Lighthouses of Greece: Aegean Islands

This page covers lighthouses of the many Greek islands of the central and eastern Aegean Sea. These islands fall into three broad groups. First, the Cyclades include a large number of smaller islands north of Crete and southeast of Athens. Second, there are the larger islands lying off the Turkish coast in the northeastern Aegean, including Lesbos, Chios, and Samos. Finally, the Dodecanese Islands include the large island of Rhodes and many smaller islands of the southeastern Aegean. The Cyclades and Dodecanese were formerly prefectures within the region of the South Aegean; Lemnos, Lesbos, Chios, Samos, and Ikaria are regional units (counties) within the region of the North Aegean.

Crete has a separate page. The Sporades, islands located in the northwestern corner of the Aegean, are included on the Northern Greece page. Kithera and Antikithera, located at the southwestern entrance to the Aegean, are included on the Southern Greece page.

The modern Greek nation is a relatively recent creation. After several centuries of rule by the Ottoman Turks, southern Greece won its independence in a bitter struggle during the 1820s. The new Greek nation controlled the Cyclades, but none of the other islands of the Aegean. They were added at various times, as indicated in the notes below for the different island groups.

The Greek word for a lighthouse, pháros or fáros (φάρος), is the root for the words for lighthouse in many Western European languages. In Greek, nisis is an island, akra is a cape or headland, kolpós is a bay or gulf.

Lighthouses in Greece are maintained by the Hellenic Navy Hydrographic Service.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. Admiralty numbers are from volume N of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA List numbers are from Publication 113.

General Sources
Lighthouses of Greece
A comprehensive site posted by amateur radio operator Pavlidis Savas (SV2AEL); it includes data and photos for 120 traditional Greek lighthouses.
Online List of Lights - Greece
Photos by various photographers posted by Alexander Trabas.
Lighthouses in Greece
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
TrekEarth - Lighthouses of Greece
Photos by various contributors.
Lighthouses in Greece
Photos by various photographers available from Wikimedia.
World of Lighthouses - Greece
Photos by various photographers available from Lightphotos.net.
Latarnie Morskie - Morze Śródziemne
Photos posted by Gola Burkhard, a Polish lighthouse fan.
Leuchttürme an der griechischen Küste
Photos by various photographers posted by Bernd Claußen.
Europäische Leuchttürme auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard images posted by Klaus Huelse.


Spathi Light, Sérifos, May 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Dimitris Tsapelas (no longer online)

Tamelos Light
Támelos Light, Kéa, August 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Irene-Angelica Chounta

Lighthouses of the Southern Cyclades

Santoríni (Thíra) Lighthouse
Note: Southernmost of the major Cyclades, Santoríni is the shattered shell of a much larger island. The islands of the Santoríni group form a circle, the caldera rim of a volcano that exploded around 1600 BC. Inside the circle, the flooded caldera has depths of 400 m (1300 ft) and is one of the best harbors of the Mediterranean. Thíra is the largest island, forming the eastern semicircle of the ring. Spectacularly beautiful, it is one of the most popular destinations of the Aegean islands. The permanent population is about 15,000.
* Akrotíri
1892. Active; focal plane 100 m (328 ft); white flash every 10 s. 10 m (33 ft) square cylindrical stone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story stone keeper's house. 3rd order Fresnel lens. Lighthouse painted white with unpainted stone trim; lantern painted white with a green dome. JenniKate Wallace's photo is at right, Trabas has a closeup photo, Wikimedia has a fine photo by Klearchos Kapoutsis, Siim Viidu has a good 2007 photo, Lightphotos.net has a view from the sea, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The lighthouse was built for the Ottoman Empire by a French company, Société Collas et Michel. The lighthouse was automated in 1988. Nicely refurbished, this is one of the best known and most visited lighthouses of the Aegean. Boasting a spectacular view, it is a very popular location for viewing the sunset. Located on Ákra Akrotíri, the southern tip of Santoríni. Accessible by road; limited parking is available. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-039; Admiralty N4266; NGA 15952.

Mílos and Polýaigos Lighthouses

Note: Southwesternmost of the Cyclades, Mílos is irregularly shaped, about 23 by 13 km (14 by 8 mi), and has a population of about 4800. Polýaigos is an uninhabited island east of Mílos.
Akradhiá (Akradia, Mílos)
1892. Active; focal plane 88 m (289 ft); white flash every 8 s. 7 m (23 ft) square cylindrical stone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story stone keeper's house. Lighthouse unpainted; lantern painted white with a gray metallic roof. A closeup photo is available, Burkhard's page for the lighthouse has a distant view, and Bing has a distant satellite view of the station. This lighthouse guides ships approaching the sheltered bay of Mílos, on the north side of the island. Located on a small island about 3 km (2 mi) northwest of the town of Mílos. Accessible only by boat and a stiff climb. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-038; Admiralty N4240; NGA 15900.
Akrotiri Light
Akrotíri Light, Santoríni, March 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo
by JenniKate Wallace
Ormos Milou (Mílos Harbor)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 36 m (118 ft); white flash every 5 s. 5 m round cylindrical lantern, painted white. Stephanie and Sean Ware have a view from the sea, and Bing has a distant satellite view. Located atop a promontory sheltering the north side of the harbor of Mílos. Site status unknown. Admiralty N4242; NGA 15904.
Polýaigos (Políagos, Poliegos)
1898. Active; focal plane 138 m (453 ft); white flash every 5 s. 9 m (30 ft) round cylindrical stone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story stone keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome painted green. A 2009 closeup and a 2008 photo are available, Ellen Jurischk has a distant view, and Google has an indistinct satellite view. This lighthouse stands at the western edge of a 16 km (10 mi) wide passage between the Mílos group and Folégandros. Located on Ákra Maskula, the southeastern tip of the island of Polýaigos, which is southeast of Kímolos. Accessible only by boat and a stiff climb. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-095; Admiralty N4252; NGA 15920.

Folégandros and Íos Lighthouses
Note: Folégandros is about 25 km (15 mi) southeast of Mílos; it has a permanent population of about 800. Íos is a larger island, about 18 km (11 mi) long and 10 km (6 mi) wide, north of Santoríni and south of Páros and Náxos; it has a population of about 1800 and is fairly well known as a tourist destination.
*
Asprópunta (Folégandros)
1919. Active; focal plane 70 m (230 ft); three white flashes every 30 s. 11 m (36 ft) round masonry tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome painted green. A 2008 closeup is available, and Trabas has a closeup of the lantern by Egidio Ferrighi, and Google has a distant satellite view. Located on the southwest coast of Folégandros about 3 km (2 mi) west of Áno Meriá. Accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-044; Admiralty N4256; NGA 15932.
Íos (Ákra Fanari)
1892. Inactive. Approx. 6 m (20 ft) square cylindrical stone tower with lantern and gallery, rising from a small 1-story stone keeper's house. The lighthouse is unpainted; lantern painted white with a green dome. The active light (focal plane 33 m (108 ft); white flash ever 4 s) is on a short skeletal tower. Rachel Lake's photo is at right, Ryan Tomko has a closeup, Trabas has Egidio Ferrighi's view from the sea, Lightphotos.net also has a view from the sea, and Bing has a satellite view. Íos has a beautiful natural harbor; in a panoramic photo of the bay the lighthouse can be seen at the end of the promontory on the far side of the harbor entrance. Near the bottom of his home page, Savas writes (2/3 the way down the page) that "in the island of Íos the lighthouse was restored and remains open to the public with the initiative of the local authorities." However, tourist sites for Íos do not mention the lighthouse as an attraction. Located on Ákra Fanari, on the west side of the Íos harbor entrance. Site status unknown. Admiralty N4262; NGA 15944.
Ios Light
Íos Light, Íos, June 2007
Flickr photo copyright Rachel Lake; permission requested

Amorgós Lighthouses
Katapola (Ákra Ágios Ilias)
1882. Inactive. Approx. 7 m (23 ft) round cylindrical stone tower attached to the front of a 1-story stone keeper's house. Burkhard's page for the lighthouse has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. The active light (focal plane 46 m (151 ft); two white flashes every 10 s) is on a small beacon on the hillside above the old lighthouse. Amorgós is the easternmost of the Cyclades; it has a population of about 400. Located on a promontory on the west side of the island and the north side of the entrance to Katapola, the one port on the island. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty N4278; NGA 15988.

Páros Lighthouses
Note: Located near the center of the Cyclades, Páros is a roughly circular island about 12 km (7.5 mi) in diameter. Páros, on the west coast, and Náousa, on the north, are the principal towns and ports. The island has a population of about 13,000.
Ágios Fokás (2)
Date unknown (station established 1867). Active; focal plane 14 m (46 ft); white flash every 4 s. 8m (26 ft) square skeletal tower mounted atop a small stone building, part of the original light station. A 1-story stone keeper's house stands nearby. The buildings are unpainted; light tower painted white. Trabas has an excellent photo, and Google has a satellite view. At the bottom of Savas's page is a photo showing a free-standing skeletal light tower; apparently this was an earlier light at this station. Located on a promontory sheltering the north side of the harbor of Páros. Apparently accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-052; Admiralty N4286; NGA 15824.
* Kórakas (Náousa)
1887. Active; focal plane 60 m (197 ft); one long (2 s) white flash every 12 s. 10 m (33 ft) square cylindrical stone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story stone keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome painted green. Trabas has Egidio Ferrighi's photo (also seen at right), a closeup and a 2009 photo are available, and Google has a satellite view. Note: there is another Kórakas lighthouse on Lésvos (see below). Located on a promontory sheltering the west side of the harbor of Náousa. Accessible by a primitive road (4WD recommended). Site open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-086; Admiralty N4290; NGA 15836.
Kórakas Light
Kórakas Light, Páros
photo copyright Egidio Ferrighi; used by permission

Sérifos Lighthouse
Note: Sérifos is a small island in the western Cyclades, about 40 km (25 mi) north of Mílos. It has a population of about 1400.
*
Spathi
1901. Active; focal plane 67 m (230 ft); three white flashes every 30 s. 10 m (33 ft) square cylindrical stone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story stone keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome painted green. A photo by Dimitris Tsapelas is at the top of this page, another page for the lighthouse is available, Matteo Oriani has a photo, another photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the southern tip of the island. Accessible by road (4WD recommended). Site open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-121; Admiralty N4228; NGA 15764.

Lighthouses of the Northern Cyclades

Kéa Lighthouses
Note: Kéa is the closest of the Cyclades to Athens, being located about 16 km (10 mi) southeast of Cape Soúnion. The island is 19 km (12 mi) long and thinly populated by about 1800 people. It is accessible by ferry from Lavrió.
* Ágios Nikólaos (Kéa)
1831. Active; focal plane 32 m (105 ft); two white flashes every 10 s. 8 m (26 ft) square stone tower with lantern and gallery, rising from a 1-story stone keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white, lantern dome green. A photo by Dimitris Tsapelas is at right, Burkhard has a page for the lighthouse, Sarala Kron has a September 2006 photo, Claußen also has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. This is the one of the first lighthouses built by the Greek government after Greece won its independence. It appears to have been renovated recently. The Orthodox chapel of Ágios Nikólaos (St. Nicholas) is attached to the lighthouse. Note: there is another Ágios Nikólaos lighthouse on Rhodes (see below). Located at the end of a narrow peninsula protecting the north side of the harbor of Vourkarió, the principal port of Kéa, on the northwest side of the island. Site open, tower closed; there are also good views of this lighthouse from ferries arriving in Kéa from Lavrió on the mainland. ARLHS GRE-050; Admiralty N4212; NGA 15628.
Támelos
1893. Active; focal plane 60 m (197 ft); two white flashes every 15 s. 7.5 m (25 ft) round tower with lantern and gallery, rising from a 1-story keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white, lantern dome green. Teddy Triant has a 2008 photo, Claußen has two photos, and Google has a satellite view. Located on Ákra Támelos, the southern point of Kéa. There is a road to the lighthouse; local guidance may be needed. Site status unknown. ARLHS GRE-126; Admiralty N4218; NGA 15624.

Ágios Nikólaos Light, Kéa, May 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Dimitris Tsapelas (no longer online)

Síros (Syros) and Míkonos (Mykonos) Lighthouses
Note: Síros occupies a strategic position in the center of the Cyclades, east of Kéa, southwest of Tínos, and west of Míkonos. Ermoupoli (Hermoupolis) is the principal town of the island. Míkonos lies at the southeastern end of the ridge that also includes Tínos and Ándros. It has a population of about 6200 and is one of the best known tourist attractions of the Aegean, known for its beaches and jetset villas.
Gaiduronísi (Dhidhimi)
1834. Active; focal plane 68 m (223 ft); white flash every 6 s. 29 m (95 ft) round masonry tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story keeper's house. The lighthouse is unpainted white stone; lantern painted white. A good 2007 photo, a closeup, and a distant view are available, and Google has a satellite view. Built by French engineers, this is the tallest Greek lighthouse. Located on an island about 3 km (2 mi) east of Ermoúpolis, Síros. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS GRE-069; Admiralty N4308; NGA 15708.
** Armenistís
1891. Active; focal plane 184 m (604 ft); white flash every 10 s. 19 m (62 ft) octagonal cylindrical stone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story stone keeper's house. The lighthouse is unpainted; lantern painted white with a green dome. The original 2nd order Fresnel lens is displayed in a replica lantern outside the Aegean Maritime Museum in Míkonos Chóra, the principal town of the island. A photo is at right, Trabas has Egidio Ferrighi's photo, a 2008 photo and Burkhard's distant view are available, and Google has a satellite view and an excellent street view by Jürgen Roß. Amy Neeson's November 2007 photo showed a lighthouse in need of paint and restoration; there has been some improvement since that time. Perched spectacularly above the sea with a fine view of Tínos, this lighthouse is a popular tourist attraction. Located on the northwestern tip of Míkonos, about 6 km (3.5 mi) north of Míkonos Chóra. Accessible by road. Site open; the resident caretaker conducts tours of the tower by arrangement. ARLHS GRE-043; Admiralty N4302; NGA 15804.
Armenisitis Light
Armenistís Light, Míkonos, August 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by D1v1d

Lighthouses of Tínos
Note: Tínos is located immediately southeast of Ándros, the two islands being separated by a strait about 1.2 km (3/4 mi) wide. The island is about 20 km (13 mi) long and has a population of about 8000. Unfortunately, none of the island's three lighthouses is readily accessible.
* Liváda
1910. Active; focal plane 41 m (135 ft); one long (1.5 s) white flash every 15 s. 10 m (33 ft) square cylindrical stone tower with lantern and gallery, rising from the front of a 1-story stone keeper's house. The lighthouse is unpainted; lantern painted white. A distant view is at right, and Bing has a satellite view. Alexander Pagidas has an October 2005 photo showing the lighthouse in very poor condition, but an August 2007 photo shows some evidence of repairs. Located at the end of a spectacular narrow promontory at the northeastern corner of Tínos, near the village of Liváda. Accessible by a hiking trail. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-090; Admiralty N4322; NGA 15744.
Planítis (Pánormos) (1)
1886. Inactive. 8 m (26 ft) square cylindrical stone tower with gallery, unpainted, attached to the ruins of a 1-story stone keeper's house. The active light (focal plane 80 m (262 ft); two white flashes every 14 s) is on a square skeletal tower in front of the historic lighthouse. Zack Sofianos has a closeup photo, and Google has a distant satellite view. Planítis is an island sheltering the north side of the bay of Pánormos, on the north coast of Tínos. Accessible only by boat. Site apparently open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-109; Admiralty N4320; NGA 15738.
Dísvato
1903. Active; focal plane 33 m (108 ft); white flash every 10 s. 9 m (30 ft) square cylindrical stone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story stone keeper's house. The lighthouse is unpainted; lantern painted white with a green dome. Zack Sofianos has a closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located on an island off the northwestern tip of Tínos, the lighthouse guides ships through the Tínos-Ándros Strait. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS GRE-062; Admiralty N4318; NGA 15736.

Liváda Light
Liváda Light, Tínos, August 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Yiannis G.


Lighthouses of Ándros
Note: Ándros is the largest and northernmost of the Cyclades. Located only 10 km (6 mi) southeast of Euboea, it is about 40 km (25 mi) long and as much as 16 km (10 mi) wide. The permanent population is about 9000.
* Gávrio (1)
1874. Inactive for many years. 8 m (26 ft) stone tower rising from the seaward end of a ruined stone keeper's house. The modern light (focal plane about 96 m (315 ft); flash every 2 s, red or green depending on direction) is on a square skeletal tower next to the historic lighthouse. Karabatsos Theodoros has closeup photo, a 2013 photo is available, and Google has a distant satellite view. According to Savas, the lighthouse had a focal plane of 96 meters, and this seems reasonable based on the Google imagery. NGA lists the focal plane of the modern light as only 15 m (49 ft), but this figure appears to be the tower height rather than the focal plane. Located atop a steep hill on the west side of the entrance to the harbor of Gávrio, the principal port of Ándros, near the northwestern end of the island. Savas says the lighthouse is accessible by road from Gávrio, although the terrain looks rather rough. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-126; Admiralty N4332.5; NGA 15660.
* Fasa (Ákra Fassa)
1856. Active; focal plane 201 m (659 ft); white flash every 10 s. 20 m (66 ft) round cylindrical stone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story stone keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white, lantern dome green. A photo and a second photo are available, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse guides vessels through the strait, about 10 km (6 mi) wide, that separates Ándros from Évvoia. Located near the western tip of Ándros, about 15 km (9 mi) north northwest of Gávrio. Accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-064; Admiralty N4330; NGA 15672.
* Griá
1914. Active; focal plane 86 m (282 ft); white flash every 10 s. 10 m (33 ft) round stone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story stone keeper's house. The lighthouse is unpainted, the lantern is painted white with a green dome, and the keeper's house is painted white. Miltos Anagnostou has an excellent closeup, and Google has a satellite view. Although it is rather remote, this lighthouse deserves to be better known. Located on a spectacular promontory on the north side of Ándros, about 5 km (3 mi) north of Ándros Chóra. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-072; Admiralty N4338; NGA 15676.
Tourlitis (Turlitis, Ándros Chóra)
1887. Active; focal plane 19 m (62 ft); two white flashes every 15 s. 7 m (23 ft) round stone tower with lantern and gallery. The lighthouse is unpainted white stone; lantern painted white. A photo is at right, a 2008 photo is available, Anton Flo has a more distant view, and Google has a satellite view. This location of this lighthouse, perched on an isolated rock, is unique among Greek lighthouses. There are no keeper's quarters; stairs cut into the rock lead down to a crude landing site. Since Ándros Chóra is a frequent stop for cruise ships, photos of the lighthouse are fairly common. Located on a rock in the harbor of Ándros Chóra. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. ARLHS GRE-127; Admiralty N4334; NGA 15680.
Tourlitis Light
Tourlitis Light, Ándros Chóra, May 2009
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by anjči

Lighthouses of the North Aegean Region

Lighthouses of Lémnos (Límnos)
Note: Lémnos (or Límnos) is a substantial island located in the northeastern Aegean about 65 km (40 mi) west of the entrance to the Dardenelles. The population of the island is about 17,000. Like the other Greek islands of the eastern Aegean, it was part of the Ottoman Empire until captured by Greece during the Balkan Wars of 1912-13. The decisive naval battle of the First Balkan War was fought off Lémnos in January 1913; the Greek victory in that battle opened the way for Greece to occupy Lémnos and many of the other islands controlled by the Ottomans. Administratively, Lémnos is part of Lésbos prefecture.
* Mírina (Kastro) (1) (?)
1912 (Ottoman). Inactive. 5 m (16 ft) round stone tower with lantern and gallery, mounted atop the walls of an ancient castle. The lighthouse is unpainted, lantern painted white with a green dome. According to Savas, this lighthouse is mounted "at the top of the castle." This is a reference to a fort built by Venice, which occupied Límnos during the 16th and early 17th century. The survival of this lighthouse is doubtful; it can't be found in Google satellite imagery or in available photos of the ruined fort. The modern light (focal plane 83 m (272 ft); white flash every 6 s) is mounted atop a 2 m (9 ft) square concrete shelter just inside the castle walls. Trabas has a closeup of that light, and Google has a satellite view. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-079; Admiralty N4575; NGA 16904.
* Pláka
1912 (Ottoman). Active; focal plane 55 m (180 ft); three white flashes every 30 s; in addition, a continuous red light is displayed at 36 m (118 ft). 18 m (59 ft) round stone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story stone keeper's house. The lighthouse is unpainted, lantern painted white with a green dome. Claußen has photos, a view from the sea is available, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. Located at the end of a sharp promontory at the northeastern corner of Lémnos, about 3 km (2 mi) north of the village of Pláka. Accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-107; Admiralty N4572; NGA 16920.
Kombi (1)
1912 (Ottoman). Inactive. 7 m (23 ft) round stone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story stone keeper's house. Lantern removed. The lighthouse is unpainted. No closeup photo available, but the lighthouse can be seen in a distant view (for a better look, click on the photo), and Google has a satellite view. The modern light (focal plane 61 m (200 ft); two quick white flashes every 6 s) is on a square skeletal tower, painted white. Located atop Kombi, an island just off the west side of the entrance to the bay of Moúdhros, on the south coast of Lémnos. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-083; Admiralty N4578; NGA 16888.

Lighthouses of Lésbos (Lésvos)
Note: Very close to the Turkish coast, Lésvos is the largest island of the eastern Aegean and the most populous, with about 90,000 permanent residents. Mitilíni (Mytilene), on the southeast coast, is the capital and largest town. The island was part of the Ottoman Empire from 1462 to 1912.
*** Megalonísi (Sígri, Meganísi) (2)
1947 (station established 1861). Active; focal plane 53 m (174 ft); two white flashes every 15 s. 15 m (49 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story concrete keeper's house. The lighthouse is unpainted white concrete; lantern dome painted green. A 2008 photo by Stratos Loukos is at right, amateur radio operator SZ8LH has a page on a visit to the lighthouse, and Bing has a satellite view of the center. Megalonísi (Big Island) is an island sheltering the harbor of Sígri, a port at the western end of Lésbos. The original lighthouse was destroyed by German troops during World War II. Located near the southern end of Megalonísi. The island is accessible by boats that can be hired daily from Sígri except in bad weather. Site open; photos indicate the tower is open for climbing. ARLHS GRE-097; Admiralty N4598; NGA 19732.
* Molivos
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); white or green light, depending on direction, 2.5 s on, 7.5 s off. 4 m (13 ft) round lantern, painted white. A closeup is available, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on Ákra Molivos, a promontory on the north coast of Lésbos about 2 km (1.2 mi) northeast of Míthimna; this is only 8 km (5 mi) southeast of Cape Baba, Turkey. Accessible by a short walk from nearby roads. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty E4595; NGA 19740.
Kórakas (Ákra Kórakas, Ákra Skamnia, Sikaminias) (2)
Date unknown (station established 1863). Active; focal plane 13 m (43 ft); flash every 5 s, white or red depending on direction. 6 m (20 ft) round lantern, painted white, built in front of a ruined 1-story keeper's house. Moumtzis Stelios has a good view from the sea, a 2009 photo and a closeup of the lantern are available, and Bing has a satellite view. Note: there is another Kórakas lighthouse on Páros (see above). Located on Ákra Kórakas, at the northeastern corner of Lésbos about 40 km (25 mi) northwest of Mitilíni. According to Savas, the site is difficult to reach on foot. ARLHS GRE-086; Admiralty N4594; NGA 19752.

Megalonísi Light, Sígri, August 2008
Panoramio photo copyright Stratos Loukos; used by permission
* Mitilíni (Ákra Kastro, Fykiotrypa) (4?)
2007 (station established 1863). Active; focal plane 20 m (66 ft); three white flashes every 14 s. 6 m (20 ft) mast mounted on a 1-story concrete equipment building. Building painted white with a red tile roof. A 2008 closeup and a second photo are available, and Google has a satellite view. Claußen has 2006 photos of the previous light, a 6 m (20 ft) skeletal tower mounted on the ruins of a 1-1/2 story lighthouse. Huelse has a postcard view that shows a still earlier version of this station, perhaps the second lighthouse. Its history is unknown. The original (1863) lighthouse had a higher focal plane and must have been farther from the water. Located on a promontory about 1.2 km (3/4 mi) northeast of the Mitilíni waterfront. Accessible by a short walk from the coastal road. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-099; Admiralty N4607; NGA 19756.
* Mitilíni Inner Harbor
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 9 m (30 ft); red flash every 1.5 s. 6 m (20 ft) mast attached to a 1-story masonry equipment building. Mast painted white with one red horizontal band; building painted white with a red roof. Trabas has a photo, and Google has a satellite view and a street view across the harbor. Located at the end of a short pier on the south side of the entrance to the inner harbor. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty N4608; NGA 19768.

Lighthouses of Psará and Chíos
Note: Chíos, with a population of about 55,000, lies only 5 km (3 mi) off the central east coast of Turkey. Long a center of Greek culture in the Aegean, it is a popular tourist destination. Psará is a much smaller island in the central Aegean about 16 km (10 mi) northwest of Chíos; it has only one settlement with a population of about 400. Both islands are administered within Chíos prefecture.
Ágios Georgíos (Kokinopulo, Psará)
1909 (Ottoman). Active; focal plane 78 m (256 ft); white flash every 10 s. 9 m (30 ft) round masonry tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story masonry keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome painted green. Manolis Roxanas has the photo at right, and Google has a distant satellite view. Located on Ákra Ágios Georgíos (Cape St. George), the cape at the southeastern corner of Psará. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS GRE-054; Admiralty N4632; NGA 19900.
Pasas (Oinousés)
1885 (Ottoman). Active; focal plane 69 m (226 ft); two white flashes every 20 s. 8 m (26 ft) round stone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story stone keeper's house. The lighthouse is unpainted; lantern painted white with a green dome. Google has a satellite view. This lighthouse marks a major hazard in the northern end of the Chíos Strait, which separates Chíos from the Turkish coast. Located on a small island off the east end of the larger island of Oinouses (or Inouses), about 25 km (15 mi) northeast of Chíos town and 8 km (5 mi) west of the Turkish coast. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS GRE-104; Admiralty N4654; NGA 19968.
Ágios Georgíos Light
Ágios Georgíos Light, Psara, June 2012
Panoramio photo copyright Manolis Roxanas; used by permission



Lighthouse of Ikaría (Icaria)
Note: Ikaría is the southernmost of the North Aegean islands, located 19 km (12 mi) southwest of Samos and 35 km (22 mi) east of Míkonos. The island is 32 km (20 mi) long and has a population of about 7000; it is administered as part of Samos prefecture.
Papas
1890 (Ottoman). Active; focal plane 75 m (246 ft); one long (1.3 s) white flash every 20 s. 11 m (36 ft) round cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story masonry keeper's house. The tower is unpainted; lantern painted white with a green dome; house painted white. A 2012 photo is available, Nikos Karaftis has a 2008 photo, a distant view from the sea shows the isolated situation of the station, and Google has a satellite view. This lighthouse marks the broad passage between Ikaría and Míkonos, leading to the central Aegean. Located on Ákra Papas, the southwestern tip of the island. The light is not accessible by road, but it may be possible to hike to it. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-103; Admiralty N4690 NGA 20068.

Lighthouses of the Dodecanese Islands

Note: Ródos (Rhodes) and the smaller islands of the Dodecanese, located in the southeastern corner of the Aegean, remained in the Ottoman Empire until they were seized by Italy in 1912, during the Balkan Wars. After World War I, the Treaty of Lausanne confirmed Italian sovereignty in 1923. Following World War II, the islands were under British occupation until the UN peace treaty with Italy transferred them to Greece in 1947.
Lighthouses of Kálimnos and Kos
Kalólimnos (Imia) (1)
1864 (Ottoman). Inactive. 6 m (20 ft) round cylindrical stone tower with lantern, attached to a 1-story stone keeper's house. The active light (focal plane 29 m (95 ft); white flash every 3 s) is on a short skeletal tower in front of the historic tower. A closeup photo (last lighthouse on the page) is available, and Google has an indistinct satellite view of the station. This lighthouse is on Kalólimnos, a small island in the center of the strait between the Greek island of Kálimnos and Turkey's Bodrum peninsula. Located on the highest point of the island. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS GRE-076; Admiralty N4708; NGA 20180.
Psérimos (Ákra Rousá)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 43 m (141 ft); two flashes, a white flash followed by a red flash, every 10 s. 4 m (13 ft) round lantern, painted white. A distant view is available, and Google has a satellite view. The light station is not nearly as well known as a large Greek flag painted on a nearby bluff. Psérimos is an island about 8 km (5 mi) long and about 4 km (2.5 mi) north of Kos. Located at the southeastern tip of the island. Site status unknown. Admiralty N4711; NGA 20196.
Kandeloussa (Kandelioússa, Kandeliusa)
1890 (Ottoman). Active; focal plane 55 m (180 ft); white flash every 10 s. 10 m (33 ft) round tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story keeper's house. A closeup photo (next to last lighthouse on the page) is available, Dawid Kefalos has a view from the sea, and Google has an indistinct satellite view. Located on a small island about 18 km (11 mi) south of the southwestern tip of Kos and about 15 km (9 mi) southwest of Nísiros. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS GRE-014; Admiralty N4764; NGA 20292.

Lighthouses of Ródos (Rhodes)
* Prasonísi
1890 (Ottoman). Active; focal plane 61 m (200 ft); four white flashes (separated by 5 s) every 30 s. 14 m (46 ft) round cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery, rising from a 1-story masonry keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white, lantern dome painted green. A good 2006 photo and more distant 2008 photo are available, and Google has a satellite view and a closeup street view by Philippe Dubois. This is one of the best known windsurfing locations in Europe. Located on a peninsula (prasonísi) projecting from the southern tip of Ródos (Rhodes). Site open, tower closed. Admiralty N4756; NGA 20388.
* Ágios Nikólaos
1863 (Ottoman). Reactivated in 2007; focal plane 24 m (79 ft); two long (1.3 s) white flashes every 12 s. 6 m (20 ft) round stone tower with gallery mounted atop the 14th century Fortress of St. Nicholas (Ágios Nikolaus). The lighthouse is unpainted white stone. Sometime after Savas's photos were taken, the lantern was removed and the light was moved to a short skeletal tower seen in Claußen's photo and in an October 2006 photo by Matt Boulton. Sometime in the next year the lighthouse was restored, as seen in Yehuda Cohen's October 2007 photo at right, and the skeletal tower was removed. Another page for the lighthouse is available, Patricia Fenn has a 2009 photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view and a street view by Georg Lindner. The fort is one of the fortifications built by the Knights Hospitaller, a crusading military order that ruled the island from 1309 until it was captured by the Ottoman Turks in 1522-23. Note: there is another Ágios Nikólaos lighthouse on Kéa (see above). Located at the end of the main breakwater on the east side of the harbor of Ródos (Rhodes), at the northern tip of the island. Site and fortress open, tower closed. ARLHS GRE-187; Admiralty N4744; NGA 20416.

Ágios Nikólaos Light, Ródos, October 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Yehuda Cohen

Lighthouse of Megísti (Kastelorizo)
Strogilí Megísti (Ipsili, Strongili, Megísti, Kastelorizo)
1917 (French). Active; focal plane 107 m (351 ft); white flash every 5 s. 7 m (23 ft) round concrete (?) tower with lantern and gallery, rising from a 1-story keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white, lantern dome painted green. Claußen has an excellent photo, and Google has a satellite view. This lighthouse stands atop a small island 6 km (3.5 mi) southeast of Megísti. Megísti is the ancient name, and now the official name, for the group of three small islands better known for many years as Kastelorizo or Castellorizo. Located only 3 km (2 mi) off the southwestern coast of Turkey, the islands are 110 km (70 mi) east of Rhodes. Megísti is also the name of the largest island. Occupied by French troops in 1915, during World War I, the islands were transferred to Italy by the Treaty of Sèvres in 1921. Administered as part of Italy's Dodecanese Islands colony, the islands were occupied by British troops in 1943 and transferred to Greece with the rest of the Dodecanese in 1947. The lighthouse was built during the French occupation. Located near the southwestern end of the central ridge of the island of Strogilí (also called Ipsili or Strongili), the easternmost island of the group. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS GRE-053; Admiralty N5848; NGA 20584.

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Notable faux lighthouses:

Adjoining pages: North: Northern Greece | East: Southern Turkey | South: Crete | West: Southern Greece

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Posted December 31, 2006. Checked and revised October 21, 2014. Lighthouses: 38. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.