Lighthouses of Northeastern England

This page covers lighthouses of the northeastern coast of England, north of Flamborough Head, including the counties of Northumberland, Tyne and Wear, Durham, and North Yorkshire. Facing the North Sea, this is a busy coastline with many harbors, especially along the estuaries of the Tyne and the Tees.

The British system of lighthouse administration is decentralized, with the major towers under the management of Trinity House (a corporation chartered by the Crown) and smaller towers generally under the control of local port authorities. This system has generally assisted lighthouse preservation, and so has the British custom of building very sturdy brick or stone lighthouses at most of the stations. Most of the onshore lighthouses are accessible to visitors, and several of them are major tourist attractions.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. Admiralty numbers are from Volume A of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA numbers are from Publication 114.

General Sources
Trinity House
Chartered by Henry VIII in 1514, Trinity House has built and operated lighthouses in Britain for 500 years. About a dozen of the lighthouses have Visitor Centres.
Association of Lighthouse Keepers
Founded by serving and retired keepers, this lighthouse association is open to everyone.
Online List of Lights - England
Photos by various photographers posted by Alexander Trabas.
Lighthouse Compendium
There is lots of useful information on this site by Michael Millichamp, including his Guide to English and Welsh Lights, an inventory of surviving English and Welsh lighthouses.
Photographers Resource - Lighthouses
Photos and articles on lighthouses of the British Isles.
Lighthouses in England
Photos by various photographers available from Wikimedia; many of these photos were first posted on Geograph.org.uk.
Lighthouses in England, United Kingdom
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
Tynemouth Lighthouses
Photos contributed by Joke Reijnen.
Britische Leuchttürme auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard images posted by Klaus Huelse.
Information about English Lightvessels
Lightship information and photos posted by Iris Klempau.

Souter Light
Souter Light, South Tyneside, June 2011
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Lewis Bingle

Northumberland Lighthouses

Berwick-Upon-Tweed and Holy Island Lighthouses
* Berwick-Upon-Tweed Breakwater
1826. Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); white flash every 5 s. 13 m (43 ft) round stone tower with a conical stone roof; the light is displayed through a window. The roof and lowest 1/4 of the tower are painted red; the rest of the tower is painted white. Barbara Carr's photo is at right, Trabas has a great closeup photo, Grahame Dunbar has a 2008 photo, Christopher Tait has a 2007 photo, Wikimedia has several photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. In 2011, local contractor Iain Grieve contributed his services to repaint and refurbish the lighthouse. Berwick-Upon-Tweed is the northernmost town in England, right on the border of Scotland. Located at the end of the breakwater on the north side of the entrance to the River Tweed. Accessible by walking the breakwater. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Port of Berwick. ARLHS ENG-173; Admiralty A2818; NGA 2264.
* [Lindisfarne (Emmanuel Head, Holy Island)]
Around 1800-1810. Never lit. Approx 12 m (39 ft) square pyramidal stone tower, painted white. Rick Crowley has an excellent closeup, Dan Tarbit has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Lindisfarne, properly called the Holy Island of Lindisfarne or simply Holy Island, is the site of a 7th century monastery that served as the base for Christian evangelising in northern England during the Dark Ages. This historic daybeacon is located on Emmanuel Point, at the northeast corner of the island. Accessible by hiking across the sand from the village. Site open.
[Old Law (Guile Point) West (2)]
1829 (station established 1799). Never lit. 25 m (82 ft) square pyramidal stone obelisk. Walter Baxter has a closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view. The Old Law obelisks mark the southeastern entrance to the harbor of Holy Island, which is just off the mainland southeast of Berwick Upon Tweed. The original beacons were wooden towers. Located on the beach about 110 m (120 ft) west of the east beacon. Site open, but there doesn't appear to be any road access to this site.
Old Law (Guile Point) East
1829 (station established 1799; unlit until about 1992). Active; focal plane 9 m (29 ft); white, red, or green light, depending on direction, 4 s on 2 s off. 21 m (69 ft) square pyramidal stone obelisk; the light is mounted about 1/3 of the way up the tower. Trinity House has a page with a photo, Photographers Resource has a page for the beacons, Trabas has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. The light was established about 1992, and in 1995 Trinity House assumed responsibility for maintaining the light. Located at the tip of a long sand spit about 5 km (3 mi) northeast of Detchant. Site open, but there doesn't appear to be any road access to this site. Operator: Trinity House. ARLHS ENG-222; Admiralty A2816; NGA 2262.
Berwick-Upon-Tweed Light
Berwick-Upon-Tweed Breakwater Light, January 2013
Geograph Creative Commons photo by Barbara Carr

Farne Islands Lighthouses
Note: The Farne Islands are a group of small islands extending perpendicular to the coast and 2.5-8 km (1.5-5 miles) offshore near Bamburgh. Famous as the refuge for St. Aiden and St. Cuthbert during the 7th century, the islands today are one of Britain's most important bird sanctuaries.
**** Longstone
1826 (Joseph Nelson). Active; focal plane 28 m (92 ft); white flash every 20 s. 26 m (85 ft) round stone tower with lantern and gallery, painted red with a broad white horizontal band. Fog horn (2 blasts every 60 s). 1-story keeper's house. John Lord's photo is at right, Photographers Resource has a page for the lighthouse, Steve Tomkins has a good closeup, Trabas has Ronald Wöhrn's view from the sea, Wikimedia has several photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view with a 1903 inscription, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse is famous for the wreck of the steamship Forfarshire in 1838; keeper William Darling and his daughter Grace heroically rescued 9 survivors of the wreck. In 2013, Trinity House considered replacing the station's diesel generator with a wind turbine; following protests, this plan was scrapped and solar panels will be added with the diesel as a backup. Located on a tiny island at the outer end of the Farne Islands. Site of a Trinity House Visitor Centre, the lighthouse is accessible by boat tours from Seahouses (North Sunderland). Site open, tower open to guided tours daily May through October if weather and sea conditions permit. Operator: Trinity House. ARLHS ENG-070; Admiralty A2814; NGA 2260.
Brownsman Island
1800. Inactive since 1811. Approx. 12 m (39 ft) square rubblestone tower, unroofed. A photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. This lighthouse replaced the earlier lights on Staples Island and was then replaced by the Inner Farne High and Low Lights. Brownsman Island is just to the north of Staples Island and about 3.2 km (2 mi) northeast of Inner Farne. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower open but not climbable.
Staples Island (Peel Tower) (2?)
1784 (station established 1778). Inactive. Ruins, about 4 m (13 ft) high, of a square rubblestone tower. A photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. According to Trinity House, the first lighthouse was blown over by a storm. This is presumably the second lighthouse, built on Staples and not (as Trinity Houses suggests) on Brownsman Island. Located at the southern tip of Staples Island, about 3 km (1.8 mi) northeast of Inner Farne. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower open but not climbable.
Longstone Light
Longstone Light, Farne Islands, June 2011
Flickr Creative Commons photo by John Lord
* Inner Farne (1) (Prior Castell's Tower)
1673. Inactive since 1811. Light tower built atop a 4-story castle, now partially in ruins. Phil Champion has a photo, another photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. Inner Farne is famous as the site of an ancient monastery, dating from St. Cuthbert's residence on the island in the late seventh century. The lighthouse was authorized by King Charles II. Trinity House says merchants refused to pay dues for the light and it was not lit, but there is other evidence that it was in use at least sporadically for many years and continuously starting in 1784. Located at the north end of Inner Farne. Site open, tower status unknown. ARLHS ENG-040.
* Inner Farne (High) (2)
1811 (Daniel Alexander). Station established 1776. Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); two flashes every 15 s, white or red depending on direction. 13 m (43 ft) round brick tower with lantern and gallery, painted white, attached to 1-story keeper's houses. Nigel Mykura's photo is at right, Photographers Resource has a page for the station, Martin Brewster has another good photo, Trabas has a photo by Ronald Wöhrn, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. The former low light was demolished in 1910. In 2005, the National Trust paid £132,000 to purchase the lighthouse from Trinity House. Located on Inner Farne, the island closest to the mainland, about 3 km (2 mi) north of North Sunderland and a similar distance east of Bamburgh. Accessible by boat tours from Seahouses (North Sunderland); also visible from the beach in North Sunderland or Bamburgh. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Trinity House. Owner/site manager: National Trust (Farne Islands National Nature Reserve). ARLHS ENG-060; Admiralty A2812; NGA 2256.
Inner Farne Light
Inner Farne Light, Farne Islands, August 2008
Geograph Creative Commons photo by Nigel Mykura

Bamburgh and North Sunderland Lighthouses
* Bamburgh (Black Rock Point) (2)
1910. Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); white, red, or green light, depending on direction, occulting twice every 8 s. 10 m (29 ft) square building with lantern mounted on the roof. No keeper's house, as this was never a staffed station. Mark Dodds has a photo, Trabas has an excellent closeup photo by Ian Wright, Photographers Resource has a page for the lighthouse, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The original lighthouse, a round iron skeletal tower, was demolished in 1975 and the light moved to the roof of the original service building. Located on the rocky shore at Black Rock Point about 1.6 km (1 mi) northwest of Bamburgh. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Trinity House. ARLHS ENG-004; Admiralty A2810; NGA 2252.
* North Sunderland (Seahouses)
1900. Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); continuous green light. 8 m (26 ft) hexagonal cylindrical brick tower with a domed roof, painted white; the light is shown through a window. A closeup photo is available, Trabas also has a closeup, Marinas.com has aerial photos of the harbor, and Google has a street view and an indistinct satellite view. Located at the end of the breakwater pier on the north side of the entrance to Seahouses Harbour in North Sunderland. Site open, tower closed. Operator: North Sunderland Harbour Commissioners. ARLHS ENG-258; Admiralty A2804; NGA 2244.

Southeastern Northumberland (Amble and Blyth Area) Lighthouses
* [Warkworth North Pier (Amble North Pier)]
Date unknown (station established 1848). Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); green flash every 6 s. 8 m (26 ft) square skeletal tower with gallery and enclosed upper portion. Trabas has a photo, Walter Hall has a view from the south pier, and Google has an indistinct satellite view. Located at the end of the north pier; apparently accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ENG-178; Admiralty A2785; NGA 2236.
* Warkworth South Pier (Amble South Pier)
Date unknown (station established 1848). Active; focal plane 9 m (30 ft); red flash every 5 s. 8.5 m (28 ft) round cast iron post light with gallery, mounted on a round concrete base. Tower painted with red and white horizontal bands. A concrete catwalk leads to the lighthouse. A closeup is available, Trabas has a photo, Ray Byrne has a nice sunset photo, Wikimedia has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. The light marks the entrance to the River Coquet at Amble; Warkworth is a town about 2.5 km (1.5 mi) upstream. Located at the end of the south pier; apparently accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed but probably visitors can climb atop the base. ARLHS ENG-179; Admiralty A2784; NGA 2232.
Coquet Island
1841 (James Walker). Active; focal plane 25 m (82 ft); four flashes, red or white depending on direction, separated by 2.5 s, every 30 s. 22 m (72 ft) square cylindrical sandstone tower with lantern and castellated stone gallery, attached to a 2-story keeper's house. Lantern and upper third of tower painted white; lower 2/3 of tower is unpainted reddish-gray stone. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). A photo is at right, Trabas has a photo by Arno Siering, a 2009 closeup is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. The light station is designed so that the keeper's house incorporates the surviving portion of a medieval monastery. Coquet Island is a small island, owned by the Duke of Northumberland, located about 2 km (1.2 mi) off Amble; it is an important bird sanctuary. Site (entire island) and tower closed to the public, but the lighthouse can be viewed from birding cruises from Amble. Operator: Trinity House. Site manager: Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (Coquet Island Preserve). ARLHS ENG-025; Admiralty A2780; NGA 2228.
Coquet Island Light
Coquet Island Light, Amble
Trinity House photo
* [Blyth Snook Range Front]
Date unknown (the range dates from around 1900 or earlier). Active; focal plane 4.5 m (15 ft); continuous blue light. 4 m (13 ft) hexagonal wooden tower, painted white. The light is shown through a small square opening. Dan Tarbit has a closeup photo, and Trabas also has a photo. Located on the north side of the Blyth estuary opposite Low Quay. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Port of Blyth. ARLHS ENG-210; Admiralty A2770; NGA 2200.
* Blyth High (1)
1788. Inactive since 1985. 18 m (58 ft) 3-stage round brick tower, painted white. No lantern; the light was shown through a square window near the top of the tower. The tower was originally only 12.5 m (41 ft) high; its height was increased with new stages in 1888 and again in 1900. Christine Westerback has a closeup photo, another good closeup photo is available, Trabas has Arno Siering's photo of the new and old lights, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The low light was on an 8 m (26 ft) hexagonal stone tower that does not seem to have survived. Located on Bath Terrace, just above the Quay in downtown Blyth. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: unknown. ARLHS ENG-186.
* Blyth High (2)
1985. Active; focal plane 16.5 m (54 ft); continuous blue light. 17 m (56 ft) square cylindrical skeletal tower carrying a large diamond-shaped daymark; the light is shone through a hole in the daymark. Daymark painted orange. Trabas has Arno Siering's photo, Google has a street view, and the shadow of the tower is seen in Google's satellite view. Located at East Park View and Quay Drive in Blyth. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Port of Blyth. Admiralty A2766.1; NGA 2176.
Blyth East Pier (Blyth Harbour)
1884. Active; focal plane 19 m (62 ft); four white flashes every 10 s. Fog horn (3 blasts every 30 s). 14 m (46 ft) round brick tower with lantern and gallery, painted white, mounted on a cylindrical concrete base. The lighthouse is accessed by a long catwalk. Steve Fareham has a 2007 photo, another photo is available, Trabas has a photo, Photographers Resource has both recent and historic photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. The pier also carries a series of large wind turbines. Located at the end of the long breakwater pier at Blyth, about 20 km (13 mi) northeast of Newcastle Upon Tyne. Site and tower closed. Operator: Port of Blyth. ARLHS ENG-013; Admiralty A2754; NGA 2180.

Tyne and Wear Lighthouses

Note: The metropolitan county of Tyne and Wear was formed in 1974. Previously the North Tyneside communities were in Northumberland and the South Tyneside communities were in County Durham.
North Tyneside Lighthouses
**** St. Mary's
1888. Inactive since 1984. 46 m (150 ft) brick tower with lantern and gallery, painted white. The original Fresnel lens was sent to the lighthouse museum in Penzance (now closed), and the current lens was transferred from Withernsea Light (see Eastern England). A complete light station, with keeper's houses and other buildings. R.J. McNaughton's photo is at right, the North Tyneside Council has a page for the lighthouse, P. Murphy's photo shows that the lighthouse is floodlit at night, Wikipedia's article has a photo by Colin Eberhardt, Photographers Resource has a page with many photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Trinity House built this lighthouse to replace a 17th century tower at Tynemouth Castle. The light station is located on a rocky reef, linked to the mainland at low tide by a walkway. After deactivation, it was transferred to the local government as a tourist attraction; the Friends of St. Mary's Lighthouse was organized to work for its preservation. In July 2007, the North Tyneside Council announced £130,000 in repairs and repainting for the lighthouse. A master plan for the future of the island and light station is being prepared. The original Fresnel lens will be returned from Penzance to be displayed in the base of the tower. In May 2012, the light station was listed as a Grade II historic site. Located on a rocky point north of Whitley Bay, about 5 km (3 mi) north of North Shields. Accessible by road, parking provided. Site open; tower open to guided tours on days when the time of low tide permits (call for schedule) May through November and on weekends and school holidays November through March. Note: the site may be closed due to bad weather or unusual tidal conditions. Owner/site manager: North Tyneside Council. ARLHS ENG-145; ex-Admiralty A2748.
St. Mary's Light
St. Mary's Light, Whitley Bay, August 2007
Geograph Creative Commons photo by R.J. McNaughton
* Tynemouth (Tyne North Pier)
1903 (station established 1864(?)). Active; focal plane 26 m (85 ft; 3 white flashes every 10 s. 23 m (75 ft) round tapered stone tower with lantern and gallery, unpainted; lantern painted white. Fog horn (blast every 10 s). A 2007 photo is available, Trabas has Arno Siering's photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Google has a distant street view, and Bing has an aerial view. Located at the end of the north pier at the entrance to the River Tyne in North Shields. Accessible in good weather by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Port of Tyne. ARLHS ENG-159; Admiralty A2700; NGA 2104.
* Fish Quay Low (Range Front)
1807. Inactive. 26 m (85 ft) square cylindrical stone building, painted white, with a small lantern on the roof. Alex Perry has a good 2007 photo, John Wigham has a fine closeup photo, another photo is available, and Google has a street view and an aerial view. This was an entrance range for the Tyne. Located on the Fish Quay on the waterfront of North Shields. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Port of Tyne. ARLHS ENG-300; ex-Admiralty A2703.
* Fish Quay Old Light
1727. Inactive. Square brick tower with lantern, attached to a dwelling. Steve Fareham's photo is at right, and Google has a street view and an aerial view. Located at the intersection of Beacon and Tyne Streets just above Fish Quay in North Shields. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS ENG-299.
* Fish Quay High (Range Rear)
1807. Inactive. 17.5 m (58 ft) square cylindrical stone building, painted white, with a small lantern on the roof, attached to neighboring building. Alex Perry has a good 2007 photo, another photo is available, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located on Tyne Street behind what is now called Union Quay on the waterfront of North Shields. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Port of Tyne. ARLHS ENG-301; ex-Admiralty A2703.1.
* Tyne Swing Bridge
1876. Inactive (?). Round lantern centered on an octagonal control room atop the arched bridge. Lantern painted dark blue, control room white with a dark blue roof. An excellent photo is available, Ian Britton also has a photo, a 2008 photo is available, Wikipedia's article has a photo, and Google has a street view and an aerial view. The Tyne Swing Bridge, built by Sir W.G. Armstrong and Company, was an engineering triumph of Victorian Britain. The bridge is still very much in use, but the light has not been listed as an aid to navigation for many years. Many night time photos are available, but I've found none showing a light in the lantern. Located on Bridge Street in downtown Newcastle upon Tyne. Site open, tower closed.
Fish Quay Old Light
Fish Quay Old Light, North Shields, July 2007
Geograph Creative Commons photo by Steve Fareham

South Tyneside Lighthouses
* Herd Groyne
1882. Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); directional light, 8 s on, 2 s off, showing red or green depending on direction. 15 m (49 ft) octagonal corrugated iron lantern and watch room mounted on skeletal legs. Tower painted red; lantern painted with red and white vertical stripes. Trabas also has a photo by Arno Siering, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view and an aerial view. Located at the end of the groin, off River Drive, on the south side of the Tyne in South Shields. Accessible in good weather by walking the groin. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Port of Tyne. ARLHS ENG-330; Admiralty A2702.5; NGA Light 2112.
* Tyne South Pier
1895. Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); directional light, 8 s on, 2 s off, showing white over the entrance channel, red or green to the sides. 12 m (39 ft) round tapered stone tower with lantern and gallery, unpainted; lantern painted white. Fog bell (stroke every 10 s). Trabas also has an excellent photo by Arno Siering, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has an aerial view. Located at the end of the mile-long south pier at the entrance to the River Tyne in South Shields. Accessible in good weather by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Port of Tyne. ARLHS ENG-158; Admiralty A2702; NGA Light 2108.
**** Souter (Marsden Head)
1871. Inactive since 1989. 23.5 m (77 ft) brick tower with lantern and gallery, attached to keeper's house. Lighthouse painted with red and white horizontal bands. The keeper's quarters house a museum, tea room, and gift shop. Working diaphone fog horns, operated on special occasions. Lewis Bingle's photo is at the top of this page, Photographers Resource has a good page for the lighthouse with many photos, Paul Featherstone has a nice 2008 photo, Wikimedia has an excellent photo by Glenn Scott, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a street view and an aerial view. This is an unusually complete and well preserved light station; now operated by the National Trust, it is one of the most visited lighthouses of northern England. The exterior of the lighthouse was restored and repainted in a £65,000 project in the fall of 2013. Located off the coastal road (A183) about 5 km (3 mi) north of Sunderland. Parking provided. Site open; tower open to guided tours daily in July and August; daily except Fridays mid March through June, September, and October; weekends in November and early December. Owner/site manager: National Trust (Souter Lighthouse and the Leas) . ARLHS ENG-127; Admiralty A2694.

Sunderland Lighthouses
* Sunderland South Pier (relocated)
1856 (Thomas Meik). Inactive since 1903(?). 15 m (50 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted white. When the pier was shortened in 1983, the lighthouse was relocated to a site overlooking the sea in Roker Cliff Park. Steve Fareham's photo is at right, Michelle Simmons has a good photo, and Google has a street view and an aerial view. Located off Whitburn Road at the foot of Chichester Road on the north side of Sunderland. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: City of Sunderland. ARLHS ENG-117.
* Roker Pier (Sunderland North Pier)
1903. Active; focal plane 25 m (82 ft); white flash every 5 s. 23 m (75 ft) round tapered granite tower with red and white horizontal bands, lantern and gallery. Tower unpainted; the bands are formed of natural red and white colored stone. Lantern painted white with a black dome. Fog signal (siren blast every 20 s). John Kirkwood has a good photo, Gail Johnson has another good photo, Trabas has a closeup, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Google has a distant street view across the harbor, and Bing has an aerial view. In 2013 the city began a major project to restore both the pier and the lighthouse. The lantern was restored in 2013, and in 2014 the pier was resurfaced and restored. Additional restoration work is planned for the lighthouse, and it is hoped that it will then be opened for climbing. Located at the end of the pier on the north side of the entrance to the River Wear in Sunderland. Normally accessible by walking the pier. Site and tower closed in 2013. Operator: Port of Sunderland. ARLHS ENG-116; Admiralty A2681; NGA 2084.
Sunderland South Pier Light
Sunderland South Pier Light, July 2007
Geograph Creative Commons photo by Steve Fareham

County Durham Lighthouses

Seaham Area Lighthouse
Seaham North Breakwater
1905. Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); long (1.2 s) green flash every 10 s; continuous green shown in bad weather. 10 m (33 ft) round cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern, painted with black and white horizontal bands. The gallery has been removed sometime in recent years. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). A good photo is available, Gem Fox has a 2008 photo, Trabas has a photo, Wikimedia has a good photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has an aerial view. Located at the end of the north breakwater in Seaham. Site and tower closed. Operator: Seaham Harbour Authority. ARLHS ENG-123; Admiralty A2674; NGA 2072.

Hartlepool Borough Lighthouses
* The Heugh (Hartlepool Headland) (3)
1927 (station established 1847). Active; focal plane 19 m (62 ft); two white flashes every 10 s, day and night. 16.5 m (54 ft) round steel tower with lantern and gallery, painted white. A photo is at right, Martin Brewster has another fine closeup photo, a third good closeup is available, Trabas has a photo by Capt. Peter Mosselberger, Photographers Resource has a page with many photos, Google has a street view, and Bing has an aerial view. The original lighthouse, a 14.5 m (46 ft) tapered sandstone tower, was the first British lighthouse designed to be fueled entirely by natural gas from nearby coal mines. This lighthouse, seen in a historic postcard view posted by Huelse, was undamaged by shelling from German ships in early 1915, but it was demolished later that year because it stood in the line of fire of coastal artillery. The lantern and lens were mounted on a temporary square pyramidal frame tower with enclosed watch room, located on the Town Moor behind the guns. The lantern and lens are now on display at the Hartlepool Museum on Maritime Avenue. Located on the headland known as the Heugh (pronounced "uff"), sheltering Hartlepool Harbour, on the north side of the city. Site open, tower closed. Operator: PD Teesport. ARLHS ENG-314; Admiralty A2663; NGA 2056.
Hartlepool Old Pier (Pilots Pier)
1836. Active; focal plane 13 m (43 ft); flash every 3 s, white over the entrance channel and green otherwise. 12 m (39 ft) square pyramidal wood tower, painted white with two narrow horizontal red bands on each face. Rotating radar antenna atop the lantern. Ivan Dobsky has a good photo, Trabas has a fine closeup, another good closeup photo is available, Wikimedia has Ian Paterson's photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Google has a foggy street view, and Bing has an aerial view. Recently renovated by the port authority, the Old Pier is now called Pilots Pier. Located at the end of the pier on the north side of the entrance to the old harbor at Hartlepool. Site and tower closed. Operator: PD Teesport. ARLHS ENG-305; Admiralty A2664; NGA 2052.
* Hartlepool West Harbour
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 6 m (20 ft); flash every 2 s, white, red or green depending on direction. Light mounted on the balcony railing of a 2-story concrete block harbor master's office. Trabas has a good photo, Google has a street view, and Bing has an aerial view. Located on the north side of the sea lock at the entrance to the Hartlepool West Harbor, used by small craft. Site and building open. Admiralty A2667.4; NGA 2062.
The Heugh Light
The Heugh Light, Hartlepool, February 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Chris (hidden-teesside.co.uk)
* Seaton Carew High (Seaton Tower)
1839. Inactive since the 1890s. Approx. 19 m (62 ft) round stone tower on a square stone base; lantern removed. The tower is unpainted. The lighthouse formerly stood at Seaton Carew southeast of Hartlepool. It was taken down and rebuilt as a war memorial during the redevelopment of the Hartlepool waterfront. A photo is available, Wikimedia has Hermann Luyken's view from the harbor, Google has a street view, and Bing has an aerial view. Located at the end of a pier inside the Hartlepool Marina in downtown Hartlepool. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: unknown. ARLHS ENG-332.

North Yorkshire Lighthouses

Redcar and Cleveland Borough Lighthouses
South Gare
1884. Active; focal plane 16 m (53 ft); long (1.5 s) flash, white or red depending on direction, every 12 s. 13 m (43 ft) round cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery. Entire lighthouse painted white. Fog horn (two blasts every 30 s). Fred Brunskill has a page on the South Gare pier with several photos of the lighthouse, David Roberts has a good photo, Trabas has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. In 2007, the lighthouse became the first in the U.K. to be powered by a hydrogen fuel cell. Located at the end of the stone pier at the entrance to the River Tees about 8 km (5 mi) northwest of Redcar. Site and tower closed (pier fenced). Operator: PD Teesport. ARLHS ENG-131; Admiralty A2626; NGA 2020.
* Redcar Promenade Range Rear
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); red light, 1.5 s on, 1 s off. Light mounted near the top of a 2-story red brick building. Trabas has a photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The building is a Marks and Spencer grocery, located on the Esplanade in Redcar. The front light is on a pole across the street. Site open. Admiralty A2620.1; NGA 2012.

Scarborough Borough Lighthouses
* Whitby West Pier (2)
About 1914 (station established 1831). Active; focal plane 14 m (46 ft); continuous green light. 7 m (23 ft) round wood lantern mounted on a square wood skeletal tower. Lantern painted green; the wood legs are unpainted. Trabas has a photo, Wikimedia has Nicholas Mutton's closeup, and Google has a satellite view and a street view showing all four pier lights. Located at the end of the extended Whitby West Pier. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Port of Whitby. Admiralty A2599; NGA 1984.
* Whitby West Pier (1)
1831. Generally inactive; a green light is displayed when a vessel is expected and it is safe to enter the harbor. 25 m (83 ft) round cylindrical fluted stone tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on a square base. Tower unpainted, lantern painted white with a black dome. Gary Denham's photo is at right, another excellent photo is available, Trabas has a photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The Whitby piers were extended in 1914, and the active lights were moved to wood skeletal towers at the ends of the extensions. In February 2012, the lighthouse was closed due to structural concerns; it's estimated that £200,000 will be needed to repair the two 19th century pier lighthouses, and even more expensive repairs may be needed for the piers themselves. Located at the original end of the west pier; accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower apparently open (a photo shows visitors on the gallery). ARLHS ENG-165; Admiralty A2599.2.
** Whitby East Pier (1)
1855. Inactive since about 1914. 17 m (55 ft) round cylindrical stone tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on a square base. Tower unpainted, lantern painted white with a black dome. Hanan Smart has a fine closeup, Trabas has a photo, another photo is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The Whitby piers were extended in 1914, and the active lights were moved to wood skeletal towers at the ends of the extensions. Located at the original end of the east pier; accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ENG-163.
Whitby West Pier Light
1831 West Pier Light, Whitby, June 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo
by Gary Denham
Whitby East Pier (2)
About 1914 (station established 1855). Active; focal plane 14 m (46 ft); continuous red light. 7 m (23 ft) round wood lantern mounted on a square wood skeletal tower. Lantern painted red; the wood legs are unpainted. Jon Tait has a photo, Paul Bradley has a 2008 photo, Trabas has a closeup, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of the extended Whitby East Pier, which is detached from the older pier. Site and tower closed. Operator: Port of Whitby. Admiralty A2598; NGA 1988.
* Whitby High
1858 (James Walker). Active; focal plane 73 m (240 ft); white or red light, depending on direction, 5 s on 5 s off. 13 m (43 ft) octagonal brick tower with lantern and gallery, painted white, attached to 1-story keeper's house. A photo by Martin Dawes is at right, another good photo is available, Trabas has an excellent photo, Wikimedia has Phil Catterall's closeup photo, Photographers Resource has a page with several photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. The original low lighthouse was deactivated in 1890 and subsequently demolished. Located atop a cliff about 3 km (2 mi) east of Whitby Harbour. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Trinity House. ARLHS ENG-164; Admiralty A2596; NGA 1992.
* Scarborough Pier (St. Vincents Pier) (2)
1931 (reconstructed 1806 lighthouse; inactive 1914-1931). Active; focal plane 17 m (56 ft); white light, 2.5 s on, 2.5 s off. 15 m (49 ft) round brick tower with lantern and gallery, painted white, attached to 2-story keeper's house (1843). Fog horn (blast every 60 s). A winter 2008 photo and a good 2007 photo are available, Trabas has a closeup, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Google has a street view, and Bing has an aerial view. The tower was heightened by 5 m (17 ft) in the 1840s. The original lighthouse had to be demolished after being heavily damaged by shelling from a German ship in 1914; the current tower was built to replace it in 1931. The keeper's house has been used as an office and clubhouse by the Scarborough Yacht Club since 1952. The exterior of the lighthouse was repaired and restored in 2008. Located on a pier in the old harbor at Scarborough; the pier's original name is St. Vincent's Pier but it is usually called Lighthouse Pier. Accessible by walking the short pier. Site open, tower closed. Owner/operator: Scarborough Borough Council. Site manager: Scarborough Yacht Club. ARLHS ENG-121; Admiralty A2592; NGA 1976.
Whitby High Light
Whitby High Light, Whitby, August 2009
Geograph Creative Commons photo
by Martin Dawes

Information available on lost lighthouses:

  • Blyth West Pier (1888-?), Blyth, Northumberland. Millichamp does not mention this 6 m (20 ft) pierhead lighthouse, and no information on its history is available. Photographers Resource has a historic photo (halfway down the page). The pier is now marked by two red lights on a mast; Trabas has a photo. Admiralty A2760; NGA 2184.
  • Red Acre Point (1831?-1940), Seaham, Durham. This 18 m (58 ft) stone lighthouse was demolished to prevent it from guiding German ships in World War II.
  • Seaton Carew Low (1839-?), Hartlepool, Durham. Demolished; the location has probably been lost to beach erosion.
  • Sunderland Old North Pier (1) (1803?-1920?), Sunderland, Tyne and Wear. The pier is now marked by a light on a tall mast; Trabas has a photo. Admiralty A2686; NGA 2092.
  • Tynemouth Castle (1681-1898), North Tyneside, Tyne and Wear. This historic lighthouse was demolished in 1898-99.

Notable faux lighthouses:

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Adjoining pages: North: Southeastern Scotland | South: Eastern England

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Posted August 27, 2004; checked and revised May 21, 2014. Lighthouses: 40. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.