 mi) wide. The island is oriented southeast to northwest. The northern end is separated from the mainland by the narrow waters of the Inside Passage, while the southern end lies west of the broad Strait of Georgia. The Strait of Juan de Fuca separates the southern end of the island from the U.S. state of Washington. Victoria, the capital of British Columbia, is at the southeastern tip of the island. There are good roads along the Strait of Georgia from Victoria to Campbell River and along the south coast from Victoria to Port Renfrew, but the northern and western coasts are more difficult to reach. Lighthouses are listed clockwise around the island, starting on the east coast.
Upper Strait of Georgia Lighthouses
Chrome Island (Yellow Island) Range Rear (3)
1989 (station established 1891). Active; focal plane 22 m (72 ft); continuous yellow light visible only on the range line; also a general-navigation light, white flash every 5 s. 7.5 m (25 ft) round concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern and gallery painted red. Staffed light station with 1-story red-roofed keeper's house and other buildings. Scott Fitz has a photo of the station, Wikimedia has several distant views, Marinas.com has fine aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. The original light, mounted on the roof of the keeper's house, was replaced in 1922 by a skeletal tower with enclosed gallery and watch room. The 1891 lantern was transferred to the 1922 tower and then to a new lighthouse at Port Alberni (see below). Located on a small island just off Boyle Point, the southern point of Denman Island about 1.5 km (1 mi) east of Deep Bay; there is an excellent view of the light station from Boyle Point Provincial Park. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-137; CCG 0496, Admiralty G5532.1, NGA 12832.
Sisters Islets (2)
1967 (station established 1898). Active; focal plane 21 m (70 ft); two white flashes every 15 s. Approx. 18 m (60 ft) narrow round cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, flared at the top, painted white; lantern painted red. Automated station; the status of the keeper's house is not clear. Anderson has several small photos, Marinas.com has excellent aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Located on a small island in the middle of the Strait about 15 km (10 mi) north of Qualicum Beach. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-462; CCG 0493, Admiralty G5529, NGA 12852.
Ballenas Islands (Parksville) (2)
1917 (station established 1900, relocated 1912). Active; focal plane 21 m (70 ft); white flash every 10 s. 11 m (35 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern and gallery painted red. Automated station; the status of the keeper's house is not clear. Mitchell has an excellent closeup, in which it appears that the light is now mounted on the gallery. Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. The original lighthouse, a square wood tower, was built on South Ballenas Island in 1900, but the station was disassembled and relocated to North Ballenas in 1912. Except for the light station, the island is privately owned. Located on the north point of North Ballenas Island in the Strait about 8 km (5 mi) east of Parksville. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-018; CCG 0490, Admiralty G5508, NGA 12868.
Entrance Island (Nanaimo) (2)
About 1970 (station established 1876). Active; focal plane 19 m (62 ft); white flash every 5 s. 14 m (45 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower, painted white; lantern and gallery painted red. Staffed light station with 2-story red-roofed keeper's house and other buildings. C.M. Hanchey's photo is at right, John Alexander has a closeup photo, Mitchell has a nice distant view, Trabas has Klaus Kern's view from the sea, Marinas.com has excellent aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. In September 2009, the government announced that the station would be destaffed to cut costs. Located on a small island off the mouth of Nanaimo Harbour, about 13 km (8 mi) east of the city. Accessible only by boat; visible from ferries entering and leaving the harbor. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-171; CCG 0435, Admiralty G5488, NGA 13300.
Entrance Island Light
Entrance Island Light, Nanaimo, August 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.M. Hanchey

Southern Gulf Islands Lighthouses
Note: The Southern Gulf Islands lie off the southeast coast of Vancouver Island between Nanaimo and Sidney. The international boundary between the U.S. and Canada runs northward through the Haro Strait off Victoria and then sharply eastward through Boundary Pass, which separates the Southern Gulf Islands from the San Juan Islands in the U.S. state of Washington. This boundary was established in 1859 after a tense international dispute known locally as the Pig War.
* Porlier Pass Range Rear (Virago Point)
Date uncertain (station established 1902). Active; focal plane 10 m (34 ft); continuous yellow light. 7.5 m (25 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern and gallery painted red. Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. The front range lighthouse, at nearby Race Point, was replaced by a small modern beacon in 1996. A descendent of one of the keepers has posted recollections of life at this station. Located at the northwest end of Galiano Island, which is accessible by ferry from several locations. The lighthouse is accessible by a short hiking trail. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-403; CCG 0289, Admiralty G5394.1, NGA 13412.
* Active Pass (Georgina Point, Mayne Island) (2)
1940 (station established 1885). Inactive since 1969. 2-story wood keeper's house; the light was formerly shown from a lantern mounted at the peak of the roof. Rick Leche's photo is at right, Trabas has Klaus Kern's photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Lighthouse Explorer has a postcard view of the original (1885) lighthouse, a square pyramidal wood tower attached to a keeper's cottage. In 1969 the lantern was removed and the light moved to a separate tower (next entry). This lighthouse marks the entry to the channel leading from the Strait of Georgia south through the islands to Swartz Bay. The light station grounds are now a park maintained by the Mayne Island community. In 2014 the light station was recognized as a heritage lighthouse under HLPA. Located off Waugh Road on the northern tip of Mayne Island, which is accessible by ferry from Tsawwassen on the mainland or Swartz Bay on Vancouver Island. Also visible from the ferries crossing the Strait of Georgia from Tsawwassen to Swartz Bay. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Parks Canada (Gulf Islands National Park Reserve). Site manager: Georgina Point Lighthouse Heritage Park.
* Active Pass (Georgina Point, Mayne Island) (3)
1969 (station established 1885). Active; focal plane 17.5 m (57 ft); white flash every 10 s. 11 m (35 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern and gallery painted red. A photo is at right, and Mitchell has a great closeup. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Georgina Point Lighthouse Heritage Park. ARLHS CAN-002; CCG 0275, Admiralty G5360, NGA 13480.
Portlock Point (2)
1987 (station established 1895). Active; focal plane 15.5 m (51 ft); quick-flashing white light. 7.5 m (25 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern and gallery painted red. Rick Leche has a good photo, Mitchell has a closeup, Trabas has a good photo, Wikimedia has several photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Huelse has a postcard view of the original lighthouse, which was taller. A kerosene explosion killed the keeper and destroyed the keeper's house in 1964. Ownership of the light station was transferred to Parks Canada in 2006. Located at the eastern end of Prevost Island about 5 miles south of Active Pass as the ferry runs. Accessible only by boat (most of Prevost Island is privately owned); visible from the ferries crossing the Strait of Georgia from Tsawwassen on the mainland to Swartz Bay on Vancouver Island. Site and tower closed. Operator: Canadian Coast Guard. Owner/site manager: Parks Canada (Gulf Islands National Park Reserve). ARLHS CAN-411; CCG 0267, Admiralty G5368, NGA 13504.
Active Pass Light
Active Pass Light, Mayne Island, October 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo
by Rick Leche
* East Point (Saturna Island) (2)
1948 (station established 1888). Active; focal plane 37 m (121 ft); white flash every 15 s. 14 m (45 ft) square steel skeletal tower, painted red. Modern 1-story keeper's house (1960) and fog signal building. Trabas has an excellent photo by Michael Boucher, and Bing has a satellite view. Saturna Island is accessible by ferry from Mayne Island. The light station is located in East Point Park, an undeveloped reservation. Located, as its name implies, at the eastern end of Saturna Island, the junction of the Haro Strait and the Strait of Georgia. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-448; CCG 0264, Admiralty G5358, NGA 13596.

Victoria Area Lighthouses
Discovery Island (2)
Date unknown (station established 1886). Inactive since 1970. 2-story wood keeper's house; the light was shown from a lantern at the peak of the roof. The original lighthouse was a square wood tower attached at one end of a 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house; it is not clear when that lighthouse was replaced. Located adjacent to the present lighthouse. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: BC Parks (Discovery Island Provincial Marine Park).
Discovery Island (3)
1970s (station established 1886). Active; focal plane 28 m (93 ft); white flash every 5 s. 11.5 m (38 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern painted red. The 2-story wood keeper's house survives. Mitchell has a good photo, Chelsea Stanley has a closeup of a bald eagle perched atop the lantern, Trabas has Rainer Arndt's view from the sea, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Most of the Discovery Island is a provincial park, with a primitive campground and hiking trails. Access is mostly by sea kayak, as there is no protected landing for boats. Located at Sea Bird Point on the eastern end of the island about 5 km (3 mi) east of Victoria, marking the junction of the Haro Strait and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: BC Parks (Discovery Island Provincial Marine Park). ARLHS CAN-160; CCG 0216, Admiralty G5334, NGA 13684.
[Fiddle Reef (2)]
Date unknown (station established 1898). Active; focal plane 7 m (23 ft); quick flash every 1 s, white or red depending on direction. 5 m (17 ft) round white fiberglass tower, centered a square stone pier. A photo is available, and Bing has a satellite view. The present light stands on the pier of the original lighthouse, a square wood "pepperpot" tower with lantern and gallery. Located on a reef about 1 km (0.6 mi) offshore from the Oak Bay section of Victoria. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CAN-175; CCG 0215, Admiralty G5332, NGA 13692.
[Trial Islands (1)]
1906. 2-story red-roofed keeper's house; the light tower was mounted at the peak of the roof, as seen in Huelse's postcard view. Ramjheetun Elodie's photo is at right.The keeper's house remains in service, and Lighthouse Digest has Eric Manchester's 2002 article on longtime keeper Ian McNeil. Located adjacent to the present lighthouse.
Trial Islands (2)
1970 (station established 1906). Active; focal plane 28 m (93 ft); green flash every 5 s. 13 m (42 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern painted red. Ramjheetun Elodie's photo is at right, Mitchell has an excellent closeup photo of the light station, Trabas has Rainer Arndt's view from the sea, Wikimedia has distant views, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. In September 2009, the government announced that the station would be destaffed to cut costs. Located at the south end of Trial Island marking the western entrance to Victoria Harbour. Accessible only by boat; visible distantly from Beach Drive near Anderson Hill Park in the southern part of Victoria. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-506; CCG 0212, Admiralty G5328, NGA 13700.
Trial Islands Light
Trial Islands Light, Victoria, August 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Ramjheetun Elodie
[Trial Islands (1) (lantern)]
1906. Inactive since 1970. Removed in 1970, the original lantern and 4th order Fresnel lens from the 1906 lighthouse are on display in Bastion Square outside the Maritime Museum of British Columbia in Victoria. Google has a street view and a satellite view. Site open. Owner/site manager: Maritime Museum of British Columbia.
Brotchie Ledge (2)
1989 (station established 1898). Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); green flash every 4 s. 12 m (39 ft) round fiberglass tower mounted on a conical concrete pier. The fiberglass tower is white with a green band at the top. Rob Johnston has a 2008 photo, Trabas has Michael Boucher's photo, a more distant view is available, and Bing has a distant satellite view. Brotchie Ledge, a famous and dangerous obstruction in the approach to Victoria, is named for Captain William Brotchie, who wrecked his ship Albion on the rock in 1849. Buoys were placed as early as 1843 to warn navigators away from the ledge. An effort to build a caisson lighthouse failed in 1897 when a storm overturned the caisson, so the following year a concrete beacon was built instead. Janis Ringuette has a full account of the history of the light. Located about 1200 m (3/4 mi) south of the entrance to Victoria harbor. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. CCG 0205, Admiralty G5310, NGA 13704.
* Ogden Point Breakwater
1917. Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); quick-flashing red light. 7 m (23 ft) square tapered concrete tower, painted white with a broad red band at the base. Chris Campbell has a photo, Emily Norton has a 2008 closeup, Trabas has Michael Boucher's photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of the breakwater on the east side of the entrance to Victoria harbor. Accessible by walking the breakwater. Site open, tower closed. CCG 0204, Admiralty G5312, NGA 13708.
**** Fisgard
1860. Active; focal plane 21.5 m (71 ft); white or red light (depending on direction), 2 s on, 2 s off. 14.5 m (48 ft) round brick tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern painted red. Tower floodlit at night. Lighthouse attached to the original 2-story brick keeper's house, which is painted bright red. This is the oldest lighthouse in British Columbia and a national historic site. The Fort Rodd Hill and Fisgard Lighthouse Preservation Society provides volunteers to conduct tours and operate the gift shop, and the keeper's house is operated as a lighthouse museum. C.M. Hanchey's photo is at right, Anderson has a fine page with several photos, Trabas has Michael Boucher's photo, Wikimedia has numerous photos, Lighthouse Digest has Jeremy D'Entremont's 2002 article on the history of the station, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. In June 2009, the federal government appropriated $1.56 million to restore the lighthouse. Work was completed in time for the celebration of the 150th anniversary of the light in 2010. Located on a small island, connected to the mainland by a causeway, at the western entrance to Esquimalt Harbour, off Ocean Boulevard in Belmont Park west of Victoria. Site open; museum and tower open daily (entry fee). Owner: Parks Canada. Site manager: Fisgard Lighthouse National Historic Site. ARLHS CAN-176; CCG 0197, Admiralty G5306, NGA 13740.
Fisgard Light
Fisgard Light, Victoria, August 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo
by C.M. Hanchey

South Coast (Strait of Juan de Fuca) Lighthouses
Note: The Strait of Juan de Fuca separates the southern end of Vancouver Island from the U.S. state of Washington. The strait is about 150 km (90 mi) long and generally about 30 km (19 mi) wide.
Race Rocks (Great Race Rock)
1860. Active; focal plane 36 m (118 ft); white flash every 10 s. 24.5 m (80 ft) round "Imperial" stone tower with lantern and gallery, painted with black and white horizontal bands; lantern painted red. Fog horn (three 2 s blasts every 60 s). The original keeper's house was demolished in 1974, but the more modern light station buildings have been in use as an ecological research station since 1997. Pete Hanson has a good closeup photo, Jeff Lorton has a lovely panoramic view, Anderson's page has good photos, Wikimedia has photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. The lighthouse was restored and repainted in 2009 in time for its 150th anniversary celebration in 2010. Pearson College leases the station and has established an endowment fund to maintain it. Located on Great Race Rock, a small island in the Strait of Juan de Fuca about 15 km (9 mi) southwest of Victoria. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed (special permission is required to land on the island). Owner: Pearson College. Site manager: Race Rocks Marine Protected Area. ARLHS CAN-426; CCG 0189, Admiralty G5300, NGA 13760.
* [Estevan Point/Triangle Island (lantern and lens)]
1910. First-order Fresnel lens and round cast iron lantern, painted red, mounted on a short white tower. Anderson has photos on his page for Triangle Island Light, a 2007 closeup photo is available, and Google has an excellent street view and a satellite view. This historic lens was used from 1910 to 1918 at Triangle Island Light. In 1920, it was relocated to the Estevan Point Light, where it remained in service until the 1980s. In 2004 it was donated to the Sooke Region Museum. Located at 2070 Phillips Road in Sooke. Site and museum open daily, tower closed.
Whiffin Spit (3?)
Date unknown (station established 1906). Active; focal plane 6.5 m (21 ft); quick white flash every 1 s. 6 m (20 ft) round cylindrical fiberglass tower centered on a rectangular 1-story concrete equipment shelter. Lighthouse painted white with one green horizontal band near the top of the tower. Fog horn (3 s blast every 30 s) activated only on radio request. The station also includes an automatic weather station. A photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. Little is known about the history of this station. Located at the end of the 1.5 km (1 mi) long Whiffin Spit, which nearly closes the entrance to the harbor of Sooke. Site open, tower closed. CCG 0188, Admiralty G5296, NGA 13772.
Race Rocks Light
Race Rocks Light, Strait of Juan de Fuca, July 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Cliff Hellis
* Sheringham Point
1912 (William P. Anderson). Active; focal plane 22 m (72 ft); green flash every 15 s. 19.5 m (64 ft) hexagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern and gallery are red. Anderson's page has photos, Mike Bingley has a closeup photo, Robyn Hanson has a good 2007 photo, Wikimedia has a photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. The Sheringham Point Lighthouse Preservation Society was formed in 2003 to work for preservation of the lighthouse within a proposed 4.5 ha (10 acre) park. In early 2008, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans completed a land swap with a neighboring landowner to make the park possible. The next step came in 2011 when DFO declared the light station surplus property so that it can be transferred to a local government agency. In 2010 there was concern about inappropriate devlopment when Western Forest Products decided to sell a much larger tract of 2300 ha (5700 acres) surrounding the lighthouse. Located on a rocky promontory at the end of Sheringham Point Road off BC 14 in Shirley, about 16 km (10 mi) west of Sooke. Site and tower closed (fenced), but it is possible to walk close to the lighthouse. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-458; CCG 0186, Admiralty G5292, NGA 13800.

Southern Pacific Coast Lighthouses
Carmanah Point (2)
1920 (station established 1891). Active; focal plane 55.5 m (182 ft); white flash every 5 s. 11 m (36 ft) octagonal pyramidal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern painted red. Staffed light station with a 1-story, red-roofed keeper's house and other buildings. A photo is at right, Christine Rondeau has a good closeup photo, Wikimedia has a nice photo by Mike Beauregard, Marinas.com also has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. This lighthouse marks the northern entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, which leads to Seattle and Vancouver. The original lighthouse was a square wood tower attached to the keeper's house. Located on the West Coast Trail in the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve about 20 km (13 mi) northwest of the Gordon River Trailhead near Port Renfrew. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-120; CCG 0180, Admiralty G5288, NGA List 13820.
Pachena Point
1908. Active; focal plane 47 m (154 ft); two white flashes every 7.5 s. 20 m (66 ft) octagonal wood tower with lantern and gallery; original 1st order Fresnel lens in use. Lighthouse painted white, lantern red. Staffed light station with two 2-story keeper's houses and other buildings. Jason Kurylo has a closeup photo, Mitchell has an aerial view, Marinas.com also has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Bing has a satellite view. A historic station, little changed in more than a century. Located on the West Coast Trail in the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve about 15 km (9 mi) south of Bamfield. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-362; CCG 0178, Admiralty G5280, NGA 13828.
Cape Beale (2)
1958 (station established 1874). Active; focal plane 51 m (167 ft); continuous red or white light (depending on direction) with a brighter flash every 5 s. 10 m (33 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with square central cylinder, lantern and gallery, and a slatted white daymark on three sides. The tower, lantern and gallery are painted red. This is a staffed light station with several red-roofed buildings. Clay Dean has a closeup photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view of the station. The station is located within the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve at the southern entrance to Barkley Sound. Accessible via hiking trails leading from the area of Bamfield. Site open, and keepers sometimes will accompany visitors in climbing the tower. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-091; CCG 0176, Admiralty G5256, NGA 13836.
*** Port Alberni
2001. Active (privately maintained); focal plane about 13 m (43 ft); white flash every 12 s. Approx. 11 m (36 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, rising from a 1-story museum building. Lighthouse painted white, lantern and gallery red. R.B. Sampson has a closeup photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. This new lighthouse carries the original 1891 lantern of the Chrome Island Light (see above). Located on an elbow of the quay of the small boat harbor in Port Alberni, at the head of the Alberni Inlet, a 40 km (25 mi) long fjord. Site open, museum open daily late June through early September, tower status unknown. Owner/site manager: Alberni Valley Maritime Discovery Centre. CCG 0167.
Carmanah Point Light
Carmanah Point Light, Port Renfrew, September 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Outdoorsgirl
* Amphitrite Point (2)
1915 (station established 1906). Active; focal plane 15 m (50 ft); white flash every 12 s. 6 m (20 ft) structure: lantern centered atop a 2-story service building. Building painted white, lantern red. Anatoliy Knyazev's photo appears at right, Mitchell also has a closeup photo, Trabas has Klaus Kern's photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. The original lighthouse was destroyed by a tsunami on 2 January 1914. In fact, the area around the lighthouse is dangerous in heavy surf at any time. A Coast Guard Vessel Management Control Centre is adjacent to the light station. Located at the south end of the town of Ucluelet, off BC 4 at the northern entrance to Barkley Sound. Parking nearby. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-010; CCG 0135, Admiralty G5246, NGA 14000.
Lennard Island (2)
Date unknown (station established 1904). Active; focal plane 35 m (115 ft); white flash every 10 s. 18 m (58 ft) round "apple-core" cylindrical steel skeletal tower, flared at top and bottom, with lantern and gallery. Tower painted white, lantern and gallery red. This is an active Coast Guard station with half a dozen red-roofed buildings. The lighthouse replaced an octagonal wood tower. Trabas has a distant view by Günther Hess, Lighthouse Digest has Eric Manchester's 2002 feature article on life at the station, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view of the station. Located on an island at the entrance to Clayoquot Sound. Accessible only by boat; visible distantly from the Pacific Rim Highway (BC 4) near Tofino. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-273; CCG 0134, Admiralty G5242, NGA 14004.

Amphitrite Point Light, Ucluelet, February 2004
Flickr Creative Commons photo
by Anatoliy Knyazev

Northern Pacific Coast Lighthouses
Estevan Point
1910 (William P. Anderson). Active; focal plane 37.5 m (123 ft); two white flashes, separated by 5 s, every 15 s. 30.5 m (100 ft) octagonal concrete tower with flying buttresses, lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white, lantern red. The 1st order Chance Brothers Fresnel lens, removed in the 1980s, was donated to the Sooke Region Museum in 2004 along with its lantern, which was originally installed at Triangle Island (see below). Estevan Point is an active Coast Guard station with half a dozen red-roofed buildings and several communication towers. Anderson has photos, H.J. Selde has a photo, Michael Shepard has a second photo, and Google has a satellite view. The Japanese submarine I-26 shelled the light station in June 1942, but no damage was done. In 2014 the light station was recognized as a heritage lighthouse under HLPA. The lighthouse marks a prominent headland about 30 km (20 mi) south of Nootka Light, surrounded by the Hesquiat Peninsula Provincial Park. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-173; CCG 0114, Admiralty G5224, NGA 14084.
* Nootka (2)
1958 (station established 1911). Active; focal plane 31 m (101 ft); white flash every 12 s. Square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with square central cylinder, lantern, and gallery. Skeletal framework, lantern and gallery painted red; central cylinder painted white. Staffed light station with several 2-story red-roofed buildings, boathouse, and helipad. Another photo of the station is available, there's a nice view (2/3 of the way down the page), Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. A nearby monument marks the discovery of Nootka Sound by Capt. James Cook in 1778. The lighthouse is a twin of the Cape Beale Light (see above). Located at the southeastern tip of Nootka Island marking the northern entrance to Nootka Sound. The station is adjacent to the Native American settlement of Yuquot, which is accessible in the summer by tour boat or by water taxi from Gold River at the end of BC 28. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-343; CCG 0105, Admiralty G5219, NGA 14088.
Quatsino (Kains Island) (2)
Date unknown (station established 1908). Active; focal plane 28 m (93 ft); white flash every 5 s. Approx. 7.5 m (25 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower, attached to a 1-story equipment building. Lighthouse painted white. This is a staffed light station with a 2-story, red-roofed keeper's house and other buildings. Lighthouse Explorer has a good Coast Guard photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. Located on Kains Island at the entrance to Quatsino Sound about 55 km (35 mi) southeast of Cape Scott. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-423; CCG 0068, Admiralty G5178, NGA 14276.
Cape Scott (3)
1981 (station established 1927). Active; focal plane 70 m (229 ft); white flash every 10 s. 9 m (29 ft) square steel skeletal tower with lantern and gallery; lantern painted red. Active Coast Guard station with several red-roofed buildings. Su-Laine Yeo Brodsky's photo is at right, Lighthouse Explorer has a good photo by Harvey Humchitt, Wikimedia has John Freeland's photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. The original mast light was replaced in 1960 by a skeletal tower built on the foundation of a World War II radar installation. The lighthouse is surrounded by Cape Scott Provincial Park. Located at the northwestern tip of Vancouver Island. Accessible by a 65 km (40 mi) drive on a gravel road from Port Hardy (4WD suggested), followed by a hike of 24 km (15 mi). Site open, and visitors can climb to the gallery of the tower. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-107; CCG 0066, Admiralty G5172, NGA 14336.
Cape Scott Light
Cape Scott Light, Cape Scott Provincial Park, June 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Su-Laine Yeo Brodsky
Triangle Island
1910. Inactive since 1919. 8 m (26 ft) round concrete tower with eight ribs. Mitchell has a closeup photo, but the island is only a triangular blur in Bing's satellite view. Built at 207 m (680 ft) above sea level, this light proved to be useless in foggy weather; in addition, there was a disaster in November 1918 when the supply ship Galiano sank in heavy seas after departing the station. The lantern and 1st order Fresnel lens were relocated in 1919 to Estevan Point Light. Removed to storage in the 1980s, they were donated in 2004 to the Sooke Region Museum in Sooke (see above). The island has large seabird populations and is now the Anne Vallee Provincial Ecological Reserve. Located atop an island about 50 km (30 mi) northwest of Cape Scott, Vancouver Island. Accessible only by boat in dangerous seas. Site and tower closed. Owner: BC Parks. Site manager: Lanz and Cox Islands Provincial Park. ARLHS CAN-507.

Inside Passage Lighthouses

Note: The Inside Passage is the network of waterways behind and between the numerous island of the Pacific coast, from Vancouver Island northward into Alaska. Nearly all of the Passage is sheltered from Pacific storms by the islands, but strong tidal currents and many underwater obstacles make it hazardous to navigate. Ferries and cruise ships sailing the passage are the principal means of surface transportation everywhere along this coast. Most of the lighthouses in this group can be photographed at close range from passing cruise ships. The listing here is south to north.
Southern Inside Passage Lighthouses
Note: This section of the Passage includes the narrow straits along the north side of Vancouver Island, from the Strait of Georgia to Queen Charlotte Sound.
** Cape Mudge (Quadra Island) (2)
1916 (station established 1898). Active; focal plane 17.5 m (58 ft); continuous red or white light, depending on direction, with a more intense flash every 5 s. 12 m (40 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern and gallery painted red. Fog horn (3 s blast every 30 s). Staffed light station with two 2-story red-roofed keeper's houses and other buildings. One of C.M. Hanchey's photos is at right, Mitchell has a closeup, Trabas has a distant view by Günther Hess, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. The original lighthouse was a square wood tower. In September 2009, the government announced that the station would be destaffed to cut costs; after public protests, this plan was dropped. The lighthouse marks the entrance from the broad Strait of Georgia to the Discovery Passage, the first narrow section of the Inside Passage. Located in Cape Mudge Village at the southern end of Quadra Island (accessible by ferry from BC 19 in Campbell River). Site open; tower is sometimes open to guided tours during the summer (inquire locally). Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-100; CCG 0511, Admiralty G5580, NGA 12560.
[Chatham Point (2)]
1957 (station established 1908). Active; focal plane 6.5 m (21 ft); green flash every 5 s. 4.5 m (15 ft) round cylindrical steel tower, painted white with a green band at the top; no lantern. This is a staffed light and weather station with two 1-story keeper's houses and other buildings. Fog horn (2 s blast every 20 s). Trabas has a photo by Jeffrey James, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. Located about 40 km (25 mi) north of Campbell River on the west side of the Inside Passage, where the route takes a sharp turn from the Discovery Passage into the Johnstone Strait. Land access from Chatham Point Road is probably closed to the public, so the light is best seen by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-132; CCG 0518, Admiralty G5590, NGA 12508.
Cape Mudge Light
Cape Mudge Light, Quadra Island, August 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.M. Hanchey
* Pulteney Point (Sointula) (2)
1943 (station established 1905). Active; focal plane 12 m (40 ft); red flash every 10 s. 9 m (30 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story fog signal building. Lighthouse painted white; lantern and gallery painted red. Fog horn (three 2 s blasts every 60 s). This is a staffed light station with a keeper's house and other buildings. Jeff Werner's photo is at right, Agustin Mantilla has a photo, Trabas has a small photo by Rainer Arndt, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Anderson has a Coast Guard historic photo of the original lighthouse. Sointula, the alternate name for the lighthouse, is the name of a nearby settlement founded by Finnish immigrants in 1901. For southbound vessels, this lighthouse marks the entrance to the narrow Broughton Strait from Queen Charlotte Strait. Although it is remote, this station is accessible by a 10-15 minute walk from the west end of the gravel road running the length of Malcolm Island, which is accessible by ferry from BC 19 at Port MacNeill. Located on the west end of Malcolm Island. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-420; CCG 0553, Admiralty G5628, NGA 12328.
Scarlett Point (2)
Date unknown (station established 1905). Active; focal plane 24 m (78 ft); white flash every 5 s. 11 m (37 ft) round steel tower with lantern and gallery, flared at the top, painted white; octagonal lantern painted red. Staffed light station with 1-story keeper's house, fog signal building, and other buildings. A 2008 photo and a 2007 distant view are available, Trabas has Rainer Arndt's photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the northeastern point of Balaklava Island, an island off the north coast of Vancouver Island about 15 km (10 mi) northwest of Port Hardy. Accessible only by boat, but easily seen from passing ships. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-450; CCG 0570, Admiralty G5648, NGA 12268.

Pulteney Point Light, Malcolm Island, August 2004
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Jeff Werner

Queen Charlotte Sound Lighthouses
Note: Queen Charlotte Sound is the section of the Pacific Ocean between Vancouver Island and the Queen Charlotte Islands. Here the protection for the Inside Passage disappears, and ships are exposed to the open ocean for about 50 km (30 mi).
Pine Island (3)
2000s (station established 1907). Active; focal plane 28 m (93 ft); red flash every 10 s. Round cylindrical steel tower, painted white, without lantern. Staffed light station with one 2-story and two 1-story keeper's house and other buildings. The original lantern, lens, and fog horns are on display at the Campbell River Maritime Heritage Centre in Campbell River. Trabas has Rainer Arndt's photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. The 1907 lighthouse, a square wood tower, was destroyed by a giant wave during a storm in February 1967. The present light replaced the 1967 lighthouse, an approx. 10.5 m (35 ft) square cylindrical steel tower with lantern, gallery, and square pyramidal skeletal bracing. The 1967 lighthouse appears in Mitchell's photos, but it has been demolished. The island is a wildlife preserve for nesting sea birds. Located on a small island in the middle of the entrance to Queen Charlotte Strait from Queen Charlotte Sound. Accessible only by boat, but easily seen from passing ships. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-382; CCG 0576, Admiralty G5649, NGA 12252.
Egg Island (3)
1964 (station established 1898). Active; focal plane 88 m (290 ft); white flash every 5 s. 26 m (85 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower. Staffed light station with two keeper's houses, fog signal building, and other structures. Trabas has a distant view from the sea by Günther Hess, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. The 1898 lighthouse, a square wood tower attached to a keeper's house, was relocated to a higher elevation in 1903 because of danger from storm waves. Despite this move, it was destroyed by the enormous waves of a storm on 2 November 1948. A new lighthouse, with a square concrete tower attached to one corner of a keeper's house, was built in 1949. Lighthouse Explorer's photo is of the 1949 lighthouse. ocated on an island in the center of the passage across the sound about 10 km (6 mi) north of Cape Caution on the eastern shore of Queen Charlotte Sound. Accessible only by boat, but easily seen from passing ships. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-740; CCG 0579, Admiralty G5658, NGA 12216.

Bella Bella Area Lighthouses
Note: With a population of 1400, Bella Bella (Waglisla) is the largest settlement on the coast between Queen Charlotte Sound and Prince Rupert. The town has a sheltered location on the east side of Campbell Island; ships on the Inland Passage must negotiate several tight turns and narrow straits to pass the town.
Addenbroke Island (3)
1998 (station established 1914). Active; focal plane 24 m (79 ft); white flash every 5 s. 8 m (26 ft) round concrete tower, painted white. Staffed light station with two keeper's houses, fog signal building, and other structures. Trabas has a photo by Günther Hess, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. The original lighthouse was replaced by a steel skeletal tower in 1968. Located on an island in Fitzhugh Sound, on the east side of Calvert Island about 100 km (60 mi) north of Port Hardy and a similar distance southwest of Bella Coola. Accessible only by boat, but easily seen from passing ships. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-004; CCG 0585, Admiralty G5672, NGA 12192.
Dryad Point (Bella Bella) (2)
1919 (station established 1899). Active; focal plane 11.5 m (38 ft); white or red light, depending on direction, occulting every 5 s. 8.5 m (28 ft) square concrete tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white, lantern red. Staffed light station with two keeper's houses, fog signal building, and other structures. C.B. Curran's photo is at right, Nigel Walsh has a photo, Pam Wilson has a photo, Trabas has a photo by Günther Hess, Lighthouse Explorer has a closeup by Chris Mills, James Teresco has posted additional photos, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. This small lighthouse is a familiar landmark on the Inside Passage, because ships must slow down and make a tight turn around the point. In September 2009, the government announced that the station would be destaffed to cut costs; this plan was later abandoned. Located on the northeast point of Campbell Island about 3 km (2 mi) north of Bella Bella. Accessible only by boat, but easily seen from passing ships. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-163; CCG 0611, Admiralty G5700, NGA 12072.
Dryad Point Light
Dryad Point Light, Bella Bella, August 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.B. Curran
Ivory Island (1)
1898. Inactive since 1957. 2-story square wood keeper's house; the lantern, formerly located at the peak of the roof, was removed in 1957. Lighthouse painted white; the roof is red. This is a rare survivor among the early lighthouses of the Inside Passage.
Ivory Island (3)
1983 (station established 1898). Active; focal plane 20 m (67 ft); white flash every 5 s. 5 m (17 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower mounted on a platform attached to a 1-story fog signal building; no lantern. Tower painted red. Staffed light station with two keeper's houses and other buildings. Wikimedia has two photos, Trabas has a photo by Günther Hess, Ammundsen has a recent but distant view of the station, another view from the sea is available, and Google has a satellite view. In 1957 the light was moved from the original lighthouse to a steel skeletal tower, which collapsed when the station was inundated by a powerful storm on Christmas Day 1982.Located on the south side of the island in the entrance to the Seaforth Channel from Milbanke Sound, about 15 miles northwest of Bella Bella. Accessible only by boat, but easily seen from passing ships. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-252; CCG 0617, Admiralty G5713, NGA 12052.

Klemtu Area Lighthouse
Boat Bluff (2)
Date unknown (station established 1897). Active; focal plane 11.5 m (38 ft); white or red light, depending on direction, occulting every 5 s. 7 m (24 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower mounted on a square base having four legs. Tower painted white, base red. Staffed light and weather station with two 2-story keeper's houses, fog signal building, and other buildings. Tom Zane contributed the photo at right, Lindsey Turner has a photo, Trabas has a photo by Günther Hess, Wikimedia has two photos, Lighthouse Digest has Jeremy D'Entremont's November 2003 feature article on the light station, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. Located directly on the Inside Passage on the west side of Sarah Island, marking the northbound entrance to the narrow Sarah Passage, about 5 km (3 mi) north of the village of Klemtu. Accessible only by boat, but easily seen from passing ships, which must make a sharp turn here if they wish to use the Sarah Passage and Tolmie Channel. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-048; CCG 0640, Admiralty G5720, NGA 12000.

Prince Rupert Area Lighthouses
Note: Prince Rupert has a population of about 12,500 and is the northernmost town of Canada's Pacific coast. The town is accessible by road via the Yellowhead Highway (BC 16).
[Genn Island]
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 9 m (30 ft) (?); red flash every 6 s. 8 m (26 ft) round fiberglass tower mounted on a 1-story square concrete base. Lighthouse painted white with a red horizontal band at the top. No photo available, and the light is not seen in Google's satellite view. The passenger ship Prince Rupert ran aground on Genn Island in 1917. Located on a small island about 3.5 km (2.2 mi) southeast of the Lawyer Islands light station (previous entry). Accessible only by boat, but visible from passing ships. Site open, tower closed. CCG 0684, Admiralty G5768, NGA 11752.
Boat Bluff Light Station
Boat Bluff Light Station, Klemtu, August 2007
photo copyright Tom Zane; used by permission
#Lawyer Islands (3)
Early 1960s (station established 1901). Inactive since about 2007 and demolished sometime before 2011. This was a 20 m (65 ft) square steel skeletal tower, painted white. The original lighthouse at this station was a square wood tower attached to a keeper's house. Mariners complained that the light was too low, so it was replaced in 1909 by an octagonal wood tower at a higher elevation. The skeletal tower that replaced the historic lighthouses was a landmark for travelers on the Inside Passage. Around 2007 the light was replaced by two smaller beacons at the north and south ends of the island (CCG 0685.3 and 0685.5). Located on an island about 25 km (15 mi) south of Prince Rupert. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-272; ex-CCG 0685, ex-Admiralty G5770, ex-NGA 11748.
Holland Rock (3)
About 1947 (station established 1908). Active; focal plane 7 m (23 ft); three white flashes, separated by 2 s, every 12 s. 6 m (20 ft) square cylindrical steel skeletal tower mounted atop a 1-story fog signal building. Entire lighthouse painted white. Trabas has a photo by Günther Hess, and Bing has a satellite view. An acetylene beacon placed on Green Top Island in 1906 was moved here in 1908. A lighthouse with a square tower rising from a 2-story keepers house was built in 1912. It served until it was destroyed by fire in 1946. The present light is built on the stone pier of the 1912 lighthouse. Located on an isolated rock in Chatham Sound about 15 km (10 mi) south of Prince Rupert. Accessible only by boat, but easily seen from passing ships. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-229; CCG 0690, Admiralty G5772, NGA 11704.
Lucy Islands (2)
1960 (station established 1907). Active; focal plane 21.5 m (71 ft); red flash every 6 s. 10.5 m (35 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern and gallery painted red. Keeper's house demolished in 1988. Miguel Borges's photo is at right, Mitchell has a good photo, a 2007 photo and another closeup are available, Lighthouse Explorer has a Coast Guard photo, and Bing has a satellite view. Located at the northeastern tip of the islands, about 15 km (10 mi) west of Prince Rupert, marking the start of the Metlaketla Channel leading to Prince Rupert Harbour. Accessible only by boat, but easily seen from passing ships. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-290; CCG 0719, Admiralty G5807, NGA 11604.
Green Island (2)
Date unknown (station established 1906). Active; focal plane 19 m (63 ft); white flash every 5 s. 10.5 m (35 ft) octagonal pyramidal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern and gallery painted red. Staffed light station with at least two keeper's houses and other buildings. Chad Graham has an excellent closeup, Ed deJong has a 2010 photo of the station, Ammundsen has a nice photo, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. Located on a small island off the northeastern tip of Dundas Island, about 40 km (25 mi) northwest of Prince Rupert and about 5 km (3 mi) south of the Alaskan border. Accessible only by boat, but easily seen from passing ships. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-742; CCG 0730, Admiralty G5814, NGA 11556.
Lucy Islands Light
Lucy Islands Light, Prince Rupert, August 2005
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Miguel Borges

Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands) and Hecate Strait Lighthouses

Note: The Queen Charlotte Islands (now known officially by the native name Haida Gwaii) lie off the northern coast of British Columbia, separated from Alaska to the north by the broad Dixon Entrance and from the mainland to the east by the equally broad Hecate Strait. Hecate Strait narrows from 140 km (88 mi) in the south to 30 km (19 mi) at its northern end; the Dixon Entrance is about 80 km (50 mi) wide.
Langara Point
1913. Active; focal plane 49 m (160 ft); white flash every 5 s. 7.5 m (25 ft) hexagonal concrete 6-ribbed tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern painted red. The 1st order Fresnel lens in use is the only one of its size still in service in Canada. This staffed light station includes Canada's westernmost lighthouse. A Coast Guard photo is at right, Mitchell has a closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view. Langara Fishing Adventures offers tours to the island, including visits to the light station and accommodations at its fishing lodges. Located at the northern tip of Langara Island at the extreme northern end of the Queen Charlotte Islands, marking the south side of the Dixon Entrance. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-269; CCG 0807, Admiralty G5856, NGA 11376.
[Cape St. James]
1914. Inactive since 1984. The lighthouse, an octagonal concrete tower, was demolished after being deactivated. The active light is on a short post. Garth Sinclair has a distant aerial photo (the station is atop the hill on the right), there's a portfolio of historic photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on a high island at the extreme southern end of the Queen Charlotte Islands. Accessible only by boat or helicopter. Site status unknown. ARLHS CAN-110; CCG 0770, Admiralty G5826, NGA 11316.
McInnes Island
1921. Active; focal plane 30 m (98 ft); white flash every 5 s. 9 m (30 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white, lantern red. Staffed light station with 2-story crew house and other buildings. Lighthouse Explorer has a Coast Guard photo, Ammundsen has an aerial view by Mike Mitchell, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. Located on the south side of a small island off the southern tip of Price Island, marking the northern entrance to Milbanke Sound about 50 km (30 mi) west of Bella Bella (this is at the extreme southeastern end of Hecate Strait). Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-310; CCG 0619, Admiralty G5715, NGA 12040.
Bonilla Island (2)
1960 (station established 1927). Active; focal plane 36.5 m (120 ft); white or red flash (depending on direction) every 5 s. 10 m (33 ft) white round fiberglass tower with lantern and gallery; lantern painted red. Staffed light station with two 1-story keeper's houses and other buildings. Mitchell has a closeup photo, a distant aerial photo is available, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. This is British Columbia's newest light station; the lighthouse replaced a small beacon. Located on an island off the northwestern tip of Banks Island, on the northeastern side of Hecate Strait. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-050; CCG 0734, Admiralty G5748, NGA 11528.
Langara Point Light
Langara Point Light, Dixon Entrance, September 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Canadian Coast Guard
Triple Islands
1920. Active; focal plane 28 m (92 ft); two white flashes, separated by 2.5 s, every 9 s. 22 m (72 ft) octagonal cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 2-story concrete keeper's house. Staffed light station with helipad. Trabas has Rainer Arndt's photo, Ammundsen has an aerial photo by Chris Mills and a photo of the lens, Lighthouse Explorer has Alec Provan's photo, Mitchell also has a good photo, a 2008 view from the sea is available, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on the northwesternmost of three rocky islets marking the entrance to the Brown Passage, which leads from the Dixon Entrance to Prince Rupert, about 40 km (25 mi) west of the town. Accessible only by boat in dangerous seas or by helicopter. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-508; CCG 0752, Admiralty G5812, NGA 11460.

Information available on lost lighthouses:

  • Albert Head (?-?), Strait of Juan de Fuca near Victoria. The lighthouse was removed but a radiobeacon remains. ARLHS CAN-005.
  • Barrett Rock (1919-?), Chatham Sound near Prince Rupert. A small offshore beacon is in service here. ARLHS CAN-020; Admiralty G5794, NGA 11624.
  • Berens Island (1875-?), Victoria Harbour. The lighthouse was replaced by a beacon used only when seaplanes are landing or taking off nearby. ARLHS CAN-032; Admiralty G5312.4, NGA 13712.
  • Capilano Point (1913-1969), Burrard Inlet, Vancouver. Deactivated in 1948, the lighthouse was burned in 1969. ARLHS CAN-115.
  • First Narrows (1890-1969), Burrard Inlet, Vancouver. This lighthouse was replaced by a small offshore beacon. ARLHS CAN-415; Admiralty G5435, NGA 12984.
  • Gallows Point (1923-?), Nanaimo Harbour. This lighthouse was replaced by a small beacon. ARLHS CAN-191; Admiralty G5492, NGA 13268.
  • Pointer Island (1899-?), Inside Passage. This lighthouse was replaced by a round concrete tower. ARLHS CAN-400; Admiralty G5680, NGA 12168.
Adjoining pages: North: Alaska | South: Washington

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Posted January 14, 2004. Checked and revised February 15, 2014. Lighthouses: 54, lightships: 1. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.