Lighthouses of the Republic of Cyprus

Cyprus, the third largest island of the Mediterranean Sea, is located south of Turkey. The island was conquered by the Ottoman (Turkish) Empire in 1571 and remained under Ottoman rule for three centuries. In 1878, The Ottoman sultan agreed to cede Cyprus to Britain in return for British support for Turkey in its war with Russia. After 82 years of British rule, the island became an independent republic in 1960 under a constitution drafted in an effort to balance the interests of Greek and Turkish Cypriots. Britain retained sovereignty over two large military bases, Akrotiri and Dhekelia, on the south coast. Unfortunately, the political compromise dissolved into violence in 1974. Turkish troops intervened and occupied the northern third of Cyprus, establishing the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus. United Nations troops administer the Green Line, a narrow zone separating the Greek and Turkish sections of the island. The Turkish Republic is not recognized diplomatically by any country except Turkey.

Lighthouses in the (Greek) Republic of Cyprus are maintained by the Cyprus Ports Authority. The Greek word for a lighthouse is pharos or faros.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. Admiralty numbers are from volume E of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA List numbers are from Publication 113.

General Sources
Cyprus Ports Authority - Lighthouses
A description of the history of Cyprus lighthouses, illustrated with several small photos.
Lighthouses of Cyprus
Pages for three of the lighthouses, posted by Claudia & Mike Hovorka.
Online List of Lights - Cyprus
Photos by various photographers posted by Alexander Trabas.
Lighthouses in Cyprus
Photos by various photographers available from Wikimedia.
World of Lighthouses - Cyprus
Photos by various photographers available from Lightphotos.net.
Europäische Leuchttürme auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard views posted by Klaus Huelse.

Pafos Light
Paphos Light, Paphos, March 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Marko Forsten

Lighthouses
Cavo Greco (Cape Greco)
1892. Active; focal plane 16 m (52 ft); one long (1.5 s) white flash every 15 s. 15 m (49 ft) round masonry tower with lantern and gallery. Entire lighthouse painted white. Trabas has a photo, the Hovorkas have a distant photo, a nice view from the sea is available, and Google has a satellite view. Cape Greco, the southeastern tip of Cyprus, is at the end of a long, slender peninsula. Located about 8 km (5 mi) southeast of Ayia Napa. Site and tower closed, but it is possible to view the light station from a distance. ARLHS CYP-003; Admiralty E5888; NGA 20940.
* Cavo Kiti (Cape Kiti, Larnaca) (2)
Date unknown (station established by the Ottoman government in 1864). Active; focal plane 20 m (66 ft); three white flashes every 15 s. 8 m (26 ft) octagonal stone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to one corner of a 1-story masonry keeper's house. The tower is unpainted; lantern painted white. A photo is at right, Varnavas Artemiou has a 2008 photo, Marcel Berendsen has another closeup, and a Google has a satellite view. The Hovorkas found the lighthouse under renovation in 2005. The original light was shown on a mast atop a white house, and that light was still listed in 1909. Located on a promontory at Kiti, about 12 km (7.5 mi) south of Larnaca. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CYP-004; Admiralty E5882; NGA 20904.
Cavo Gata (Cape Gata, Akrotiri)
1864 (Ottoman). Active (?); focal plane 58 m (190 ft); white flash every 5 s. 8 m (26 ft) octagonal cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story masonry keeper's house. The lighthouse was originally painted white. A closeup photo and Steve Bryan's closeup show the lighthouse in very poor condition, a photo page describes the lighthouse as abandoned, Joni McFarland-Johnston has a distant view from the sea, and Google has a satellite view. We need more information on the status of this historic and endangered lighthouse. The lighthouse stands on the southernmost tip of Cyprus. Although it is within the British military base of Akrotiri, it is operated by the Cyprus Port Authority. Located on the point of the cape, about 8 km (5 mi) southeast of Akrotiri and 20 km (13 mi) south of the city of Limassol. Site status unknown. ARLHS CYP-002; Admiralty E5876; NGA 20856.
* Paphos (Pafos)
1888. Active; focal plane 36 m (118 ft); one long (1.5 s) white flash every 15 s. 20 m (66 ft) round stone tower with lantern and gallery. Entire lighthouse painted white. The lighthouse stands next to a second century Roman amphitheater, part of which is seen a 2004 photo. Marko Forsten's photo is at the top of this page, Dave Gunn has a photo, the Hovorkas have photos, a 2009 photo and closeup are available, Trabas has a photo by Rainer Arndt, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and a Google satellite view is available. This handsome British Imperial tower is the best known and most visited lighthouse of Cyprus. Paphos is at the southwestern corner of the island, where the lighthouse served as the landfall light for ships arriving from Britain. Located on a promontory projecting into the Mediterranean at Paphos. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CYP-005; Admiralty E5908; NGA 20836.
Cavo Kiti Light
Cape Kiti Light, Larnaca, September 2008
Panoramio Creative Commons photo by Charing1
Cavo Akamas (Cape Akamas)
1989. Active; focal plane 211 m (692 ft); two white flashes every 15 s. 4.5 m (15 ft) light mounted at one corner of a 1-story stone building (a former British Army observation post). ARLHS has a photo, qsl.net has a portfolio of photos by amateur radio operator 5B8AP, and Google has a satellite view. Located atop the bluff at the westernmost tip of Cyprus, about 80 km (50 mi) north northwest of Paphos. Accessible by a long hike or a rough ride by 4x4 vehicle. Site open, building closed. ARLHS CYP-001; Admiralty E5910; NGA 20986.

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Notable faux lighthouses:

Adjoining page: North: Northern Cyprus

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Posted May 14, 2007. Checked and revised June 12, 2014. Lighthouses: 5. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.