Lighthouses of Denmark: Copenhagen

Denmark, located at the mouth of the Baltic Sea, includes the north-pointing peninsula of Jylland (Jutland) in the west and a large number of islands to the east. The capital, København (Copenhagen), is on the island of Sjælland (Zealand). Like Istanbul and Singapore, Copenhagen stands at one of the great critical passages of world commerce, in this case the entrance to the Baltic Sea from the North Sea. This page describes the lighthouses of the Hovedstaden, or Capital Region, including the metropolitan area of København.

The Danish word for a lighthouse is fyr. The front light of a range is the forfyr and the rear light is the bagfyr. In October 2011, the government placed maintenance of Danish aids to navigation under the Danish Maritime Authority (Søfartsstyrelsen).

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. DFL numbers are from the Dansk Fyrliste (Danish Light List). Admiralty numbers are from volume C of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA List numbers are from Publication 116.

General Sources
Danske Fyrtårne
A comprehensive site on Danish lighthouses, with many photos; the text is entirely in Danish.
Online List of Lights - Denmark East
Photos by various photographers posted by Alexander Trabas.
Leuchttürme.net - Dänemark
A fine web site by Malte Werning, with excellent photos.
Leuchtturmseiten von Anke und Jens - Denmark
Photos of more than 100 Danish lighthouses, with notes in English.
Dänische Leuchttürme
Photos of more than 175 Danish lighthouses posted by Klaus Huelse.
Denmark Lighthouses
Photos by Larry Myhre on Flickr.com.
World of Lighthouses - Denmark
Photos by various photographers available from Lightphotos.net.
Sjælland
Photos posted by Anna Jenšíková.
Lighthouses in Denmark
Photos available from Wikimedia.
Lighthouses in Denmark
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
Indholdsfortegnelse
History of the Danish lighthouse service, with photos of selected lighthouses, posted by the Danish Environment and Energy Ministry (Miljø & Energi Ministeriet).
Dänische Leuchttürme auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard views posted by Klaus Huelse.
Danske Fyrskibe
Comprehensive information on Danish lightships (in Danish), posted by the group managing the Horns-Rev.
Feuerschiffe in Dänemark
Lightship information posted by Iris Klempau.


Nordre Røse Light, København, September 2006
Wikipedia Creative Commons photo by Niels Elgaard Larsen


Drogden Light, København, June 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Larry Myhre

Halsnæs Lighthouses
Hesselø (2)
1865 (rebuilt in 1902) (station established 1841). Active; focal plane 40 m (131 ft); white flash every 15 s. 24 m (79 ft) round masonry tower with lantern and double gallery, attached by a covered passageway to a 2-1/2 story masonry keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white, lantern gray or black. Trabas has a distant photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a good satellite view. The lighthouse was substantially rebuilt in 1902 after a large crack appeared in the tower. Hesselø is a small, isolated island in the Kattegat about 25 km (15 mi) north of Sjælland. The island is privately owned and closed to visitors. Located on the highest point of the island. Site and tower closed. Site manager: private. ARLHS DEN-016; DFL-1035; Admiralty C0222; NGA 2044.
** Spodsbjerg (3)
1907 (station established 1845). Active; focal plane 40 m (131 ft); white, red or green light depending on direction, occulting once every 5 s. 9 m (30 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a small equipment shed. The lantern is topped by a cast iron crown, the Danish royal symbol. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome and crown painted red. Trabas has an excellent closeup, the Fyrtårne site has a page with good photos, Myhre has a good photo, Huelse has a closeup and a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse marks the entrance to the Isefjord, a large protected bay on the north coast of Sjælland. The original light here was on a pole; it was replaced in 1865 by a 5 m (17 ft) tower. The present lighthouse was restored in 2005. Located at the end of the Fyrstein, off the Spodsbjergvej on the north side of Hundested. Site open; the Anke/Jens site says the tower is open for climbing. ARLHS DEN-120; DFL-1050; Admiralty C0226; NGA 2052.
* Roskilde Havn Bagfyr
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 13 m (43 ft); red light, 1 s on, 1 s off, synchronized with the front light. Light mounted on the roof of a 1-story brick building; we don't know the nature of the building. Trabas has a photo. The front light is on a mast on the waterfront, 400 m (1/4 mi) north. This range guides boats into the harbor of Roskilde, at the head of the Roskilde Fjord, an eastern branch of the Isefjord that lies in the western suburbs of København. Located several blocks south of the Roskilde waterfront. Site open. DFL-1240a; Admiralty C0239.71; NGA 2120.

Gribskov Lighthouses
**** Nakkehoved (Vest)
1772 (greatly increased in height in 1898). Active; focal plane 54 m (177 ft); three white flashes every 20 s. 21 m (69 ft) square cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-1/2 story brick keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white, lantern red. A 1st order Fresnel lens (1898) is in use. The tower was raised in height by about 10 m (33 ft) in 1898, when the current lantern and lens were installed. A photo is at right, the Fyrtårne site has a page with good photos, Myhre has an excellent 2007 photo, Trabas has a good photo, Wikimedia has a photo by Guillaume Baviere, Huelse has both a photo and a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. This historic and well-known lighthouse stands on the west side of the entrance to the Øresund, the narrow passage between Denmark and Sweden that is the shortest and deepest entrance to the Baltic Sea. The station is managed by the Holbo Herreds Kulturhistoriske Centre, which provides tours year round. Located at the end of the Fyrvejen, off the Nakkehovedstrandvej on the east side of Gilleleje. Site open, tower open for tours daily except Mondays May through October and on Wednesdays and Sundays November through April. Site manager: Fyrhistorisk Museum på Nakkehoved. ARLHS DEN-028; DFL-2515; Admiralty C1872; NGA 4592.
* Nakkehoved Øst
1772. Inactive since 1898. Approx. 11 m (36 ft) square cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-1/2 story brick keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white. Myhre has a 2007 closeup, Huelse also has a photo and a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. The Nakkehoved station originally had twin lighthouses separated by about 300 m (1000 ft). In 1898 the eastern lighthouse was deactivated while the western one was raised in height and upgraded to a first order station. The old east lighthouse has been preserved and has been in use recently as a waterfront restaurant. Located on the Fyrvejen in Gilleleje, about 500 m (0.4 mi) east of the active lighthouse. Site open, restaurant open daily, tower status unknown. Site manager: Restaurant Fyrkroen. ARLHS DEN-027.
Nakkehoved Vestfyr
Nakkehoved Vest Light, Gribskov, June 2006
Wikipedia Creative Commons photo by Sir48

Helsingør (Elsinore) Lighthouses
*
Julebaek
1925. Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); white, red or green light depending on direction, occulting once every 5 s. 4 m (13 ft) square wood building; the light is displayed through a rectangular window set into a corner of the structure. Lighthouse painted white with one red horizontal band. Trabas has a closeup photo, the Fyrtårne site has a page with a photo, and Google has a street view, but the building is hidden by overhanging trees in Google's satellite view. This directional light guides westbound ships that have just passed Helsingør on their way out of the Baltic. Located just off the beach on the east side of Hellebaek, about 4 km (2.5 mi) northwest of Helsingør. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS DEN-124; DFL-2536; Admiralty C1884; NGA 4612.
** Kronborg (Helsingør Slot, Elsinore Castle)
1772 (castle built 1585). Active; focal plane 33 m (108 ft); white, red or green light depending on direction, occulting twice every 6 s. 31 m (102 ft) castle tower with lantern and double gallery. Larry Myhre's photo is at right, Myhre has a more distant photo, Huelse has a good photo and a romantic postcard view, the Anke/Jens site has a 2003 photo and two photos taken while the tower was under restoration in 2001, the Fyrtårne site has a page for the station, Trabas has a photo, Wikimedia has a photo of the lighthouse in action, and Google has a satellite view. Kronborg is one of the most famous castles of northern Europe, a masterpiece of Renaissance architecture, and the fictional setting of Shakespeare's tragedy Hamlet. It stands on a peninsula marking the narrowest point of the Øresund; the Swedish coast is only 4 km (2.5 mi) to the east. The castle was built by King Frederick II to control the entrance to the Baltic Sea. The light crowns the northeastern tower of the castle, called the Dronningens Tårn (Queen's Tower). A light was first placed in a window of the tower in 1772. A lantern was added to the tower in 1800, and in 1842 Denmark's first Fresnel lens was installed. The present lantern with its elaborate crown was built in 1878. Located just to the northeast of Helsingør harbor. Site open, castle open daily; tower status unknown. Site manager: Danish Palaces and Properties Agency (Slots og Ejendomsstyrelsen). ARLHS DEN-119; DFL-2570; Admiralty C1908; NGA 4672.
* Helsingør Nordmole
Date unknown (1916?). Active; focal plane 7 m (23 ft); continuous green light. 6 m (20 ft) 2-stage round tower with a small lantern, painted green with white trim; lantern dome is gray metallic. Trabas has a fine closeup, Myhre has a good photo, and Google has a satellite view. Huelse has a photo and a historic postcard view of an earlier mole lighthouse. These mole lighthouses are familiar to travelers on Scandlines ferries crossing between Helsingør and Helsingborg, Sweden. Located at the end of the north mole protecting the harbor of Helsingør. Accessible by walking the mole. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS DEN-230; DFL-2598; Admiralty C1914; NGA 4684.
* Helsingør Sydmole
Date unknown (1916?). Active; focal plane 7 m (23 ft); continuous red light. 6 m (20 ft) 2-stage round tower with a small lantern, painted red with white trim; lantern dome is gray metallic. Trabas has a fine closeup, Myhre has a good photo, Huelse also has a good photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of the south mole protecting the harbor of Helsingør. Accessible by walking the mole. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS DEN-229; DFL-2594; Admiralty C1912; NGA 4676.
Kronborg Fyr
Kronborg Light, Helsingør, December 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo
by Larry Myhre

København (Copenhagen City) Lighthouses
Note: The C-shaped fortress of Trekroner lies strategically in the center of the entrance to København. Long breakwaters extend north and south from the fortified island, leaving only narrow passages at the north and south.
*
Hellerup
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 5 m (17 ft); green flash every 3 s. 4.5 m (15 ft) hexagonal metal tower with a small lantern. Lighthouse painted dark green (almost black). Benches surround this tiny lighthouse. Trabas has a closeup, Myhre has another closeup, Huelse also has a good photo, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. The light may have been relocated to this site; if so, we don't know its origin. Located at the end of the east mole of the yacht harbor at Hellerup, a residential neighborhood on the north side of København. Accessible by walking the mole. Site open, tower closed. DFL-2672; Admiralty C1950; NGA 4736.
* Middelgrundsfort Vest (2)
1975 (station established 1952). Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); white, red, or green light depending on direction, occulting once every 5 s. 4 m (13 ft) round lantern, painted red. Huelse has a closeup photo, Jenšíková also has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. The Middelgrundsfort is a fortress built on a shoal off the harbor of København. After many years of disuse, the fortress now houses a restaurant and conference center. Located about 3.5 km (2 mi) northeast of the harbor; accessible by passenger ferry. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS DEN-130; DFL-2840; Admiralty C1964; NGA 4760.
* Middelgrundsfort Øst (2)
1975 (station established 1952). Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); white, red, or green light depending on direction, occulting twice every 12 s. 4 m (13 ft) round lantern, painted red. Huelse has a closeup photo, Jenšíková also has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located about 3.5 km (2 mi) northeast of the harbor; accessible by passenger ferry. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS DEN-129; DFL-2845; Admiralty C1965; NGA 4764.
* Stubben (Frihavn Nordmole)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 7 m (23 ft); green flash every 3 s. 7 m (23 ft) round tower with lantern and gallery, painted green. Trabas has a photo, Myhre has a good photo, and Google has a good satellite view. Located at the end of a short breakwater on the north side of the northern entrance to København. Site open, tower closed. DFL-2714; Admiralty C1983; NGA 4812.
* #Kronløbsbassin (1)
Date unknown. Replaced. 4.5 m (15 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern, painted green. Myhre has a good photo of the original lighthouse, and Google has a satellite view. Trabas has a photo of the new light (focal plane 6 m (20 ft); continuous green light). Located at the end of a short mole in the northwest section of København harbor. Site and tower closed. DFL-2732; Admiralty C1994; NGA 4824.
* Langeliniekaj
Date unknown. Inactive. 4 m (13 ft) round cast iron tower with a small lantern, painted red with one white horizontal band. Jessica Spengler's photo appears at right, Huelse has a 2008 photo, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. This light is missing from the Danish Light List. Located at the end of the Langelinie quay. Site open, tower closed.
Frihavn Sydmole
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 7 m (23 ft); red flash every 3 s. 7 m (23 ft) round tower with lantern and gallery, painted red. Myhre has a good photo, Trabas has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of the long breakwater extending from the north side of the island of Trekroner. Site and tower closed. DFL-2710; Admiralty C1982; NGA 4808.
Langeliniekaj Fyr
Langeliniekaj Light, København, May 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Jessica Spengler
* Trekroner (2)
1858 (station established 1836). Active; focal plane 20 m (66 ft); white, red, or green light depending on direction, 1 s on, 1 s off. 12 m (39 ft) round tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on an early 19th century stone fort. Lighthouse painted white. Myhre's photo is at right, the Fyrtårne site has a page with several photos, Trabas has a photo, Huelse has a good photo, and Google has a satellite view. Built in the late 1700s, the Trekroner Søfort (sea fort) is in the center of the entrance to the traditional inner harbor of København. The island is accessible by water taxi service from the København waterfront. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS DEN-044; DFL-2705; Admiralty C1978; NGA 4804.
#Trekroner Forfyr
1877. Inactive since 1926. Approx. 6 m (20 ft) cast iron skeletal tower with a round lantern room. The abandoned lighthouse was painted with a red and white checkerboard daymark. Myhre has a 2008 photo of the two range lights, Huelse has a photo, Google has a satellite view, and the light appears at the extreme right of Trabas's photo of the 1858 lighthouse. When Jenšíková visited the fort in 2009, she found the old lighthouses had been removed. Formerly located northwest of the present lighthouse. Site open.
#Trekroner Bagfyr
1877. Inactive since 1926. Approx. 4.5 m (15 ft) round cast iron lantern mounted on four short legs. Myhre has a 2008 photo of the two range lights, and Huelse has a photo. The abandoned lighthouse was painted with a red and white checkerboard daymark. When Jenšíková visited the fort in 2009, she found the old lighthouses had been removed. Formerly located west of the present lighthouse. Site open.
Trekroner Fyr
Trekroner Light, København, June 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Larry Myhre
Lynetteløb (2)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 6 m (20 ft); white, red, or green light depending on direction, 2 s on, 2 s off. 5 m (17 ft) post mounted on a round concrete base, painted green. Google has a satellite view. Trabas has a photo of the original light, a round cast iron tower with lantern. Located at the end of the long breakwater extending from the south side of the island of Trekroner. Site and tower closed. DFL-2750; Admiralty C1986; NGA 4832.

København (Copenhagen City) Lightships
Note: In addition to the ships listed here, Fyrskib XII is reported sunk at its berth in København. No less than five Danish lightships have been converted to tall sailing ships. Two of them (Motorfyrskib III and Motorfyrskib IV) are listed below. Another, Fyrskib XVIII, is now Den Store Bjørn, a school ship for troubled teenagers.
**** Fyrskib XVII Gedser Rev
1895 (N.F. Hansen, Odense). Decommissioned 1972. 35.5 m (116 ft) wood lightship; the light was displayed from a lantern atop the mainmast. Hull painted red with a white horizontal band; superstructure painted white, lantern red. A photo is at right, Dragan Ancevski has a closeup photo, Myhre has a 2006 photo, and Google has a closeup street view and a satellite view. Engines were installed in the ship in 1921, and thereafter it served the rest of its career on the Gedser Rev station south of Falster. After it was decommissioned a private foundation purchased the ship for the Danish national museum. It was thoroughly restored at Hvide Sande in 2001-03 and is in excellent condition. Moored at Nyhavn in København; the photo at right shows that the light tower of another lightship is on the quay next to the ship. Site open, ship open daily. Owner/site manager: Nationalmuseet. ARLHS DEN-007.
* Motorfyrskib III Donna Wood
1918 (Rasmus Møller Værft, Fåborg). Decommissioned 1974. This 20.4 m (67 ft) oak lightship was converted to a 2-masted tall ship. Vessel painted white with gold trim. Klempau has a page for the ship, and Google has a closeup street view and a satellite view. This ship served most of its career on the Lappegrund station and the last ofur years at Halskov Rev. The ship is available for charter. When in København, it is docked at Nyhavn just west of the Gedser Rev.
Motorfyrskib II Vyl (reported currently in Gdansk, Poland)
1916 (Rasmus Møller Værft, Fåborg). Decommissioned 1978. 33.6 m (110 ft) steel lightship; the light was displayed from a lantern atop the mainmast. Hull painted red with a white horizontal band; superstructure painted white, lantern red. Except for an interruption during and shortly after World war II, this ship served from 1930 through 1969 on the Vyl station. It was sold in 1978 to the Dragør sailing club, which restored the vessel and used it as a club headquarters ship. In 1985 it was sold to Arp Hansen, the owner of the Nyhavn Hotel, who operated the ship as a restaurant during the summer months. In the late 1990s it was sold again. In 2006 the ship was towed to Poland. In March 2008, Klempau discovered a photo of the ship at a shipyard in Gdansk. However, the report locally was that the ship was to be returned eventually to Denmark. Site status unknown. Owner: private. ARLHS DEN-234.
Fyrskip Gedser Rev
Lightship XVII Gedser Rev, København, May 2011
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Dansk Nationalmuseet
* Fyrskib XI Drogden
1878 (F. Sparre, Nysted, Lolland). Decommissioned 1977. 35 m (115 ft) wood lightship; the light was displayed from a lantern atop the mainmast. Hull painted red with a white horizontal band; superstructure painted white, lantern red. A 2007 photo is at right, Myhre has a 2008 photo, Jenšíková has photos, and Google has a closeup street view and a satellite view. Never powered, the ship served from 1919 to 1977 on the Drogden station. In 1977 it was sold to an artist, Bo Bonfils, who built additional superstructure to serve as a residence and studio. Since then, the ship has been in the hands of several private owners; the current owner, Stig Romain Andresen, bought the ship in 2005. Moored on the Frederiksholm Canal in København and in use as a private residence. Site and vessel closed, but the ship can be viewed from the quay. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS DEN-231.
* Fyrskib XIII Læsø Rende (Ark XIII)
1880 (De forende Oplagspladser og Værfter, Christianshavn). 31.5 m (103 ft) wood lightship; the masts have been removed. Hull painted red with a white horizontal band. Jenšíková has photos, and Google has a closeup street view and a satellite view. This ship served the Læsø Rende station from 1916 to 1972. Sold to the justice ministry, it was used for 20 years as a half-way house for prisoners. The mainmast and lantern were sent to the Fiskeri- og Søfartsmuseet in Esbjerg, where, according to Iris Klempau, they are in poor condition. In 1992 it was sold to a private owner, who renamed it Ark XIII and converted it for use as a private residence. It has been moored at several locations but most recently it has been on the Frederiksholm Canal opposite the Drogden. Site and vessel closed, but the ship can be viewed from the quay. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS DEN-232.
Fyrskib XI Drogden
Lightship XI Drogden, København, August 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Admanchester
Danish Lightship Ten (Fyrskip X)
1877. Decommissioned 1972. 31.5 m (103 ft) wooden lightship with light tower amidships, painted red with white trim and a white horizontal stripe. This sturdy Danish vessel is said to be the world's oldest surviving lightship. During its long career it served many stations around the Danish coastline. After it was decommissioned, it was stripped of its light tower and sold as the club ship of the Hobro Sejlclub. In 1978 it was sold to a Copenhagen businessman, who used it as an office; he was able to purchase the light tower of another lightship. Sold again in 1993, it spent four years in Helsingør as a restaurant. In 1997 the owners went bankrupt and sold the ship to English buyers. After refurbishing in England, the ship was moored near Tower Bridge in London, where it was again converted into a restaurant in 2005. Richard White has a photo, and Jonathan Reed has a closeup, of the ship in London. However, in February 2008 Graham Ewing took a photo of the ship moored at the Sun Pier in Chatham, on the Medway. The ship appeared to be in good condition. On 10 May 2008, the ship was spotted under tow through the Kiel Canal in Germany, on its way back to the Baltic. By June Larry Myhre's photo shows the ship in København, moored in the Refshaleøen neighborhood. Google has a satellite view of the lightship at its new location. The owner and projected use of the vessel are not known. Site and vessel closed, but the ship can be viewed from the quay. Owner/site manager: private. Formerly ARLHS ENG-316.
* Motorfyrskib IV (light tower)
1918. Decommissioned. This 20.4 m (67 ft) lightship, a sister ship of Motorfyrskib III, has been converted to a tall ship originally named Rana and berthed at Hadsund on the Mariager Fjord in Jylland. More recently, the ship was sold and sailed to Antigua, where it appears as a tourist attraction, converted to a faux pirate ship named the Black Swan. The light tower and lantern were removed and are displayed at the Motorbadsklub. Google has a satellite view. Located off the Kraftværksvej on the east side of downtown København. Site open, tower closed.

Tårnby Lighthouse
Nordre Røse
1877 (rebuilt in 1893). Active; focal plane 14 m (46 ft); white, red, or green light depending on direction, occulting twice every 6 s. 17 m (56 ft) round tapered granite tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on an elliptical stone pier. The tower is unpainted; lantern painted red. Niels Elgaard Larsen's photo is at the top of this page, Myhre has a good 2008 photo, Trabas has a distant view, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. This directional light guides ships through the narrow passage between the mainland of Sjælland and the island of Saltholm. Located in the Oresund about 600 m (3/8 mi) northeast of the København airport. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. ARLHS DEN-131; DFL-2920; Admiralty C2042; NGA 4936.

Dragør Lighthouses
* Dragør Forfyr
1877. Inactive since 1906. 10 m (33 ft) square brick lantern room at one end of a 2-story brick keeper's house; the light was shown through a large square window. The lighthouse is unpainted red brick. Myhre has a closeup, Huelse also has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the waterfront just south of the Nordre Tangvej in Dragør, a short distance south of the København airport. Site open, tower closed.
* Dragør Bagfyr
1877. Inactive since 1906. Approx. 16 m (52 ft) square 4-stage brick tower; the light was shown through a small square window. The lighthouse is unpainted red brick with rectangular white panels on each side. Lars-Jacob Hove's photo is at right, Myhre has a closeup, Huelse also has a photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located on the Øresunds Alle at Annasvej in downtown Dragør. Site open, tower closed.
* Dragør Fort
Date unknown. Inactive since 2013. 6 m (20 ft) triangular steel skeletal tower with lantern and gallery, painted gray. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. This lighthouse is likely to be demolished. Located at the southeast corner of the historic Dragør Fort. Site open, tower closed. DFL-2985; Admiralty C2053; NGA 4992.
* Drogden
1937 (lightship station established 1838). Active; focal plane 18 m (59 ft); white, red, or green light depending on direction, occulting three times every 15 s. 20 m (66 ft) square stone tower with lantern and gallery, centered on a 1-story rectangular keeper's cottage and mounted on an elliptical stone pier. The tower is painted with red and white horizontal bands; lantern painted red. Myhre's photo is at the top of this page, and Huelse also has a photo. Located in the southern entrance to the Oresund about 5 km (3 mi) southeast of Dragør. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. ARLHS DEN-132; DFL-3025; Admiralty C2060; NGA 4940.

Dragør Rear Light, Dragør, August 2004
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Lars-Jacob Hove

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Notable faux lighthouses:

Adjoining pages: East: Scania | South: Sjælland Region

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Posted February 1, 2007. Checked and revised December 14, 2013. Lighthouses: 25, lightships: 7. Site copyright 2013 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.