Lighthouses of Germany: Cuxhaven and Stade

Germany has two coastlines, one facing northwest on the North Sea and the other facing northeast on the Baltic Sea. This page lists lighthouses on the North Sea coast in the Cuxhaven District and along the south side of Elbe estuary in the Stade District, between Cuxhaven and Hamburg.

Interest in lighthouses is strong in Germany, and most of the towers are in good condition. A federal law provides blanket protection to historic lighthouses. There is concern, however, that many of the lights may be deactivated in the coming years as navigators depend less and less on them.

In German, a lighthouse is a Leuchtturm ("light tower"), plural Leuchttürme. The front light of a range is the Unterfeuer and the rear light is the Oberfeuer. There are many modern range lighthouses, and most of these towers are crowned by a topmark: a large, distinctive structure that serves to mark the range clearly in the daytime. Some topmarks are conical, others are funnel-shaped, and some consist of one or more gallery-like rings around the tower.

Germany is a federal republic with 16 member states called Bundesländer. The lighthouses on this page are all in the state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), except for the historic lighthouse of Neuwerk, which is under the juristiction of the city-state of Hamburg.

Lighthouses in Germany are operated by the regional harbor authority, called the WSA (Wasser- und Schiffahrtsamt). The WSA's are linked to and regulated by a federal agency, the Wasser- und Schifffahrtsamtverwaltung des Bundes (WSV).

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. Admiralty numbers are from volume B of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA List numbers are from NGA Publication 114.

Leuchtturm Neuwerk
Neuwerk Light, Neuwerk, June 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Alexander Johannes

General Sources
Leuchtturm-Atlas
A large site with excellent photos and information on nearly all German lighthouses, maintained by Frank and Birgit Toussaint.
Online List of Lights - Germany North Sea
Photos by various photographers posted by Alexander Trabas.
Leuchttürme.net - Deutschland
Outstanding photos by Malte Werning.
Lighthouses in Germany
Photos available from Wikimedia.
Lighthouses in Germany
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
Leuchtturmseiten von Anke und Jens - Germany
This site has photos and information on many of the lights.
Deutsche Leuchttürme/Feuerschiffe
Photos posted by Klause Huelse. Huelse also has a large collection of historic postcard views.
Schifffahrtszeichen
Lighthouse information from WSA Cuxhaven.
Schifffahrtszeichen
Lighthouse information from WSA Hamburg.
Interessengemeinschaft Seezeichen e.V.
Germany's national lighthouse preservation organization.
Feuerschiffe in Deutschland
An outstanding site on German lightships, maintained by Iris Klempau.
Mielstack Unterfeuer
1907 Mielstack Unterfeuer, Lühe, August 2011
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Margret Pirzer

Elbemündung Offshore (Neuwerk Area) Lighthouses

#Großer Vogelsand
1975. Light inactive since 1999; fog horn inactive since 2004; tower demolished 2008. The tower was formerly floodlit at night. 39 m (128 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower with a large, 3-story lantern and keeper's quarters structure, topped by a helipad. Lighthouse painted with red and white horizontal bands. Leuchtturm-Atlas also has a good photo. This large modern lighthouse cost 15 million marks, making it the most expensive lighthouse ever built in Germany. It replaced the Elbe 2 lightship in warning ships away from the extensive shallows on the north side of the Elbe entrance. After deactivation, the lighthouse was leased with the intention of making it available for overnight accommodations and conferences. These plans collapsed due to the very high costs estimated for renovation. In December 2008 the upper section of the lighthouse was removed and barged to Bremerhaven to be scrapped. Instead, it was purchased by a Bremerhaven hostel (see the Bremerhaven page) and moved to that city. The rest of the lighthouse was demolished. Formerly located about 9 km (5.5 mi) north of Neuwerk and 20 km (13 mi) northwest of Cuxhaven. Site manager: WSA Cuxhaven. ARLHS FED-007; ex-Admiralty B1340.
**** Neuwerk
1814. Active; focal plane 38 m (125 ft); three long (2 s) flashes every 20 s, white, red, or green depending on direction. 39 m (128 ft) square masonry tower with lantern centered on a square pyramidal roof. Alexander Johannes's photo is at the top of this page, Werning has a good page for the lighthouse, Trabas has a closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view. Neuwerk is an island in the North Sea about 12 km (7.5 mi) northwest of Duhnen. Built by Hamburg around 1300-1310 as a fortified watchtower, the lighthouse is the oldest building on the German coast. It served mariners for 500 years as a daybeacon before being converted to a lighthouse by addition of a large lantern on the roof. It is now a national historic site, with apartments in the tower available for overnight rental. (Note: The lighthouse is actually in the city-state of Hamburg. In 1969, Hamburg surrendered to Niedersachsen its historic harbour rights in Cuxhaven in return for jurisdiction over the island of Neuwerk and its smaller neighbors Scharhörn and Nigehörn.) In 2013, WSA Cuxhaven announced it would deactivate the light at the end of the year, since it is no longer needed for navigation. However, WSA Hamburg agreed to take over the station and continue to operate the light, given its historical significance. Located at the southern end of the island. The island is accessible by passenger ferry from Cuxhaven. Operator (light) WSA Hamburg (accommodations) Pension Leuchtturm Neuwerk. Site manager: Nationalpark Hamburgisches Wattenmeer. ARLHS FED-165; Admiralty B1344; NGA 10436.
Gelbsand Unterfeuer
2010. Active; focal plane 25 m (82 ft); white light, 2 s on, 2 s off. 28 m (92 ft) round cylindrical tower with gallery, painted black with one white horizontal band. A photo is at right, and Trabas has Helmut Seger's photo. These modern light towers were prefabricated at the Voss shipyard in Cuxhaven. Seger also has a photo of the two range lights under construction and a photo showing them in action after they were installed in June 2010. The range is unusual in that it guides ships both entering and departing the Elbe; the incoming range replaced the historic Baumrönne-Altenbruch range (see below). Located about 8 km (5 mi) northeast of Neuwerk. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty B1348.49.
Gelbsand Lights
Gelbsand Oberfeuer (left) and Unterfeuer, Elbemündung, 2010
WSA Cuxhaven photo
Gelbsand Oberfeuer
2010. Active; focal plane 50 m (164 ft); white light, 2 s on, 2 s off. 53 m (174 ft) round cylindrical tower with gallery, painted with black and white horizontal bands. A photo is above, Trabas has Rainer Arndt's photo, and another photo is available. Located about 1.1 km (0.7 mi) northwest of the front light. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty B1348.5.

Northern Cuxhaven District Lighthouses

Cuxhaven Lighthouses
* Duhnen (2)
1958 (station established 1898). Inactive since 1980. Approx. 9 m (30 ft) lantern mounted atop a 2-story building. Building and lantern painted white; building has an orange tile roof. Werning has a good photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. The original lighthouse was a square wood tower. The present building is now a public reading room (Lesehalle) adjacent to a popular seaside resort. Located at the west end of the North Sea waterfront of Duhnen, just west of Cuxhaven at the southern entrance to the Elbe estuary. Site open, building open but tower closed. Owner/site manager: Nordseebad Cuxhaven-Duhnen. ARLHS FED-072.
* [Kugelbake]
Late 1940s (station established 1703). Unlit beacon. 30 m (98 ft) quadrupod wood tower with a vertical slatted daymark, topped by a staff carrying a round daymark simulating a ball. The tower is stained dark brown. Wikimedia Commons has a good photo, a fine closeup is available, and Google has a satellite view. Since 1703 the Ball Beacon (Kugelbake) has been a traditional landmark and symbol of Cuxhaven. The tower carrying the ball has been rebuilt many times. In 1853 a lighthouse was added, a 7.5 m (25 ft) square skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. This tower was removed when the light was relocated to Duhnen in 1898. In 2001 the WSV removed the historic ball, leading to a great public outcry, and in May 2002 the ball was returned to the City of Cuxhaven for display in a museum setting. Since 1913 a representation of the Kugelbake has appeared on the coat of arms and logo of the city. Located on the point of land at the south side of the entrance to the Elbe, at the northwestern corner of Cuxhaven. Site open, tower closed.
**** Lightship Elbe 1 (Bürgermeister O'swald II)
1948 (Jos. L. Meyer, Papenburg). Decommissioned 1988. 49 m (161 ft) steel lightship with light tower and lantern amidships. A good 2008 photo and a second photo are available, Klempau has a page for the ship with historic photos, and Google has a satellite view. Launched in 1943, the ship could not be completed and placed into service until after World War II. Stationed off the mouth of Elbe, it was damaged many times by collisions with other vessels, but was always repaired and returned to service. Since its retirement the ship has been moored in Cuxhaven as a museum vessel, tended by volunteer members of the Feuerschiff-Verein Elbe 1. In recent years the ship has been returned to operational condition and has undertaken a number of voyages; there is a photo of it returning to port in July 2008. When in port in Cuxhaven the ship is usually moored at the Havenkaje near Alte Liebe (next entry) during the summer and at the Neuen Fischereihafen during the winter. Site open, vessel open for tours in season; check its web site for current information. ARLHS FED-014.
* Cuxhaven ("Alte Liebe")
1805. Inactive since 2001. 23 m (75 ft) round cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery. Tower is unpainted red brick; lantern dome is unpainted green copper. A photo is at right, Larry Myhre has a photo, Werning has an excellent page, Wikimedia has a good 2010 photo, Hansjörg Fichtner has a good photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. This historic tower was built by the city of Hamburg; after only a short time in service it was extinguished until the end of the Napoleonic wars in 1814. The physicist Karl-Ferdinand Braun conducted early experiments in radio transmission at the lighthouse in 1899. After almost two centuries of operation the lighthouse (Germany's oldest in service) was deactivated in May 2001 and sold into private ownership. In 2005 the owner, Klaus-Otto Lammert, restored the interior and exterior of the tower. Located on the old waterfront in downtown Cuxhaven. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS FED-066; Admiralty B1360; NGA 10456.
* Osteriff
1934. Inactive since 1983. 13 m (42 ft) round cylindrical steel tower with lantern and gallery, painted black with a single white horizontal band. Bing has a satellite view. This tower is a sibling of the three Pagensand lighthouses of the same era (see the Hamburg Area page). Originally located off the entrance to the Oste River from the Elbe near Otterndorf, the lighthouse has been relocated to stand outside the headquarters of WSA Cuxhaven, near Alte Liebe. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: WSA Cuxhaven. ARLHS FED-308.
Leuchtturm Cuxhaven
Cuxhaven Light (Alte Liebe), December 2010
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Kirstin
* Steubenhöft (Amerikahafen) (2)
1955 (station established 1913). Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); white or green light, depending on direction, occulting once every 4 s. 10 m (33 ft) round cylindrical steel tower with lantern and gallery. Entire lighthouse painted green. Werning has a good page for the lighthouse, Trabas has a closeup photo by Schüler, and Bing has a satellite view. This light was built to guide ships into Amerikahafen, a former harbor on the east side of Cuxhaven for transatlantic liners. Located at the end of a short mole at the east end of the Cuxhaven waterfront. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Cuxhaven. ARLHS FED-067; Admiralty B1374; NGA 10468.

Altenbruch Area Lighthouses
#Baumrönne Unterfeuer
1971. Demolished in 2011. 25 m (82 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted red with a white band on the lower 1/4. The daymark was changed from horizontal black and white bands in early 2008, and several months later a very large triangular daymark was added to the tower. Werning has a fine photo showing the original appearance of the lighthouse. This was the front light of an inbound (eastbound) range; the rear light was on the Altenbruch Oberfeuer. The range was abandoned in 2010 because increasing development of the Cuxhaven waterfront was blocking mariners' view of the light. Bing's satellite view of the location confirms the removal of the lighthouse. Located on the dike at the edge of the Elbe, 2940 m (1.8 mi) northwest of the rear light and about 8 km (5 mi) southeast of Cuxhaven. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Cuxhaven. ARLHS FED-035; Admiralty B1360.9; NGA 10440.
* Altenbruch (3) Oberfeuer (Neue Schlanke Anna)
1971. Active; focal plane 51 m (167 ft); white light, 4 s on, 4 s off. 59 m (194 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower with tapered lower portion and double gallery at the 51 m level, originally painted with black and white horizontal bands. In 2008, the upper portion of the lighthouse was repainted red, and a large triangular daymark was placed on a tall mast next to the tower. Larry Myhre's photo is at right, Werning has a good page showing the original appearance of the tower, and Trabas has a photo by Wolfgang Warncke showing the 2008 changes. This soaring modern tower, one of Germany's tallest, inherited the traditional nickname Schlanke Anna (Skinny Anna). The original Schlanke Anna, seen in Huelse's postcard view, was demolished in 1976. The tower originally carried a second light, the rear light of the inbound Baumrönne range; that range was discontinued in 2010 and Bing's satellite view shows that the mast with the triangular daymark has been removed. Located in a field on the west side of Altenbruch. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Cuxhaven. ARLHS FED-030; Admiralty B1361; NGA 10444.
Schlanke Anna
Dicke Berta and Schlanke Anna, Altenbruch, June 2008
Flickr photo copyright Larry Myhre; used by permission
** Altenbruch Unterfeuer (2) (Dicke Berta)
1897 (station established 1871). Inactive since 1983. 13 m (43 ft) round cylindrical steel tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white, lantern and gallery black. A photo is at right, Werning's page has a good photo, Leuchtturm-Atlas has a great closeup photo, Wikimedia has many photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. The Altenbruch station has always been crucial for navigators entering the Elbe; from the 16th century sailors steered by the twin towers of the Altenbruch church. Hamburg built a wooden lighthouse on the dike in 1871, and in 1897 replaced it with this tower, which was immediately nicknamed Dicke Berta (Fat Bertha). Huelse also has a postcard view of the 1871 beacon. The lighthouse carried the front light of a range; the rear light was the 34 m (112 ft) cast iron Osterende-Groden Oberfeuer, nicknamed Schlanke Anna (Skinny Anna). Between 1915 and 1918 Dicke Berta was taken down and rebuilt a short distance away because of a change in the range line. The range was replaced in 1968 by the Altenbruch-Wehldorf range, but Dicke Berta remained active until 1983. The lighthouse was then transferred to a preservation society, which has restored the building. The building has since become a popular site for weddings. Located near the Altenbruch harbor. Site open; tower open Saturday and Sunday afternoons Easter weekend through the end of September. Owner: Niedersächsischen Verwaltungsamt-Institut für Denkmalpflege. Site manager: Förderverein Dicke Berta e.V. ARLHS FED-277.
Altenbruch Unterfeuer (3)
1968 (station established 1871). Active; focal plane 19 m (63 ft); white light 4 s on, 4 s off, synchronized with the rear lights; also red or green lights, 4 s on, 4 s off, are shown for ships to the left or right of the inbound range. 20 m (66 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower with a large lantern and upper and lower galleries. Upper third of the lighthouse painted red, lower 2/3 painted with black and white horizontal bands. Trabas has a closeup photo by Wolfgang Warncke, and Google has a satellite view. Werning has an excellent photo showing the pre-2008 paint pattern, all black and white bands. This lighthouse carries the front lights for both the inbound Wehldorf and outbound Altenbruch ranges. Located in the river, 600 m (0.38 mi) northwest of the Wehldorf Unterfeuer. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Operator: WSA Cuxhaven. ARLHS FED-029; Admiralty B1361.1; NGA 10445.
* Wehldorf Oberfeuer
1968. Active; focal plane 31 m (102 ft); white light 4 s on, 4 s off, synchronized with the front light. 29 m (95 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower with double gallery forming a cylindrical topmark. Lighthouse painted with black and white horizontal bands, topmark painted red. Trabas has a closeup photo by Wolfgang Warncke, and Google has a satellite view. Before 2008, the topmark was painted black, as seen in Werning's photo and aerial photos from Marinas.com. This is the rear light of an inbound (eastbound) range, one of two guiding ships into the mouth of the Elbe; the front light is carried on the Altenbruch Unterfeuer. Located behind the dike at Altenbruch, about 13 km (8 mi) southeast of Cuxhaven. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Cuxhaven. ARLHS FED-259; Admiralty B1361.2; NGA 10446.
Dicke Berta
Dicke Berta, Altenbruch, September 2012
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Tvabutzku1234

Otterndorf Area Lighthouses
Otterndorf Oberfeuer
1986. Active; focal plane 52 m (171 ft); white light 2 s on, 2 s off, synchronized with the front light. 52 m (171 ft) round cylindrical tower with a large funnel-shaped topmark, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Trabas has a good photo by Wolfgang Warncke, Wikimedia has a photo that also shows the two Belum range lights, and Google has a satellite view. Located in a marshy area in front of the dike just east of the Otterndorf harbor entrance. Site and tower closed. Operator: WSA Cuxhaven. ARLHS FED-179; Admiralty B1396.1; NGA 10502.2.
Otterndorf-Belum Unterfeuer
1986. Active; focal plane 23 m (75 ft); white light 2 s on, 2 s off, synchronized with the rear lights. 25 m (82 ft) round cylindrical tower with a large funnel-shaped topmark, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Trabas has a closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view. This tower carries the front lights for both the inbound Belum and outbound Otterndorf ranges. Located just offshore in the Elbe, 1340 m (0.8 mi) west of the Belum Oberfeuer and 2660 m (1.65 mi) east of the Otterndorf Oberfeuer. Site and tower closed. Operator: WSA Cuxhaven. ARLHS FED-036; Admiralty B1396; NGA 10502.
Belum Oberfeuer
1986. Active; focal plane 45 m (148 ft); white light 2 s on, 2 s off, synchronized with the front light. 44 m (144 ft) round cylindrical tower with a large funnel-shaped topmark, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Trabas has a closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view. This is the rear light of an inbound (eastbound) range. Located in a marshy area in front of the dike about 4 km (2.5 mi) east of the Otterndorf harbor entrance. Site and tower closed. Operator: WSA Cuxhaven. ARLHS FED-037; Admiralty B1395.9; NGA 10502.1.

Stade District Lighthouses

Balje Area Lighthouses
Balje (2) Unterfeuer
1979. Active; focal plane 24 m (79 ft); white light 4 s on, 4 s off, synchronized with the front light. 25 m (82 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower with double gallery forming a cylindrical topmark. Lighthouse painted with red and white horizontal bands. Werning has a good photo, Trabas has a good photo by Wolfgang Warncke, and Google has a satellite view. Located 2460 m (1.5 mi) west of the rear light in an area flooded except at very low tide. Site and tower closed. Operator: WSA Cuxhaven. ARLHS FED-282; Admiralty B1412; NGA 10520.
* Balje (2) Oberfeuer
1979. Active; focal plane 54 m (177 ft); white light 4 s on, 4 s off, synchronized with the front light. 56 m (184 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower with double gallery forming a cylindrical topmark. Lighthouse painted with red and white horizontal bands. Walter Rademacher's aerial view is at right, Trabas has a closeup by Schüler, Werning has a fine photo, and Google has a satellite view. This is the rear light of a major range guiding ships into the Elbe; its light reaches some 37 km (23 mi) out to sea. Located quite close to the old lighthouse. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Cuxhaven. ARLHS FED-033; Admiralty B1412.1; NGA 10524.
* Balje (1)
1904. Inactive since 1979. 17 m (56 ft) round cylindrical stone tower, incorporating keeper's quarters, with upper and lower galleries. Lighthouse painted white; conical roof is gray. Walter Rademacher's aerial view is at right, Werning has a fine page for the lighthouse, Günther Heyde has a photo, the lighthouse appears in Schüler's photo of the Balje Oberfeuer, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. The area is a bird sanctuary (Vogelschutzgebiet), and the lighthouse now houses the sanctuary's ranger station. Located on the south bank of the Elbemündung (mouth of the Elbe), off the coastal road about 10 km (6 mi) northwest of the town of Balje. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Vogelschutzgebiet Hullen. ARLHS FED-034.
Balje Lights
1904 Balje Light and 1979 Balje Oberfeuer, Balje, September 2011
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Walter Rademacher

Drochtersen (Krautsand) Area Lighthouses
* Krautsand Oberfeuer
1908. Active; focal plane 35 m (115 ft); white light 4 s on, 4 s off, synchronized with the front light. 36 m (118 ft) hexagonal skeletal tower with a large circular lantern and gallery, enclosed 2-story watch room, and central cylinder, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Adjoining 1-1/2 story keeper's house. Werning's photo is at right. Trabas also has an excellent photo by Schüler of this historic lighthouse, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. This is the rear light of a downstream (westbound) range. The lighthouse, a sibling of the Grünendeich Oberfeuer, was extensively restored in 1988, and the original Fresnel lens was replaced with a modern range optic. Located 920 m (0.57 mi) northwest of the front light at Krautsand. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Hamburg. ARLHS FED-133; Admiralty B1482.1.
* Krautsand Unterfeuer (2)
1978 (station established 1901). Active; focal plane 20 m (66 ft); white light 4 s on, 4 s off, synchronized with the rear light. 20 m (66 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Werning has a great photo, Trabas has a closeup by Klaus Kern, and Google has a satellite view. The original lighthouse, a hexagonal stone tower seen in Huelse's postcard view, was demolished in 1978 to make way for strengthening the dike along the riverbank. Located just behind the dike on the southwest bank of the Elbe at Krautsand. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Hamburg. ARLHS FED-132; Admiralty B1482.
* Ruthensand Unterfeuer
1955. Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); white light 2 s on, 2 s off, synchronized with the rear light; also a directional light, white, red, or green, occulting once every 6 s. 15 m (49 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, painted red with a white horizontal band. Werning has a good photo, Trabas has a closeup, and Google has a satellite view. This is an upsteam (eastbound) range. Located 1000 m (0.6 mi) north of the rear light, on the south bank of the Elbe at Ruthenstrom east of Drochtersen. Site and tower closed, but the lighthouse is easily seen from the road. Operator: WSA Hamburg. ARLHS FED-202; Admiralty B1474.
Krautsand Oberfeuer
Krautsand Oberfeuer, Drochtersen
photo copyright Malte Werning; used by permission
* Ruthensand Oberfeuer
1955. Active; focal plane 30 m (98 ft); white light 2 s on, 2 s off, synchronized with the front light. 30 m (98 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Trabas has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located in a pasture on the south bank of the Elbe about 2.5 km 1.5 mi) east of Drochtersen. Site and tower closed, but the lighthouse is easily seen from the road. Operator: WSA Hamburg. ARLHS FED-203; Admiralty B1474.1.

Stade Area Lighthouses
* Bützflethersand Oberfeuer
1970. Active; focal plane 33 m (108 ft); white light 2 s on, 2 s off, synchronized with the front light; also a directional light, white, red, or green flash every 6 s. 31 m (102 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and funnel-shaped topmark, mounted on a concrete base, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Werning has an excellent photo, and Google has a satellite view. This range guides downstream (westbound) traffic, but the directional light guides upstream (eastbound) traffic. Located beside the riverside highway (Bützflether Industriestraße) 610 m (670 ft) north of the front light, near a large industrial complex. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Hamburg. ARLHS FED-063; Admiralty B1524.1.
* Bützflethersand Unterfeuer
1970. Active; focal plane 20 m (66 ft); white light 2 s on, 2 s off, synchronized with the rear light. 20 m (66 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and funnel-shaped topmark, mounted on a concrete base, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Werning has a good photo, Trabas has a photo by Schüler, and Google has a satellite view. The range lights replaced a lighthouse seen in Huelse's historic postcard view. Located at the end of a short groin projecting from the southwest bank of the Elbe at Stadersand, about 400 m (1/4 mi) north of the Stadersand Unterfeuer. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Hamburg. ARLHS FED-062; Admiralty B1524.
* Stadersand Unterfeuer (2)
1958 (station established 1897). Active; focal plane 20 m (66 ft); white light 4 s on, 4 s off, synchronized with the rear light. 22 m (72 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on a concrete base, painted with red and white horizontal bands. A photo is at right, Werning has a good photo, Trabas has a closeup by Schüler, and Google has a satellite view. Huelse has a historic postcard view of the original lighthouse. This range guides upstream (eastbound) traffic. Located at the edge of the river 785 m (1/2 mi) north of the rear light. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Hamburg. ARLHS FED-227; Admiralty B1522.
Stadersand Oberfeuer (2)
1958 (station established 1897). Active; focal plane 40 m (131 ft); white light 4 s on, 4 s off, synchronized with the front light. 38 m (125 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Werning has a good photo, Trabas also has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located in the deactivated Stade Nuclear Power Plant at Stadersand on the southwest bank of the Elbe about 10 km (6 mi) northeast of Stade. Site and tower closed. Operator: WSA Hamburg. ARLHS FED-228; Admiralty B1522.1.
Stadersand Unterfeuer
Stadersand Unterfeuer, Bützfleth, March 2010
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Morn the Gorn
* Twielenfleth (2)
1984 (station established 1893). Active; focal plane 20 m (66 ft); directional light, white, red, or green light, depending on direction, occulting once every 6 s. 15 m (49 ft) round cylindrical tower with flared top, lantern and gallery, painted with black and white horizontal bands. Werning has a fine photo, Trabas has a closeup by Schüler, and Google has a satellite view. This light guides upstream (eastbound) traffic. Located in front of the dike on the south bank of the Elbe at Twielenfleth, only a few steps from the older light. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Hamburg. ARLHS FED-242; Admiralty B1532.
* Twielenfleth (1)
1893. Inactive since 1984. 7 m (23 ft) square cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery mounted on a short, square skeletal tower. Lighthouse painted white with black trim; skeletal section and lantern roof are black. Werning has a good photo, and Google has a satellite view. Huelse has a historic postcard view of this lighthouse, which is a rare survivor of its class. Located behind the dike on the south bank of the Elbe at Twielenfleth, about 16 km (9 mi) east of Stade. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: unknown. ARLHS FED-243.

Lühe Area Lighthouses
* Grünendeich (Lühe Oberfeuer)
1900 (J. H. Hartje). Active; focal plane 35.5 m (117 ft); white light 2 s on, 2 s off, synchronized with the front light. 39 m (129 ft) hexagonal skeletal tower with a large circular lantern and gallery, enclosed 2-story watch room, and central cylinder, mounted on a 1-story hexagonal brick base. Lighthouse painted with red and white horizontal bands, lantern white with a black roof, gallery railing black. Walter Rademacher's photo is at right, Werning has a good photo, Trabas has a photo by Schüler, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse was restored in 1994. Located on the Kirchenstieg near the Minneweg in Grünendeich, 1546 m (1 mi) west of the front light. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Hamburg. ARLHS FED-097; Admiralty B1540.1.
* Lühe Unterfeuer (2)
1970 (station established 1900). Active; focal plane 16 m (52 ft); white light 2 s on, 2 s off, synchronized with the rear light. 12 m (40 ft) round cylindrical tower with a large round lantern and gallery, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Anett Jauernig's photo is below right, Werning has a good photo, Trabas has a closeup by Schüler, and Google has a satellite view. The Lühe range is a downstream (westbound) range. Located on the south bank of the Elbe very close to the west side of the mouth of the Lühe River. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Hamburg. ARLHS FED-149; Admiralty B1540.
* Lühe Unterfeuer (1)
1900. Inactive since 1970. Approx. 12 m (40 ft) square tower rising from one corner of 1-story keeper's house. Lantern removed. Building painted white with red-brown trim. Werning has an excellent photo, and Google has a satellite view. Huelse has a historic postcard view of this lighthouse. Sibling of the Mielstack lighthouse (previous entry). The lighthouse was sold and is occupied as a private residence. Located in Lühe, just west of the mouth of the Lühe River. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS FED-306.
Somfletherwisch (Mielstack) Unterfeuer (2)
2009 (?). Active; focal plane 19 m (62 ft); white light 4 s on, 4 s off, synchronized with the rear light. 22 m (72 ft) round cylindrical tower with a large round lantern and gallery, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Lantern roof is black. Trabas has Helmut Seger's photo, and Michael Friedchen has a 2011 photo, but the tower is too new to appear in Google's satellite view. Located on the south bank of the Elbe about 200 m (220 yd) west of the older lighthouse (next entry). Site open, tower closed. Admiralty B1534.
* Mielstack Unterfeuer (1)
1907. Inactive since about 2009. 16 m (52 ft) square tower with round lantern and gallery rising from one corner of a 1-story keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white with brown trim and a brown tile roof; lantern's conical roof is black. Margret Pirzer's photo is at the top of this page, Werning has a good photo, Trabas has a closeup by Schüler, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. This very attractive lighthouse is located on the main riverbank street in the Mielstack neighborhood of Lühe, 600 m (0.4 mi) southeast of the mouth of the Lühe River. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Hamburg. ARLHS FED-153.
* Somfletherwisch (Mielstack Oberfeuer)
1907. Active; focal plane 32 m (105 ft); white light 4 s on, 4 s off, synchronized with the front light. 35 m (115 ft) hexagonal skeletal tower with a large circular lantern and gallery, enclosed 2-story watch room, and central cylinder. Lighthouse painted with red and white horizontal bands, lantern white with a black roof, gallery railing black. Trabas has an excellent photo by Schüler, Werning has a good photo, and Google has a satellite view. Sibling of the Grünendeich Oberfeuer (see below). This is an upstream range. Located at Wisch, 750 m (1/2 mi) southeast of the front light and about 2 km (1.2 mi) southeast of Lühe on the south bank of the Elbe. Site open, tower closed. Operator: WSA Hamburg. ARLHS FED-224; Admiralty B1534.1.

Grünendeich Oberfeuer
Grünendeich Oberfeuer, Lühe, May 2008
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo
by Walter Rademacher

Lühe Unterfeuer
Lühe Unterfeuer, Lühe, November 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Anett Jauernig

Information available on lost lighthouses:

  • Bassenfleth Unterfeuer (1897-1959), South bank, Stade area.
  • Bassenfleth Oberfeuer (1897-1959), South bank, Stade area. Huelse has a postcard view.
  • Brunshausen (1897-1930), South bank near Stadersand.
  • Neuwerk Unterfeuer (1815-1885), Neuwerk Island.

Notable faux lighthouses:

Adjoining pages: North: North Frisia | East: Hamburg Area | South: Bremerhaven Area

Return to the Lighthouse Directory index | Ratings key

Posted March 30, 2005. Checked and revised February 1, 2014. Lighthouses: 34. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.