Lighthouses of Southern Chile

Chile has one of the world's longest and most dangerous coastlines, more than 4000 km (2500 mi) long with at least 5000 rocky islands. To guard this coast, the Chilean Navy operates one of the world's most active and most distinguished lighthouse services, the Chilean Maritime Signaling Service (Servizio de Señalización Marítima). In fact, Chile is still building new lighthouses in the southern part of the country. The Cape Horn Light, the southernmost major lighthouse in the world, was inaugurated in 1991.

Tierra del Fuego, the land south of the Strait of Magellan, was disputed between Chile and Argentina until a treaty in 1881 gave Chile control of the western half of the territory and all of the Strait. The Strait did not become an important shipping route until around that time, as steam replaced sail power for ships between the Atlantic and Pacific. A continued dispute between Chile and Argentina over the ownership of several smaller islands near Cape Horn was not resolved until 1985, when the two countries accepted a mediation decision by Pope John Paul II.

Many of the historic lighthouses of southern Chile are the work of George Slight (1859-1934), a Scottish engineer who moved to Chile in the 1890s and eventually became the head of the Chilean Maritime Signaling Service. In all, he designed and supervised the construction of more than 70 lighthouses.

Chile is divided into 15 regiónes, including 3 that span the southern part of the country. The Spanish word for a lighthouse is faro. In Spain, the word faro is usually applied only to the larger coastal lights, but in South America it is often used for all fixed lights, including towers too small to be considered lighthouses.

Additional information is needed for many of these lighthouses, and recent photos would be especially welcome.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. Admiralty numbers are from volume G of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA List numbers are from Publication 111 except for the Punta Düngeness and Cabo Espíritu Santo lighthouses at the east end of the Strait of Magellan, which are listed in Publication 110. The Chilean light list, Lista de Faros de la Costa de Chile, is not available online.

Faro Cabo de Hornos
Cabo de Hornos Light, Cape Horn, January 2010
Creative Commons photo by Luis Alejandro Bernal Romero

General Sources
Rutas Turísticas de Faros
Photos and information on the major lighthouses posted the National Tourism Service.
Online List of Lights - Chile
Photos posted by Alex Trabas, including a series of photos of Strait of Magellan lights taken by Capt. Theo Hinrichs during a November 2009 passage.
Faros de Chile
This web site has historical information and photos (current and historic).
Lighthouses in Chile
Photos available from Wikimedia.
World of Lighthouses - Chile
Photos available from Lightphotos.net.

Magallanes Region Lighthouses

Cape Horn Lighthouses
Monumental Cabo de Hornos (Isla Hornos, Cape Horn)
1991. Active; focal plane 61.5 m (202 ft); white flash every 5 s. 11 m (36 ft) round cylindrical steel tower with lantern and gallery, originally painted with red and white bands, now incorporated into a 1-story brick station building. A photo by Luis Alejandro Bernal Romero is at the top of this page, another 2010 photo is available, Wikimedia has several photos, and Faros de Chile has a photo, but clouds obscure Google's already-fuzzy satellite view of the cape. The lighthouse has a powerful modern lens with a range of about 37 km (23 mi). The light station was placed in service on 17 November 1991. Douglas Cameron's photos show the original appearance of the light, Carlos Postigo has another closeup photo, and a distant view from a passing cruise ship shows the harsh beauty of this site. The station building was built in 2006; there is a photo of the work in progress and Pablo Tavella has a photo of the completed building. A sculpture near the lighthouse is a memorial to the many sailors who have died "rounding the Horn." This is the world's southernmost traditional lighthouse, the true Lighthouse at the End of the World; it stands in latitude 55º 57.9' S. (There are minor aids to navigation farther south, including the next two entries and several lights in Antarctica.) Located high on a ridge of Isla Hornos, the island that includes Cape Horn, about 2 km (1.25 mi) northeast of the southernmost tip of the cape. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower normally closed. ARLHS CHI-006; Admiralty G1336.5; NGA 111-2713.
[Cabo de Hornos] (2?)
Date unknown (station established 1962). Active; focal plane 40 m (131 ft); white flash every 12 s. 4 m (13 ft) round fiberglass tower, colored white with a red horizontal band. No photo available, but Bing has a satellite view. This small beacon marks the ultimate point of the cape, about 5 km (3 mi) southwest of the lighthouse. The original beacon was wooden, according Admiralty listings. Site status unknown. Admiralty G1336; NGA 111-2712.
[Islas Diego Ramirez (Isla Gonzalo)]
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 108 m (354 ft); white flash every 15 s. 5 m (17 ft) round cylindrical fiberglass tower colored white with one red horizontal band. Piero Mancini has a closeup photo, but Google has only a fuzzy satellite view of the island. This is the southernmost navigational aid of South America. The Diego Ramirez Islands lie in the Drake Passage about 105 km (65 mi) southwest of Cape Horn. Ships "rounding the Horn" aim to sail south of the islands, but as close to them as they safely can. In 1957, Chile established a weather station on Isla Gonzalo, the southernmost island if the group; Wikimedia has a view from the sea that shows the station and the light tower atop the peak in the background. The light has a range of 22 nautical miles (40.7 km, 25.3 mi). Located on the highest point of the island. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1338; NGA 111-2718.

Eastern Strait of Magellan (Estrecho de Magallanes) Lighthouses
Note: The Strait of Magellan is 570 km (350 mi) long and as little as 2 km (1.2 mi) wide. Although Magellan managed to make the first passage of the strait in 1520, its navigation was too difficult for most sailing ships. As a result, the usual route for most sailors between the Atlantic and Pacific was "around the Horn." Chile took control of the strait in 1843 and founded Punta Arenas, the one city on the waterway, in 1848. Argentina accepted Chilean control in the boundary treaty of 1881. From about that time until the opening of the Panama Canal in 1914, the strait was the preferred route for steamships between the two oceans. The major lighthouses of the strait date from this period. The eastern section of the strait is a broad bay, the Bahía Posesión.
Cabo Espíritu Santo (2)
1997 (station established 1968). Active; focal plane 70 m (230 ft); white flash every 15 s. 8 m (26 ft) cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted with red and white bands. 1-story keeper's house, staffed, painted white with a red roof. A 2007 photo and a second photo are available, and Google has a satellite view. The present lighthouse replaced a fiberglass tower. Located on the southern side of the entrance from the Atlantic to the Strait of Magellan, within a few meters of the Argentine border. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-007; Admiralty G1404; NGA 110-20368.
Punta Düngeness
1899 (Alan Brebner) (station established in the 1870s). Active; focal plane 32 m (105 ft); white flash every 10 s. 25 m (82 ft): lantern and 2-story watch room atop a short hexagonal pyramidal skeletal tower, all mounted on a conical concrete base. 1-story keeper's house and signal station, staffed. Tower painted with horizontal red and white bands; building white with a red roof. Max Reichenbauer's photo is at right, Pablo Yañez has a 2010 photo, a good 2005 photo is available, Faros de Chile has a photo and a historic photo, and Google has a good satellite view. Located on the northern side of the entrance from the Atlantic to the Strait of Magellan, within a few meters of the Argentine border and about 20 km (13 mi) southwest of Argentina's Cabo Virgenes lighthouse. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-016; Admiralty G1402; NGA 110-20364.

Faro Punta Dungeness
Punta Düngeness Light, Strait of Magellan, September 2009
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Max Reichenbauer

Cabo Posesión
1900. Active (?); focal plane 90 m (295 ft); white flash every 18 s. 11 m (36 ft) square cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white with one red horizontal band that extends the full width of the building. This lighthouse appears to be abandoned and deteriorating; the absence of solar panels means it is almost certainly inactive. Oscar Urízar Gromsch has a photo, Trabas has Capt. Theo's view from the strait, a third photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. Site open, tower closed. Located atop a vertical cliff on the northern shore of the Bahía Posesión west of Punta Dungeness. ARLHS CHI-036; Admiralty G1408; NGA 111-2532.
Cerro Direccíon
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 83 m (272 ft); white flash every 10 s. 11 m (36 ft) round hourglass-shaped fiberglass tower, colored white with a red horizontal band. Trabas has Capt. Theo's photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located atop a high hill about 12 km (7.5 mi) north of Punta Delgada. Site and tower closed, although there is a good view from the highway nearby. Admiralty G1412; NGA 111-2516.
** Punta Delgada
1902 (George Slight). Active; focal plane 21 m (69 ft); white flash every 5 s. 12 m (39 ft) round cylindrical metal tower with lantern and gallery, painted with red and white bands, rising from 1-story signal station. Trabas has Capt. Theo's photo seen at right, Chen Guttman has a good closeup, and Google has a satellite view. There is a small maritime museum in the building. The lighthouse is at the western end of the Bahía Posesión, marking the entrance to Angostura Primera, the first narrow part of the Strait and the closest approach of Tierra del Fuego to the mainland. The terminal for the ferry crossing the Strait to Tierra del Fuego is adjacent to the light station. Site and museum open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-015; Admiralty G1414; NGA 111-2496.
Faro Punta Delgada
Punta Delgada Light, Strait of Magellan, 2009
photo copyright Capt. Theo Hinrichs; used by permission


Punta Arenas Area Lighthouses
Note: This central section of the Strait runs north to south. Near Punta Arenas, the strait is about 25 km (15 mi), but to the south it narrows to 8 km (5 mi) between Cabo San Isidro and Isla Dawson.
Isla Magdalena
1902 (George Slight). Active; focal plane 49 m (161 ft); white flash every 10 s. 13 m (43 ft) round cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted with horizontal red and white bands. The 1-story keeper's house, white with a red roof, is now a national park visitor center with resident caretakers. Pablo Yañez's photo is at right, Carlos Yañez has a 2006 photo, and a closeup is available, but the station is not seen well in Google's distant satellite view. As seen in the photo, the building was in poor condition, largely unroofed. The island, home to a large colony of penguins, is frequently visited by ecotours. Located on an island in the center of the Strait about 40 km (25 mi) northeast of Punta Arenas. Site manager: Los Pingüinos (Penguins) National Monument. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-031; Admiralty G1428; NGA 111-2448.
* [Bahía Porvenir] (2?)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 19 m (62 ft); white flash every 12 s. 8 m (26 ft) round fiberglass post, painted white with a narrow red horizontal band. Michal Synowiec has a photo, a view from the strait is available, and Bing has a satellite view. This light, identical to dozens of lights in southern Chile, guides ferries arriving in Tierra del Fuego from Punta Arenas across the strait. Located on a promontory southwest of the ferry terminal. Accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-034; Admiralty G1440; NGA 111-2404.
* [Punta Santa Ana (Puerto del Hambre, Fuerte Bulnes)] (2?)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 40 m (131 ft); white flash every 10 s. 5 m (17 ft) square concrete pillar, painted white with a narrow red horizontal band. A photo and a second photo are available, and Google has a satellite view. The plaque on the light honors Bernardo O'Higgins, the hero of the Chilean War of Independence. Built in 1843, Fuerte Bulnes was the first Chilean settlement on the strait. Located on Punta Santa Ana, a sharp headland at Puerto del Hambre, about 60 km (38 mi) south of Punta Arenas. Accessible by road; tours are available from Punta Arenas. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1444; NGA 111-2384.

Faro Isla Magdalena
Isla Magdalena Light, Strait of Magellan, 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Carlos Yañez

Cabo San Isidro
1904 (George Slight). Active; focal plane 28 m (92 ft); white flash every 5 s. 8 m (26 ft) round cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a large 1-story keeper's house. The lantern is in ruins but still contains an active light, as seen in Jorge Benavente's photo. Lighthouse painted white with one red horizontal band. The keeper's house has been refurbished as a lodge and visitor center. José Huenante Barria has a closeup, a 2009 closeup is available, and Google has a good satellite view. This is the southernmost traditional light station of mainland South America. Located about 20 km (13 mi) south of Puerto del Hambre (Port Famine) and 80 km (15 mi) south of Punta Arenas. Ecotours to this site are available from Punta Arenas. Access requires a hike of about 3 hours from the end of the road. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Hosteria Faro San Isidro. ARLHS CHI-010; Admiralty G1446; NGA 111-2380.

Western Strait of Magellan (Estrecho de Magallanes) Lighthouses
Note: The western section of the strait runs southeast to northwest to reach the Pacific Ocean. For the most part, the strait is quite narrow, often 5 km (3 mi) or less in width.
Islote Fairway
1920. Active; focal plane 39 m (128 ft); white flash every 5 s. 5.5 m (18 ft) hexagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with one red horizontal band. 1-story keeper's house, painted white with a red roof. This is a staffed station. Ted Smith's photo is at right, Alberto Alsina has another view from the sea, and Google has a very fuzzy satellite view of the island. This lighthouse marks the junction of the Strait with the Smyth Channel (Canal Smyth), the south end of the inland passage through the Chilean fjords. Located in the entrance to Canal Smyth, on the north side of the main channel of the Strait. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-055; Admiralty G1480; NGA 111-2320.
Bahía Felix (Isla Tamar)
1907 (Luis Camuzi and George Slight). Active; focal plane 30 m (98 ft); white flash every 15 s. 14 m (46 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, attached at one end of a 1-story keeper's house. Lighthouse painted with horizontal red and white bands. Staffed keeper's house. Google has a very distant satellite view of the location. Located on Isla Tamar, a small island on the south side of the Strait opposite the Canal Smyth entrance. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-003; Admiralty G1478; NGA 111-2328.
Evangelistas (Islotes Evangelistas)
1896 (George Slight). Active; focal plane 58 m (190 ft); white flash every 10 s. 13 m (43 ft) cylindrical steel tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on 1-story concrete and stone keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white with red trim; lantern painted white, watch room red. 500 mm lens. Keeper's house staffed. Manuel Arcaya's photo is at right, Eduardo Fainé has a 2009 photo, and Trabas has Capt. Theo Hinrichs's 2009 photo. This is the landfall light for ships arriving at the Strait of Magellan from the Pacific. A tremendous engineering accomplishment for its day, the lighthouse is perched on a rocky islet about 30 km (20 mi) northwest of the western entrance to the Strait, facing the full force of the "Furious Fifties." It is one of the most exposed lighthouses in the world. The lighthouse complex also includes a telecommunications station and a weather station. The lighthouse was restored in 1995-96; as part of the restoration, the fiberglass lantern then in use was replaced with a replica of the original lantern. Accessible only by helicopter or by boat in heavy seas. Site and tower closed. ARLHS CHI-017; Admiralty G1498; NGA 111-2324.

Islote Fairway Lighthouse
Islote Fairway Light, Strait of Magellan
photo copyright Ted Smith; used by permission

Faro Evangelistas
Islotes Evangelistas Light, Strait of Magellan, October 2005
Panoramio photo copyright Manuel Arcaya; used by permission


Última Esperanza Province Lighthouses
Note: North of the Strait of Magellan, the coast of southern Chile is deeply cut by numerous fjords. The name of the province, "Last Hope," seems appropriate for this difficult-to-navigate region. There are numerous small lights along the fjords; only the largest and most conspicuous of these lights are listed here.
[Islote Pollo]
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 14 m (46 ft); white flash every 5 s. 8 m (26 ft) round cylindrical fiberglass tower, colored white with one narrow red horizontal band. A view from the channel is available, and Google has a very distant satellite view. Located on a reef in the middle of the Gray Channel (Canal Gray) on the east side of Isla Pedro Montt. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-088; Admiralty G1491.5; NGA 111-2280.
Isla Brinkley
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 13 m (42 ft); white flash every 10 s. 10 m (33 ft) hexagonal concrete tower, painted white with a red band. No photo available, and Google has only a distant satellite view of the area. Located on the Collingwood Strait. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-067; Admiralty G1504; NGA 111-2236.
Bahía Gregg
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 13 m (43 ft); three white flashes every 9 s. 10 m (33 ft) round concrete tower, painted white with a red band. No photo available, and Google has a distant satellite view. Located on the east side of the Isla Taraba, marking a sharp turn in the inland passage through the fjords.Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-033; Admiralty G1508; NGA 111-2220.
Isla Bonduca
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); white flash every 12 s. 10 m (33 ft) round concrete tower, painted white with a red band. Larry Myhre has a distant view from the sea, but the tower is not seen in Google's distant satellite view. Located on an island in the Canal Sarmiento, part of the inside passage east of Isla Hanover. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-041; Admiralty G1520; NGA 111-2192.
Punta Porpoise
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 16 m (52 ft); green flash every 5 s. 10 m (33 ft) octagonal concrete tower, painted white with a green band at the top. Jurgen Klinksiek's photo is at right, Marcos Riffo Hutinel has a view from the sea, and Google has a very distant satellite view of the location. This lighthouse is probably typical of the older small lighthouses of the Chilean fjords. Located at a narrow passage of the Angostura Guia, a strait separating Isla Chatham and Isla Hannover. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-074; Admiralty G1526; NGA 111-2180.
Isla Inocentes
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 32 m (105 ft); white flash every 12 s. 9 m (30 ft) concrete tower, painted with horizontal red and white bands. No photo available, and Google has only a distant satellite view of the island. Located on the east side of the Strait of Concepción at the intersection of the Inocentes Channel. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-086; Admiralty G1530; NGA 111-2168.
Isla Stratford
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 25 m (82 ft); white flash every 10 s. 9 m (30 ft) octagonal concrete tower, painted white with a red band. No photo available, and Google has only a distant satellite view of the area. Located on the west side of the Strait of Concepción, near the northeastern corner of the Isla Madre de Dios. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-048; Admiralty G1534; NGA 111-2148.
Isla Mason
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 25 m (82 ft); white flash every 15 s. 9 m (30 ft) octagonal concrete tower, painted white with a red band. No photo available, and Google has only a distant satellite view of the island. Located on a small island at the intersection of the Icy Channel and the Wide Channel. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-043; Admiralty G1536; NGA 111-2120.
Faro Punta Porpoise
Punta Porpoise Light, Última Esperanza, January 2002
photo copyright Jürgen Klinksiek; used by permission

Aysén (Aisén) Region Lighthouses

Note: At the southern end of the Aysén Region, the Taitao Peninsula extends the mainland to the Pacific Ocean shore, interrupting the inside passage through the Chilean fjords. Ships must round Cabo Raper through the open Pacific before returning to the inside route. The Tres Montes Peninsula is the extreme southwestern end of the Taitao Peninsula, ending at Cabo Raper.
Cabo Raper
1914 (George Slight). Active; focal plane 61 m (200 ft); white flash every 5 s. 14 m (46 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a large 1-story keeper's house. Lighthouse painted with red and white bands. Keeper's house staffed. A reduced version of a Navy photo is at right, Manuel Arcaya has a photo, Joan Alarcon has a 2008 closeup (halfway down the page), another photo is available, and Ramiro Navajas has a distant view. Google has a very distant satellite view of the station. The construction of this famous lighthouse posed a huge engineering challenge, which was overcome by building a special railroad 6.5 km (4 mi) long to carry materials to the station. The cape is at the southern end of the Tres Montes peninsula overlooking the northern entrance to the Golfo de Penas. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-009; Admiralty G1562; NGA 111-2040.
Isla Auchilú
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 70 m (230 ft); white flash every 15 s. 10 m (33 ft) concrete tower, painted with horizontal red and white bands. No photo available, and the tower is not seen in Google's distant satellite view of the area. Located on an island on the north side of the entrance to the Darwin Channel. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-039; Admiralty G1564; NGA 111-2032.
Isla Quemada
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); white flash every 5 s. 6 m (20 ft) octagonal concrete tower, painted white with one horizontal red band. Larry Myhre has a photo, but the tower is not seen in Google's distant satellite view of the area. Located on an island on the north side of the Darwin Channel off the west end of Isla Quemada. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. Admiralty G1568; NGA 111-2016.

Cabo Raper Light, Golfo de Penas
photo by Servicio de Señalización Marítima
Cayo Blanco
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 18 m (56 ft); three white flashes every 9 s. 10 m (33 ft) octagonal concrete tower, painted white with a red horizontal band. Larry Myhre has a view from the sea, a fuzzy photo is available, but Google has an indistinct satellite view. Located on a rocky reef in the southern part of the Moraleda Channel, near Puerto Frances. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-053; Admiralty G1577; NGA 111-1932.
Islote Cocos
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 45 m (148 ft); white flash every 15 s. 10 m (33 ft) round conical concrete tower, painted white with a red horizontal band. No photo available, and Bing has only a fuzzy satellite view of the island. The light is listed erroneously as "Islote Locos" by the NGA and ARLHS. Located on a small island in the entrance to the Moraleda Channel in northern Aysén. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-056; Admiralty G1584; NGA 111-1904.

Los Lagos Region Lighthouses

Note: The Los Lagos Region is at the northern end of Chile's Patagonian fjord district. Its capital, Puerto Montt, is connected by major highways to the populated central part of the country. A prominent feature of the region is the large Isla de Chiloé, which separates the Pacific from the Gulfs of Corcovado and Ancud.
Coastal Lighthouses
Isla Guafo
1907 (George Slight). Active; focal plane 144 m (472 ft); white flash every 10 s. 8 m (26 ft) round steel tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on a concrete base. Lighthouse painted white with a red horizontal band; lantern roof is also red. The modern 1-story keeper's house staffed by rotating 4-man crews who serve 4 months on station. One of Adam and Cheryl Zaricki's photos is at right, Manuel Arcaya has an aerial photo, a historic photo is available, and Google has a good satellite view of the station. The original 2-story keeper's house was destroyed by an intense storm in 1973. Isla Guafo is southwest of the Isla de Chiloé in the center of the entrance to the Golfo Corcovado. Located at the northwestern tip of the island. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. ARLHS CHI-021; Admiralty G1592; NGA 111-1888.
Punta Animo
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); white flash every 5 s. 10 m (33 ft) round fiberglass tower, painted white with a red horizontal band. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. Located on a promontory of the mainland about 30 km (19 mi) south of Punta Chulao. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1636.5; NGA 111-1764.
* Punta Chulao
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 30 m (98 ft); white flash every 10 s. 10 m (33 ft) round concrete tower, painted white with a red horizontal band. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. Located on a promontory of the mainland at the southern entrance to the Gulf of Ancud from the straits separating the Isla de Chiloé from the mainland. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CHI-066; Admiralty G1656; NGA 111-1676.
Banco San José
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 13 m (43 ft); three red flashes, in a 2+1 pattern, every 14 s. 15 m (49 ft) triangular skeletal tower, painted red with a green horizontal band. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. Located on a dangerous reef in the center of the entrance to the Seno Reloncaví, the sound leading to Puerto Montt. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1693; NGA 111-1664.
Isla Queullin (Paso Queullin)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 14 m (46 ft); white flash every 15 s. 8.5 m (28 ft) concrete tower, painted white with a red band. Larry Myhre has a distant view from the sea, and Bing has a satellite view. Located at the tip of a snad spit extending from the west side of Isla Queullin in the center of the entrance to the Seno Reloncaví. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-045; Admiralty G1692; NGA 111-1660.
Isla Tabón
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 73 m (240 ft); white flash every 10 s. 13 m (43 ft) concrete tower, painted white with a red band. Larry Myhre has a photo, and Bing has a satellite view. Located near the west end of the island, which is at the northern end of the Golfo de Ancud. Site status unknown. ARLHS CHI-049; Admiralty G1684; NGA 111-1656.

Isla Guafo Light, December 2003
photo copyright Adam and Cheryl Zaricki
used by permission
Bajo Corvio (Paso Quigua)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); four white flashes every 12 s. 12 m (39 ft) fiberglass post light mounted on a square base. No photo available, but Bing has a good satellite view. Located on a sandbar near the east end of the Chacao Channel. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1682; NGA 111-1592.
** Punta Corona
1859 (Enrique Siemen). Active; focal plane 66 m (216 ft); white flash every 10 s. 9 m (30 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white with a single red band below the gallery; the lantern roof is also red. Keeper's house staffed. Juan Sebastian Dominguez has a good 2008 photo, a wider view of the station is available, and Google has a satellite view. This is the oldest active lighthouse in Chile, although it appears to have been modernized. The lighthouse is at the northern end of the Isla Grande de Chiloé, marking the entrance to Ancud. Accessible by road. Site open, and the station crew will sometimes conduct tours of the tower. ARLHS CHI-013; Admiralty G1676; NGA 111-1552.
Isla de Doña Sebastiana (Range Rear)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 30 m (98 ft); white flash every 5 s. 14 m (46 ft) round fiberglass tower, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Alex Haro Brintrup has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. The range guides vessels leaving the Chacao Channel (Canal de Chacao), which separates Isla Grande de Chiloé from the mainland. Located at the southwestern point of the island, on the north side of the Channel. Site status unknown. Admiralty G1672.1; NGA 111-1548.

Lago Llanquihue Lighthouses
Note: Lago Llanquihue, Chile's second largest lake, is a natural lake located in the Los Lagos Region. The lake has an elevation of 70 m (230 ft) above sea level.
* Cofradía Náutica Frutillar
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); red flash every 5 s. 8 m (26 ft) round wood tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white, lantern black. José Pedro Martínez has a photo, Angel-C. Aibar has a second photo, Lightphotos.net has a closeup, and Google has a satellite view. The design of the lighthouse was inspired by the famous Brant Point Light in Nantucket, Massachusetts. Located at a small marina on the west shore of the lake just south of Frutillar. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Cofradía Náutica Frutillar. Admiralty G1703.9.
* Puerto Varas
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 6 m (20 ft); white flash every 5 s. 5 m (17 ft) round cylindrical fiberglass tower, colored white with one red horizontal band. A photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of the breakwater at the marina in Puerto Varas, at the south end of the lake. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty G1703.4.

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Notable faux lighthouses:

Adjoining pages: North: Central and Northern Chile | East: Southern Argentina | South: Antarctica

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Posted December 2004. Checked and revised September 20, 2013. Lighthouses: 34. Site copyright 2013 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.