Lighthouses of France: Corse (Corsica)

The fourth largest island of the Mediterranean, Corsica is located southwest of France, north of Sardinia, and due south of Genoa, Italy. After centuries of Genoese control, the island was conquered by France in 1768-69 and has remained French territory since. It is governed as a région of France and enjoys a limited degree of autonomy. In 1975 it was divided into two départements, Haute-Corse (Northern Corsica) and Corse-du-Sud (Southern Corsica). The Corsican language, closely related to Italian, is spoken alongside French.

The French word for a lighthouse, phare, is often reserved for the larger coastal lighthouses; a smaller light or harbor light is called a feu (literally "fire," but here meaning "light"). The front light of a range (alignement) is the feu antérieur and the rear light is the feu postérieur.

Aids to navigation in France were regulated for many years by the Bureau des Phares et Balises. This venerable agency has been absorbed as the office of Maritime Signalization (Signalisation Maritime) within Ecology, Infrastructure and Energy Ministry (Ministère de l'Écologie, du Développement Durable, et de l'Énergie). However, many of the lights are actually operated by the transport ministries or port authorities of the departmental governments.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. Admiralty numbers are from volume E of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA List numbers are from Publication 113.

General Sources
Le Phare à travers le Monde
A large, well known site, rich in fine photos, maintained by Alain Guyomard and Robert Carceller.
Phares de France
A second large and well known site by Jean-Christophe Fichou, rich in historical information.
Ministère de la Culture - Phares
Historical data on more than 180 French lighthouses, with photos of most of them.
Phareland, le Site des Phares de France
This comprehensive site has good photos and information about the major lighthouses.
Online List of Lights - Mediterranean France
Photos by various photographers (many by Arno Siering or Rainer Arndt) posted by Alexander Trabas.
Lighthouses in France
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
Lighthouses in Corsica
Photos available from Wikimedia.
Société Nationale pour le Patrimoine des Phares et Balises (S.N.P.B.)
The French national lighthouse preservation organization.
Französische Leuchttürme
Historic photos and postcard images posted by Klaus Huelse.


Mortella Light and Sémaphore, Saint-Florent, September 2005
Flickr Creative Commons photo by ben7va


Pertusato Light, Strait of Bonifacio, August 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Marco Bruni

Haute-Corse (Northern Corsica) Lighthouses

Calvi Lighthouses
* La Revellata
1844. Active; focal plane 97 m (318 ft); two white flashes every 10 s. 19 m (62 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery, rising from the center of a square 1-story masonry keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white with black trim outlining the corners of the tower and building; lantern painted white. Alain Bachellier's photo is at right, Ole Johansen has a closeup photo, another closeup photo is available, Trabas has Arno Siering's view from the sea, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. This is the landfall light for Calvi, a port on Corsica's northwest coast. Located on a knife-edge ridge at the tip of the Pointe de la Revellata, about 8 km (5 mi) northwest of Calvi via twisting mountain roads. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS COR-004; Admiralty E0918; NGA 8044.
* Calvi Jetée (2)
1938 (station established 1899). Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); quick-flashing green light. 10 m (33 ft) square cylindrical stone tower. Tower unpainted, except that a narrow green band is painted around the top of the tower. Roberto Ferrari has a good photo, Trabas and Siering have a closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. Located at the end of a sturdy groin extending into the sea at the foot of the citadel. Accessible by walking the mole. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS COR-040; Admiralty E0922; NGA 8056.

L'Île Rousse (Isula Rossa) Lighthouses
* La Pietra (Île Rousse)
1857. Active; focal plane 64 m (210 ft); three flashes every 12 s, white or green depending on direction. 13 m (43 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery, rising from the center of a square 1-story masonry keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white, lantern green. Phareland.com has numerous photos of this station, Trabas and Siering have a great photo, Daniel Kiechle has an excellent closeup, Giuseppe Grande has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. This lighthouse is built on a near-island, connected to the mainland by only a narrow isthmus. The light is the landfall light for Île Rousse, which is a terminal for ferries from Marseille. Located at the end of the D81A highway about 1 km (0.6 mi) north of Île-Rousse. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS COR-015; Admiralty E0926; NGA 8068.
La Revellata Light
La Revellata Light, Calvi, September 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Alain Bachellier
* Île Rousse Jetée (2)
1934 (station established 1858). Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); green light, 2 s on, 2 s off. 6 m (20 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on a circular stone base at the end of the pier. Tower painted white, lantern and gallery green. Trabas and Siering have a good photo, another photo is available, Huelse has an interesting postcard view, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. Located at the end of the mole sheltering the ferry terminal of Île-Rousse. Accessible by walking the mole. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS COR-022; Admiralty E0928; NGA 8072.

Saint-Florent Lighthouses
Mortella
1877. Active; focal plane 43 m (141 ft); green light, 3 s on, 1 s off. 14 m (46 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery. The keeper's house, formerly attached, has been demolished. Lighthouse painted white, lantern and gallery green. A photo appears at the top of this page, Jeff Warder has a view from below the lighthouse, Trabas has Arno Siering's very distant view, and Google has a satellite view. This lighthouse marks the west side of the entrance to the Golfe de Saint-Florent on the north coast of Corsica. High above the lighthouse is a historic signal station (sémaphore). Located on Punta Mortella, about 6 km (4 mi) by sea northwest of Saint-Florent. There does not appear to be any good road access to this location. Site and tower closed. ARLHS COR-019; Admiralty E0930; NGA 8076.
Fornali
1876. Active; focal plane 14 m (46 ft); green flash every 4 s. 11 m (36 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery. The keeper's house, formerly attached, has been demolished. Lighthouse painted white with green trim on the corners of the tower, lantern and gallery green. A good photo is available, Trabas and Siering have a distant view, and Google has a satellite view. This lighthouse is on the west side of the Golfe de Saint-Florent opposite the town of Saint-Florent. There is a road in this area but it's not clear if the lighthouse is accessible. Located about 2.5 km (1.5 mi) west of Saint-Florent. Site status unknown. ARLHS COR-030; Admiralty E0932; NGA 8084.
Tignoso (Tignasu)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 6 m (20 ft) (?); red flash every 4 s. 9 m (30 ft) round tower, painted red. Joseph Panza has a photo, Trabas has Siering's photo, and Google has a satellite view. The light is on top of the tower, so it seems the focal plane height should also be 9 m. Located on a rock in the Golfe de Saint-Florent, about 600 m (3/8 mi) northwest of the harbor of Saint-Florent. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty E0934; NGA 8088.

Rogliano (Cap Corse Area) Lighthouses

La Giraglia (Cap Corse)
1848 (Léonce Reynaud). Active; focal plane 85 m (279 ft); white flash every 5 s. 26 m (85 ft) round cylindrical stone tower with lantern and gallery, centered on a square 1-story masonry keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white, lantern and gallery black. A square medieval watch tower stands next to the lighthouse. A photo is at right, a spectacular view and a view from the sea are available, Trabas has Siering's view, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. This important light station marks the extreme northern tip of Corsica, Cap Corse. The lighthouse was under construction for ten years before it was finally finished in 1848. Located at the northern tip of the Île de la Giraglia, a small island about 2 km (1.25 mi) off the point of Cap Corse. Accessible only by boat, but there are good if distant views from the vicinity of Barcaggio. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS COR-016; Admiralty E0852; NGA 8100.
* Macinaggio (2)
Date unknown (station established 1880). Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); white or red light depending on direction, occulting twice every 6 s. 8 m (26 ft) round rubblestone tower; no lantern. Trabas and Siering have a photo, a view from across the harbor is available, and Google has a closeup street view and a satellite view. This modest light replaced a cast iron tourelle. Located at the end of the breakwater at Macinaggio, the northernmost port of Corsica's east coast. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS COR-012; Admiralty E0854; NGA 8104.
La Giraglia Light
La Giraglia Light, Cap Corse, January 2005
Panoramio photo copyright Pitta isa; permission requested

Bastia Lighthouses
Note: Bastia is the capital of Haute-Corsica, the principal port of the island, and the destination for ferries arriving from Marseille, Toulon, Nice, Genoa, Savona, and Livorno.
* Bastia Jetée de Saint-Nicolas (2)
1930s? (station established 1875). Active; focal plane 9 m (30 ft); green flash every 4 s. 5 m (16 ft) round cylindrical masonry tower with gallery. Tower unpainted except for a green band around the top of the tower. A photo is available, Trabas and Arndt have a distant view, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. Located at the end of the breakwater protecting the newer harbor of Bastia. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS COR-026; Admiralty E0860; NGA 8124.
* Bastia Môle Génois (2)
1904 (station established 1863). Active; focal plane 13 m (43 ft); green light, occulting twice every 6 s. 9 m (30 ft) round cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery. Tower unpainted; lantern and gallery painted green. Trabas and Arndt have good closeup, Guyomard and Carceller also have photos, Max Difermo has a photo of this light and the Jetée du Dragon light, a photo of the harbor entrance shows all three jetty lights, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located at the end of the north mole enclosing the old harbor of Bastia. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS COR-029; Admiralty E0858; NGA 8120.
* Bastia Jetée du Dragon (2)
1904 (station established 1861). Active; focal plane 16 m (52 ft); four flashes, white or red depending on direction, every 12 s. 13 m (43 ft) round cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery. Tower unpainted; lantern and gallery painted red. A photo is at right, Trabas and Arndt have a good photo, Guyomard and Carceller also have photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located at the end of the south mole enclosing the old harbor of Bastia. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS COR-031; Admiralty E0856; NGA 8112.
* Bastia Feu du Dragon
1864. Inactive since 1904. Approx. 10 m (33 ft) round masonry tower with gallery, unpainted, rising from the roof of a 1-story building within the Bastion du Dragon, now the site of a merchant marine academy. In Remé Langlumé's photo, the old lighthouse rises from the white building in the left foreground. Fred Bastiani has a photo that shows the lighthouse centered between the modern Jetée du Dragon (left) and Môle Génois lights, and the lighthouse is also centered in a Google street view and satellite view. Located above the base of the Jetée du Dragon. Site open, tower status unknown. Site manager: Lycée Maritime et Aquacole de Bastia. ARLHS COR-047.
Feu du Dragon, Bastia
Jetée du Dragon Light, Bastia, March 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Solea20

San Giuliano Lighthouse
* Alistro
1864. Active; focal plane 93 m (305 ft); two white flashes every 10 s. 27 m (89 ft) octagonal masonry tower with lantern and gallery, attached to the front of a 1-story masonry keeper's house. The tower is unpainted light gray stone; lantern painted black. Two additional keeper's houses and other light station buildings. An important signal station stands near the lighthouse. Harold Martin has a good photo, Gilles Talon has a fine closeup, Wikimedia has a panoramic view, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view and a street view from the village below the lighthouse. This lighthouse is near the easternmost point of the island, but it does not mark any particular cape or hazard; its purpose is to fill in an otherwise dark section of the coastline. Located on the heights about 2 km (1.25 mi) from the coast near Alistro and 5 km (3 mi) north of Bravonne. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS COR-008; Admiralty E0864; NGA 8136.

Corse-du-Sud (Southern Corsica) Lighthouses

Porto-Vecchio Lighthouses
* Punta San Ciprianu (Giovan Lungo, Cala Rossa, Pointe Saint-Cyprien)
1880. Active; focal plane 26 m (85 ft); flash every 4 s, white or green depending on direction. 13 m (43 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery, rising from the front of a 1-1/2 story masonry keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white, lantern and gallery black. A 2009 closeup photo is available, there is a view from the sea, Trabas has Siering's distant view, and Google has a fuzzy satellite view. This lighthouse marks the north side of the entrance to the Golfe de Porto-Vecchio, the largest and best harbor on the east coast of Corsica. Located on the Punta San Ciprianu in Cala Rossa. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS COR-037; Admiralty E0867; NGA 8156.
Pecorella
1973 (light added to existing daybeacon). Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); three green flashes every 12 s. 14 m (46 ft) round solid stone daybeacon to which a light has been added. Tower painted white with a green band at the top. It is not known when the daybeacon was built. A photo and a distant view are available, and Trabas and Siering have a similar distant view, but the reef is only a blur in Google's satellite view. Located on a rock (Rocher Pecorella) in the center of the entrance to the Golfe de Porto-Vecchio, warning ships to pass to the south; the rock is about 1.5 km (1 mi) east of Punta San Ciprianu and the same distance north of Punta Chiappa. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. ARLHS COR-038; Admiralty E0866.4; NGA 8152.
* La Chiappa (Porto-Vecchio)
1845. Active; focal plane 65 m (213 ft); four white flashes, in a 3+1 pattern, every 15 s. 21 m (69 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery, rising from the center of a square 1-story masonry keeper's house. Formerly unpainted light gray stone, the lighthouse has recently been painted white; lantern and gallery painted red. Olivier Bonnenfant's photo is at right, Trabas and Siering have a similar photo, Phareland.com has numerous photos, Wikimedia has a closeup, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. This is the landfall light for Porto Vecchio. Located on Punta Chiappa, the south side of the entrance to the Golfe de Porto-Vecchio, at the end of Route du Phare about 5 km (3 mi) northeast of Piccuvaghjia. Accessible by road; limited parking. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS COR-007; Admiralty E0866; NGA 8148.

Strait of Bonifacio Lighthouses
Note: The Strait of Bonifacio, only 11 km (7 mi) wide, separates Corsica from Sardinia. Strewn with rocks and shoals, it is one of the most dangerous passages in the western Mediterranean. Marco Bruni's photo of the Pertusato lighthouse (at the top of this page) includes a view across the strait to the mountains of Sardinia.
Chiappa Light
Chiappa Light, Porto-Vecchio, June 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Olivier Bonnenfant
Écueil de Perduto (Perduto Rock)
1980. Active; focal plane 16 m (52 ft); three quick white flashes every 10 s. 28 m (92 ft) steel post with gallery and a small equipment shelter on the gallery; the column is supported by tripod bracing at the base. Tower painted with black and yellow horizontal bands. A tiny photo is available, and Google has a distant satellite view. This light was installed as part of France's responsibility under an agreement with Italy to improve the safety of navigation in the Strait of Bonifacio. The listed focal plane conflicts with the listed tower height; probably the 28 m figure for the latter is the total height of the structure including the underwater tripod. Located on a rock southeast of the Île Perduto in the approach to the Strait from the northeast, about 7 km (4.5 mi) east of the southern tip of Corsica. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS COR-044; Admiralty E0875; NGA 7960.
Les Lavezzi (Îles Lavessi)
1874. Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); white or red light, depending on direction, occulting twice every 6 s. 12 m (39 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery, rising from the front of a 1-1/2 story masonry keeper's house. Lighthouse (both house and tower) painted with red and white horizontal bands. A photo is at right, Daniel Witting has a photo, Marco Palumbo has a closeup, Jo Peraldi has a view from the sea, and Google has a satellite view. The Îles Lavezzi, located in the middle of the eastern entrance to the Strait of Bonifacio, have been the scene of countless shipwrecks, including the loss of the French frigate Sémillante and all 750 men aboard in February 1855. The islands are now a protected nature reserve; ecotours are available from Bonifacio. Located on the southern point of the largest island of the group. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS COR-049; Admiralty E0872; NGA 7948.
Écueil Lavezzi (Tourelle des Lavezzi)
1904. Active; focal plane 18 m (59 ft); two white flashes every 6 s. 22 m (72 ft) round solid stone beacon with lantern, watch room, and gallery. Wikimedia has a photo (note that Îles Lavezzi lighthouse at upper right), and Trabas has Siering's very distant view, but the light is not visible in Google's satellite view. Lighthouse painted with red and black horizontal bands. This is France's southernmost lighthouse. The word écueil means a reef, and this one is particularly hazardous. Located on an isolated rock in the very center of the Strait of Bonifacio about 1.5 km (1 mi) south of the Phare des Lavezzi. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. ARLHS COR-033; Admiralty E0874; NGA 7952.
Lavezzi Light
Îles Lavezzi Light, Strait of Bonifacio, May 2005
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Paula

Bonifacio Lighthouses
* Pertusato
1844. Active; focal plane 100 m (328 ft); two white flashes every 10 s. 17 m (56 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery, rising from the center of a square 1-story masonry keeper's house. The lighthouse is painted white with black trim outlining the corners of the tower and building; lantern and gallery painted black. Marco Bruni's photo is at the top of this page, another good photo is available, Trabas and Siering have a photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. One of the great lighthouses of the Mediterranean, this historic light marks the southernmost tip of Corsica. For ships eastbound through the Strait of Bonifacio, it is the rear light of a range, Cap Feno being the front light. Located on Mont Pertusato at the point of the cape, about 5 km (3 mi) southeast of Bonifacio. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS COR-006; Admiralty E0876; NGA 7944.
La Madonetta
1854. Active; focal plane 28 m (92 ft); red light, 2 s on, 2 s off. 12 m (39 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery, rising from the center of a 1-story masonry keeper's house. Tower and lantern painted red; keeper's house painted white. Matthieu Faure has a closeup photo, Guyomard and Carceller have photos, Trabas and Siering have a fine photo (also seen at right), an aerial photo is available, Marinas.com also has aerial photos, Huelse has a "pittoresque" postcard view, and Bing has a satellite view. This lighthouse has a remarkable site atop a triangular block of sandstone attached to the mainland by a narrow peninsula. Located on the west side of the narrow entrance to the harbor of Bonifacio. There does not appear to be road access to this location. Site and tower closed. ARLHS COR-009; Admiralty E0878; NGA 7964.
Cap Feno
1874. Active; focal plane 23 m (75 ft) and 21 m (69 ft); two synchronized lights, each displaying a flash every 15 s; the upper light white or red depending on direction, the lower light always white but intensified along the line joining this light to the Phare de Pertusato. 12 m (39 ft) 3-story square masonry tower with a flat roof, painted white with a black band around the top. Lantern removed. Wikimedia has a closeup photo, Guyomard and Carceller also have a closeup, Trabas has Siering's very distant view, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the point of the cape, about 6 km (4 mi) west of Bonifacio, marking the north side of the western entrance to the Strait of Bonifacio. There does not appear to be road access to this location. Site and tower closed. ARLHS COR-013; Admiralty E0888; NGA 7980.

Southwest Coast Lighthouses
Les Moines
1911. Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); six quick white flashes followed by one long flash, every 15 s. 34 m (112 ft) round solid stone tower supporting a watch room and lantern; three galleries. Upper portion of the tower painted yellow, lower portion black. Fichou has a drawing of the light showing the structural details, and Trabas has a closeup photo. This light was built when it became clear that the Phare de Sénétosa did not provide enough protection for ships off the southwest coast of Corsica. Located on the rocky reef called the Éceuil des Moines (Monks' Reef), about 6 km (4 mi) off the rugged coastline. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. ARLHS COR-027; Admiralty E0890; NGA 7984.
Phare de la Madonetta
La Madonetta Light, Bonifacio
photo copyright Arno Siering; used by permission
Sénétosa
1892. Active; focal plane 54 m (177 ft); flash every 5 s, white or red depending on direction. Twin 15 m (49 ft) round masonry towers attached at opposite ends of a 2-story masonry keeper's house; the north tower has a lantern and gallery, the south has a gallery and a red screen on a tripod. Building painted white; lantern, galleries and daymarker are black. A 2009 photo is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. Only a few twin lighthouses were built in France, but it is not clear whether the second tower here was ever lit. Located on a rugged coastal road roughly 15 km (10 mi) southwest of Grossa. 4WD recommended. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS COR-005; Admiralty E0894; NGA 7988.
* Propriano (2)
Date unknown (station established 1879). Active; focal plane 16 m (53 ft); white or green light, depending on direction, occulting three times every 12 s. 17 m (56 ft) round stone tower with lantern and gallery. Tower painted white, lantern and gallery dark green. Guyomard and Carceller have two photos by Catherine Boyer, Trabas and Siering have a good photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view and a distant satellite view. Propriano is a small port on the Golfe de Valinco in southwestern Corsica. Located at the end of the Jetée du Scoglio-Longo, which also serves as a breakwater mole for Propriano. Accessible by walking the jetty. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS COR-035; Admiralty E0896; NGA 7992.

Ajaccio Area Lighthouses
Note: Ajaccio is the capital of Corse-du-Sud, the principal port of the island's west coast, and the largest city on the island with a population of about 65,000.
Cap Muro
1927. Active; focal plane 57 m (187 ft), white light, 3 s on, 1 s off. 11 m (36 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower; lantern removed. Tower painted white. Simone de Paoli has an October 2008 photo, Trabas has Siering's very distant view, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on the point of the cape, marking the southern entrance to the Golfe d'Ajaccio and the northern entrance to the Golfe de Valinco, about 7 km (4.5 mi) west of Acqua d'Oria. Reaching this remote location would require a lengthy hike over difficult terrain. Site and tower closed. ARLHS COR-014; Admiralty E0900; NGA 8004.
* Ajaccio Citadelle
1851. Active; focal plane 19 m (62 ft); two flashes every 10 s, white or red depending on direction. 13 m (43 ft) round cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery. Tower painted white, lantern and gallery red. Trabas and Siering have a good photo (also seen at right), a 2010 closeup is available, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse was built on the 16th century Citadelle d'Ajaccio, which stands on a peninsula projecting into the Golfe d'Ajaccio. The citadel is now a French military school and is closed to the public, although the lighthjouse can be seen from nearby. The city's traditional harbor is sheltered behind the peninsula and the citadel. Site and tower closed. ARLHS COR-025; Admiralty E0908; NGA 8008.
Éceuil de la Citadelle
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); four red flashes every 15 s. 13 m (43 ft) round concrete tower, painted red. A photo is available, Trabas has Siering's distant view, and Google has a distant satellite view and a distant street view. Located on a submerged reef about 400 m (1/4 mi) southeast of the Citadelle lighthouse. Accessible only by boat, but easily seen from shore. Admiralty E0906; NGA 8032.
Îles Sanguinaires
1844. Active; focal plane 98 m (322 ft); three white flashes every 15 s. 18 m (59 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery, rising from the center of a square 1-story masonry keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white, lantern and gallery red. A view from the sea is available, Paul Carmen has a second view, Trabas has Siering's view from shore, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Bing has a satellite view. This is the landfall light for Ajaccio; it is built atop a steeply conical island in the northern entrance to the Golfe d'Ajaccio about 16 km (10 mi) west of the city. Ships arriving from France often pass through a narrow channel between the island and the mainland. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. ARLHS COR-003; Admiralty E0902; NGA 8036.
Phare d"Ajaccio
Citadelle Light, Ajaccio
photo copyright Arno Siering; used by permission

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Notable faux lighthouses:

Adjoining pages: North: Liguria (Italian Riviera) | South: Northern Sardinia | West: Côte d'Azur (French Riviera)

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Posted April 17, 2006. Checked and revised April 8, 2014. Lighthouses: 30. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.