Lighthouses of Central and Northern Chile

Chile has one of the world's longest and most dangerous coastlines, more than 4000 km (2500 mi) long with at least 5000 rocky islands. To guard this coast, the Chilean Navy operates one of the world's most active and most distinguished lighthouse services, the Chilean Maritime Signaling Service (Servizio de Señalizacíon Marítima). In fact, Chile is still building new lighthouses in the southern part of the country. The Cape Horn Light, southernmost lighthouse in the world, was inaugurated in 1991.

Chile's present northern border was not established until 1929. During the War of the Pacific (1879-1883), Chile conquered the Atacama region from Bolivia and occupied the Antofagasta, Iquique, Arica, and Tacna regions of Peru. The Chilean occupation of Tacna and Arica was the cause of an extended dispute between Chile and Peru. In a 1929 agreement, the disputed area was divided, with Tacna returning to Peru and Arica remaining in Chile. The Península Serrano lighthouse at Iquique, shown below, was built by Peru before the start of the war.

Many of the historic lighthouses of Chile are the work of George Slight (1859-1934), a Scottish engineer who moved to Chile in the 1890s and eventually became the head of the Chilean Maritime Signaling Service. In all, he designed and supervised the construction of more than 70 lighthouses.

Chile is divided into 15 regiónes. The Spanish word for a lighthouse is faro. In Spain, the word faro is usually applied only to the larger coastal lights, but in South America it is often used for all fixed lights, including towers too small to be considered lighthouses.

Additional information is needed for most of these lighthouses, and recent photos would be especially welcome.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. Admiralty numbers are from volume G of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA List numbers are from Publication 111. The Chilean light list, Lista de Faros de la Costa de Chile, is not available online.

General Sources
Rutas Turísticas de Faros
Photos and information on the major lighthouses posted the National Tourism Service.
Lighthouses of Northern Chile
Five excellent photos contributed by Iván Vargas.
Online List of Lights - Chile
Photos by various photographers posted by Alexander Trabas. Photos from the Valparaíso area are by Carlos María Silvano.
Faros y Balizas de Chile
Flickr.com group pool, with more than 200 photos of Chilean lighthouses.
Faros de Chile
This web site has historical information and photos (current and historic).
Lighthouses in Chile
Photos available from Wikimedia.
World of Lighthouses - Chile
Photos available from Lightphotos.net.
Leuchttürme Südamerikas auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard views posted by Klaus Huelse.

Punta Ángeles Light
Punta Ángeles Light, Valparaíso, May 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Nick Herber

Los Ríos Region (Valdivia Area) Lighthouses
* Morro Niebla (2)
1900 (station established 1860). Active; focal plane 50 m (164 ft); white flash every 10 s. 8 m (26 ft) round cylindrical cast iron tower, painted white with one red horizontal band. Marcos Escalier's photo is at right, another photo is available, Ignacio Platero has a more distant view, Wikimedia has several photos, and Google has a satellite view. This is Chile's third oldest light station, established to guide ships into the Bahía Corral, the harbor serving the inland city of Valdivia. Huelse has a postcard view of the original lighthouse, a shorter cast iron tower. Located in a historic fort atop a bluff on the east side of the entrance to the bay near Niebla, about 35 km (22 mi) west of Valdivia. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-060; Admiralty G1728; NGA 1504.
[Morro Bonifacio]
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 44 m (144 ft); white flash every 10 s. 4 m (13 ft) rectangular concete equipment shelter, painted white with a red horizontal band. ARLHS has a photo, and the small light is barely visible in Google's satellite view. Located atop a prominent cape about 35 km (21 mi) north of the Morro Niebla lighthouse. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-103; Admiralty G1744; NGA 1500.

Biobío Region (Concepción Area) Lighthouses
* Mocha Oeste (Isla Mocha)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 30 m (98 ft); white flash every 15 s. 13 m (43 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white with a single red band at the base; the lantern is gray metallic. Jose Francisco Hurtado has a fine 2008 photo, another 2008 photo is available, Alejandro Mora Fuentes has a 2009 photo, Wikimedia has Carolina Merino León's photo and a 2012 closeup, and Bing has an indistinct satellite view. The Isla Mocha is an oval-shaped island about 14 km (8.5 mi) long located 34 km (21 mi) west of Tirúa. About half the island is a nature reserve, and it has become a popular destination for ecotourists. There is regular air service from Conceptión and from Tirúa. The lighthouse stands on a rocky headland on the west side of the island, accessible by hiking trails. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-024; NGA 1490.
* Punta Morguilla
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 30 m (98 ft); white flash every 10 s. 4 m (13 ft) round fiberglass tower, colored white with one red horizontal band. Roberto Quilodran has a photo, and Bing has a distant satellite view. Located on a promontory near Morguilla. Accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1756; NGA 1484.

Morro Niebla Light, Niebla, February 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Marcos Escalier
* Punta Lavapié
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 57 m (187 ft); white flash every 12 s. 4 m (13 ft) round fiberglass tower, colored white with one red horizontal band. Símon Alvaro Muñoz has a photo, and Google has a distant street view and a distant satellite view. Located on a cape marking the southern entrance to the Bahía de Lota. Accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1762; NGA 1476.
* Punta Lutrin (Faro del Parque)
1894. Active; focal plane 49 m (160 ft); white flash every 5 s. 13.5 m (44 ft) octagonal cylindrical cast iron tower mounted on an octagonal base. Lighthouse painted white with a single red band below the gallery. Felipe Elgueta Frontier has a good photo, Nidia Valenzuela has another photo, Wikimedia has photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Huelse has a historic postcard view in which the tower is mounted on an elaborate 1-story castellated stone base; this base has been replaced by a much simpler structure. The lighthouse is located in a lovely botanical garden, the Parque Isadora Cousiño de Lota. Punta Lutrin is just north of Lota, about 8 km (5 mi) south of Puerto Coronel. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Municipalidad de Lota. ARLHS CHI-071; Admiralty G1768; NGA 1452.
* Punta Puchoco (Coronel)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 19 m (62 ft); one long (1.3 s) white flash every 10 s. 6 m (20 ft) round fiberglass tower, colored white with one red horizontal band. José González Spaudo has a photo and a view from the sea, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on a cape sheltering the northern entrance to Puerto Coronel. Accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1784; NGA 1432.
Isla Santa María (2)
Date unknown (station established 1887). Active; focal plane 73 m (240 ft); white flash every 15 s. 8 m (26 ft) round cylindrical fiberglass tower, painted white with one red horizontal band. Huelse has a postcard view of the original lighthouse, a 14 m (46 ft) first-order tower rising from a 1-story keeper's house. The modern light stands amidst the ruins of the historic light station, as seen in a closeup photo and a Bing satellite view. The Isla Santa Maria is a roughly triangular island about 16 km (10mi) in diameter, located about 40 km (25 mi) west of Puerto Coronel. Located near the northern tip of the island. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-027; Admiralty G1764; NGA 1424.
Punta Hualpen (Gualpén) (2)
1984 (station established 1914). Active; focal plane approx. 16 m (52 ft); white flash every 5 s. 5 m (17 ft) round cylindrical fiberglass tower. Keeper's house staffed. José González Spaudo has a closeup photo, Cristian Correa has a photo, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. The original cast iron lighthouse was near the keeper's house and had a focal plane of 33 m (108 ft). Located on the toe of a prominent cape about 16 km (10 mi) northwest of Concepción. Site status unknown (permission of the naval staff may be required); the light station is accessible by road. ARLHS CHI-070; Admiralty G1794; NGA 1420.
Punta Tumbes
1913. Active; focal plane 39 m (128 ft); white flash every 5 s. 6.5 m (21 ft) round cylindrical metal tower, painted with red and white bands. Fog siren (three 3 s blasts every 30 s). No current closeup photo available, although Ignacio Acuña Pantoja has posted an older photo in which the lighthouse is painted all white. Cecilia Amigo has a view from the sea, and Google has a satellite view of the station, which includes several keeper's houses and other buildings. Located at the point, at the western entrance to the Bahía de Concepción, about 13 km (8 mi) north of Talcahuano and 30 km (19 mi) north of Concepción. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-099; Admiralty G1796; NGA 1408.
Banco Belén (Belen Shoal)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); three white flashes every 10 s. 11 m (36 ft) round cylindrical fiberglass tower, colored with black and yellow horizontal bands and mounted on a round concrete pier. José González Spaudo has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located on a shoal off Talcahuano in the Bahía de Concepción. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-035; Admiralty G1814; NGA 1396.
Isla Quiriquina (2)
1905 (station established 1869). Active; focal plane 90 m (295 ft); white flash every 10 s. 7 m (23 ft); lantern mounted on a short round cylindrical cast iron tower. Lighthouse painted with red and white bands. Keeper's house staffed. A Navy photo is at right, and Bing has a satellite view. The lighthouse replaced an older tower destroyed by an 1897 earthquake; it appears that it has been relocated several times. The island is the site of a Chilean Navy base and school. Visits to the island by the public are allowed, but reservations are required for transportation. Visiting the lighthouse requires a hike over rough terrain from the school. Located at the northern tip of the island, which lies in the entrance to the Bahía de Concepción. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. ARLHS CHI-025; Admiralty G1798; NGA 1348.
Faro de Quiriquina
Isla Quiriquina Light, Concepción
photo by Servicio de Señalización Marítima

Maule Region Lighthouses
* Cabo Carranza
1895. Active; focal plane 52 m (171 ft); white flash every 10 s. 19 m (62 ft) square cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted with red and white bands. Keeper's house, staffed, and other light station buildings. Prefabricated in England by Chance Brothers, Ltd. Tomás Jorquera Sepúlveda has the photo at right, a closeup and a distant view, Trabas has Silvano's photo, Wikimedia has another distant view, and Google has a good satellite view. Located on Punta Santa Ana, which is at the mouth of the Río Loanco, just north of the tip of the cape, about 65 km (40 mi) west of Talca. The station is accessible by an unpaved road, passable in good weather. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-005; Admiralty G1846; NGA 1336.
Trilco (Punta Cardonal)
Date unknown (2006?). Active; focal plane 45 m (148 ft); white flash every 5 s. 7 m (23 ft) hexagonal tower, painted with red and white horizontal bands. A distant view is available, and Google has an indistinct satellite view. This appears to be a privately built light; it was listed in an Admiralty Notice to Mariners in late 2006. Located on a steep bluff about 25 km (15 mi) northwest of Vichuquén. Site status unknown. Admiralty G1848; NGA 1334.

O'Higgins Region Lighthouses
Punta Topocalma
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 118 m (387 ft); white flash every 10 s. 4 m (13 ft) round fiberglass tower, colored white with one red horizontal band. A closeup and a more distant view are available, and Google has a satellite view. Located on a mountainous cape about 40 km (25 mi) west of La Estrella. Accessible by a hiking trail. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-076; Admiralty G1750; NGA 1332.
Cabo Carranza Light
Cabo Carranza Light, Niebla, January 2008
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Tomás Jorquera
* Jardín del Lago
Date unknown. Active; focal plane about 10 m (33 ft); white light, characteristic unknown. 8 m (26 ft) round stucco-clad tower with a small lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white. Lalo Guzman has a photo, another photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. Lago Rapel is a large artificial lake in the northern part of the O'Higgins Region, built as part of a hydroelectric project. Located at a small marina on the north shore of the lake near Santa Inés. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Jardín del Lago Marina.

Valparaíso Region Lighthouses
* Punta Panul (San Antonio)
1924. Active; focal plane 89 m (292 ft); white flash every 10 s. 9.5 m (31 ft) octagonal concrete tower, painted with red and white bands. 1-story keeper's house, white with a green roof, is staffed. The light was upgraded with a more powerful lamp in 1999. A Navy photo is at right, a closeup is available, Mario Pereda Reyes has a 2008 photo of the light station, Erwin Herment has a photo, Google has a distant street view, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. Located atop a steep bluff about 7 km (4 mi) north of San Antonio. Site status unknown, but the lighthouse can be seen from nearby. ARLHS CHI-073; Admiralty G1857; NGA 1284.
* Pajaros Ninos (Algarrobo)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 35 m (115 ft); white flash every 10 s. 4 m (13 ft) round fiberglass tower, colored red. Juan Ramirez Jardua has a photo, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on a small island, connected to the mainland by a causeway, at Algarrobo. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1866; NGA 1280.
* Rada Quintay
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 26 m (85 ft); red flash every 10 s; a white flash every 5 s is shown over a dangerous shoal to the southwest. 6 m (20 ft) square pyramidal concrete tower, attached to a 1-story equipment shelter. Entire structure painted red. Hector Martinez has a 2008 closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located on a headland about 40 km (25 mi) southwest of Valparaíso. Accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1869; NGA 1278.

Punta Panul Light, San Antonio
photo by Servicio de Señalización Marítima
* Punta Curaumilla
1893. Active; focal plane 84 m (276 ft); white flash every 15 s. 4 m (13 ft) round lantern, painted with red and white horizontal bands. The adjacent keeper's house is not occupied. Fog siren (3 blasts every 30 s). Hugo Gallardo has a photo, a closeup and a more distant view are available, and Bing has a satellite view. This little lighthouse commands a spectacular view. Located on the point, a prominent cape projecting into the Pacific near Laguna Verde, about 25 km (15 mi) west southwest of Valparaíso. Accessible by road. Site open (fenced, but visitors can approach very closely), tower closed. ARLHS CHI-014; Admiralty G1870; NGA 1272.
* Punta Ángeles (3)
1908 (station established 1838). Active; focal plane 60 m (197 ft); white flash every 10 s. 18 m (59 ft) cast iron tower. Lantern red; tower painted white with a broad red band. Keeper's house staffed. Nick Herber's photo is at the top of this page, Rodrigo David has a good photo, Trabas has Silvano's photo, another excellent photo is available, Wikimedia has a nice aerial view, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a street view and an aerial view. This is Chile's oldest light station, established by Paul Delano (1775-1842), an American captain who became an admiral in the early Chilean navy. The original lighthouse, a pyramidal wooden tower, was built by the city of Valparaíso. It was replaced in 1857 by a brick tower, which was destroyed by an earthquake in 1906. The present lighthouse was prefabricated in England by Chance Brothers, Ltd. In 1967 the tower was relocated a short distance inside the Punta Angeles maritime complex; the George Slight Lighthouse Museum is nearby. Located on the Camino Costera, on the rocky headland at the western entrance to the Bahía de Valparaíso, about 3 km (2 mi) northwest of the city. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-001; Admiralty G1874; NGA 1268.
Punta Duprat (2)
1980 (station established 1921). Active; focal plane 21 m (69 ft); white flash every 5 s. 16 m (51 ft) octagonal fiberglass tower, with lantern and gallery, mounted on a pyramidal base. Tower colored white with a narrow red band under the gallery; lantern red. Carlos Yanez has the photo at right, Trabas has Silvano's photo, and Google has an aerial view and a distant street view along the pier. This lighthouse replaced a round concrete lighthouse of similar design, which was removed due to damage from eathquakes. Located on the knuckle (bend) of the Chilean Navy breakwater pier at Valparaíso. Site and tower closed. ARLHS CHI-068; Admiralty G1875; NGA 1260.
#Valparaíso Molo de Abrigo (Valparaíso Naval Breakwater) (1)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); white flash every 5 s, except that a flash every 3 s is shown over an approach channel to the northeast. This was a 7 m (23 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower, painted white with one red horizontal band. Sergio Reyes Niño has a 2007 photo, Carlos Ruiz Badilla has a wider view, and Google has an aerial view. Trabas has Silvano's photo of the new light, a simple post. Located at the end of the Chilean Navy breakwater pier at Valparaíso. Site and tower closed. Admiralty G1876; NGA 1256.
Punta Condell
Date unknown (apparently relocated here in 1987). Active; focal plane 17 m (56 ft); white flash every 12 s. 6.5 m (22 ft) round cylindrical cast iron tower with domed lantern and gallery. Tower and lantern painted white, gallery red. Eduardo Fainé has a good closeup, Trabas has a fine photo by Silvano, and Google has an aerial view and an indistinct street view. The original location of this tower is not known. Today the tower is a memorial to Carlos Condell, a hero of the 1879 Battle of Iquique during the War of the Pacific. Located on a rocky headland near Viña del Mar northeast of Valparaíso, marking the east entrance to the harbor. Site and tower closed. ARLHS CHI-069; Admiralty G1878; NGA 1263.
Punta Concón
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); white flash every 12 s; also two red flashes every 6 s are shown over rocks to the north. 5 m (17 ft) round cylindrical fiberglass tower mounted on a square 1-story stone tower. Lighthouse colored white with one horizontal red band. Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located beside the Avenida Gorgoño, the coastal road at Concón, about 15 km (9 mi) north of Valparaíso. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-012; Admiralty G1880; NGA 1255.

Punta Duprat Light, Valparaíso, March 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Carlos Yanez
Club de Yates (Higuerillas)
Date unknown (2005?). Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); white flash every 5 s. 7 m (23 ft) round cylindrical tower with a square lantern, mounted on a square 1-story equipment room. Lighthouse painted white with one horizontal red band; the pyramidal lantern roof is also red. Patricia Santini has a photo, Pilar Palacios has a 2007 photo, Martin Krepelin has a twilight photo, and Bing has an indistinct satellite view. The light is apparently quite recent, as I have seen no photos earlier than 2006. Located at the end of the breakwater at Concón, a largely recreational harbor about 15 km (9 mi) north of Valparaíso. The breakwater is not walkable, but there are good views from the waterfront. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager : Club de Yates. Admiralty G1880.5; NGA 1254.
* Península Los Molles (Quintero)
1944. Active; focal plane 94 m (308 ft); white flash every 15 s. 16 m (52 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted with red and white bands. The keeper's house is the residence of the Port Captain of Quintero. Leonardo Needham has an excellent photo, a distant view is available, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. This very accessible lighthouse seems to attract little attention. Located on the Avenida Cristóbal Colón, on a headland about 8 km (5 mi) northwest of Quintero. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-022; Admiralty G1882; NGA 1252.

Coquimbo Region Lighthouses
Punta de Tablas (Cabo Tablas)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 72 m (236 ft); white flash every 10 s. 5 m (17 ft) round fiberglass tower, colored white with one red horizontal band. Pato Novoa has a distant view, and Bing has a distant satellite view. Located on a steep-sided rock at the tip of a cape about 13 km (8 mi) north of Los Vilos. Practically inaccessible, but easily seen from a hiking trail on the mainland. Site status unknown. Admiralty G1892; NGA 1212.
* Punta Tortuga (Coquimbo)
1886. Active; focal plane 24 m (79 ft); white flash every 13 s. 4 m (13 ft) lantern, mounted on a square concrete foundation directly on the rocky point. Lantern painted red with a white roof. A photo taken New Year's Eve 2007 is available, Juan Castro has a closeup, and the tiny tower is centered in Google's satellite view. Punta Tortuga is the headland sheltering the bay of Coquimbo. Located beyond the end of Camino El Faro, about 3 km (2 mi) north northwest of downtown Coquimbo. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-077; Admiralty G1900; NGA 1184.
*** Monumental La Serena
1950. Active; focal plane 28 m (92 ft); white flash every 5 s. 25 m (82 ft) cream-colored square concrete tower, rising from the center of a square 1-story building. Gallery red; lantern with domed roof. Johan Fabry's photo is at right, José Francisco Carle Carrera has a good photo, Wikimedia has two photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The lighthouse was built as a landmark terminating the Avenida Francisco de Aguirre, which links the old city to the sea. The Navy conveyed ownership of the building to the city in 1996; the lighthouse is now used as a cultural center and meeting hall. Located directly on the beach in La Serena. Site open and tower open. Site manager: Municipalidad de La Serena. ARLHS CHI-002; Admiralty G1900.5; NGA 1176.
Punta Mostacilla
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 38 m (125 ft); white flash every 5 s. 8 m (26 ft) round cylindrical fiberglass tower, painted white with one narrow red horizontal band. A closeup photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. This light marks a small artificial harbor. Located on a promontory about 12 km (7.5 mi) northwest of La Higuera. Site status unknown. ARLHS-072; Admiralty G1908; NGA 1168.
La Serena Light
La Serena Light, La Serena, March 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Johan Fabry

Atacama Region Lighthouses
Isla Chañaral (2)
Date unknown (station established 1897). Active; focal plane 58 m (190 ft); white flash every 12 s. 7.5 m (25 ft) round tower with gallery, painted with red and white bands. Christian Latorre has a distant view, and Bing has a satellite view. The Isla Chañaral is the largest of the Islotes Atacama, located about 6 km (3.5 mi) offshore and about 65 km (40 mi) southwest of Huasco (not near the port of Chañaral). The site of the world's largest breeding colony of Humboldt penguins, the island is part of the Reserva Nacional Pingüino de Humboldt. Visitation is by permit only. Site and tower closed. ARLHS CHI-042; Admiralty G1916; NGA 1164.
[Punta Guacolda]
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 39 m (128 ft); one long (2 s) white flash every 15 s. 8 m (26 ft) round fiberglass tower, painted white with one narrow red horizontal band. An aerial photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. This light marks a facility from which iron ore is shipped. Located on a promontory about 4 km (2.5 mi) west of Huasco. Site status unknown. Admiralty G1918; NGA 1160.
* Punta Caldera (2)
1868. Active; focal plane 38 m (125 ft); white flash every 12 s. 18.5 m (61 ft) square wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted with red and white bands. A Navy photo is at right, Iván Vargas has contributed a photo, Marcelo Báez has a good photo and a view from the sea, Google has a distant street view, and Bing has a satellite view. In Huelse's historic postcard view, the lighthouse appears without the horizontal bands. Chile's only all-wooden lighthouse. The lighthouse was restored in 1947 and again in 1987. Located on a prominent cape about 5 km (3 mi) northwest of the waterfront of Caldera; the cape is accessible by road but it's a tough hike from the end of the road to the lighthouse. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-065; Admiralty G1924; NGA 1148.
*** Monumental Chañaral (Faro del Milenio)
2000. Active; focal plane 83 m (272 ft); white flash every 5 s. 15 m (49 ft) round metal (steel?) tower with lantern, mounted on a 1-story circular stone base. Ricardo Martini has a photo, another photo is available, Leon Calquin's photo shows the situation of the lighthouse, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. This lighthouse was built by the city of Chañaral as a Millennium project and tourist attraction. It was inaugurated 1 September 2000. The interior of the tower contains an exhibition space. Located on a steep hillside above Chañaral. Site open, tower believed to be open but we do not have schedule information. ARLHS CHI-090; Admiralty G1932; NGA 1141.
Faro de Punta Caldera
Punta Caldera Light, Caldera
photo by Servicio de Señalización Marítima

Antofagasta Region Lighthouses
Caleta Coloso
Date unknown (station established 1917). Active; focal plane 36 m (118 ft); three white flashes every 12 s. 20 m (67 ft) rectangular metal tower, painted with red and white bands. No photo available, and the tower is not seen in Google's street view or satellite view. The building is part of the port of Caleta Caloso, a shipment point for nitrate from the Atacama Desert. Located on a headland about 18 km (11 mi) south of Antofagasta. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-037; Admiralty G1940; NGA 1127.
Antofagasta (Outer Breakwater, Extremo Molo de Abrigo)
1934. Active; focal plane 18 m (59 ft); white flash every 5 s. 14 m (43 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Felipe Ascencio's photo appears at right, Javier Bahamondes has a photo of the two mole lights, Iván Vargas has contributed an older photo in which lighthouse is painted all red, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the end of the main (south) breakwater at Antofagasta. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-058; Admiralty G1946; NGA 1124.
Antofagasta Molo Este
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 6 m (20 ft); green flash every 5 s. 5 m (17 ft) round cylindrical dark green fiberglass tower with lantern. Javier Bahamondes has a photo of the two mole lights, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of the east (really the north) mole of Antofagasta's modern harbor. Site status unknown. Admiralty G1947; NGA 1120.
Punta Tetas
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 33 m (108 ft); white flash every 18 s. 8 m (26 ft) round fiberglass tower, painted white with one narrow red horizontal band. Gerhard Huedepohl has an aerial photo, and Google has a satellite view. This site would be a long walk from the nearest road. Located on the cape at the northern entrance to the Bahía de Antofagasta. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-075; Admiralty G1948; NGA 1112.
* [Punta Angamos (2?)]
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 109 m (358 ft); white flash every 10 s. 8 m (26 ft) slender round fiberglass tower, colored white with one red horizontal band. A distant view is available, and Google has a satellite view. Iván Vargas has contributed a photo of a light similar to the Punta Gruesa Light (see below); this light apparently does not survive. A nearby viewpoint is a popular tourist attraction. The headland of Punta Angamos projects into the Pacific northwestward, sheltering the Bahía Mejillones. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-096; Admiralty G1952; NGA 1108.
Antofagasta Light
Extremo Molo de Abrigo Light, Antofagasta, December 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Felipe Ascencio
* Puerto Mejillones del Sur
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 20 m (66 ft); green flash every 3 s. The light was mounted originally on the balcony of the square tower of the harbormaster's office, a 2-story 19th century building painted white with red trim. Google's street view suggests that the light has been moved to a skeletal tower on the roof of the building. Javier Velasco has posted a 2003 closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view. Mejillones del Sur is a small town facing north onto a broad bay about 80 km (50 mi) north of Antofagasta. Located on the beach. Site open, building presumably open, tower status unknown. Admiralty G1953; NGA 1098.

Iquique Area (Tarapacá Region) Lighthouses
* Punta Gruesa (Iquique)
Date unknown (station established 1947). Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); white flash every 10 s. 10 m (33 ft) pyramidal concrete tower atop a 1-story equipment room; light displayed from a small lantern on the front face of the tower. Iván Vargas has contributed a photo, another photo is available, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The light is a memorial to Chilean seamen lost in the Battle of Iquique and its continuation, the Battle of Punta Gruesa, on 21 May 1879. Located on a headland about 15 km (10 mi) south of Iquique. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1964; NGA 1072.
Península Serrano
1878 (Barbier et Fenestre). Active; focal plane 39 m (128 ft); white flash every 12 s. 22 m (72 ft) slender cylindrical cast iron tower with four skeletal legs, painted with red and white bands (lantern red). A Navy photo appears at right, Patricia Santini has a 2011 photo, Google has a street view, and the tower is centered in a Google satellite view. This lighthouse was built by the French firm Barbier et Fenestre for the government of Peru, which controlled the Iquique area at the time. The lighthouse was placed in operation in time to witness the naval Battle of Iquique in May 1879; later that year the city was conquered by Chilean forces. Declared a National Monument in 1986, this lighthouse is a rare surviving example of French lighthouse design. The lighthouse was carefully restored in 1993-95. Located on the Serrano Peninsula on the south side of the Bay of Iquique. The lighthouse is in the middle of the commerical port of Iquique, and the absence of photos suggests that this area is not open to the public. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-095; Admiralty G1974.3; NGA 1050.
Iquique (Molo de Abrigo, Outer Breakwater) (2)
1932 (station established 1903). Active; focal plane 19 m (62 ft); red flash every 10 s. 13.5 m (44 ft) octagonal masonry tower with lantern and gallery. Entire lighthouse painted red. A 2009 photo and a view from the sea are available, Trabas has a view from the sea by Capt. Theo Hinrichs, and Google has a good street view and a distant satellite view. Located at the end of the west breakwater at Iquique, which projects from the north side of the Península Serrano. Site and tower closed. ARLHS CHI-082; Admiralty G1968; NGA 1036.

Arica Region (Región de Arica y Parinacota) Lighthouses
* Península Alacrán (Isla Alacrán) (2)
Date unknown (station established 1913). Active; focal plane 23 m (75 ft); white flash every 15 s. 8 m (26 ft) round fiberglass tower, painted white with a red band. The Isla Alacrán is a small island just off the coast, now joined to shore by a causeway. Kuba Jurkowski has a closeup photo, Dany Valcarce has a second closeup, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. This light replaced a historic lighthouse, and Manuel Gajardo's photo suggests that it may be built on the foundations of the earlier light. Located between the commercial and small boat harbors at Arica. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-061; Admiralty G1984; NGA 1012.
Faro Punta Serrano
Península Serrano Light, Iquique
photo by Servicio de Señalización Marítima
Arica South Breakwater
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 20 m (66 ft); red flash every 5 s. 12 m (39 ft) concrete post with an enclosed concrete lantern, painted red. E. Guzmán has a 2009 photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of the breakwater. Site and tower closed. ARLHS CHI-059; Admiralty G1986; NGA 1020.
* Limitrofe (Concordia Range Rear)
1972. Active; focal plane 42 m (138 ft); green flash every 5 s. 22 m (72 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower, all four sides covered with slats painted in red and white bands; light displayed from atop a small square equipment room at the top of the tower. Iván Vargas has contributed a photo, Manuel Arcaya has a sunset photo, and Google has a satellite view. Keeper's house staffed. This light was formerly the rear light of a range. The front light, across the border in Peru, was demolished after being heavily damaged by an earthquake. Located at the Peruvian border about 30 km (19 mi) north of Arica. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-101; Admiralty G1987; NGA 1008.

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Notable faux lighthouses:

  • Huasco (Atacama Region) has a prominent lighthouse, which can be climbed, but the lighthouse is not an active aid to navigation. The tower was formerly painted with red and white bands, as seen in a 2005 photo. Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view.

Adjoining pages: North: Southern Perú | South: Southern Chile

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Posted December 2004. Checked and revised June 12, 2014. Lighthouses: 44. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.