Lighthouses of Germany: Bremerhaven

Germany has two coastlines, one facing northwest on the North Sea and the other facing northeast on the Baltic Sea. This page lists lighthouses of the North Sea port of Bremerhaven on the estuary of the Weser River, as well as its approaches through the shallow bight known as the Außenweser ("Outer Weser"). Navigation on the Weser continues upstream to Bremen, and there is a separate page for the lights of the Weser above Bremerhaven.

Bremen was one of the members of the Hanseatic League, which dominated trade in northern Europe from roughly the 13th through the 17th centuries. Today the Free Hanseatic City of Bremen (Freie Hansestadt Bremen) includes the two cities of Bremen and Bremerhaven, but not the territory between them: that area is part of the state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen). The Cuxhaven District of Lower Saxony surrounds Bremerhaven to the north, east, and south.

Interest in lighthouses is strong in Germany, and most of the towers are in good condition. A federal law provides blanket protection to historic lighthouses. There is concern, however, that many of the lights may be deactivated in the coming years as navigators depend less and less on them.

In German, a lighthouse is a Leuchtturm ("light tower"), plural Leuchttürme. The front light of a range is the Unterfeuer and the rear light is the Oberfeuer. There are many modern range lighthouses, and most of these towers are crowned by a topmark: a large, distinctive structure that serves to mark the range clearly in the daytime. Some topmarks are conical, others are funnel-shaped, and some consist of one or more gallery-like rings around the tower.

Lighthouses in Germany are operated by the regional harbor authority, called the WSA (Wasser- und Schiffahrtsamt). This page includes the jurisdictions of two WSA's: Bremerhaven and Bremen. The WSA's are linked to and regulated by a federal agency, the Wasser- und Schifffahrtsamtverwaltung des Bundes (WSV).

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. Admiralty numbers are from volume B of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA List numbers are from NGA Publication 114.

Bremerhaven Oberfeuer
Bremerhaven Oberfeuer, Bremerhaven, September 2005
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Jürgen Howaldt

General Sources
Leuchtturm-Atlas
A large site with excellent photos and information on nearly all German lighthouses, maintained by Frank and Birgit Toussaint.
Online List of Lights - Germany North Sea
Photos by various photographers posted by Alexander Trabas.
Leuchttürme.net - Deutschland
Outstanding photos by Malte Werning.
Leuchtturmseiten von Anke und Jens
Good photos and and brief accounts for many of the lighthouses, in English.
Deutsche Leuchttürme/Feuerschiffe
Photos posted by Klause Huelse.
Lighthouses in Germany
Photos available from Wikimedia.
Deutsche Leuchttürme auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard images, also posted by Klaus Huelse.
Die Land-Seezeichen des WSA Bremerhaven
Lighthouse information from WSA Bremerhaven.
Interessengemeinschaft Seezeichen e.V.
Germany's national lighthouse preservation organization.
Lightships in Germany
An outstanding site on German lightships, maintained by Iris Klempau.
Roter Sand Light
Roter Sand Light, Außenweser, September 2010
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Kirstin

Sandstedt (Southern Cuxhaven District) Lighthouses

Sandstedt Lighthouses
* Sandstedt Unterfeuer (2)
1981 (station established 1898). Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); white light occulting once every 6 s, synchronized with the rear light. 17 m (56 ft) slender round cylindrical tower with a large octagonal pyramidal topmark. Tower painted white, topmark red. The light is displayed from a tiny window in the middle of the topmark. Werning has a closeup, Trabas has a good photo by Klaus Kern, M. Gieschler has a 2008 photo, and Google has a satellite view. This is a downstream (northbound) range. The original lighthouse was relocated to the Deutsches Schiffahrtsmuseum in Bremerhaven (see below). Located on the riverbank on the east side of the Weser south of the village of Sandstedt. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-205; Admiralty B1297.
* Sandstedt Oberfeuer (2)
1981 (station established 1898). Active; focal plane 23 m (75 ft); white light occulting once every 6 s, synchronized with the front light. 35 m (115 ft) slender round cylindrical tower with a large octagonal funnel-shaped topmark. Tower painted white, topmark red. The light is displayed from a tiny window below the topmark. Trabas has a good photo by Manfred Schüler, Werning has a good photo, Udo Borchers has a 2009 photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located in a field 420 m (0.25 mi) north northeast of the front range light and about 300 m (0.2 mi) southeast of the old rear range light, west of the village of Sandstedt. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-206; Admiralty B1297.1.
* Sandstedt Oberfeuer (1)
1898. Inactive since 1981. Approx. 25 m (82 ft) square pyramidal cast iron skeletal tower with central cylinder, enclosed watch room, lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted red; lantern dome is green. Werning's photo is at right, Udo Borchers has a 2009 closeup, Huelse also has a photo of the light, and Google has a satellite view. Located beside the K53 highway about 700 m (0.4 mi) east of the Sandstedt ferry terminal. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: unknown. ARLHS FED-314.

1898 Sandstedt Oberfeuer, Sandstedt
photo copyright Malte Werning; used by permission

Hansestadt Bremen Lighthouses

Fischereihafen and Geestemünde (South Bremerhaven) Lighthouses
* Brinkamahof (Weddewarden Unterfeuer, Kleiner Roter Sand) (relocated)
1912. Inactive since 1980. 26 m (85 ft) round cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, incorporating keeper's quarters, painted with red and white horizontal bands; lantern dome is black. Leuchtturm-Atlas also has a good photo, and Google has a satellite view. This lighthouse was originally located near the Imsum container port; it was deactivated when that port was expanded. In 1980 a large floating crane was used to lift the tower and transport it to the Bootshafen Marina (now called Nordsee-Yachting) on the other side of Bremerhaven, where it has served as a clubhouse and caretaker's residence. WSA Bremerhaven has a photo of the lighthouse being lifted by the crane. Site open, tower closed. Located on the west side of the Wesermarsch harbor, at the south end of the Fischereihafen, on the south side of Bremerhaven. Owner/site manager: Nordsee-Yachting. ARLHS FED-286
* Fischereihafen Oberfeuer (Doppelkorn)
1973. Active; focal plane 45 m (148 ft); white light occulting once every 6 s. 44 m (144 ft) slender round cylindrical tower with a double funnel-shaped topmark. Lighthouse painted with red and white horizontal bands; the topmark is red. Trabas has a good photo by Ulrich Bode, Werning has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. The light is nicknamed Doppelkorn, "double liqueur-glass." The Fischereihafen range is a upstream (southbound) range for ships passing Bremerhaven and continuing upriver. Located in an industrial area on the east side of the Fischereihafen, 1280 m (0.8 mi) southeast of the front light. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-329; Admiralty B1256.9.
* Geestemünde-Fischereihafen Unterfeuer
1973. Active; focal plane 17 m (56 ft); white light occulting once every 6 s. 11 m (33 ft) slender round cylindrical tower with a funnel-shaped lantern room. This lighthouse serves as the front range tower for both the Geestemünde and Fischereihafen ranges; the lights are displayed through a window in the lantern. Trabas has a great photo by Manfred Schüler in which the Geestemünde mole lights can also be seen, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the dike south of downtown Bremerhaven and near the north end of the Fischereihafen. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-332; Admiralty B1257.
* Geestemünde Oberfeuer
1973. Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); white light occulting once every 6 s. 25 m (82 ft) slender round cylindrical tower with a large funnel-shaped topmark. Lighthouse painted with red and white horizontal bands; the "funnel" is red. Trabas also has a good photo by Manfred Schüler, and Google has a satellite view. This is a downstream (northbound) range guiding ships toward the Geestemünde (old harbor). Located about 340 m (370 yd) northeast of the front range light on a dike on the north side of the Fischereihafen in Bremerhaven. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-331; Admiralty B1257.1.
* Geeste (Geestemünde) South Mole
1925. Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); continuous green light. 14 m (46 ft) square skeletal tower with octagonal lantern and square gallery. Entire lighthouse painted green. Trabas has a good photo by Ulrich Bode, Werning also has a fine photo, and Google has a satellite view. The lower Geeste River is the old harbor of Bremerhaven. Its mouth, the Geestemünde, is also the entrance to the Elbe-Weser Waterway leading to Otterndorf on the lower Elbe. Located at the end of the south mole, which extends only a short distance into the river; accessible by walking the mole. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-047; Admiralty B1275; NGA 10420.
* Geeste (Geestemünde) North Mole (2)
1914 (station established 1857). Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); continuous red light. 14 m (46 ft) round brick tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse unpainted, lantern and gallery painted red. Hannes Grobe's photo is at right, Werning has a good photo, Trabas has an excellent closeup photo by Ulrich Bode, Wikimedia has many photos, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of the north mole, which extends only a short distance into the river; apparently accessible by walking the mole. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-046; Admiralty B1274; NGA 10416.
Geestemünde Nordmole Light
Geestemünde North Mole Light, Bremerhaven, 2008
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Hannes Grobe

Downtown Bremerhaven Lighthouses
* Lightship Elbe 3 (Eiderlotsgaliot IV)
1909. Decommissioned 1966. 44 m (144 ft) 3-masted steel lightship. Hull painted red, masts and superstructure white. Built by Eiderwerft AG, Tönning. Leuchturm-Atlas has a good photo, Huelse has a historic photo, and Google has a satellite view. The ship served as a minesweeper during World War I. From 1927 until World War II, the ship was named Bürgermeister Abendroth II after a Hamburg politician who worked for better conditions for lightship crews. After the war it served the Elbe 3 station off Cuxhaven until 1966. Since 1967 the ship has been moored at Bremerhaven in the collection of the Deutches Schiffahrtsmuseum. The ship has been restored to its original configuration, with three tall masts. Site open, ship open daily April through October. Owner/site manager: Deutsches Schiffahrtsmuseum.
* Sandstedt Unterfeuer (1) (relocated)
1898. Inactive since 1981. 11 m (34 ft) triangular cast iron skeletal tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern dome is greenish metallic. Werning has a good photo, Wikimedia has Hannes Grobe's closeup, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse was relocated in 1983 to the maritime museum on the Hans-Scharoun-Platz in downtown Bremerhaven. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Deutsches Schiffahrtsmuseum. ARLHS FED-204.
* Lightship Fehmarnbelt I (lantern)
1905. Inactive since 1968. The lightship was scrapped in 1968, but its lantern is on display outside the maritime museum on the Hans-Scharoun-Platz in downtown Bremerhaven. Lantern painted white. The Anke/Jens site has a photo, Wikimedia has a closeup by Hannes Grobe, and Google has a satellite view. Site open. Owner/site manager: Deutsches Schiffahrtsmuseum. ARLHS FED-141.
* Bremerhaven Unterfeuer (Zwiebelturm, Minarett)
1893. Active; focal plane 21 m (62 ft); white light, 2 s on, 2 s off, synchronized with the rear light. 26 m (85 ft) tapered-conical round cast iron tower with gallery, crowned by a large ball and a spire. Lighthouse painted with red and white horizontal bands. Allie Caulfield's photo is at right, Trabas also has a good photo by Ulrich Bode, Werning has a photo, Wikimedia has several photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. This remarkable Gay Nineties tower has been a Bremerhaven landmark for more than a century. Its nickname Zwiebelturm ("onion tower") refers to its round topmark. The light is part of an upstream (northbound) range, helping ships leaving the Weser negotiate a major turn in the estuary. The lighthouse was relocated by 56 m (184 ft) in 1992 to improve its visibility. In recent years the Bremerhaven zoo has expanded along the waterfront and the lighthouse now stands just outside the zoo grounds. Located on the south side of the entrance to the Neuer Hafen (new harbor) in Bremerhaven. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. Site manager: Zoo am Meer Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-049; Admiralty B1268; NGA 10408.
* Bremerhaven Oberfeuer (Loschenturm)
1855 (Simon Loschen). Active; focal plane 34 m (111 ft); white light, 2 s on, 2 s off, synchronized with the front light. 37 m (121 ft) square brick New Gothic tower with octagonal lantern. Tower is unpainted brick, lantern painted green. On the side of the tower is a large iron bracket structure formerly used to display storm signals. Jürgen Howaldt's photo appears at the top of the page, Werning has a nice photo, Trabas also has a good photo by Ulrich Bode, Wikimedia has many photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. This elegant lighthouse, designed by the Bremen architect Simon Loschen, could not be more different from the front range tower. The oldest operating lighthouse of Germany's North Sea mainland, it narrowly escaped destruction during World War II. Located about 200 m (220 yd) north of the front light, near a former lock that provided entry to the Neuer Haven (originally the light keepers also operated the lock). Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-050; Admiralty B1268.1; NGA 10412.
Zwiebelturm
Zwiebelturm and Loschenturm, Bremerhaven, March 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Allie Caulfield
* Tallship Alexander von Humboldt (ex Lightship Reserve Sonderburg (Kiel III))
1906. Decommissioned 1986. 53.3 m (175 ft) steel lightship, converted to a fully-rigged 3-masted bark. The lightship served as a reserve ship in the North Sea until World War II; after the war it served the Kiel station until its deactivation. A serious collision with the Finnish MV Satu in 1957 knocked it off-duty for two years, and a second collision with the Liberian MV Ocean Wind in 1986 led to the ship being withdrawn from service. It was sold to a sail training institute in Bremerhaven and converted to a 3-masted sailing ship. Since 1988 it has been one of the world's best-known tall ships, appearing in ports around the world. The ship's home port remains Bremerhaven. Owner/site manager: Deutsche Stiftung Sailtraining.
* Kaiserschleuse (Kaiserhafen East Mole, Klingelturm, Pingelturm)
1900. Inactive since 2011. 15 m (49 ft) tapered round brick tower with lantern and gallery, the lantern crowned with a spike like that of an Imperial Army helmet. Lighthouse unpainted red brick with white false window casings; lantern is green. The original fog bell, still active (4 strokes every 10 s), is mounted on the side of the tower. Werning's photo is at right, Larry Myhre has a photo, Wikimedia has several good photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. The elegant turn-of-the-century architecture of this lighthouse makes it a unique historic treasure. The light guided ships into the Kaiserhafen, a protected harbor in downtown Bremerhaven entered through a lock, the Kaiserschleuse. The familiar sound of the fog bell gave the lighthouse the local nicknames of Klingelturm or Pingelturm. Located on the east side of the harbor entrance, on the north side of downtown Bremerhaven. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-338; Admiralty B1264; NGA 10404.
* Großer Vogelsand (upper section)
1975 (relocated to Bremerhaven in 2010). Approx. 15 m (49 ft) 16-sided steel tower topped by a helipad. Building painted red with a white horizontal band. This structure is the top of the former Großer Vogelsand lighthouse, which stood in the North Sea off the entrance to the Elbe (see the Cuxhaven and Stade page). The top of the lighthouse was removed in December 2008 and brought to Bremerhaven to be scrapped. Instead, the huge unit was moved in June 2010 to the Havenhostel Bremerhaven, where it was renovated as part of the hostel. Wikimedia has a photo of the move. Florian Pförtsch has a 2013 photo, another photo is available, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on the Bürgermeister-Smidt-Straße at the Rickmersstraße on the north side of downtown Bremerhaven. Site presumably open, tower status unknown. Owner/site manager: Havenhostel Bremerhaven. ex-Admiralty B1340.
Klingelturm
Der Klingelturm, Bremerhaven
photo copyright Malte Werning; used by permission

Imsum (North Bremerhaven) Lighthouses
[Imsum]
Date unknown. Inactive since 1996 and removed in 2005. 21 m (62 ft) slender round cylindrical tower with lantern, watch room, and gallery. Lighthouse painted red with two narrow white bands around the watch room; lantern roof was green. Werning has a fine photo, and the Anke/Jens site also has a good closeup photo. The lighthouse was removed to make way for expansion of the Imsum containership terminal. The lighthouse was donated to the Deutsches Schiffahrtsmuseum, which has it in storage for possible display in the future. According to Werning, the lantern is from an earlier, unidentified lighthouse. Formerly located just offshore a short distance southeast of the Imsum Oberfeuer. Site appears to be open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-119; ex-Admiralty B1238.
* Imsum Oberfeuer (2)
2009 (station establishment date unknown). Active; focal plane 39 m (128 ft); white light occulting once every 6 s, synchronized with the front light. 43 m (141 ft) round cylindrical tower with gallery, painted red with a white horizontal band. Lighthouse painted red with a single white horizontal band. Trabas has a closeup photo by Helmut Seger. The previous light was on a steel tripod tower with a central spiral stairway, topped by a triangular funnel-shaped topmark. Werning has a good photo of that lighthouse, and Google has a fine (albeit obsolete) satellite view. This is the only Außenweser light built on land. Located just north of the Imsum container ship terminal on the west bank of the Weser at Weddewarden north of Bremerhaven. Site appears to be open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-336; Admiralty B1230.1.
Imsum Unterfeuer (2)
2009 (station establishment date unknown). Active; focal plane 21 m (69 ft); white light occulting once every 6 s, synchronized with the rear light. 21 m (69 ft) round cylindrical tower with gallery, painted red with a white horizontal band. The tower also carries a slatted triangular daymark, painted red. Trabas has a good photo by Helmut Seger, and Bing has a satellite view. Located in the water 900 m (0.56 mi) west northwest of the rear light. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-337; Admiralty B1230.

Wremen and Dorum (Western Cuxhaven District) Lighthouses

Wremen Lighthouses
Hofe Unterfeuer
1974. Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); white light occulting once every 6 s, synchronized with the rear light. 43 m (141 ft) slender round cylindrical tower with a distinctive clamshell-like topmark. Lighthouse painted with red and white horizontal bands. Werning has a good photo, Trabas has a closeup photo by Helmut Seger, and Bing has a satellite view. This is an outbound range, guiding ships leaving the Weser. Located about 2.5 km (1.5 mi) west of the coast southwest of Wremen. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-297; Admiralty B1240; NGA 10376.
Hofe Oberfeuer
1974. Active; focal plane 35 m (115 ft); white light occulting once every 6 s, synchronized with the front light. 43 m (141 ft) slender round cylindrical tower with a distinctive clamshell-like topmark. Lighthouse painted with red and white horizontal bands. Werning has a good photo, Trabas has a closeup photo by Helmut Seger, and Bing has a satellite view. Located 1300 m (0.8 mi) north northwest of the front light. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-298; Admiralty B1240.1; NGA 10380.
* Wremen (Kleine-Preuße) (replica)
2005 replica of 1906 lighthouse. Inactive (a decorative light is displayed). Approx. 12 m (39 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, painted with black and white horizontal bands. Stefan Grunwald has a 2011 photo, Martina aus Beers has a good 2008 photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view of the original lighthouse, and Google has a satellite view. The original lighthouse was demolished in 1930. The replica was prefabricated and erected in a single day in April 2005. Located on the north side of the harbor entrance in Wremen, a town between Dorum and Bremerhaven. Site open, tower status unknown. Site manager: Nationalpark Niedersächsisches Wattenmeer.

Dorum Lighthouse
** Obereversand (Eversand Oberfeuer) (relocated)
1887. Reactivated (inactive 1923-2004; now privately maintained and unofficial); focal plane 29 m (95 ft); continuous white light. 34 m (112 ft) square cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, incorporating 3-story keeper's quarters, mounted on a square skeletal foundation. Lighthouse painted dark brown. A photo by Frank Kagels is at right, Werning has a page for the lighthouse with a good photo, Olaf Strunck has another photo, and Bing has a satellite view. By the 1990s, the foundation of this Außenweser lighthouse was undermined and the tower was in danger of collapse. In 1999, a preservation society was formed to work with the national park service for relocation and restoration of the lighthouse. In early 2003, the lighthouse was ingeniously lifted off its foundations and barged to the harbor of Dorum, where it was installed on a new foundation just offshore and fully restored. Leuchturm-Atlas has a portfolio of photos of the relocation. A pier and and external stairway provides access to the gallery and lantern room. The light was relit in a ceremony on 14 August 2004. Located on the waterfront at Dorum. Site open, tower open on weekends (inquire locally for the schedule of tours). Owner: Nationalpark Niedersächsisches Wattenmeer. Site manager: Förderverein Leuchtturmdenkmal Obereversand e.V. ARLHS FED-084.

Obereversand Light, Dorum, November 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Frank Kagels

Außenweser Offshore Lighthouses

Note: This remarkable collection of offshore lighthouses guides ships through extensive shoals at the entrance to the Weser estuary and the port of Bremerhaven. The area is called the Außenweser, the "Outer Weser."
Solthörn Unterfeuer
1981. Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); white light 2 s on, 2 s off, synchronized with the rear light. 20 m (65 ft) slender round cylindrical tower with an octagonal 2-ringed topmark. Lighthouse painted red with two horizontal white bands. Trabas has a closeup photo, and Werning has a good photo. Like the Hofe Range, this is an outbound range, guiding ships leaving the Weser. Located about 4 km (2.5 mi) west of the coast northwest of Wremer. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-341; Admiralty B1239; NGA 10368.
Solthörn Oberfeuer
1981. Active; focal plane 31 m (102 ft); white light 2 s on, 2 s off, synchronized with the front light. 33 m (108 ft) slender round cylindrical tower with an octagonal 2-ringed topmark. Lighthouse painted red with two horizontal white bands. Trabas has a closeup photo, and Werning has a good photo. Located 700 m (0.44 mi) north northwest of the front light. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-340; Admiralty B1239.1; NGA 10372.
Wremer Loch Oberfeuer
1967. Active; focal plane 31 m (102 ft); white light 3 s on, 3 s off, synchronized with the rear light. 34 m (112 ft) slender round cylindrical tower with lantern and a small octagonal gallery. Lighthouse painted black with two white bands; lantern painted green. Trabas has a closeup photo, and Werning also has a photo. Located 1060 m (0.7 mi) northwest of the front light. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-343; Admiralty B1224.1; NGA 10364.
Wremer Loch Unterfeuer
1967. Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); white light 3 s on, 3 s off, synchronized with the rear light. 18 m (59 ft) slender round cylindrical tower with lantern and a small octagonal gallery. Lighthouse painted black with one white band; lantern painted green. Trabas has a closeup photo, and Werning's photo is at right. Located about 3 km (2 mi) southeast of Langlütjen Range Front. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-342; Admiralty B1224; NGA 10360.
Langlütjen Unterfeuer
1970. Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); white light occulting once every 6 s, synchronized with the rear light. 19 m (62 ft) slender round cylindrical tower with a large octagonal gallery. Lighthouse painted black with two white bands around the gallery. Werning has a good photo, and Trabas has a closeup photo. Located about 5 km (3 mi) southeast of Langlütjennordsteert. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-302; Admiralty B1228; NGA 10352.
Wremer Loch Unterfeuer
Wremer Loch Unterfeuer
photo copyright Malte Werning; used by permission
Langlütjen Oberfeuer
1970. Active; focal plane 31 m (102 ft); white light occulting once every 6 s, synchronized with the front light. 34 m (112 ft) slender round cylindrical tower with a small octagonal gallery. Lighthouse painted black, gallery white. Trabas has a closeup photo, and Werning also has a good photo. This is an outbound range, guiding ships leaving the Weser. Located 930 m (0.6 mi) northwest of the front light. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-303; Admiralty B1228.1; NGA 10356.
Langlütjennordsteert
Date unknown. Inactive since 2001. 16 m (52 ft) structure: lantern, gallery, and watch room on tripod pilings. Lantern, including roof, painted yellow; tripod legs painted black. Werning also has a good photo. Sibling of Robbennordsteert. The lighthouse remains in service as a daybeacon. Located about 2 km (1.2 mi) east of the Robbenplate Oberfeuer. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-304; Admiralty B1226.
Robbenplate Oberfeuer
1925. Active; focal plane 37 m (121 ft); white light occulting once every 6 s. 39 m (127 ft) square aluminum-clad brick tower incorporating keeper's quarters, with lantern and four galleries. Lighthouse painted red with white trim. The lantern (1906) was transferred from the Meyers Legde Neu Light. Werning's photo is at right, Wikimedia has a 2011 photo, and Trabas has a good photo by Manfred Schüler. The front light is a post light on a tripod. Located about 3.5 km (2 mi) southeast of the Robbennordsteert Light, at the west end of the Robbenplate shoal. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-198; Admiralty B1214.1; NGA 10344.
Robbennordsteert
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); continuous white or red light, depending on direction. 16 m (52 ft) structure: lantern, gallery, and watch room on tripod pilings. Lantern painted red; lantern roof and tripod legs painted black. Werning has a fine photo, and Trabas also has a closeup photo. Located about 2 km (1.25 mi) southeast of Dwarsgat Range Rear Light. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-199; Admiralty B1210; NGA 10336.
Meyers Legde Neu
1906. Inactive since 1923. 24 m (79 ft) round cylindrical cast iron tower; lantern removed and transferred to the Robbenplate Range Rear Light. Located about 750 m (1/2 mi) south of the older lighthouse. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Nationalpark Niedersächsisches Wattenmeer. ARLHS FED-156.
Robbenplate Oberfeuer
Robbenplate Oberfeuer
photo copyright Malte Werning; used by permission
Meyers Legde Alt
1887. Inactive since 1945. 26 m (85 ft) square cast iron tower incorporating 3-story keeper's quarters, mounted on a square skeletal foundation. Like the Eversand Range Lights, the Meyers Legde lighthouses guided ships on a secondary entrance to the Weser from the north. Also like the Eversand Unterfeuer (next entry), the interior of the lighthouse was gutted by fire at some time after deactivation. In 1986, ledges were added to the tower as nesting sites for cormorants, and this lighthouse is also now white with bird droppings. Located about 3 km (2 mi) east of Eversand Range Front Light. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Nationalpark Niedersächsisches Wattenmeer. ARLHS FED-339.
Eversand Unterfeuer
1887. Inactive since 1923. 21 m (69 ft) square cast iron tower incorporating 3-story keeper's quarters, mounted on a square skeletal foundation. The range guided ships on a secondary entrance to the Weser from the north. The interior of the lighthouse was gutted by fire at some after deactivation. In 1982, ledges were added to the tower as nesting sites for cormorants. This succeeded, if anything, only too well; Werning has a good photo of the results. The lighthouse, originally painted black, is now white with bird droppings. The rear range light was successfully relocated to Dorum-Neufeld in 2003 (see above). Located about 2 km (1.2 mi) east of the Dwarsgat Unterfeuer Light. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Nationalpark Niedersächsisches Wattenmeer. ARLHS FED-083.
Dwarsgat Oberfeuer
1976. Active; focal plane 35 m (115 ft); white light, 3 s on, 3 s off, synchronized with the front range. 36 m (118 ft) slender round cylindrical tower with a drum-shaped lantern and topmark and a gallery low on the tower. Lighthouse painted red with two white horizontal bands. Trabas has a closeup photo, and Werning also has a good photo. Located about 4 km (2.5 mi) east northeast of the Hohe Weg Light, marking the main channel into the Weser and Bremerhaven. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-292; Admiralty B1225.1; NGA 10332.
Dwarsgat Unterfeuer
1976. Active; focal plane 16 m (52 ft); white light, 3 s on, 3 s off, synchronized with the rear range. 19 m (62 ft) round cylindrical tower with a drum-shaped lantern and topmark, painted red with one white horizontal band. Werning has a good photo, and Trabas has a photo by Manfred Schüler. Located about 4 km (2.5 mi) east northeast of the Hohe Weg Light, marking the main channel into the Weser and Bremerhaven. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-291; Admiralty B1225; NGA 10328.
Hohe Weg
1856 (Johann J. van Ronzelen). Active; focal plane 29 m (95 ft); continuous light, white, red, or green depending on direction. 36 m (118 ft) octagonal aluminum-clad brick tower with lantern and double gallery. Keeper's quarters incorporated in the tower. Lighthouse painted red with white trim; lantern painted green. The original 2nd order Sautter, Lemonier & Cie. Fresnel lens is on display at the Deutsches Schiffahrtsmuseum in Bremerhaven. A photo is at right, Trabas has an excellent photo by Klaus Kern, German Wikipedia has an article with several photos, and Werning has a photo. This historic lighthouse guides ships around a dangerous shallow area called the Hohe Weg (high way) off the entrance to the Weser. The modern lantern and radar antenna were installed in 1962; Huelse has a historic postcard view showing the tower in its original appearance. Located 25 km (15 mi) northwest of Bremerhaven. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-108; Admiralty B1198; NGA 10324.
Hohe Weg Light
Hohe Weg Light, Außenweser, September 2011
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Kirstin
Alte Weser
1964 (Andreas Carstens). Active; focal plane 33 m (108 ft); continuous light, white, red, or green depending on direction; there are 12 sectors in all. 38 m (125 ft) round inverted-conical concrete and steel tower with lantern and gallery and a 2-story overhanging observation and control center about 2/3 of the way up the tower. Lighthouse painted red with two white horizontal bands; lantern painted green. Fog horn (Morse code "AL," short-long-short-long-short-short, every 60 s). Werning's photo is at right, Trabas also has a good photo by Manfred Schüler, and German Wikipedia has an article with photos. Three years' work was needed to build this striking modern lighthouse. Located about 3 km (2 mi) northeast of Roter Sand. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-001; Admiralty B1188; NGA 10308.
Tegeler Plate
1965. Active; focal plane 21 m (68 ft); white, red, or green light depending on direction, occulting three times every 12 s. 24 m (79 ft) round cylindrical steel tower with lantern and gallery atop an octagonal equipment room. Lighthouse painted red, lantern white. Werning also has a page for the lighthouse, and Trabas has a distant view. This lighthouse replaced the Bremen lightship station. Located about 15 km (9 mi) southeast of Alte Weser. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Bremerhaven. ARLHS FED-020; Admiralty B1196; NGA 10320.
Roter Sand
1885. Inactive since 1986. 28 m (92 ft) round cast iron, brick lined tower with primary and secondary lanterns and a triangular gallery, built on a steel caisson. Keeper's quarters incorporated in the tower. Lighthouse painted with red and white horizontal bands; the base of the tower and roofs of the lanterns are black. A photo is near the top of this page, Werning has a page with a great photo, Wikimedia has an excellent photo by Markus Jastroch, Tim Boettger also has a good photo, and Huelse has a historic postcard view. This is one of the world's great waveswept lighthouses. Construction of the tower posed enormous difficulties; the first attempt failed when a storm overturned the incomplete caisson on 13 October 1881. The light was downgraded in 1964, when Alte Weser took over its function as the landfall light for Bremerhaven. When the light was deactivated in 1986, there was immediate concern that the lighthouse would be lost. However, WSA Bremerhaven restored and strengthened the foundation of the tower in 1987, and in that same year a foundation (Stiftung Leuchtturm Roter Sand) was established to raise funds for preservation and restoration. Since 1999 the tower has been open for day tours and overnight stays. Located in the North Sea off the entrance to the Weser, about 10 km (6 mi) northeast of the island of Wangerooge. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower open to tours. Owner: Nationalpark Niedersächsisches Wattenmeer. Site manager: Leuchtturm Roter Sand. ARLHS FED-019.
Leuchtturm Alte Weser
Leuchtturm Alte Weser, Außenweser
photo copyright Malte Werning; used by permission

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Notable faux lighthouses:

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Adjoining pages: North: Cuxhaven and Stade | South: Bremen | West: Borkum to Wilhelmshaven

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Posted February 26, 2005. Checked and revised January 25, 2014. Lighthouses: 39; lightships: 3. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.