Lighthouses of France: Languedoc-Roussillon

This page includes lighthouses of the southernmost part of mainland France, in the region of Languedoc-Roussillon. The coast of this region includes the départements of Gard, Hérault, Aude, and Pyrénées-Orientales. The first three departments fall within the historic province of Languedoc, so-called because its inhabitants spoke (and many still speak) the Occitan language (langue d'oc), which is related to Catalan. Pyrénées-Orientales corresponds roughly to the former province of Roussillon, which was part of the principality of Catalonia until it was captured by France in 1659. Here Catalan itself is often spoken.

The coast of Languedoc-Roussillon faces east or southeast on the Golfe du Lion, a broad bight of the Mediterranean Sea. The coast is mountainous in the south, where the Pyrenees come down to the sea, but it is a relatively low coast elsewhere, with few major ports.

The French word for a lighthouse, phare, is often reserved for the larger coastal lighthouses; a smaller light or harbor light is called a feu (literally "fire," but here meaning "light"). The front light of a range (alignement) is the feu antérieur and the rear light is the feu postérieur.

Aids to navigation in France were regulated for many years by the Bureau des Phares et Balises. This venerable agency has been absorbed as the office of Maritime Signalization (Signalisation Maritime) within Ecology, Infrastructure and Energy Ministry (Ministère de l'Écologie, du Développement Durable, et de l'Énergie). However, many of the lights are actually operated by the transport ministries or port authorities of the departmental governments.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. FR numbers, where available, are the French light list numbers. Admiralty numbers are from volume E of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA List numbers are from Publication 113.

General Sources
Le Phare à travers le Monde
A large, well known site, rich in fine photos, maintained by Alain Guyomard and Robert Carceller.
Phares de France
Another large and well known site, this one by Jean-Christophe Fichou, rich in historical information.
Ministère de la Culture - Phares
Historical data on more than 180 French lighthouses, with photos of most of them.
Phareland, le Site des Phares de France
This comprehensive site has good photos and information about the major lighthouses.
Online List of Lights - Vol. E - France
Photos posted by Alexander Trabas; most are by Arno Siering.
Lighthouses in Languedoc-Roussillon
Photos available from Wikimedia.
Lighthouses in France
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
Société Nationale pour le Patrimoine des Phares et Balises (S.N.P.B.)
The French national lighthouse preservation organization.
Französische Leuchttürme
Historic photos and postcard images posted by Klaus Huelse.

Phare de l'Espiguette
Pointe de l'Espiguette Light, Grau-du-Roi, July 2007
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Wolfgang Honisch

Lighthouses of Gard

Grau-du-Roi and Aigues-Mortes Lighthouses
Note: In Occitan, a grau is an inlet or pass connecting the sea to a lagoon or inland waterway. In this case, grau-du-roi or the "king's channel" refers to the canal ordered by King Louis IX in the 13th century to make Aigues-Mortes a seaport.
* L'Espiguette
1869 (M. Dupuy). Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); three white flashes every 15 s. 27 m (89 ft) square masonry tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story masonry keeper's house. Upper third of the lighthouse painted black, lower 2/3 white. A photo by Wolfgang Honisch is at the top of this page, Trabas has a photo by Siering, Phareland.com has many photos of this lighthouse, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Wikipedia has a French article on the lighthouse, and Bing has a satellite view. The Pointe de l'Espiguette is a broad, sandy barrier, the southwestern extension of the Camargue (the Rhône delta). Sediment from the Rhône is accumulating here; the lighthouse was built 150 m (165 yd) from the sea but now it is a full kilometer (0.6 mi) from the surf. Located at the end of the Route de l'Espiguette about 6 km (4 mi) southeast of Grau-du-Roi. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-276; FR-1321; Admiralty E0586; NGA 6320.
* Aigues-Mortes (Tour de Constance)
1246. Inactive for many centuries. 33 m (108 ft) round cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on one side of a large cylindrical donjon (keep). A photo by Dan Forys is at right, another excellent photo is available, Wikimedia has Ingo Mehling's photo, and Google has a good satellite view. King Louis IX (St. Louis) built the Tour de Constance in 1242 and established a light on it in 1246, before he departed on the Seventh Crusade in 1248. He also had a canal dredged to make Aigues-Mortes a seaport. After the crusades, the canal silted up and the tower ceased to show a light. Located in Aigues-Mortes, a historic port town now 6 km (3.75 mi) northeast of Grau-du-Roi and the sea. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Centre des Monuments Nationaux. ARLHS FRA-512.
* Port Camargue Jetée de l'Ouest
Date unknown (station established 1872). Active; focal plane 9 m (30 ft); three green flashes every 15 s. 7 m (23 ft) post attached to a triangular 1-story equipment room. Lighthouse painted white; the light is green. Trabas has a photo, and Google has an aerial view. Located at the end of the west jetty at Port Camargue, about 2.5 km (1.5 mi) south of Grau-du-Roi. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty E0583.2; NGA 6296.
Tour Constance
Tour de Constance, Aigues-Mortes, July 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Dan Forys
* Port Camargue Jetée de l'Est
Date unknown (station established 1873). Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); red flash every 4 s. 6 m (20 ft) post attached to a triangular 1-story equipment room. Lighthouse painted white; the light is red. Trabas has a photo, Guyomard and Carceller have photos (click on either right arrow; the metal tower shown on this page is apparently a faux lighthouse), and Google has an aerial view. Located at the end of the east jetty at Port Camargue, about 2.5 km (1.5 mi) south of Grau-du-Roi. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty E0583.4; NGA 6300.
* Grau-du-Roi Jetée de l'Est (2)
Date unknown (station established 1873). Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); three green flashes every 15 s. 9 m (30 ft) metal post light rising from a triangular 1-story equipment room. Lighthouse painted white; the light is green. Trabas has a closeup photo, and Google has an aerial view. This light replaced a cast iron tourelle shown in Huelse's postcard view. Located at the end of the west jetty at Grau-du-Roi. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-306; Admiralty E0582; NGA 6284.
* Grau-du-Roi
1829. Inactive since 1869. 19 m (62 ft) round cylindrical stone tower with lantern and gallery, centered on a 1-story keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white. Magali M's photo is at right, Guyomard and Carceller have two good photos, Wikimedia has several photos, and Google has an aerial view. Grau-du-Roi is a small port on the west side of the Camargue (the Rhône delta); a canal leads northeast to the older port town of Aigues-Mortes. This lighthouse was replaced in 1869 by the Phare de l'Espiguette, but the old tower has been carefully preserved. Located at the base of the west jetty of the canal entrance in Grau-du-Roi. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-307.
* Grau-du-Roi Jetée de l'Ouest (3)
Date unknown (station established 1858). Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); red light occulting twice every 6 s. 9 m (30 ft) metal post rising from a triangular 1-story equipment room. Lighthouse painted white; the light is red. A closeup photo is available, Trabas has a closeup, and Google has an aerial view. This light replaced a cast iron tourelle (1872) shown in Huelse's postcard view. Located at the end of the west jetty at Grau-du-Roi. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-309; Admiralty E0582.2; NGA 6288.

Grau-du-Roi Light, Grau-du-Roi, March 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Magali M

Lighthouses of Hérault

La Grande Motte, Mauguio, and Palavaz-les-Flots Lighthouses
Note: These are lights of popular beachfront resorts north of Sète.
[La Grande Motte (Jetée Ouest)]
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); two red flashes every 6 s. 12 m (39 ft) post with two wing-like white concrete walls. Dan Cristescu has a photo, Trabas has a photo by Siering, Peter Kriens has a view from the sea, and Google has an aerial view. The effect of the walls is to make the light appear much larger at a distance. Located at the end of the west breakwater at La Grande Motte. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-704; Admiralty E0580; NGA 6276.
* Carnon-Plage Jetée Est
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 9 m (30 ft); four red flashes every 15 s. 6 m (20 ft) round tower rising from a triangular 1-story equipment shelter. Lighthouse painted white with green trim. Trabas has a photo by Siering, Valerie Nicolle has a photo of both Carnot-Plage lights, and Google has an aerial view. Located on the east (really north) breakwater at Carnon-Plage. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty E0578.2; NGA 6280.
* Carnon-Plage Jetée Sud-Ouest
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 9 m (30 ft); four red flashes every 15 s. 6 m (20 ft) round tower rising from a triangular 1-story equipment shelter. Lighthouse painted white with red trim. Trabas has a photo by Siering, Valerie Nicolle has a photo of both Carnot-Plage lights, and Google has an aerial view. This marina also has a canal connection to the Canal du Rhône à Sète. Located on the south breakwater at Carnon-Plage. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-700; Admiralty E0578; NGA 6272.
* Le Lez (Palavaz-les-Flots)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); green flash every 2.5 s. 6 m (20 ft) post rising from a triangular 1-story equipment shelter. Lighthouse painted white with dark green band at the top. Stéphane Rossignol's photo is at right, Trabas has a closeup photo by Siering, Philippe Graille has a 2011 photo, another photo is available, and Google has an aerial view. This light marks the entrance to the Lez River, which is canalized in its lower course; the river channel leads to Palavas-les-Flots and connects to the intracoastal Canal du Rhône à Sète. The other side of the entrance is marked not by a light but by a statue of a fisherman. Located on the north side of the river/canal entrance. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty E0577.5; NGA 6270.

Frontignan Lighthouse
Frontignan Digue Est
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); three green flashes every 12 s. 8 m (26 ft) concrete tripod tower. Entire lighthouse is white. No photo available, but Google has a good satellite view. The light appears to be a smaller version of the Épi Dellon light (next entry). Located at the end of the east breakwater of Frontignan, a town on the east side of Sète. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Admiralty E0557.2; NGA 6216.
Feu du Lez
Feu du Lez, Mauguio, January 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Stéphane Rossignol

Sète Lighthouses
Sète Épi Dellon Extrémité Est (2?)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 20 m (66 ft); red flash every 4 s. 15 m (49 ft) concrete tripod tower. Entire lighthouse is white. Trabas has Siering's photo showing four Sète lighthouses, including this one at upper left, and Google has a good satellite view. NGA formerly listed the tower height as only 7 m (23 ft), probably referring to an earlier light. The Sète Epi Dellon breakwater has a long eastward extension, and this light is located at the extreme east end of the breakwater. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Admiralty E0547.5; NGA 6200.
Sète Épi Dellon
1896. Active; focal plane 21 m (69 ft); red light occulting once every 4 s. 19 m (62 ft) round masonry tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white, lantern and gallery red. A photo is available, Trabas has Siering's photo showing this lighthouse to left of center, Phareland.com has a photo of the Môle St.-Louis light showing the outer breakwater as well; the 1869 Brise-Lame light appears on the right and the Épi Dellon light in the center. Google has a good satellite view. Located at the center of the breakwater's southeastern extension. Accessible only by boat (the outer breakwater does not connect to shore). Site and tower closed. Admiralty E0547; NGA 6196.
Sète Brise-Lames (Outer Breakwater)
1869. Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); red light occulting twice every 6 s. 8 m (26 ft) round cast iron tourelle with lantern and gallery. Tower painted white; lantern and gallery painted red. Trabas has Siering's photo, Guyomard and Carceller have a photo (click three times on the right arrow), and Google has a satellite view. When it was built, this lighthouse marked the north end of the outer breakwater. By the 1890s, the breakwater had been extended eastward, so the lighthouse now stands in the elbow where this newer section joins the original. Accessible only by boat (the outer breakwater does not connect to shore). Site and tower closed. Admiralty E0550; NGA 6192.
Sète Nouvelle Digue (South Jetty)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); red occulting once every 4 s. 7 m (23 ft) round tower rising from a triangular 1-story equipment shelter. Lighthouse painted white with red trim. Trabas has Siering's photo, D. Rivaud has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of a rubblestone breakwater extending southward off the Môle St.-Louis. Accessible only by boat; this mole is not walkable. Admiralty E0552; NGA 6184.
* Sète Môle Saint-Louis (4)
1948 (station established 1684). Active; focal plane 34 m (112 ft); four flashes every 12 s, white or red depending on direction. 31 m (101 ft) round masonry tower with lantern and gallery. Tower painted white; lantern painted red. David Wing's photo is at right, Wikimedia has a 2011 photo, Phareland.com has photos, Trabas has Siering's closeup, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a good satellite view. The port of Sète was built in the late 1600s as the Mediterranean entrance of the Canal du Midi. The Môle Saint Louis is the historic breakwater mole sheltering the port and the canal entrance; today there is also an outer breakwater to the southeast. The original tower was rebuilt a few years later when the mole was extended; that tower served until a tall lighthouse was built in 1861. The present lighthouse is a copy of the 1861 lighthouse, which was destroyed during World War II. Located at the end of the mole. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-486; FR-1301; Admiralty E0546; NGA 6180.
* Sète (Mont St. Clair)
1903. Active; focal plane 93 m (305 ft); white flash every 5 s. 23 m (75 ft) octagonal masonry tower with lantern and gallery. Tower painted white; lantern painted dark green. A magnificent turn of the 20th century tower. Keeper's houses and other station buildings also survive. Trabas has Siering's closeup photo, another good photo is available, Phareland.com has good photos, and Google has a fine satellite view. Located off the Chemin du Phare, on the slope of Mont Saint Clair, to the west of the harbor entrance and just below the sailors' cemetery. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-362; FR-1300; Admiralty E0544; NGA 6164.

Môle St.-Louis Light, Sète, August 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by David Wing
* Canal de Sète Entrance East Side (Pointe Courte)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); quick-flashing green light. 7 m (23 ft) post rising from a triangular 1-story concrete equipment room. Lighthouse painted white with green trim at the top. Sophie Ménart has a good photo, and Google has a satellite view. The Canal de Sète is a historic channel connecting the Étang de Thau to the sea through Sète. Located at the end of the Quai du Mistral, marking the east side of the entrance to the canal from the lagoon. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty E0560; NGA 6236.
* Canal de Sète Entrance West Side
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); quick-flashing red light. 7 m (23 ft) post rising from a triangular 1-story concrete equipment room. Lighthouse painted white with red trim at the top. A 2010 closeup and another photo are available, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of the Quai de la Daurade, marking the west side of the entrance to the canal from the lagoon. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty E0561; NGA 6240.
Pointe du Barrou
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 6 m (20 ft); quick-flashing white light. 6 m (20 ft) round stone tower; lower half painted yellow, upper half black. A photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. Located on a shoal in the Étang de Thau on the approach from the lagoon to Sète. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty E0561.5; NGA 6241.

Marseillan (Étang de Thau) Lighthouses

Note: The Étang de Thau is the largest of a series of lagoons along the coast of Languedoc. The sound is about 21 km (13 mi) long and 8 km (5 mi) wide. The Canal du Rhône à Sète connects the Étang de Thau to Marseille through the chain of lagoons. Built in the late 1600s, the Canal du Midi provided (and still provides) a water connection between the Mediterranean and the Garonne, which flows into the Atlantic below Bordeaux.
* Marseillan Jetée Nord-Est
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 7 m (23 ft); green light, 2 s on, 2 s off. 6 m (20 ft) round tower rising from a triangular 1-story equipment shelter. Lighthouse painted white with green trim. A 2007 closeup photo is available, also a second closeup, Trabas has Siering's photo, and Google has an aerial view. Located on the north side of the entrance to the harbor of Marseillan from the Étang de Thau. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-707; Admiralty E0567.2.
* Marseillan Jetée Sud-Ouest
Date unknown. Inactive. 6 m (20 ft) round tower rising from a triangular 1-story equipment shelter. Lighthouse painted white with red trim. A photo is available, and Google has an aerial view. Located on the south side of the entrance to the harbor of Marseillan from the Étang de Thau. Site open, tower closed.
* Les Onglous (Canal du Midi)
1902. Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); white or red light depending on direction, occulting twice every 6 s. 11 m (36 ft) round cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery. Tower painted white, lantern and gallery rail red. A photo is at right, Trabas has Siering's photo, another good photo is available, Wikimedia has several photos, and Google has an aerial view. This lighthouse stands on a short jetty projecting into the Étang de Thau. It marks the entrance from the sound into the Canal du Midi. Located on the east jetty at the canal entrance, about 1.5 km (1 mi) south of Marseillan. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-376; Admiralty E0568.
Feu des Onglous
Les Onglous Light, Marseillan, June 2009
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Gloverepp
#Marseillan-Plage Digue Ouest (1)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 7 m (23 ft); red flash every 4 s. 5 m (17 ft) post rising from a 1-story concrete equipment room. Lighthouse painted white with green trim at the top. A closeup and another photo are available, but Google's satellite view shows that the equipment room has been removed. The marina at Marseillan-Plage is also the start of a canal for small craft leading to the south end of the Étang de Thau. Located at the end of the west (really north) breakwater at Marseillan-Plage, northeast of Cap d'Agde. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-706; Admiralty E0542; NGA 6154.

Agde Lighthouses
Fort Brescou (1)
1836. Inactive since 1901. 9 m (30 ft) round stone tower, unpainted; lantern removed. Ted Sarah has a closeup photo, the tower can be seen rising from the center of the fort in Guyomard and Carceller's photo by Guy Guyonnet, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has an aerial view. The Île de Brescou is a fortified island in the Mediterranean off Cap d'Agde; built for defense, the fort was later used for many years as a prison. Guided tours were stopped in 2005 because of the deteriorated condition of the fort. A support group, Amis de Brescou, has formed to work for its restoration. Located about 1.5 km (1 mi) south of the point of Cap d'Agde. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. ARLHS FRA-702.
Fort Brescou (2)
1901 (station established 1836). Active; focal plane 22 m (72 ft); two flashes every 6 s, white or red depending on direction. 14 m (46 ft) round masonry tower with lantern and gallery mounted on a round concrete base. Tower painted white, lantern and gallery red. David Reverchon's photo is at right, Trabas has Siering's photo, another good photo is available, and Google has an aerial view. Located at the southern (seaward) corner of the fort. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. ARLHS FRA-015; Admiralty E0538; NGA 6136.
* Cap d'Agde (Mont St.-Loup)
1836. Inactive since 1903. Square masonry tower with lantern and gallery, rising from a large fortification. The building is now a French Navy signal station. Eugène van Rijn has a closeup, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a good aerial view. Guyomard and Carceller also have a photo of an older tower, the 1750 Tour des Anglais, but it is not clear that this tower was used as a lighthouse. The lighthouse was built in connection with improvement of the Canal du Midi, which made Agde a major port. In 1903, with Agde in decline, the light was moved to Mont St.-Clair in Sète. Located at an elevation of 113 m (370 ft) on the summit of Mont Saint-Loup, an extinct volcano rising on the southeast side of the town of Agde, about 2.5 km (1.5 mi) from the coast; the mountain is protected as a nature reserve. Site open, tower status unknown. ARLHS FRA-708.
Agde Jetée de l'Est (4)
Date unknown (station established 1805). Active; focal plane 14 m (46 ft); green light occulting once every 4 s. 11 m (36 ft) round masonry tower, painted white. Fog horn (blast every 10 s). An excellent photo is available, and Google has an aerial view. This lighthouse replaced a cast iron tourelle installed in 1867. Located at the end of the east jetty at the mouth of the Rivière de l'Hérault in Le Grau d'Agde. Accessible by walking the jetty. Site status unknown. ARLHS FRA-068; Admiralty E0535; NGA 6124.

1901 Fort Brescou Light, Agde, August 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by David Reverchon
Agde Jetée de l'Ouest (2)
Date unknown (station established 1868). Active; focal plane 14 m (46 ft); red light occulting twice every 6 s. 11 m (36 ft) round masonry tower, painted white. Guyomard and Carceller have a distant view by Anastasia Roche, a 2009 photo is available, Wikimedia has a photo showing both Agde lighthouses, and Google has an aerial view. The original lighthouse was a cast iron tourelle. Located at the end of the west jetty at the mouth of the Rivière de l'Hérault opposite Le Grau d'Agde. The jetty is accessible by a road on the west side of the river, and the light may be accessible by walking the jetty. Site status unknown. ARLHS FRA-140; Admiralty E0534; NGA 6128.

Lighthouses of Aude

* [Narbonne-Plage (Bassin des Exals)]
1990. Active; focal plane 24 m (79 ft); three white flashes every 12 s. 10 m (33 ft) gray metallic post with four sweeping wings. A 2009 photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. Located atop a bluff at the small boat harbor of Bassin des Exals, about halfway between the beach towns of Narbonne-Plage and St.-Pierre-la-Mer. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-185; Admiralty E0527.2; NGA 6113.
* Port-la-Nouvelle Jetée du Nord (3)
Date unknown (station established 1882). Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); green light, 2 s on, 2 s off. 12 m (39 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower, painted white with a green top. Trabas has Siering's photo, Rémy Dubuc has another photo, a 2008 photo is available, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on the north jetty at the harbor entrance in Port-la-Nouvelle. Site status unknown. ARLHS FRA-426; Admiralty E0524; NGA 6104.
* Port-la-Nouvelle Jetée du Sud (3) (Feu Antérieur)
1948(?) (station established 1882). Active; focal plane 23 m (75 ft); quick-flashing white light. 18 m (59 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower with gallery and a small lantern, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Lionel Maraval's photo is at right, Guyomard and Carceller also have a photo, Trabas has a closeup by Hendrik Porath, Jérôme Biasio has a 2007 photo, Wikimedia has a photo, and Bing has a satellite view. This station replaced an earlier light on the Jetée de l'Ouest, which was active at least by 1805 and must have been very nearly in the same location. Huelse has a postcard view of the 1882 lighthouse, a typical cast iron tourelle; it was replaced in 1929 by a cylindrical masonry tower that was destroyed in World War II. The rear light of the range is a skeletal mast on a building 3.5 km (2 mi) west northwest. Located on the south jetty at the harbor entrance in Port-la-Nouvelle. Accessible by walking the jetty. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-427; Admiralty E0522; NGA 6100.
* Cap Leucate
1951. Active; focal plane 66 m (217 ft); two white flashes every 10 s. 19 m (62 ft) square pyramidal masonry tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white with unpainted granite trim; lantern painted red. Trabas has Siering's photo, a good 2007 photo is available, Claude Bihain has a photo, Phareland.com has numerous photos, Wikimedia has a photo, Huelse has an uncluttered postcard view that shows the layout of the station clearly, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the Chemin du Phare on the north side of Leucate-Plage. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-230; FR-1293; Admiralty E0518; NGA 6088.
Feu de Port-le-Nouvelle
Jetée du Sud Light, Port-la-Nouvelle, January 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Lionel Maraval

Lighthouses of Pyrénées-Orientales

Note: The scenic coast of Pyrénées-Orientales is called the Côte Vermeille (Vermilion Coast).
Le Barcarès and Canet-en-Roussillon Lighthouses
* Grau Saint-Ange (Le Barcarès)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); two red flashes every 10 s. 7 m (23 ft) post rising from a triangular 1-story concrete equipment room. Lighthouse painted white. Trabas has Siering's photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of the south breakwater at Le Barcarès, near the northern border of Pyrénées-Orientales. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty E0517; NGA 6084.
* Canet-Plage
1977. Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); four white flashes every 15 s. 24 m (79 ft) triangular concrete tower with gallery and an enclosed equipment room at the base. The light and gallery are supported by three concrete columns, with access via a stairway that spirals almost magically up the open center of the tower. Entire lighthouse is white. François La Poutré has a fine closeup, Trabas has Siering's closeup, and Google has a satellite view. This modern design is by the architectural firm of Cardin, Diatkine et Frémolle of Montpellier. Located on the dunes behind the beach at Canet-Plage, about 800 m (1/2 mi) north of the harbor. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty E0514.5; NGA 6072.
Canet-Plage Jetée du Sud
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 9 m (30 ft); three red flashes every 12 s. 6 m (20 ft) post centered on a triangular 1-story concrete equipment shelter. Lighthouse is white concrete; the light and its short mast are red. A distant view is available, Trabas has Siering's view across the harbor, and Google has a distant satellite view. Click on the right arrow of the Guyomard/Carceller page for a better view. Located at the end of the breakwater at Canet-Plage, the beach resort town adjacent to Canet-en-Roussillon. Apparently accessible by walking the breakwater, but it's a long walk. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty E0515; NGA 6076.

Collioure and Port-Vendres Lighthouses
* Collioure
1886. Active; focal plane 14 m (46 ft); green light, 2 s on, 2 s off. 14 m (46 ft) round stone tower, attached to the end of the mole. There is a stone equipment room at the top of the tower, level with the top of the mole, surmounted by a round cast iron watch room and then the light supported by four ornately curved iron legs. The NGA list gives up and calls this highly unusual light tower simply a "structure." Trabas has Siering's closeup photo, another good closeup is available, Wikimedia has a photo by Roger Davies, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of the jetty on the north side of the harbor entrance at Collioure, a small fishing port about 3 km (2 mi) northwest of Port-Vendres. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-243; Admiralty E0512; NGA 6056.
* Port-Vendres (Fort du Fanal) (2)
1700 (inactive 1710-1770; station established in the 14th century). Active; focal plane 29 m (95 ft); green light, 3 s on, 1 s off. 18 m (59 ft) square masonry tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern and gallery painted green. Jean-Pierre Bazard's photo is at right, Chris Bosworth has a photo, Trabas has Siering's photo, Peter Goulding also has a photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. According to Fichou, beacon fires were displayed from a tower built here in the 14th century, but that tower was destroyed around 1610. The present tower was included in the fort built by Vauban for Louis XIV in 1684; it became known later as the Fort du Fanal, fanal being a lantern or beacon. Lights were shown from 1700 to 1710 and then continuously from 1770, with more modern equipment being installed in 1843. Located on a bluff on the west side of the harbor entrance at Port-Vendres. Site and fort open daily, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-291; Admiralty E0498; NGA 6024.
* Port-Vendres Range Rear (2)
Date unknown (station established 1858). Active; focal plane 23 m (75 ft); quick-flashing white light, intensified on the range line and synchronized with the front light. 11 m (36 ft) tower, painted with in a red and white checkered pattern with a red band at the top. No photo available, but a Google satellite view probably shows the tower. Located 200 m (655 ft) south southwest of the front light. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-614; Admiralty E0497.1; NGA 6052.
Fort du Fanal Light
Fort du Fanal Light, Port-Vendres, September 2011
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Jean-Pierre Bazard
* [Port-Vendres Range Front]
1858. Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); quick-flashing white light. 11 m (36 ft) post with gallery, mounted on a square stone pedestal. Gallery painted red. Frank Vidal has a good photo, Trabas has Siering's photo, a view from the harbor is available, and Google has a satellite view. The rear light was originally mounted on the roof of the keeper's house. Located on the tip of a promontory on the east side of the harbor. Site and tower closed, but there's a good view from the highway turnout just above the light. Admiralty E0497; NGA 6048.
* Port-Vendres Môle de l'Est (Pointe de la Presqu'île)
1885. Active; focal plane 20 m (66 ft); red light occulting three times every 12 s. 17 m (56 ft) hexagonal cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern, gallery, and enclosed watch room mounted on six iron legs. Lionel Maraval's photo is at right, Trabas has Siering's photo, a closeup photo is available, Guyomard and Carceller have a distant view (click on the right arrow) taken from Fort du Fanal on the opposite side of the harbor, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. The drawing on Fichou's page is of this lighthouse, although it is incorrectly captioned Feu de Port instead of Feu du Môle. This unusual lighthouse was designed by the engineering firm of Parlier and Cutzach, who were asked to design a tower of the least possible weight. Apparently they did a good job, since their work has stood for 120 years. Located at the end of the east breakwater at Port-Vendres; accessible by walking the breakwater. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-599; Admiralty E0504; NGA 6044.
Feu de Port-Vendres
Môle de l'Est Light, Port-Vendres, October 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Lionel Maraval
* Cap Béar (2)
1905 (station established 1836). Active; focal plane 80 m (262 ft); three white flashes every 15 s. 27 m (89 ft) square granite tower with lantern and gallery. The tower is unpainted; lantern painted red. Several 1-story masonry keeper's houses and other station buildings. Steve Groom's photo is at right, Trabas has Siering's excellent photo, a good 2007 photo is available, Claude Bihain has a 2009 photo, Phareland.com has numerous photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a good satellite view. The original lighthouse was a 9 m (30 ft) masonry tower much higher on the slope of the ridge. Having a focal plane of 229 m (751 ft), it was too often obscured by low clouds. Located on the cape about 2.5 km (1.5 mi) east of Port-Vendres; accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-213; FR-1282; Admiralty E0496; NGA 6020.

Cerbère Lighthouse
* Cap Cerbère (2)
1982 (station establishment date unknown). Active; focal plane 55 m (180 ft); white flash every 4 s. 10 m (33 ft) square cylindrical tower, painted white, enclosed on the land side by three decorative stone "wings"; the light is mounted on a short red mast atop the tower. Trabas has Siering's photo, Phareland.com has photos, Peter Goulding has a photo, Guyomard and Carceller's page includes two views from the front (seaward) side (click on the right arrow), and Bing has a satellite view. This interesting design is by the Paris architectural firm of Lucien Guerra. The new light replaced a smaller structure much lower on the slope, having a focal plane of 19 m (62 ft). The lighthouse marks the southernmost promontory of mainland France, about 600 m (0.4 mi) north of the Spanish border. Located on the cape, about 1.5 km (1 mi) east of the Cerbère waterfront; accessible by the twisting N114 coastal highway. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS FRA-215; Admiralty E0492; NGA 6008.
Cap Béar Light
Cap Béar Light, Port-Vendres, October 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Steve Groom

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Notable faux lighthouses:

Adjoining pages: East: Marseille Area | South: Catalonia

Return to the Lighthouse Directory index | Ratings key

Posted April 3, 2006. Checked and revised April 12, 2013. Lighthouses: 42. Site copyright 2013 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.